mudcat.org: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics

GUEST,sorefingers 14 Jan 07 - 07:59 PM
Ron Davies 14 Jan 07 - 08:08 PM
GUEST,Scoville 14 Jan 07 - 08:15 PM
Alba 14 Jan 07 - 09:39 PM
mg 14 Jan 07 - 10:02 PM
Peace 14 Jan 07 - 10:12 PM
Peace 14 Jan 07 - 10:18 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Jan 07 - 10:33 PM
Bee 14 Jan 07 - 10:39 PM
Peace 14 Jan 07 - 10:43 PM
Richard Bridge 14 Jan 07 - 10:52 PM
iancarterb 14 Jan 07 - 11:03 PM
Bee-dubya-ell 14 Jan 07 - 11:36 PM
robinia 14 Jan 07 - 11:45 PM
Bert 15 Jan 07 - 12:12 AM
Cluin 15 Jan 07 - 01:53 AM
The Fooles Troupe 15 Jan 07 - 02:13 AM
Anne Lister 15 Jan 07 - 03:22 AM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 03:22 AM
fat B****rd 15 Jan 07 - 03:34 AM
Scrump 15 Jan 07 - 05:15 AM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 05:39 AM
GUEST,Shimrod 15 Jan 07 - 05:49 AM
The Fooles Troupe 15 Jan 07 - 05:54 AM
Uncle_DaveO 15 Jan 07 - 10:39 AM
Scrump 15 Jan 07 - 11:04 AM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 11:23 AM
GUEST,meself 15 Jan 07 - 11:26 AM
Scrump 15 Jan 07 - 11:53 AM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 12:00 PM
Scrump 15 Jan 07 - 12:08 PM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 12:10 PM
JeremyC 15 Jan 07 - 12:45 PM
GUEST,sorefingers 15 Jan 07 - 01:44 PM
Bert 15 Jan 07 - 02:40 PM
GUEST,Jim 15 Jan 07 - 02:56 PM
Charley Noble 15 Jan 07 - 04:03 PM
JeremyC 15 Jan 07 - 04:14 PM
Nigel Parsons 15 Jan 07 - 04:25 PM
Liz the Squeak 15 Jan 07 - 04:36 PM
Amos 15 Jan 07 - 05:10 PM
Tootler 15 Jan 07 - 05:38 PM
melodeonboy 15 Jan 07 - 06:04 PM
BK Lick 15 Jan 07 - 06:40 PM
dick greenhaus 15 Jan 07 - 06:46 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Jan 07 - 06:51 PM
GUEST,meself 15 Jan 07 - 07:28 PM
Jim Lad 15 Jan 07 - 07:35 PM
Peace 15 Jan 07 - 07:44 PM
GUEST,meself 15 Jan 07 - 07:48 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,sorefingers
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 07:59 PM

In the ear of the Grammar-Nasties on Mudcat I was scared to bring this topic to the forum lest I be banned or assasinated by Terribus or some of his ilk, but nowadays I feel comfortable with a public airing of my phobia.

For example, how do you feel about uttering the words ' er and wen' while singing?

Am I being over sensitive? I usually get around this one by slurring my lyrics so it sounds as if I am saying ' lovin ' but in my mouth the word is still 'loving'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Ron Davies
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 08:08 PM

Hey, this is a great music topic--upstairs with it. And--there are very few assassinations upstairs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,Scoville
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 08:15 PM

I suppose it depends on the song. Some old ones sound weird or the lyrics don't fit the tune if they're corrected, but if it fits and still makes sense, who cares?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Alba
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 09:39 PM

Sorefingers here's a wee story for you.

I went to a session a few Years back not long after arriving here in the States. First time at this particular Session and knew nobody. I was invited to join in and I did, just playing Guitar and Mandolin.
After a while someone asked if I sang and I said yes and I was then invited to sing. During the Song (which was a Traditional Scottish Song...I am Scottish by the way) a guy arrived with his Guitar case and sat down nodding hello's to the other Musicians.
When I finished Folks clapped ect and the "guy" got his Guitar out and I sensed that maybe he was the Leader of the pack so to speak. He got up and came straight over to me and said...
"That was really nice, I like that song very much but you might want to work on your Scottish pronunciation. I only notice because I have been to Scotland quite a lot so don't worry cause a lot of people will think you sound fine"

I thanked him in my very best Glasgow accent, packed up my Instruments and left...I have to say I LMAO when I got outside, I couldn't stay and didn't go back again.

