mudcat.org: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]


Are the sessions real in Ireland?

Fidjit 04 Jan 07 - 10:59 AM
The Sandman 04 Jan 07 - 11:27 AM
JennyO 04 Jan 07 - 11:40 AM
DMcG 04 Jan 07 - 11:41 AM
Sorcha 04 Jan 07 - 12:09 PM
Leadfingers 04 Jan 07 - 12:14 PM
Carol 04 Jan 07 - 12:28 PM
Shaneo 04 Jan 07 - 12:47 PM
Sorcha 04 Jan 07 - 12:50 PM
The Sandman 04 Jan 07 - 12:50 PM
McGrath of Harlow 04 Jan 07 - 01:07 PM
oombanjo 04 Jan 07 - 01:26 PM
Gulliver 04 Jan 07 - 02:33 PM
Cluin 04 Jan 07 - 02:36 PM
GUEST 04 Jan 07 - 02:57 PM
vectis 04 Jan 07 - 04:50 PM
CET 04 Jan 07 - 09:06 PM
GUEST 05 Jan 07 - 02:53 AM
GUEST,JTT 05 Jan 07 - 06:05 AM
Leadfingers 05 Jan 07 - 08:34 AM
The Sandman 05 Jan 07 - 08:50 AM
Marc Bernier 05 Jan 07 - 12:41 PM
McGrath of Harlow 05 Jan 07 - 05:55 PM
My guru always said 05 Jan 07 - 06:24 PM
Seamus Kennedy 06 Jan 07 - 01:01 AM
GUEST 06 Jan 07 - 04:30 AM
Megan L 06 Jan 07 - 04:47 AM
Shaneo 06 Jan 07 - 07:20 AM
bbc 06 Jan 07 - 07:42 AM
GUEST,meself 06 Jan 07 - 09:13 AM
bbc 06 Jan 07 - 09:37 AM
Big Al Whittle 06 Jan 07 - 09:49 AM
GUEST,meself 06 Jan 07 - 10:04 AM
bbc 06 Jan 07 - 10:25 AM
GUEST 06 Jan 07 - 10:43 AM
bbc 06 Jan 07 - 11:10 AM
Skipjack K8 06 Jan 07 - 12:22 PM
Desert Dancer 06 Jan 07 - 12:38 PM
GUEST 06 Jan 07 - 03:11 PM
Les from Hull 06 Jan 07 - 03:59 PM
GUEST,Girl Friday without cookie 06 Jan 07 - 04:50 PM
The Sandman 07 Jan 07 - 10:47 AM
GUEST,Noel Hill's Back Pocket 07 Jan 07 - 12:41 PM
GUEST 07 Jan 07 - 01:24 PM
The Sandman 07 Jan 07 - 01:48 PM
Gulliver 07 Jan 07 - 02:50 PM
Seamus Kennedy 07 Jan 07 - 03:39 PM
The Sandman 07 Jan 07 - 04:06 PM
Cluin 07 Jan 07 - 04:13 PM
BB 07 Jan 07 - 05:13 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Fidjit
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:59 AM

I was in Clare on a couple of visits 2003/4. Found the sessions in the pubs a bit, now whats the word I'm looking for. Unreal? Made up.? Not quite authentic? Do you know what I mean. Seeemingly paid musicians there to start a session feel. Very fake type. Some in Milton Malbay, on that week they have in July, were very authentic though. Even joined in with those ones. Lisdoonvarna and Doolin No way!. Dublin, Temple Bar. Forget it. Nice one in the Lighthouse at Howth though, with Barney McKenna in residence. Also at the center in Monkstown. Teaching the turists dancing and a session in the bar. Also authentic. Think I found the real ones. The others, must just be there for the turists. Now they could be a debateable point. Wotcha fink?

