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DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe

Related thread:
(origins) Origins: Lass/Pride/Donald of Glencoe-Cara Dillon (4)


Joe Offer 02 Sep 06 - 06:10 PM
Joe Offer 02 Sep 06 - 06:35 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 02 Sep 06 - 07:37 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 02 Sep 06 - 08:08 PM
Malcolm Douglas 02 Sep 06 - 08:39 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 02 Sep 06 - 09:40 PM
Malcolm Douglas 02 Sep 06 - 10:13 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 03 Sep 06 - 07:34 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 03 Sep 06 - 07:37 AM
Howard Jones 03 Sep 06 - 10:08 AM
Joe Offer 03 Sep 06 - 10:46 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 03 Sep 06 - 12:40 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 03 Sep 06 - 04:38 PM
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Subject: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 06:10 PM

This is an edited DTStudy thread, and all messages posted here are subject to editing and deletion.
This thread is intended to serve as a forum for corrections and annotations for the Digital Tradition song named in the title of this thread.

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We haven't done much work on this song, and I thought it might be worthwhile to take a look, although it doesn't seem much different from your standard, dime-a-dozen, brokentoken song (admittedly, the token isn't broken in this one). Anybody know the source of the DT version of the lyrics? Is it an accurate transcription?
Here's the DT version:

PRIDE OF GLENCOE

As I was a walking one evening of late
Where Flora's green mantle the fields decorate
I carelessly wandered, where I do not know
By the banks of a fountain that lies in Glencoe

Like she who the pride of Mount Ida had won
There approached a wee lassie as fair as the sun
With ribbons and tartans around her did flow
That once won MacDonald, the pride of Glencoe

With courage undaunted, I to her drew nigh
While the red rose and lily on her cheek seemed to vie
I asked her her name and how far she did go
And she answered, "Be kind, sir, I'm bound for Glencoe"

I said, "My wee lassie, your enchanting smile
And your comely fine features have my heart beguiled
If your kind affections on me you'll bestow
I will bless the happy hour we met on Glencoe"

"Kind sir," she made answer, "You suit I disdain
I once had a sweetheart, MacDonald by name
He's gone to the war, about ten years ago
And a maid I'll remain, till he returns to Glencoe"

"Perhaps young MacDonald regards not your name
And has placed his affection on some other dame
Perhaps he's forgotten for all that you know
The bonnie wee lassie he left in Glencoe"

"My Donald from his promise will never depart
For love, truth, and honor are found in his heart
And if I never see him, single I will go
And I'll mourn for my Donald, the Pride of Glencoe"

He finding her constant, he pulled out a glove
Which at parting she gave him as a token of love
She flew to his arms while the tears down did flow
Saying, "You're welcome, my Donald, the pride of Glencoe"

"Cheer up now, young Flora, your sorrows are o'er
And while life still remains, we will never part more
The storms of war at a distance may blow
While in peace and contentment we'll bide in Glencoe"

DT #464
Laws N39
@token @love
filename[ PRIGLENC
TUNE FILE: PRIGLENC
Tune link working now-CLICK TO PLAY
SOF

PLEASE NOTE: Because of the volunteer nature of The Digital Tradition, it is difficult to ensure proper attribution and copyright information for every song included. Please assume that any song which lists a composer is copyrighted ©. You MUST aquire proper license before using these songs for ANY commercial purpose. If you have any additional information or corrections to the credit or copyright information included, please e-mail those additions or corrections to us (along with the song title as indexed) so that we can update the database as soon as possible. Thank You.
Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

MacDonald's Return to Glencoe (The Pride of Glencoe) [Laws N39]