Grammar Police...aye, some are about as useful as a chocolate Watch:)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: mg
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:02 PM

I would never correct the language on purpose in a song..I tend to leave them like I found them...but then I couldn't pull off a Scots accent either so probably somewhere inbetween. I think if one is assembling a song from scratch grammar is something that can give so other things can be accomodated, most truly the rhythm ofthe song. mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Peace
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:12 PM

LF: Teribus is a fine person, IMO. Referring to him and associating his name with the term 'ilk' is not becoming, IMO, and I definitely disagree with you.

"It is not me, babe
No, no, no
It is not me babe
It is not me you're looking for."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Peace
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:18 PM

I cannot get any satisfaction
I cannot get any satisfaction
Because I try and I try and I try and I try
I cannot get any, I cannot get any . . .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:33 PM

No one should feel obliged to sing a song in a style they don't feel comfortable with.

If anything about a song makes you feel uncomfortable—whether it's too grammatical or too ungrammatical, too PC or too un-PC—you should feel free to change it into something you feel more comfortable with.

Alba: I loved your story, but I fear your decision to leave and not come back to that particular venue may have been premature. I'll bet there were other people present who would have loved to hear you put that guy in his place.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Bee
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:39 PM

I'm sure there were: leaders of packs often aren't, they just like act like knowitalls.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Peace
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:43 PM

Sorry. "LF: Teribus is a fine person, IMO." should have read "SF: Teribus is a fine person, IMO."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 10:52 PM

I think I take the view that one should not airbrush history.

Nonetheless there are contemporary songs I would not be able to sing (even if I wanted to) because of linguistic solecisms. One springs immediately to mind, an otherwise attractive Ian Bruce song "Too far from she".

I am however firmly of the view that one should not put on mock accents (or sing phonetically in languages one does not speak). Guy Ritchie-ism (aka the "Mockney" accent) is somewhat risible, and perhpas somewhat worse as carrying seeds of unacceptable condescension.

A rather good true story is of a barrister who had formerly been a roman catholic priest, and whose latin tags were therefore pronounced as such priests pronounce latin, not as lawyers usually do. Let us call him Smith.

Judge (snootily): "Mr Smith, where DID you learn your latin?"

Barrister (deadpan): "In Rome, M'lud".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: iancarterb
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 11:03 PM

I'm with Jim Dixon. Accents or dialect may be an affectation for a performer, or they may be perfectly comfortable with them. A folksinger is often singing a song the way he or she learned it, un- or pre- consciously, and the notion of 'performance' becomes peripheral to the communication. And anyone who ever heard Frank Warner sing understood that he WAS for the moment the person from whom he had learned the song, and that he was bringing whole the experience and history of that person. The nature of the dialect was simply not separable from the song. A singer-songwriter from the suburbs may find grammar an issue of sincerity of presentation. Not the same problem!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Bee-dubya-ell
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 11:36 PM

I don't believe most people who habitually use correct grammar in daily speech are going to be inclined toward singing songs with incorrect grammar. Most of us choose songs with which we have connections, and if a song is written in a grammatical style that is foreign to our daily way of speaking, we're probably not going to choose to sing it.

But, in reality, most of us don't use correct grammar all the time. I try to use it in writing (unless I'm intentionally writing in a "vernacular"), but don't confuse how I write with how I talk. My "vernacular" writing is much closer to the way I usually speak than is the style in which this post is written.

I'm perfectly comfortable singing songs in whatever grammatical style their authors chose to cast them, and I can't think of any reason why I would want to "clean up" the grammar in a song.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: robinia
Date: 14 Jan 07 - 11:45 PM

I once heard someone sing "Mole in the Ground" with a grammatically corrected third line: "If I were a mole in the ground (instead of "if I's a mole in the ground") I'd root that mountain down . . ."   Talk about affectation!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Bert
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 12:12 AM

Makes me wonder just how old (or young) is Sorefingers.

When I was younger I used to be horrified by the lyric "Sing it Pretty Sue" when of course it should be "prettily".

Now that I'm older, I love the song and sing it often.

