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Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady

28 Feb 02 - 02:37 PM (#660076)
Subject: The Sapnish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Bearheart

Looking for help with words, particularly place names, mentioned in this song from an album Triona and her sister did a few years ago, Dunal Lunny produced it, called "Between the Lights".

Starts out

As I was walking through Dublin City about the hour of twelve at night,
It was there I saw a fair pretty female washing her feet by candlelight.
First she washed them, then she dried them over a fire of angry coals,
And in all my life I never did see a maid so neat about the soles.

Thanks!


28 Feb 02 - 02:52 PM (#660093)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Sapnish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: MartinRyan

Sounds like a Frank Harte version - probably is. Try this version in the DT, which includes some of the Dublin placenames.

Regards


28 Feb 02 - 02:56 PM (#660094)
Subject: Lyr Add: SPANISH LADY
From: Les from Hull

These are the words I sing, but perhaps a Dublin 'catter can help better with the placenames.

We do it slowly (it's a sad song, really), introducing the first part of a reel (Christmas Eve) steadily after each chorus, and then up to speed for the full reel at the end (which to my mind gives the impression that he's over her!)

As I went down to Dublin city at the hour of twelve at night,
Who should I see but a Spanish lady washing her feet by candle light.
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of amber coal.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet about the soul,

Whack fol the too-ra loo- ra laddy, Whack fol the too-ra loo- ra- lay.

As I came back through Dublin city at the hour of half past eight,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady brushing her hair in the broad daylight.
First she tossed it then she brushed it, on her lap was a silver comb.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so fair since I did roam.

Now she's no mot for a puddle swaddy with her ivory comb and her mantle so fine
But she'd make a wife for the Provost Marshall drunk on brandy and claret wine
I got a look from the Spanish lady hot as a fire of ambry coals
In all my life I never did meet a maid so sweet about the soul

I've wandered north and I've wandered south through Stonybutter and Patrick's Close,
Up and around the Gloucester Diamond and back by Napper Tandy's house.
Old age has laid her hand upon me cold as a fire of ashy coal.
In all my life I ne'er did see a maid so sweet as the Spanish lady.

Hope this helps


28 Feb 02 - 03:11 PM (#660108)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Sapnish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: MartinRyan

"Stoneybatter" - an area of inner city Dublin.

I can't remember what "puddle swaddy" actually means - but suspect it may be "Poddle" which is a small river in Dublin - now mostly underground. That said, Frank Harte, in his "Dublin Songs" has "puddle".

Regards


28 Feb 02 - 07:02 PM (#660272)
Subject: Lyr Add: SPANISH LADY
From: GUEST,Liberty Belle.

Frank Harte sings the two versions of the Spanish Lady however this is the version that he gave Triona and Maighread Ni Dhomhnaill. As far as I know they have credited Frank with the song in the notes and Donal Lunny with the arrangement.

SPANISH LADY.

As I was a walking through Dublin city about the hour of twelve of the night,
It was there I saw a Spanish Lady washing her feet by candlelight.
First she washed them and then she dried them, over a fire of ambry coals,
And in all my life I never did see such a maid about the soles.

Chorus:
She had 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none,
She had 19,17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7, 5, 3 and one.

I stopped to look but the watchman passed. Said he, “Young fellow, now the night is late.
Along with you home or I will wrestle you straightway through the Bridewell gate.”
I got a look from the Spanish Lady, hot as a fire of ambry coals,
And in all my life I never did see such a maid so neat about the soles.

Chorus:
As I walked back through Dublin City as the dawn of day was o'er,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady when I was weary and footsore.
She had a heart so full of loving and her love she longed to share.
In all my life I never did meet with a maid that had so much to spare.

Chorus:
I have wandered north and I've wandered south by Stoneybatter and Patrick's Close,
And up and around by the Gloucester Diamond back by Napper Tandy's house.
But old age has laid her hand upon me cold as a fire of ashy coals,
And gone is the lovely Spanish Lady neat and sweet about the soles.

Chorus:
Round and around goes the wheel of fortune. Where it rests now wearies me.
Oh, fair young maids are so deceiving, sad experience teaches me.