Chas


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 11:27 AM

I can only speak from my own experience.
in my village, Ballydehob , co cork ,there is a session that was started by my partner, Cathy Cook,16 years ago,the session used to be held in rosies pub,it is still going every friday night,no one gets paid.and it goes on throughout the year.
I play in other venues during the summer,I never compromise my music,I play a mixture of polkas, slides, hornpipes, jigs and reels and sing both irish and english folk songs, you can see me at the coachmans in kenmare, or the sailors kenmare,or Caseys in baltimore.
unfortunately if it wasnt for the tourists in rural ireland,this music would not be so common,for several reasons.
1.drink drive laws[with no alternative public transport or taxis]means that many pubs in rural ireland, have and will close.
2.some irish people prefer country and western,45 per cent is my guess.
come to Ballydehob,and remember,[ please dont take offence] you like every holiday maker are a tourist and just as there are variations in folk clubs,there will be variations in sessions,but i hope there not as fake as the irish theme pubs in England.
Whenever I play, I try to sing and play with honesty and sincerity ,please visit my website www.dickmiles.com


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: JennyO
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 11:40 AM

I went to a session in Gus O'Connor's pub in Doolin, and had a great time. They were very friendly and inclusive, invited me into the group and lent me a bodhran to play. It was mostly tunes, interspersed with a song now and then. Felt very authentic to me!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: DMcG
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 11:41 AM

I've only been to Ireland for short periods, so can't really comment, beyond the fact that the only sessions I've been that did seem fake were all in Dublin.

I've spent a little while thinking what it is that seemed fake about those sessions and in most cases it seems to be more based around the banter between tunes rather than the music itself. After all, while there can be some 'unusual variations' in the tunes of the main sessions I go to, there can also be quite long periods where everyone plays as if they had been rehearsing those particular tunes together for weeks, so the accuracy of the playing itself is not a very reliable guide to whether the session is fake or not.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Sorcha
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:09 PM

Had a great time at erinmainden's session in Monkstown. And perhaps, a lot of the 'real' sessions are in private homes?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Leadfingers
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:14 PM

Sadly , what Dick said about C&W is true ! We were doing a wedding , and the brides Uncle was bemoaning the fact that in Meath , there was NO Real Irish Music , he had to come to London to find it , and the band were "All F****** English" Unquote !
Hopefully we will have some good sessions at Portaferry next month !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Carol
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:28 PM

Now we have a campervan we were wondering about spending some time in Ireland but as an unaccompanied singer I would appreciate any places/clubs/pubs where I might get the chance to sing and listen to other singers please?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Shaneo
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:47 PM

'Made up sessions', Yes there are lots around , especially in the tourists areas you mentioned, They are there to get the tourists in to buy drink.
Has anybody ever seen the American tourists who wander into an Irish pub wearing wind breakers and back packs ans sit at a table with one drink between six of them and spend the whole night there taking up space ? You will find them during the summer season in Kilkenny , Galway , Clare and Temple Bar Dublin.
I don't want to offend the American contributors to this board but this type of American visitor to Ireland is almost widespread during the summer.
They sit , appreciate the music but do not buy drink.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Sorcha
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:50 PM

I hate to tell you this, but I drank my share and THEN some when I was over! LOL!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:50 PM

Ballydehob co cork,or any place that i,m playing your welcome,usually cork or south kerry,please p m me,nearer the time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 01:07 PM

Some are, some aren't. If a real session consists of a bunch of people meeting together to make music for the fun of it, and open to all comers, rather than a programmed gig, I rather suspect you might be more likely to find that away from the tourist traps.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: oombanjo
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 01:26 PM

Try Peppers Bar in Feakle County Clare The 85 year olds are still joining in and playing, and the young 14/15 year olds are producing new tunes, as well as the old ones, picked up and taught in the local pubs and school. In August last year I stayed over for 5 weeks and agree with a lot of what you say, but there are many exceptions. Liona's bar played a good mix of Irish,and when I took out my five string I was joined by Liona herself and we played some Old time Appalachion tunes,I found out this was much appreciated by the locals and ended up being invited to play at places like the Muckross hotel as well as many other venues. Carol, the two best sessions I found for un accompanied singers were at the Feakle festival where they have a pub dedicated to just that and many a song is sung in Irish, Peppers bar also appreciated single singers, in fact when a singer was on the floor the pub fell silent,very unusual for an Irish bar, the other place was a pub on the Wexford harbour (at the far end on the corner of the the last road of to the right before you turn the corner. If you go over the bridge at Wexford heading north there is an unadvertised council site, the session starts about half one on sundays, if you go give my best to all. Get the other cambing site book by ringing the Irish tourist info office its free with lots of other usfull info. Also most of the camp sites welcome musicians, and there is usually a lounge with on or two instruments hanging om the walls. best see you soon John AKA oombanjo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Gulliver
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 02:33 PM

I really have no idea what an "Unreal? Made up.? Not quite authentic" or "fake" session is!
This attitude smacks of musical snobbism. A session (in Ireland--I'm Irish) is a session in my book, whether it's an "open"
session or not (yes, we have those too!), whether the musicians are paid or not.
Every session is different--there are singing sessions and tunes sessions, or half'n'half,
hectic sessions with practically no breaks and laid back chatty sessions.
It's up to the musicians to decide the kind of session they want, and in that sense every session is "real".      