Colloquialisms are part of life, get used to it, you can't say 'Granmaw' in proper English but that doesn't mean that you can't sing it.

Sheesh! (Gawd, there's another one - and another) I've even got songs of my own that I sing with an affected accent.

You just need to learn to speak 'people' rather than English.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Cluin
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 01:53 AM

Sing the song the way YOU want to sing it, if you want to sing it at all. It doesn't matter who did it before or how they did it.

Anything else is bullshit.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 02:13 AM

Stan Freburg did a wonderful take on this for 'ol man Ribber..

called 'Elderly Man River'... :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Anne Lister
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 03:22 AM

I think some people tend to unconsciously correct for their own style as they go, and remember the songs the way they feel comfortable singing them, so it's not always an affectation when the words seem different. It can jar, though, if you have always sung it in its "incorrect" grammar.
But yes, written grammar and spoken grammar are often different beasts. OTOH "isn't" is perfectly correct written or spoken, so wouldn't need to become "is not", and "can't" similarly wouldn't need to be "cannot".
The real difficulties for me come with songs intended for another accent (Scottish, any of the American accents, Geordie etc) and I never manage to cope with "ain't" as it's not a word I usually use.
What I really, really hate is when a (non-trad) songwriter forces grammar into a non-conversational OR written form to make a rhyme. No examples spring instantly to mind, but there have been a few!

Anne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 03:22 AM

"I Belong To Glasgow" works for me and I belong to Glasgow. (or at least, very close to it)
You is what you is sorefingers.
On a similar note. There are two days in the year when I will not listen to the radio; St. Patrick's day & Robert Burns day. Thirty million Canadians may think their fake accents are the funny but the immigrant Scots & Irish, for the most part, find it insulting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: fat B****rd
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 03:34 AM

My somewhat limited repertoire consists of mainly blues songs which obviously originate with black singers. Does the team think that it's unethical to sing in an approximation of a black singers voice and/or to "tidy up" the lyrics.
Maybe I should just get on with it. A guitarist friend of mine who worked in a bank and played in a local folk group berated me for "trying to sing like a negro" I in turn berated him for "trying to sing like a farmhand/sailor etcetc".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Scrump
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:15 AM

The idea of deliberately 'correcting' the grammar of folk songs is anathema to me. That's exactly the sort of thing a Victorian song collector would have done. I believe the song should be sung as intended by the writer, however ignorant of correct grammar they may have been.

This might mean the singer has to use dialect words or expressions. There have been discussions on other threads about the appropriateness of singing songs in a different dialect from the singer's own. My view (shared by many) is that it's OK, provided the singer takes the trouble to learn the accent properly. Others take the view that you should only sing songs from where you were born or raised, which seems to me an unnecessary restriction.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:39 AM

Sorry Scrump: but no matter how well intentioned, you cannot learn my accent and your, all-be-it well meaning, efforts will only serve to offend those whom you mimic. It's not always the best form of flattery.
I spend my whole life, trying to soften my accent and speak more slowly in an effort to be understood. If the author had a huge carbuncle on his forehead and sang through his nose, would you do it too?
Trust me. Ask your real friends. Every cripple has his own particular way of walking. I've got mine, you get your own.
No offense meant. Quite the reverse actually.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:49 AM

'Correct' grammar is actually 'standardised' grammar. At one time a country like Britain had dozens (possibly hundreds?) of different dialects. These dialects were variants of English, each with its own vocabulary and grammar. My maternal grandparents were born in East Anglia but, soon after they were married, moved 50 miles further west to an East Midlands city in which my mother was born. My mother had great difficulty understanding her own grandfather because he still spoke his local dialect.

Standardised grammar is an invention of human beings designed to improve communication between them (or to assert the dominance of particular social groups - depending on your point of view!). Deliberately subverting the rules of standardised grammar for artistic purposes is not 'wrong' because those rules are arbitrary anyway. I suppose the key question is does the subversion lead to an improved artistic experience for the audience?
As for singing in a dialect different from your own, well, it all depends whether or not you can do it convincingly ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:54 AM

What Shimrod says goes double for 'English spelling' ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 10:39 AM

I think it was Peace who said:

LF (SF): Teribus is a fine person, IMO. Referring to him and associating his name with the term 'ilk' is not becoming, IMO

What's your problem with "ilk"? It merely means "the same type" or "the same name", as someone could (but in today's world probably won't) say, "Dave Oesterreich, of that ilk." That would imply that the Oesterreiches were well known, and that I was one of that family that everyone knew about.