Chorus:


28 Feb 02 - 07:06 PM (#660274)
Subject: Lyr Add: SPANISH LADY
From: Bearheart

The version they do is similar, first and last versions the same, but middle part different and the chorus is totally different. My husband says he thinks it refers to the roulette wheel:

Chorus:
She had twenty, eighteen, sixteen, fourteen,
Twelve, ten, eight, six, four, two, none.
She had nineteen, seventeen, fifteen, thirteen,
Eleven, nine, seven, five, three, and one.

Especially since there are references to the wheel of fortune in one verse:

Around and around goes the wheel of Fortune.
Where it rests now wearies me. ETC.

The place names etc. you've given me fit perfectly with the version they do. I think this will be what I need.

But does anyone know anything more about the song? How old is it and that? And does the Spanish Lady refer to a Gypsy?

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 3-Mar-02.


28 Feb 02 - 07:09 PM (#660279)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Bearheart

Wow! Liberty Bell we were posting at the same time and you answered alot of thoughts going through my head about the song. Thanks bunches everyone.


28 Feb 02 - 07:26 PM (#660290)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: michaelr

Bearhart - from what I remember hearing about the song, it's a Dublin street ditty about a real person, presumably a young lady from Spain, who was set up with a house or apartment in Dublin by her lover, a prominent aristocrat. Although he tried to keep it secret, the arrangement soon became public knowledge, and the lady, who was thought to have promiscuous tendencies, became the subject of this popular song of the day. The number supposedly refer to the fact that she had too many lovers.

Cheers,
Michael


01 Mar 02 - 12:59 AM (#660442)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: michaelr

Just remembered, the liner notes say that Triona and Maighread got this version of the song from Frank Harte. His version, with the "numbers" chorus, is an unusual variant; insofar as choruses are atypical in trad. songs, he may have made it up himself. http://www.irishmusicweb.ie/texts/harte.html has some info on the man, and there are threads on him in the Forum database.

Michael


01 Mar 02 - 05:29 AM (#660485)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan

The usual explanation of the counting is rather more basic - its a whore counting her money. Makes a change from sheep, I suppose.
The "wheel of fortune" verse is a bit of a "floater" and may not "belong" to this song at all.

Regards


01 Mar 02 - 03:53 PM (#660822)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Mervyn

I learned a version of Spanish Lady in Australia, as a ballad, rather than with the usual more up-beat melody. My Irish friends at the time said (somewhat disparagingly) that the melody was created by an older Australian singer.

The song has basically the same lyrics as the two versions above combined, but with the "Whack for the..." chorus and an additional stanza inserted before the "I've wandered North..." stanza.

As I went back through Dublin City as the sun was about to set,
Who should I see but the Spanish lady chasing a moth with a golden net.
When she saw me then she fled me, lifting her petticoats over her knees.
In all my life I ne'er did see, a maid so shy as the Spanish lady.

I was also told by multiple sources that:
- Yeats wrote these last two stanzas.
- A "Spanish Lady" was an Irish term for a whore.

You can find multiple versions of Spanish Lady lyrics if you do a Yahoo search on "song lyrics Spanish Lady.”


01 Mar 02 - 04:33 PM (#660847)
Subject: Lyr Add: DUBLIN CITY aka GALWAY CITY
From: Mrrzy

I had forgotten ALL about this song, but the Clancy Brothers do a different song to the same tune, not called Spanish Lady but that song is mentioned in the liner notes:

(He:) As I walked out through Dublin City at the hour of 12 at night,
Whom should I spy but a handsome lassie, combing her hair by candlelight?
Lassie, I have come a-courting, your kind favors for to win,
And if you'd but smile upon me, next Sunday night I'll call again.
Cho: A raddy up a toorum, toorum, toorum, raddy up a toorum dey (bis)

(She:) So to me you came a-courting, my kind favors for to win,
But 'twould give me the greatest pleasure if you never did call again.
What would I do, when I go walking, walking out in the morning dew?
What would I do when I go walking, walking out with a lad like you? Cho.