Many session musicians make a living out of playing, and you can't blame them for trying to get some reward
for the effort they put into learning their trade,
and they'll keep the music going no matter what--in the olden days, before Ireland got so affluent,
they would have been found busking or playing at fairs, etc., and they kept the traditional music going through the hard times.

Although certain Mudcat purists may look down on the Temple Bar-type sessions, a lot of people,
Irish and visitors, still enjoy them, and there's nothing wrong with people enjoying themselves and singing along to a few come-all-yes!      

Carol, if you're coming through Dublin I can provide some info on singing sessions--just don't ask me whether they're real or fake :)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Cluin
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 02:36 PM

Who goes to Ireland and doesn't drink?

Come on!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 02:57 PM

Fidjit,
There are around 6 or 7 sessions a week in Miltown Malbay and they are of both types; those where a couple of musicians are booked in advance and those where whoever turns up sits in.
In the former, it is possible for a visiting musician to sit in, but as we have a number of excellent local players, visitors tend to defer to them. This can occasionally backfire - we've just had two potentially good sessions over the Christmas ruined by a virulent dose of spoons (don't get me started on bodhrans).
The most musically satisfying are those with regular, skilful musicians; if you want to hear the lower end of the scale, try Doolin where musicians (sic), just like Ladies Day at Ascot, go to be seen (or heard) and, just like the horses, good music takes a very second place.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: vectis
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 04:50 PM

If you are there in the winter try and find a rambling house if you want a taste of rural Ireland. It won't necessarily be traditional but it will be welcoming and great fun. Be warned though most of them are 'dry' but you get a lovely cup of tea at midnight.
PM me for more details if you're interested.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: CET
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 09:06 PM

I'm intrigued. What is a rambling house?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 02:53 AM

The old 'rambling houses' were the places were music, song and dancing (or just conversation) took place regularly before the advent of playing in pubs; they were the homes of people who played, danced and sang or those where such activities were welcomed. The Dictionary of Hiberno-English gives the definition as 'visiting from house to house for gossip and entertainment'. They were also known as ceili houses. Here in Clare, a visit to such was known as going on ones 'coor' (from the Irish 'cuairt' or 'cuaird' - circuit, round, course). The tradition pretty well died out and several attempts to revive it locally met with little success.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 06:05 AM

True, 'who comes to Ireland and doesn't drink?' - but there are plenty of people who *live* in Ireland who don't drink, and plenty more who drink moderately!

Holiday drinking is a lot of what you see in Ireland. In Temple Bar in Dublin, for instance, it's crawling with shamefully drunk people every weekend, most of them on stag parties from England.

As for 'fake sessions' and 'real sessions' - yes, there are touristy pubs where musicians are hired in to provide the noisy sound that will get the visitors partying; but there are other pubs - in Dublin too! where the music is genuine: Hughes, An Goilin and so on.

(Incidentally, I don't think the drink-drive laws are necessarily going to shut down pubs; some local entrepreneurs will undoubtedly start a minibus service where people can be run home from the pub in batches every hour from 9pm.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Leadfingers
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 08:34 AM

In my experience , where local musicians are paid to 'run' a session
they are only too pleased if visiting musicians join in , as it means they can have a go at something OTHER than the same boring stuff they do for money week after week !
And I know this is NOT always the case , but seems to be fairly common


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 08:50 AM

Jim, my townland is coor agurteen[the curve of the little fields].I AGREE LEADFINGERS,however to syop getting bored I put in afew different twiddles.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 12:41 PM

I've encountered both. However I'v never been refused when I'v asked to join a session. Funny enough, I have more than one story of, after politely asking, then being invited in, Playing feverishly all night, thinking I'm really making a contribution, then noticing at the end of the night everyone but me is getting payed, and I have a bar tab.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 05:55 PM

That's always a debatable thing, but there's some justice in the notion that the pay is for having turned up as agreed, specifically to make sure the session takes place, rather than just for being there uncommitted, but ready to play.