Now you might object to saying he's one of "the grammar nasties" (what is often even more pejoratively referred to as "grammar Nazis"), but that's a different part of your criticism.

Dave Oesterreich


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Scrump
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 11:04 AM

Jim Lad - your argument is flawed. For all you know, I could be from the same town as you and have the same accent :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 11:23 AM

Well: I'm from Airdrie and the accent changes from one side of the town to the other. That's off topic though. The advice is aimed at those who have an entirely different accent.
If my argument was all that was flawed, I'd be a happy man.
Mind you... "American Pie" doesn't work in broad Scots.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,meself
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 11:26 AM

Jim Lad - You're insulted by Canadians doing fake accents; I'm insulted by the suggestion that 30 million Canadians approve of fake accents. I don't, and don't sing in fake accents. Stompin' Tom doesn't. The late Stan Rogers didn't, but then he can no longer be included in the numbers ... So, please, make that 30 million minus two! (You do the math ... ).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Scrump
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 11:53 AM

Well: I'm from Airdrie and the accent changes from one side of the town to the other

I don't think it is off topic, because to those who say "you shouldn't sing songs unless you were born or raised in a particular area", I would ask: where do you draw the line? Should a person from Liverpool not be able to sing a Manchester song, or vice versa? The two accents are markedly different and can be distinguised even by a person who doesn't come from either city.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 12:00 PM

I've had an epiphany!
It's OK, provided the singer takes the trouble to learn the accent properly.
It should be subtle though.
Meself: I'll help you with your math if you'll help me with my carbuncle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Scrump
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 12:08 PM

It's OK, provided the singer takes the trouble to learn the accent properly

Thank you, Jim Lad. That's my view exactly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 12:10 PM

Well, thanks to cut & paste, it was your words exactly.
I'll never be wrong again, Scrump.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: JeremyC
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 12:45 PM

I'll sing a song as close to the way its written as my sensibilities allow. I really hate "put-on" archaic pronunciations (see: "The Elfin Knight," as sung by Ewan MacColl) or out-of-place colloquialisms (see: "East Virginia" as sung by Joan Baez), so I do my best to avoid them in my own singing, although I will for some reason develop a twang against my best intentions while I'm singing some Woody Guthrie songs. Hopefully I'll outgrow that. In general, I think a folk singer should sing as close to the way he/she talks as possible, while making allowances for the act of singing and the credibility of the song ("And it's a HARRRD RAAAAAIN that's going to fall").


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,sorefingers
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 01:44 PM

Thank you all for informative and helpful suggestions. But I cannot change my bad, or good, habits of a lifetime of compromisin' singing.

For me the Blues expression which sounds like 'lard lard lard...' is still 'Lord Lord Lord', and it can sound like 'Lawd Lawd Lawd' to the rest of humanity, but to me it has to be meaningful. Or singing the first lines 'Kilgarry Mountain' ( when I have the wind for it ) has to be adjusted from 'a-goin' to 'go-ing over'

As to fake accents, yeah me too. I don't know why but I squirm as a person tries to sing 'yon' or 'ken' in a broad NY drawl ( as in Who the H is Ken??? ), it just does not sound .... well... right to me.

This topic is badly titled since there is also much here about people who don't speak as they write, or the other way around. I know I certainly DO NOT try to write differently to how I speak and that does often seem ungrammatical. However I notice that the more I write and try to improve, the better I speak and think in the language I happen to be using at that time.. or something to that effect.

Posts that made me nearly choke with laughter because the author either did not realize how funny his story was or did realize and posted it anyway, Alba .... I had to stand up and walk about the room to relieve the pain of laughing so much. Richard's tale is mighty fun and he might want to send some more.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Bert
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 02:40 PM

So we're not allowed to sing "Ilkey Moor Bah't 'at" any more?