(He:) Lassie, I have gold and silver. Lassie, I have houses and land.
Lassie, I have ships on the ocean. They'll be all at your command.
(She:) What do I want with your gold and silver? What do I want with your houses and land?
What do I want with your ships on the ocean? All I want is a handsome man. Cho.

(He:) Did you ever see the grass in the morning, all bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie, diamonds sparkling in her hair?
(She:) Did you ever see a copper kettle, mended with an old tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie married off to an ugly man?

Isn't that a great song?


01 Mar 02 - 04:36 PM (#660851)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Mrrzy

Sorry, that CHO should end "toorum toorum dey" - forgot one toorum (not enough toora?). I also think they really sing (when it's her part) ships on the ocean, houses and land, gold and silver, rather than repeating the order in his part. See, I TOLD you I'd forgotten about it!


01 Mar 02 - 06:46 PM (#660950)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: MartinRyan

Mrrzy

Frank Harte also sings that one, or a similar variant - under the title "Chester City"! That Lady got around.

Regards


01 Mar 02 - 08:09 PM (#661012)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Liberty Belle

The reference to the 'Spanish Lady' is thought to refer to the black hair and Spanish looks of the woman in question. It is generally accepted that she was a 'lady of the night’.

She had a heart so filled with loving, And her love she longed to share,
And in all my life I never did meet with a maid that had so much to spare.

I have heard it said that the reference to the counting of the numbers is, that the singer in counting the odd numbers and the even numbers separately, he was saying that the lady had 'both the odds and evens of it', in other words that she had everything.

How many songs does Frank Harte sing?


01 Mar 02 - 09:06 PM (#661056)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: michaelr

Frank Harte is said to have a repertoire of over 5000 songs.

Michael


03 Mar 02 - 01:38 PM (#661892)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Jim Dixon

Mrrzy: And what is the title of the Clancy Brothers song you posted? It will never make it into DigiTrad without a title.


04 Mar 02 - 10:59 AM (#662436)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Mrrzy

Am remembering things... it's called GALWAY CITY because that's where he was wandering at the hour of twelve at night - GALWAY city, not Dublin.


04 Mar 02 - 11:00 AM (#662439)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Mrrzy

And (I've looked now) it's IN the trad, as Galway city. Quite right and proper!


05 Mar 02 - 02:09 AM (#662990)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Boab

Listen a' youse yins----- As I gaed doon the Ettrick valley, at the hour o' twelve at night, Wha did I spy but a bonnie lassie, combin' her hair in the candle light.--"Lassie I hae come a courtin', a' yer favours for tae win, and if ye will smile on me, next Sunday nicht I'll call again!" Any comments? [ There are four verses--with the 'falderaloral' chorus between--and is sung alternately male and female as a duet]] Anyone familiar with this version, or able to make comparison with the Irish version?


05 Mar 02 - 09:14 PM (#663381)
Subject: Lyr Add: ETTRICK VALLEY/HIGHWAY/LADY?
From: Uncle Jaque

Boab: I've been looking for the lyrics for "Ettrick" (was it "Valley" or "Highway"?) for years after pirating it off of a radio program onto a cassette tape. I don't recall who did it, but it's one I frequently burst out singing (memorized most of the lyr. via the tape) and play on the tin whistle.

It differs a little from "Dublin City", above, and as I recall it goes somewhat like this:

He:) As I gang doon the Etrick Highway at the hour o' 12 at night;
What should I spy but a handsome las-sie, combin' her hair by candlelight.
First she combed it, then she brushed it;
Tied it up wi' a velvet band;
Ne'er hae I seen such a handsome lassie
all up an' doon ov'r all Scotland!

Chorus:

Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum, rhu-u-dhum;
Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum-day!
(2X)

Lassie, I hae come a-courting, your kind favors for to win;
And if you'd but smile upon me, next Sunday night I'll call again.
(She:) So to me you came a-courting, my kind favors for to win;
But 'twould give me the greatest pleasure if you never would call again!
What would I do, when I go walking, walking out in the Ettrick view;
What would I do when I go walking, walkin' oot wi' a laddie like you?