DESCRIPTION: The singer tries to woo a woman of Glencoe, but she says she is loyal to MacDonald, gone to war these ten years. He suggests that MacDonald may have forgotten her; she says she will remain single even so. He then reveals himself as MacDonald
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: before 1835 (broadside, Bodleian Johnson Ballads 1641)
KEYWORDS: courting disguise separation reunion
FOUND IN: US(MW,So) Canada(Mar,Newf) Ireland Australia
REFERENCES (21 citations):
Laws N39, "MacDonald's Return to Glencoe (The Pride of Glencoe)"
Ford-Vagabond, pp. 247-248, "Donald and Glencoe" (1 text)
Ord, pp. 65-66, "Donald's Return to Glencoe" (1 text, tune referenced)
Randolph 126, "MacDonald's Return to Glencoe" (1 fragment)
FSCatskills 25, "Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Gardner/Chickering 87, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text plus mention of 2 more)
Greenleaf/Mansfield 86, "Glencoe" (1 text)
Smith/Hatt, pp. 67-69, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text)
Peacock, p. 579, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Creighton-Maritime, p. 60, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Creighton-SNewBrunswick 35, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Leach-Labrador 129, "Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Karpeles-Newfoundland 56, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Ives-NewBrunswick, pp. 70-72, "Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Mackenzie 68, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text)
O'Conor, p. 136, "McDonald's Return to Glenco" (1 text)
Meredith/Anderson, pp. 52-53, "Donald of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
SHenry H655, p. 319, "The Pride of Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
Huntington-Whalemen, pp. 113-115, "The Banks of Glenco" (2 texts, 1 tune)
MacSeegTrav 28, "The Lass o' Glencoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
DT 464, PRIGLENC*

Roud #515
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Johnson Ballads 1641, "Donald's Return to Glencoe," G. Walker (Durham), 1797-1834; also 2806 c.14(133)[many illegible words], Firth c.17(300)[some illegible words], Harding B 11(932), Firth c.14(158), Firth c.14(160), Harding B 19(109), 2806 c.18(89), Harding B 16(324a), Firth b.26(11)[a few illegible words], Firth b.25(226), Firth b.27(454), Harding B 16(323b), 2806 c.15(174), "Donald's Return to Glencoe"; Firth b.27(462), "Donand's Return to Glencoe" ["Donald" in the text]
LOCSinging, as202320, "Mc'Donald's Return to Glenco," H. De Marsan (New York), 1861-1864; also sb30347b, "Mc'Donald's Return to Glenco"
Murray, Mu23-y4:036, "Donald's Return to Glencoe," unknown, 19C
NLScotland, L.C.178.A.2(206), "Donald's Return to Glencoe," unknown, c. 1840; also L.C.Fol.70(73a), "Donald's Return to Glencoe," James Lindsay (Glasgow), c. 1875

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "John (George) Riley (I)" [Laws N36] and references there
cf. "The Silk Merchant's Daughter (I) [Laws N10]" (tune)
cf. "The Lass o Glencoe" (lyrics)
SAME TUNE:
The Silk Merchant's Daughter [Laws N10] (File: LN10)
Notes: Broadside LOCSinging as202320: H. De Marsans dating per Studying Nineteenth-Century Popular Song by Paul Charosh in American Music, Winter 1997, Vol 15.4, Table 1, available at FindArticles site. - BS
File: LN39

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2006 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


This song is Roud Number 515 (click).
Please note that Ballad Of Glencoe/Massacre of Glencoe (Jim McLean) is an entirely different song.


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Subject: ADD Version: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 06:35 PM

Here's the version from Kenneth Peacock, Songs of the Newfoundland Outports.

The Pride of Glencoe

As I went a-walking one morning of late,
Where nature's gay mantles the fields decorate,
I carelessly wandered where I did not know,
By the banks of a fountain that runs in Glencoe.

Like Erin's bold hero I had Mount Eagach won,
When a lassie approached me as bright as the sun,
The ribbons of tartan all around her did flow,
And her name it was Flora, she was the pride of Glencoe.

I said to her: "My pretty fair one your enchanting smile,
And your charming young features have my heart beguiled,
But if true affection upon me you bestow,
I'll bless the first hour that we met in Glencoe."

She answered: "Kind sir, it's your suit I disdain,
For I once loved a laddie, Macdonald by name,
He is gone to the wars about nine years ago,
And a maid I'll remain till he returns to Glencoe."

"Perhaps your Macdonald has slighted your name,
Or has placed his affections upon some foreign dame,
He may have forgotten for all that you know,
The lovely fair damsel that he left in Glencoe."

"Macdonald's true valour has been tried on the field,
Like his haughty young sister she refused for to yield;
If he never returns it is single I'll go,
And I'll mourn for Macdonald, the pride of Glencoe."