Don't be so bloody silly! Just sing the songs the best you can, and get on with it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 02:56 PM

There are certain songs that no one would correct. As mentioned above:It Ain't Me Babe and Satisfaction and I've never heard,"You aren't anything but a hound" ("hound dog" being redundant), but I have heard,"Hundreds of people didn't have any place to go" in Backwater Blues.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Charley Noble
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 04:03 PM

This is really a tough challenge for those of us who have no accent. LOL

I grew up in Maine but my folks were from New York City. My mother now sounds like a Mainer to me but Lord knows what I sound like. Well, maybe I have a little acccent when I say "idear" or "arear." Then there are all them words that I drop "r's" on... But people generally can understand me, unlike when Barry Finn talks!

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: JeremyC
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 04:14 PM

You are nothing more than a hound dog,
For you cry all the time.
You are nothing more than a hound dog,
For you cry all the time.
Metaphorically speaking, you have never captured a rabbit,
And in addition, I do not consider you a friend.

When they referred to you as "high-classed,"
They clearly spoke either in jest or in an attempt at deliberate falsehood.
When they referred to you as "high-classed,"
They clearly spoke either in jest or in an attempt at deliberate falsehood.
As I have said before, you have never captured a (metaphorical) rabbit,
And in addition, I do not consider you a friend.


Yeah, it doesn't have the same ring to it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 04:25 PM

Guest,Jim:
"Hound dog" is not redundant. Anyone interested in dogs (for breeding, showing etc.) will know that the Kennel Club lists 6 'Groups' of dog breeds:
Utility, Working, Toy, Terrier, Gundog & Hound

So "Hound dog" is just a little more specific than just "dog", however, the wording may be mis-understood. If you read the Wiki description of a hound you may consider the song trying to tell us:
"Dog, you are nothing but a hound"
Other definitions make it clear that 'Hounds' as a group will hunt game, but act only as hunters (or 'pointers') Making a lot of noise (baying) but NOT acting as retrievers.
This would also make sense of the the lines "Crying all the time" & "you ain't never caught a rabbit"


CHEERS
Nigel


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 04:36 PM

Visions of Peter Sellers dressed as Laurence Olivier/Richard III doing 'A hard days' night' are rampaging across my brain now....


LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Amos
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:10 PM

I've mentioned before the tale of the prim music teacher whose class of small children had been taught to play the violin and were included in a community show. She proudly announced that the children would now perform a 'traditional American tune called "Boil Those Cabbages Down"'. I nearly had to leave the auditorium.

A


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Tootler
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 05:38 PM

First day of a new school year. Teacher is taking the names of the new pupils.

First boy walks up to teacher's desk.
Teacher: What's your name boy?
1st Boy: Jules, Miss.
Teacher: Don't be silly. You can't use nicknames on the register. Your name is Julius.
1st Boy, walking off looking chastened: Yes, Miss.

Second boy approaches teacher's desk.
Teacher: What's your name?
2nd Boy, brightly: Billius, Miss!
...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: melodeonboy
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 06:04 PM

"Is you is or is you ain't my baby?" could become "Are you my girlfriend or not?".

Which would you prefer?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: BK Lick
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 06:40 PM

I wonder as I wander out under the sky
How Jesus our Savior did come for to die
For poor ornry people like you and like I
I wonder as I wander out under the sky

Yep, "me" jes don't work there (unless you're Scots).
—BK


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 06:46 PM

Whatever works. It don't make me no never-mind.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 06:51 PM

What Bert said "Just sing the songs the best you can, and get on with it."

You pay some respect to the language used, if it's not quite your language, but you basically sing in the way that seems natural to you.

And formal grammar doesn't come into it, any more than it does in conversation.

As for "ain't", that been good English since the 18th century, posh people's English just as much as common folk's.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,meself
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 07:28 PM

"Meself: I'll help you with your math if you'll help me with my carbuncle."

Wait a minute, what's this? A calculator! I think maybe I can handle that math problem myself ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Jim Lad
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 07:35 PM

You're a better man than me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: Peace
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 07:44 PM

The CEO hosted a soiree at the county incarceration facility
The house band was present and they played with gusto . . .

Yeah, it ain't the same.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Grammatically Correct Folk Song Lyrics
From: GUEST,meself
Date: 15 Jan 07 - 07:48 PM

How about:

   She loves you, yes, yes, yes;
   She loves you, yes, yes, yes;
   She loves you, yes, yes, yes, yes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 27 October 8:48 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.