- Cho. -

(He:) Lassie, I hae gold and silver, lassie I hae houses and land
Lassie, I hae ships on the ocean, they'll a' be at you'r command.
(She:) What do I care for your gold and silver,
what do I care for your houses and land?
What do I care for your ships on the ocean?;
When all I want is a handsome man!

- Cho. -

(He:) Did you ever see the grass in the morning, all bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie, diamonds sparkling in her hair?
(She:) Did you ever see a copper kettle, mended up wi' an old tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie married up tae an UU-gly man?

- Cho. X 2 -

*******************************************************


06 Mar 02 - 03:37 AM (#663486)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Boab

That's it, Uncle Jaque! Glad you responded; the first verse you quote is new to me, Ta! Our wee group does the rest , and carries on into Mhairi's Wedding. A nice medley.


08 Mar 02 - 10:17 AM (#665037)
Subject: Lyr Add: ETTRICK LADY (Traditional Scottish)
From: Jim Dixon

Uncle Jaque: This is pretty close to your version:
Copied from http://www.scocha.btinternet.co.uk/borderingon.htm
(They also have a sound sample, and lyrics to several other songs.)

ETTRICK LADY
(Trad. Arr. Scocha [Iain Scott and David Chapman])

As Aa gae doon the Ettrick Valley
At the oor o' twelve at night,
Who did Aa see but a handsome lassie
Combing her hair by candlelight.
Lassie Aa hev come a courtin.
Ee'll find favours for tae win,
And if ee'll but smile upon me
Next Sunday night Aa'll call again.

So tae me ee turn yer courtin
Ma fine favours for tae win,
But it wid gi'e me the greatest pleasure
If ee never did ca' again.
What wud Aa dae when Aa go oot walkin
Walkin oot for the Ettrick view?
What wud Aa dae when Aa go oot walkin
Walkin oot wi a laddie like you?

Lassie, Aa hev gold and silver.
Lassie, Aa hev hooses and land.
Lassie, Aa hev ships in the ocean.
They'll be all at your command.
What dae Aa care for yer ships in the ocean?
What dae Aa care for yer hooses and land?
What dae Aa care for yer gold and silver,
When all Aa want is a handsome man?

Did ee ever see the grass in the morning,
Aw bedecked wi jewels rare?
Did ee ever see a handsome lassie,
Diamonds sparklin in her hair?
Did ee ever see a copper kettle
Mended wi an auld tin can?
Did ee ever see a handsome lassie
Married off tae an ugly man?


08 Mar 02 - 11:22 AM (#665089)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Brían

I know there is a Spanish Arch in Galway city. I wonder if there could be some crossover between songs as often happens in folk songs. That could add to the explanation of calling her a Spanish lady.

Brían


08 Mar 02 - 06:36 PM (#665424)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: The Walrus

Martin

"...I can't remember what "puddle swaddy" actually means - but suspect it may be "Poddle" which is a small river in Dublin...." I must admit that when I saw this line my mind made the link with Dorset (It was an old Post Office sorters' "aide memoire" the "All the Piddles and Puddles go to Dorset") and, of course "swaddy/swaddie" is an old term to describe a soldier (later this became "squaddy").

I don't know what wavelength I'm working on, (but it must be an odd one) because when I saw the thread title "The Spanish Lady" I immediately thought of the "Spanish" Influenza pandemic of 1918/19 (also nicknamed "The Spanish Lady")

I reall must get more sleep.

Walrus


10 Mar 02 - 03:24 PM (#666412)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: Jim Dixon

Walrus: Interesting that you should mention the flu. I'm currently reading "Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus That Caused It," by Gina Kolata. The author remarks how strange it is that something that killed 40,000,000 people (yes, that's right) is so little mentioned in our history books. I wonder if there are any songs about it?

I suppose I shouldn't be indulging in thread creep. If anyone has anything interesting to say about this, please start a new thread.


26 Mar 02 - 07:04 AM (#676466)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan

Talked to Frank Harte at the weekend, at the Inishowen singing festival. He reckons "Poddle squaddie" was a general term of abuse deriving from the fact that as it went through the Liberties area of Dublin, mentioned in the song, the Poddle was an open sewer!