"Cheer up lovely Flora, your trouble's all o'er,
For we will be married and we'll never part more,
The rude blast of war at a distance may blow,
But in peace and content we'll reside in Glencoe."


singer: Howard Morry, 1951 - Ferryland, Newfoundland


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 07:37 PM

Joe

The DT version, apart from a few minor transcription differences, seems to be the same as the the version I have transcribed from the singing of Ray Fisher on The Bonny Birdy LP. Ray's notes say: This 'broken token' ballad has a Scottish location; was taken from the singing of a remarkable Irish lady, Brigid Tunney, and given to me by Englishman extraordinary, Ashley Hutchings. Thanks also are due to Clive Woolf, formerly assistant librarian at Cecil Sharp House, for invaluable help". Certainly Ray was the only person I ever heard singing it in those days (early 70s). The tune in the DT has some slight differences from Ray's version though - a few notes of different lengths and (if my memory serves me correctly - I did used to sing Ray's version - but I haven't played it to check this) Ray's is mixolydian rather than major (G natural rather than the G# of the DT version), but otherwise pretty much the same tune (whether that is a transcription error or a different source, I don't know).

The words in Creighton's Maritime Folk Songs is fairly close to the DT text, as is that in Ord's Bothy Ballads (though there are 2 extra verses there), the text of each verse (excluding the 2 extra in Ord) having exactly the same sense, though with some textual differences. The tunes of these are both different from the DT and from each other.

If you're interested I'll put up the Creighton and Ord versions (and my transcription of Ray Fisher's vesion too, if you like).

Mick


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 08:08 PM

Mick. That would be most interesting. Please do.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 08:39 PM

A widely-printed broadside song of the first half of the 19th century. It was immensely popular in its day, as you can tell from the wide distribution of examples found in oral currency. Most texts seem to have stayed quite close to the broadside, with the usual mis-hearings like "Eagach" (above) for "Ida", and so on.

See thread Lyr Add: Great song from Cara at Cambridge (UK) for earlier comments on this song, and on the unprovenanced DT example (which I assume was taken down by ear from a commercial recording; the odd phrasing and strange barring of the accompanying midi file suggests that). It might have been Ray Fisher's arrangement, but something has gone badly wrong with the midi transcription if that is the case.

Somebody posted the text sung by Cara Dillon in that thread, but it has only a few differences from the usual versions, and nobody ever told us where she got it anyway. I wouldn't think it helpful to a study of the song without an identified traditional source.

Various broadside editions can be seen at  Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads:

[Young] Donald's return to Glencoe

Note that the rather ghastly 19th century broadside song Flora and MacDonald, or, the Massacre of Glencoe (quoted in a couple of old threads) has nothing to do with the song under discussion here, apart from having been, it seems, slightly modelled upon it. Neither is either song in any way connected with Flora MacDonald and Charles Edward Stewart, as has been suggested here in the past by at least one of our more romantically inclined contributors.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 09:40 PM

I learned this song as a child from the singing of my mother in Cape Breton. The lyrics in the DT is about the same but the midi is not close at all, and I would say that it is a totally incorrect tune. We have a Glencoe here which was settled by emigrants from Glencoe in Scotland and the song remains a favourite.
                Slainte,
                   Sandy


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 02 Sep 06 - 10:13 PM

As a widespread song, largely transmitted via printed song sheets, it doesn't vary a great deal textually, but has a number of different tunes depending on where it is found. The DT tune is certainly related to Brigid Tunney's; whether it is a genuinely different variant from another source or just a bad transcription remains to be seen.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 07:34 AM

Here are the text for the three versions I have to hand. As you can see Ray Fisher's text is very close to that in the DT, but as Malcolm pointed out above the broadside texts have tended to remain very close. The two verses in Ord not in the other two texts do appear in the broadsides (but in the reverse order in the few I looked at!).

In the last verse of Ray Fisher's version where I have the word prevail the others have remain and on the record it actually sounds as if she sings revail, so I don't know if she started to sing remain and changed to prevail mid-way, or if I'm just now hearing it well enough!

I'll posts the tunes later.

Mick



THE PRIDE OF GLENCOE

As I was a-walking one evening of late
Where Flora's green mantle the fields decorate,
I carelessly wandered, where I do not know,
By the banks of a fountain that lies in Glencoe.

Like she who the pride of Mount Ida had won
There approached a wee lassie as fair as the sun
With ribbons and tartans around her did flow
That once won Macdonald, the pride of Glencoe.

With courage undaunted I to her drew nigh,
While the red rose and lily on her cheeks seemed to vie.
I asked her her name and how far she did go
And she answered me, "Kind, sir, I'm bound for Glencoe".