Nothing wrong with a bit of cash to be shared out at the end of a session. But that shouldn't be what it's all about, and I think that's what's meant by the distinction people have been making here between real sessions and non-real. Musicians playing stuff they don't particularly want to play, purely as a commercial transaction, when they'd really sooner be back home watching the telly, or drinking without playing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: My guru always said
Date: 05 Jan 07 - 06:24 PM

Peppers in Feakle is definitely a good one, and I recall that Lena's in Feakle was good too when I visited some years ago. Bradshaws in Castleconnell is a fine place for unaccomanied singing, and another good session is at Murrays in Upperchurch. Drumshanbo is a good place for music & there's an Inn in the hills which is also good for a session. Though IMHO you can't beat Jim o' the Mills for a good mixture, but to find it you'll need a guide.

There has been some excellent advice on the MudCat over the years about places for music and singing in Ireland and I for one am glad of the help given here. Prior to finding this fund of knowledge I spent my holidays in Ireland pottering around looking for the real music while the guys were fishing up & down the Shannon. Found a few good places, but it took a lot of looking....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 01:01 AM

Shaneo, I'll respectfully disagree with you.
I'm an Irish performer living here in the States, but I bring a busload of tourists to Ireland - 10 days in the summer, and 2 one-week trips in November. Usually between 40 and 50 people.

I bring them into pubs with sessions where I'll sit in with the lads (and lassies), and I have a network of trad musical friends who are only too delighted to see me bring in a group of Yanks.

For instance, Hoban's in Westport, Co. Mayo, where I have become fast friends with John Hoban (great songwriter, fiddler and banjoist) and the session band, Tommie Lyons on the button-box, T.P. Lynn on the piano accordion, and Liam Grealis on the fiddle.

My tourists are respectful of the music (I usually explain the format to them ahead of time, so they don't embarrass themselves), they drink up a storm, they'll buy the musicians' CDs.

A good time is always had by all.

Oh, and the pub owners just love to see me come in with a group, especially on a slow night.

If there's no session going on in town, I usually organize one in our hotel. I've engaged the services of some Mudcatters to come in and perform, and once again everyone has a blast.

It's unfair to tar all Yanks with the same brush.

Seamus


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 04:30 AM

Marc,
On the other hand, there was the case of 'the silent fiddler' who appeared at least three years running in the early days of the Willie Clancy Summer School. In those days, when the sessions were smaller, most publicans would put up rounds of drinks for the musicians.
This feller would walk into a session with his fiddle case, take out the fiddle, rosin the bow, and sit there all night without playing a note, but would be included in every round. This went on for two years running - everybody knew, but were too polite to mention it.
On the third year he turned up with a a different instrument and did the same, until somebody tapped him on the shoulder and said, "I see you've changed your instrument and are not playing the flute this year". We never saw him again - god loves a trier, as they say round here.
Jim Carroll
PS Visiting musicians are welcome here - as long as they remember that they are visitors and that the music goes on during the rest of the time they are not here. They need to fit in with what's happening rather than try to dominate the sessions - no matter how good they are. I get hacked off when I see sessions ruined by JCB driving chancers with 12 string Kalashnikovs and ******* bodhrans nausing up sessions because the locals are too polite to tell them to sling their hook - it happens on a regular basis.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Megan L
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 04:47 AM

ach sure cluin i'll come tae Ireland and drink. Tea Fruit juice and lemonade! Anybody want to say onything aboot it EH EH cum oan then clear the room an mak a ring an all fecht yes aw. :p


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Shaneo
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 07:20 AM

Seamus I dont want to tarnish a whole nation for the antics of a minority , but you must admit it still goes on, the sitting at a table with no drink in front of them . and yes they do enjoy the sessions and some can even tell a jig from a reel which is more that a lot of the Irish.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: bbc
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 07:42 AM

Shaneo,

Part of the "problem" w/ Americans not drinking may be that it's simply not a part of our culture to expect to combine music & drinking (I realize I don't speak for all of us here.). I'd be much more comfortable w/ a cover charge, so that I could enjoy the music & not be expected to drink. It's not a matter of being cheap or unappreciative. Americans may just not understand the custom or be heavy drinkers. We don't have pubs in our country in the same way you have them in England & Ireland. The most common place I hear folk music at home is at a twice-a-month concert series held in a church hall.

best,

bbc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST,meself
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 09:13 AM

Bear in mind the possiblility that at least some of these Americans, apart from perhaps not being habitual drinkers, do not have much coin to throw around. Contrary to popular belief, not all Americans are rich. I'm not familiar with the scene in Ireland, but I think it possible that those Americans "wearing wind breakers and back packs ans sit[ting] at a table with one drink between six of them" are travelling on the cheap, maybe because that's the only way they can afford to travel. They should, of course, be afforded the kind of respectful treatment generally shown the poor the world over.