Regards


28 May 03 - 08:55 AM (#960421)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent albu
From: GUEST,Stewart Dean

A comment: I heard the end of the counting of evens as nough rather than none
A question: does anyone know if the counting has any particular meaning (and why it's down rather than up)? Or is it just a song filler?


23 Aug 04 - 10:50 AM (#1254483)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Laura

I have recently discovered this song and I don't see how it could be about anything other than a 'lady of the night' in some form counting her lovers or money. However, my boyfriend's brother's theory is that she cleans houses! (first one side of the street and then the other).


06 Sep 04 - 11:11 AM (#1265276)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST

PODDLE SQUADIE, COULD BE A CORRUPTION OF "POOR LITTLE SQUADIE"

       SQUADDIE WAS A COMMON NAME FOR A RECRUIT.


01 Oct 04 - 11:27 AM (#1286102)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Balla Boy

Came across this thread through a google search looking for an explanation of th counting chorus, which I'd only heard on a collection of Donal Lunny's stuff, as opposed to the "whack to yer toodle loodle laddy" chorus most often used in ireland.

The money counting thing I find confusing - the counting down seems unusual with this meaning, as does the "none" at the end.

The Puddle Swaddy/Poor little squaddie thing might work, given the presence of the Provost Marshall in the next verse.

Anyway, the reason I though I'd chip in was the Spanish/Galway City connection. The Armada wrecked on the Galway coast after being blown off course on it's way to England. Many Spaniards are reputed to have come ashore, and this has been used traditionally to explain the often black haired/black eyed Galweigians. It's often said (and comes up in Angella's Ashes, I think) that dark people in Ireland have "the look of the Spaniard about them".

So, she's undoubtedly a lady of the night, and her "Spanish" nature captures both her looks and her West of Connaught origin.


12 Mar 09 - 01:31 PM (#2587287)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,hopeless

Any chance of chords to go with Triona's version? Please as St Patrick's is soon


12 Mar 09 - 03:26 PM (#2587375)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: michaelr

C Am
C F
Am G
F Dm G


12 Mar 09 - 06:23 PM (#2587513)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,hopeless

suppose you wouldn't type that over the lyrics for me please - the concert is saturday!


13 Mar 09 - 03:52 AM (#2587791)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady-Triona's recent album
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity

Try this one    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHOyPLSVam4&feature=related


04 Jun 09 - 07:14 PM (#2648627)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST,Shii

Hihi.

Okay, I heard a song which seems similiar to this...
I'm not sure about it, only that it's called the wheel of fortune (I think) and it's a Scottish song? And I've been looking for lyrics, but I can't seem to find them anywhere. Hum. I know the chorus and one verse.

Round and round goes the wheel of fortune
Round and round 'til it wearies me
Young men's hearts are so uncertain
Sad experience teaches me

19, 17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7 and a 5, 3, 1
20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none.

I don't want your gold and silver
I don't want your houses and lands
I don't want your ships on the oceans
All I want is a nice young lad.

Help, anybody? 83;;;


04 Jun 09 - 09:49 PM (#2648695)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: michaelr

Shii, may I suggest you read the thread from the top? Your question is answered above.


18 Sep 09 - 06:54 PM (#2726347)
Subject: Lyr Add: WHEEL OF FORTUNE
From: GUEST,Karina

Hello Shii

I have a version of Wheel of Fortune is sung by the Wise Family Band and has a similar chorus to that which you mention, with the odd numbers first, however that have the "round and round" bit afterward. This is what I can make out from the recording.

For (?) over the hills there lives a lassie
And her name I do not know
Some fine day I'm going to see her
Whether she be rich or no

Chorus
19, 17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7 and 5, 3, 1
20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, none
Round and round go the wheels of fortune
Round and round til they weary me
Young women's hearts are so uncertain
Sad experience teaches me

Well lassie I've got gold and silver
Lassie I've got horses and land
Lassie I've got ships on the ocean
All to come at your command
Chorus

I don't want your gold and silver
I don't want your horses and land
I don't want your ships on the ocean
All I want is a good young man
Chorus


18 Sep 09 - 10:56 PM (#2726447)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: MGM·Lion

I have always taken it as just a corruption of "Paddy Squaddy' = Irish common soldier, for whom indeed she would have been 'no match' if she would have made a wife for the Provost Marshall, who was rich enough to be 'drunk on brandy and claret wine' (tho why that should recommend him to a young woman I have never quite grasped)..