I said, "My wee lassie, your enchanting smile
And your comely fine features have my heart beguiled.
If your kind affection on me you'll bestow
I will bless the happy hour we met in Glencoe".

"Kind sir," she did answer, "Your suit I disdain.
I once had a sweetheart, Macdonald by name.
He's gone to the war about ten years ago,
And a maid I'll remain till he returns to Glencoe".

"But perhaps young Macdonald regards not your name
And has placed his affection on some other dame.
Perhaps he's forgotten, for all that you know,
The bonnie wee lassie he left in Glencoe".

"My Donald from his promise will never depart,
For love, truth, and honour are found in his heart.
And if I never see him, I single will go,
And I'll mourn for my Donald, the pride of Glencoe"

He finding her constant, he pulled out a glove,
Which at parting she gave him as a token of love.
She flew to his arms while the tears down did flow
Saying, "You're welcome, my Donald, the pride of Glencoe".

"So cheer up now, young Flora, your sorrows are o'er,
And while life still prevails, we will never part more.
The storms of war at a distance may blow
While in peace and contentment we'll bide in Glencoe".

Source: Ray Fisher, LP The Bonny Birdy




DONALD'S RETURN TO GLENCOE

As I was a-walking one evening of late
Where Flora's gay mantle the fields decorate,
I carelessly wandered, where I did not know,
On the banks of a fountain that lies in Glencoe.

Like her whom the prize of Mount Ida had won,
There approached me a lassie as bright as the sun,
The ribbons and tartans all around her did flow,
That once graced Macdonald, the pride o' Glencoe.

With courage undaunted I to her drew near,
While the red rose and the lily on her cheek did appear;
I asked her name, and how far she'd to go,
"Young man," sje ,made answer, "I'm bound for Glencoe."

I said, "My dear lassie, your enchanting smile
And your comely fair features does my heart beguile;
And if your affections on me you'll bestow,
You'll bless the happy hour that we met in Glencoe."

"Young man," she made answer, "your love I disdain,
I once had a sweetheart, young Donald by name,
He went to the wars nearly ten years ago,
And a maid I'll remain till he returns to Glencoe."

"The power of the French, it is hard to pull down,
They have beat many heroes of fame and renoun;
And like them, young Donald, as it may happen so-
The man you love dearly perchance is laid low."

"My Donald't true valour when tried in the field,
Like his gallant ancestors, disdaining to yield,
And French and the Spaniards he'll soon overthrow,
And in spleandour return to my arms in Glencoe."

"Perhaps your young Donald regards not your name,
But has placed his affections on some foreign dame;
He may have forgotten, for aught that you know,
The bonnie young lassie he left in Glencoe."

"My Donald from his promise can never depart,
For love, truth, and honour abound in his heart;
And should he ne'er return aye single I'll go,
And mourn for my Donald, the pride o' Glencoe."

Now proving her constant, I pulled out a glove,
Which in parting she gave me as a token of love;
She flew to my breast while the tears down did flow,
Crying, "You're my dear Donald, returned to Glencoe."

"Cheer up, my dear Flora, your sorrows are o'er,
While life does remain, we will never part more;
The rude blasts of war at a distance may blow,
But in peace and content we'll abide in Glencoe."

Source: John Ord, Bothy Songs And Ballads



THE PRIDE OF GLENCOE

As I went a-walking one evening of late
When Flora's gay mantle those fields decorate,
I carelesslie wandered, where I did not know,
Toa clear crystal fountain on the banks of Glencoe.

Like her who the pride of Mount Ina had won
There approached me a lassie as bright as the sun,
Whose finery and ribbing (ribbons?) around her did flow,
Which graced young MacDonald, the pride of Glencoe.

I thought her enchanting, unto her I drew nigh,
On the red rose and lily on her cheeks seemed to vie,
I asked her her name and how far she'd to go
When she answered me kindly, "I am bound to Glencoe."

Said I, "My pretty fair maid, your enchanting smile
And comelie sweet features does my heart beguile,
And if your affection on me you'll bestow
You will bless the happy hour that we met in Glencoe."

"Young man," she made answer, "from your suit I refrain,
For I once had a sweetheart, MacDonald by name,
He went to the war about ten years ago
And a maid I shall remain till he returns to Glencoe."