And then there are those who are able to afford to travel because they didn't throw away all their money at the boozer ... What is it the song says - "Pity the poor landlord"?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: bbc
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 09:37 AM

True--both rich & less rich Americans choose to travel, but part of it is cultural, I think. Bill Sables was surprised that, at contra dances in the U.S. (similar to barn dances), drink is usually not allowed & folks come ready to just dance. It seems that, in the UK, some people feel the need to have a few drinks before they're willing to get up. I find that, if I have only 1 drink, my balance is off for the evening & I *can't* dance well!

best,

bbc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 09:49 AM

What about the country music, what's the best place to find out who's playing what where in Ireland? I've always found that Johnny MacEvoy sort of Irish/country vibe a very attractive blend.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST,meself
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 10:04 AM

Contrarily, I find that the more I drink, the better a dancer I become. I also become a better lover, fighter, comedian, dare-devil, conversationalist, singer, companion, acrobat, alms-giver, letter-writer, holy man, wit, bard, shenachie, defender of the downtrodden, poet, actor, advocate of worthy causes, host, guest, after-dinner speaker, handyman, sage, raconteur, social co-ordinator, diplomat, critic - in short, a far more impressive and appealing personage altogether. (Not just my opinion; my ex-wife thought so too!).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: bbc
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 10:25 AM

meself, more power to you! ;)

bbc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 10:43 AM

Cover charge my arse!
We have music in at least five pubs in our town throughout the year and our tourist season lasts from March to October - which means us locals will be paying for the privelege of paying for our pints - and listening to our local musicians.
It's a sad fact - lamented by the older musicians - that the music moved into the pubs a long time ago, which at least gives the visitors a chance to hear it. The least they can be expected to do is buy a drink if they go into a pub (alchoholic or non, as the taste dictates).
It's not just Americans who have a bad reputation - we once watched a bunch of French tourists crowd out a session in Kerry, then proceed to open their own bottle of whiskey and packets of sandwiches - all looked somewhat puzzled and hurt when they were shown the door.
Too many visitors seem to think the world stops turning here after they go home (speaking as an ex-visitor who is now a resident).
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: bbc
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 11:10 AM

No offense intended. How about a minimum charge or drinks? I have no problem w/ ordering a drink or 2, but the pubs I went to in England seemed to expect one to have several & I'm just not up to that--in hard or soft drinks.

bbc

bbc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Skipjack K8
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 12:22 PM

Jim, your story of the bow-rosiner struck a chord with me. A few weeks ago, our ceilidh band did a cowboy and Indian themed barn dance for a company Christmas party in a local pub (you know the story - the Cumberland Square Eight is announced as coming from Cumberland County, Ohio), and it was a free bar. All the locals went home and donned Stetsons, cowboy boots, anything that they could get back to the bar correctly dressed for free drink.

I have to disagree with your specific comment about Doolin, on the one occasion I played in O'Connor's, in that the band (and they were a band, to be fair) were very welcoming and let me sit in with them. I didn't find out I had reached the zenith of my playing career until later, when I was told the bloke playing the fiddle was Tommy Peoples.

The chowder was to die for, too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 12:38 PM

Ha! Cumberland Co., Ohio, where the cowboys and Indians are! Ouch. What is it about company Christmas parties... ?!?