Re counting backwards — notoriously witches would cast spells by reciting things [eg The Lord's Prayer] backwards. I have always taken the backward counting [which audiences love, once they have grasped it, when you have told them "The chorus is very simple: all you have to be able to do is count — backwards!"] to be a symbol of the spell she was casting on him. Perhaps, with her foreignness, inveigling but vagarious ways, &c, we are meant to take it that she actually is a witch?


19 Sep 09 - 03:56 AM (#2726527)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST

The term "Poddle swaddy" appears in a poetic version of Spanish Lady written by Joseph Campbell (in Pedlar's Pack (date?) along with reference to a "college sizar", for example. I doubt either phrase has folk antecedents.


13 Feb 10 - 03:28 PM (#2838380)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST,maddy

I have been looking for this for about 15 years, also having it on an old cassette recorded from a radio station long ago. Today I followed the scent until I found the answer: The Corries recorded the version you might be looking for. Schocha does a version, but the Corries did the one I've been trying to find for so long - just bought it from itunes.


13 Feb 10 - 03:30 PM (#2838382)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST

Oh, I should have said: I'm referring to the Ettrick Valley (Lady) version, not the Spanish Lady.


13 Feb 10 - 03:58 PM (#2838404)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Leadfingers

Interesting version from 'The Troubles' !

As I walked out in Belfast City just at the hour of twelve at night
What should I see but a british soldier with his trousers all alight
Were you feeling cold I aked him , and to me he this did say
I smelled Incense in the petrol , it must be the work of the I R A


22 May 10 - 07:20 AM (#2911887)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: ETTRICK LADY
From: GUEST,Hugh

Please, Has anyone got the chords for this song.


22 May 10 - 11:45 AM (#2911981)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: michaelr

C Am
C F
Am G
F Dm G


27 May 10 - 07:09 PM (#2915624)
Subject: Lyr Add: WHEEL OF FORTUNE (Irish-American)
From: Jim Dixon

From an article "Irish Folk-Song" by Phillips Barry, in Journal of American Folklore, Volume 24 (American Folklore Society, 1911), page 342:

To Irish folk-singers, at least in the Northern States, we owe the presence of a large part of the folk-song current in this country. ... Yet very few Irish songs have become Americanized, — due doubtless to the exile's love of his native country. Two, however, are notable exceptions. Of these, one [is] a song of the camp, entitled "The Unfortunate Rake".... The other song is as follows:

[Musical notation is printed here.]

1. "Madam, I have come to court ye,
If your favor I could gain.
If you highly entertain me,
I will surely call again.

CHORUS: With my 20, 18, 16, 14,
12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, and 1,
With my 19, 17, 15, 13,
11, 9, 7, 5, 3, and 1.

2. "Madam, I have gold and silver.
Madam, I have house and land.
Madam, I have worldly treasures,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  ."

3. "What care I for your gold and silver?
What care I for your house or land?
What care I for your ships on the ocean?
All I want's a nice young man."

4. "Round about the wheel of fortune,
It goes round and wearies me.
Young men's ways are so uncertain,
Sad experience teaches me!"*

* Sung by S. C., Boston, Mass., native of County Tyrone, Ireland.


27 May 10 - 07:34 PM (#2915646)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Jack Campin

There are also versions of that localized to London and Edinburgh. The London one is by far the oldest recorded (it's in some versions of The Merry Muses of Caledonia, I think from the early 19th century). The Edinburgh one is the Greig-Duncan collection.

There is a Scottish tune of that name in the Skene Manuscript (early 17th century), though it's closer to the Northumbrian "Little Fishie" than to any modern "Spanish Lady" song.

The modern tune seems to be in the same family as "Donal Don" ("...may he never lack a scone") which has several names as a Scottish dance tune.