"Perhaps young Macdonald regards not your name
But has placed his affection on some foreign dame,
And may have forgotten for all that you know
That lovely young lassie he left in Glencoe."

"MacDonald from his promise could never depart,
True love and honour are found in his heart,
And if he never comes back still single I'll go
And I'll mourn for MacDonald, the pride of Glencoe."

When I seen she did not know me I pulled out a glove,
That at parting she gave me as a token of love,
She hung down her head while the tears down did flow,
Saying, "You're my MacDonald, just returned to Glencoe."

"Cheer up now, dear Flora, for your sorrows are o'er,
While life does remain, we shall never part more,
The war in its fury at a distance may go,
But in peace and content we'll reside in Glencoe."

(In last verse he sometimes sings, your toilings are o'er.)


Source: Helen Creighton, Maritime Folk Songs from Mr. Tom Gamble, Amherst, August 1953

She also lists several other recordings she collected of the song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 07:37 AM

And apologies to Malcolm for repeating pretty much what he said about the DT tune compared to Ray Fisher's in the Cara Dillon thread; I hadn't read that thread when I posted it.

Mick


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Howard Jones
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 10:08 AM

Nic Jones used to do a version of this. I was under the impression (although I may be wrong) that it was his own tune to a set of broadside words. I can't play the MIDI file for the Mudcat entry so I can't say if it's the same tune


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Joe Offer
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 10:46 AM

The tune link seems to be working now - I guess the server with the DT MIDI files was down last night.


Click to play


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 12:40 PM

And here are the tunes for the three version I posted above. (It may be coincidence but Ray Fisher sings her version in A the same as the DT version, though A mixolydian rather than A major; it is still possible that the DT version is just a not very good transcription of hers. Alternatively it might be a totally different source). In Ord, the tune for the song is actually written against the previous song and just referred to, so I had to make some choices on the assignment of notes to text. The tune is as written, but you might like to assign some of the words to different notes when there are choices.

Mick



X:1
T:The Pride Of Glencoe
S:Ray Fisher (who learned it from Brigid Tunney)
D:The Bonny Birdy - Ray Fisher
Z:Mick Pearce
L:1/4
M:3/4
Q:1/4=96
K:Amix
A/|c2 A/E/|G A> d|d (d/c/)d|e2
w:As I was a-walk-ing one even-ing_ of late
(c/d/)|(e/f/) g d|e (d/ c) e/|(d<c) A/G/|A2 z/
w:Where_ Flo_ra's green man-tle_ the fields_ de-co-rate
A/|c A E|G A> d|d (d/c/) d|e2
w:I car-less-ly wan-dered where I do_ not know
c/d/|(e/f/) g d|e (d/ c) e/|(d< c) A/G/|A2 z/]
w:By the banks_ of a foun-tain_ that lies_ in Glen-coe.

X:2
T:Donald's Return To Glencoe
S:John Ord, Bothy Songs And Ballads
L:1/4
M:3/4
K:F
(C/D/)|F F (A/c/)|d c (c/A/)|(G/A/) F F|F2
w:As_ I was a_walk-ing one_ eve_ning of late
(A/c/)|d d f|d c (c/A/)|(G/A/) c d|c2
w:Where_ Flo-ra's gay man-tle the_ fields_ de-co-rate,
(A/c/)|d d f|d c f|(A/G/) F F|D2
w:I_ care-less-ly wan-dered, where I_ did not know,
C/D/|F F (A/c/)|d c (c/A/)|(G/A/)F F|F2|]
w:On the banks of a_ foun-tain that_ lies_ in Glen-coe.

X:3
T:The Pride Of Glencoe
S:Helen Creighton, Maritime Folk Songs from Mr. Tom Gamble, Amherst, August 1953
L:1/4
M:3/4
K:Ddor
G|A A G|B A> G|E D D|D2
w:As I went a-walk-ing one even-ing of late
D|D E G|A Hd e|d c A|G2
w:When Flo-ra's gay man-tle those fields de-co-rate,
E|D E G|A {A}Hd e|d c A|G2
w:I care-less-lie wan-dered, where I did not know,
E/G/|A A G|(G/B/) HA A/G/|E D D|D2|]
w:To a clear crys-tal foun_tain on the banks of Glen-coe.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: The Pride of Glencoe
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 03 Sep 06 - 04:38 PM

This is how it was recorded in the Leach Collection:
The air is closer to what my mother sang but slower and less lilting.


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