~ Becky in Tucson, Arizona
where there are cowboys and Indians (and they don't fit the stereotypes, either!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 03:11 PM

Skipjack K8
I have to say that even though I live about 20 miles away, it is a long time since I visited Doolin, but I understand nothing much has changed. The last time we passed through on our way home from The Aran Islands, there was a coach drawing up outside O'Connor's full of be-Stetsoned guitar toting visitors all rarin' to go - not my scene I'm afraid.
I prefer to live with my memories of the three Russell brothers playing to an attentive audience - though even this is tainted by the latter days of Packie, a very fine traditional concertina player, being frozen out of the music by "musicians" who had come to listen to themselves, banging away at anything from Hank Williams to the Beatles.
I'm glad your experiences were better than ours.
Jim Carroll
Up to the time Tommy Peoples went to the States for a long period, while he was living in Clare, we used to sit in the kitchen in Friel's (Miltown) on Wednesday nights in the winter, along with about a dozen others, listening to him play solo all night.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Les from Hull
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 03:59 PM

I've (nearly) always been made to feel welcome at sessions and gigs in Ireland, but you have to understand what's going on, who's getting paid (or not), and say a nice please and thank you as any guest in another country should do.

The point that bbc makes about not wanting to drink is a good one, but the most times I've heard negative comments it has been something of the nature of 'them feckers there sitting all night over one drink'. There is no cover charge so that the only way the publican can recover any expenses is by increased sales (alcohol or non-alcohol). And the profits on non-alcoholic drinks are probably higher anyway. So expect to have a glass of something in front of you, even if it's just bottled water, or buy a bag of crisps.

Les


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST,Girl Friday without cookie
Date: 06 Jan 07 - 04:50 PM

I have not been to Ireland for a few years now. When I first went I stayed only a few miles from Rosslare, and there was a definite lack of traditional Irish music, and the locals preferred C and W. On later visits, there was music in pubs, but it was organized, and one needed a leaflet to find out what was on where. This was often out of date. Found a reasonable session in Captain Birdseye's neck of the woods, but had to find out about it from Jim Bainbridge. The very best one was in a pub called Crotty's in the Galway area. That had someone running it as a singaround.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 10:47 AM

packie russell, was an excellent concertina player.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST,Noel Hill's Back Pocket
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 12:41 PM

I'm not sure why Guest Jim Carroll feels he is able to provide decent information about sessions in Clare since he does not play an instrument!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 01:24 PM

Perhaps it is because he lives in Clare and attends numerous sessions on a regular basis.
How about an account of sessions around Nottingham?
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 01:48 PM

session etiquette.,is very important,how awful that Packie Russell,didnt want to play anymore,because of insensitive guests.
there used to be a good session in nottingham on a thursday night.
www.dickmiles.com


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Gulliver
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 02:50 PM

Always had a great time in Doolin: great music, great company, great craic!
You couldn't beat it with a big stick!

Sorry, but I have to say this: Limit the number of tourists--they will eventually destroy everywhere they go.
like a shower of locusts (witness Temple Bar). Not just in Ireland, everywhere...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 03:39 PM

As someone who brings tourists to Ireland, and exposes them to the real music and cultural heritage - not the canned cabaret shows like Jury's or Doyle's - I disagree with Gulliver's suggestion to 'limit the number of tourists - they will eventually destroy everywhere they go.

It wasn't the music-loving tourists who destroyed the Temple bar area, it was the English (mostly) bachelor and hen-parties.

I also feel that the Irish Tourist Board would resent your suggestion much more strongly than I do.

Seamus


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 04:06 PM

generally speaking   99/100 ,I find tourists appreciative,attentive and a good audience.
jim carroll was I think talking about insensitive musicians who wish to join in[they are a minority and some may even be irish or any nationality].
most tourists are not musicians, but do appreciate traditional irish music and most of them give it proper respect and as far as I am concerned are very welcome,.www.dickmiles.com


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: Cluin
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 04:13 PM

Oh hell, Gulliver. Don't worry about it. Great numbers of tourists won't go to Doolin and ruin it. There isn't even a McDonnalds there.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Folklore: Are the sessions real in Ireland?
From: BB
Date: 07 Jan 07 - 05:13 PM

GUEST with the ridiculous name, just because someone doesn't play an instrument it doesn't mean that they don't know what they're talking about regarding instrumental sessions (although I don't think anyone has limited their thinking to purely instrumental session - most of the comments apply to singing or mixed sessions as well). Jim is someone who, if you read his posts here and elsewhere, you would realise is an extremely knowledgeable person when it comes to traditional music. (Although I do wish he didn't appear here as a guest, and without identifying himself at the top of his posts - are you listening, Jim? It's so easy to become a member and doesn't commit you to anything - except occasionally receiving personal messages which you can read or not, as you choose.)

Barbara


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 17 September 11:57 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.