25 Sep 10 - 06:14 PM (#2993645)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST,kudzu2

The Corries recorded it decades ago and call it the Ettrick Lady.


19 Mar 11 - 03:59 AM (#3116859)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST,maddie

The version I know says 'she's no mot for a Proddy Scot with her ivory comb and her mantle fine' meaning that a woman so richly and extravagantly arrayed would not be a mate for the plain austerity of a Protestant Scotsman. Historically, Protestant and Catholic have fought fiercely about ornamentation and luxury.


29 Apr 16 - 04:58 AM (#3787777)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Thompson

I suppose the puddle swaddie wouldn't be a Liverpudlian squaddie? Just a suggestion out of left field.


29 Apr 16 - 11:48 AM (#3787831)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Ged Fox

Folk song collected by H.E.D. Hammond from George Moore of Hazelbury Bryan, Dorset.

As I was walking Portsmouth City
There I met a saucy strump;
Up against a wall I pushed her,
Then I found that she was drunk.
Twenty, eighteen, sixteen, fourteen,
Twelve, ten, eight, six, four, two, none;
Nineteen, seventeen, fifteen, thirteen,
Eleven, nine, seven, five, three and one.

Going on I met some other
And I told to her my case.
She said "You need go no further,"
Up she took me to her place.

When I woke up in the morning,
Oh! What a terrible sight of woes!
She had only gone and left me,
Gubbered off with all my clothes!

The backwards counting, according to the note, is supposed to be a test for drunkenness. More likely, I think, an inducement to drunkenness, i.e. anyone getting it wrong would have to down a pint before continuing the song.


27 Nov 18 - 03:36 AM (#3963501)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: GUEST

I know this from the singing of Burl Ives, and it's listed as "Dublin City".

I never could make sense of the counting chorus, but the Wheel of Fortune makes some sense.

The verses with the

"What care I for your gold and silver?
What care I for your house or land?
What care I for your ships on the ocean?
All I want's a nice young man." '

structure reminds me of versions of the "Gypsy Rover"

Thanks for the thoughts on this one


27 Nov 18 - 09:35 AM (#3963571)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Steve Gardham

Ged has given a perfectly reasonable explanation for the counting chorus. I would go one even simpler and say it was just a clever little trick for showing off. Certainly none of this romantic mysticism involved (IMO). The same chorus is used in English songs in the 'No, Sir, No'/'Ripest Apples' family Roud 542. Jim Dixon gave a version here in 2010 & Karina in 2009. I have broadsides dating back to the middle of the 18th century. The Irish, American and Scottish versions seem to be developments of the English broadside.


27 Nov 18 - 10:03 AM (#3963576)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Jack Campin

The wheel of fortune is one of those fairground gambling things where you throw darts at a spinning board. As an image of the vagaries of fate it goes back at least to the Middle Ages with the Carmina Burana. The list of numbers is just what's on the board, nothing to do with counting money or tests of sobriety.


27 Nov 18 - 11:13 AM (#3963589)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Steve Gardham

Jack
That's interesting. But are the numbers on the wheel actually arranged in that order? 20, 18 etc.? If they are then that seems fairly conclusive. If not then it's just another theory.


27 Nov 18 - 11:19 AM (#3963591)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Steve Gardham

Struggling to find anything by Googling.


27 Nov 18 - 11:55 AM (#3963593)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Jack Campin

I doubt there's a standard - I wasn't aware that there was any set order in the song either.


27 Nov 18 - 02:29 PM (#3963621)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Steve Gardham

20 to none, 19 to one. Never seen anything else. I think the 'Wheel of Fortune' stanza is probably an interloper commonplace.


27 Nov 18 - 02:41 PM (#3963626)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Spanish Lady
From: Steve Gardham

'The Wheel of Fortune' (Roud 1075) is a song in its own right, under various titles such as 'Love is Pleasing', 'The False Lover', 'When I was young I was well beloved' all from lines within the song. Broadsides only date from the middle of the 19th century and it's highly likely it's just a collection of commonplaces. There are as you would expect numerous songs with that title but not in British oral tradition.