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Sitting At The Kitchen Table

Related thread:
BS: Kitchen Table Reducks (19)


Jerry Rasmussen 13 Apr 06 - 10:27 PM
GUEST,Ron Davies 13 Apr 06 - 11:09 PM
Ebbie 14 Apr 06 - 12:23 AM
freda underhill 14 Apr 06 - 12:32 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 14 Apr 06 - 10:21 AM
Elmer Fudd 14 Apr 06 - 09:51 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 14 Apr 06 - 10:16 PM
Elmer Fudd 14 Apr 06 - 11:11 PM
Ron Davies 15 Apr 06 - 02:04 AM
freda underhill 15 Apr 06 - 08:48 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 15 Apr 06 - 09:21 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 15 Apr 06 - 01:56 PM
Ron Davies 15 Apr 06 - 06:34 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 15 Apr 06 - 07:55 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 15 Apr 06 - 09:41 PM
Ebbie 16 Apr 06 - 10:59 AM
billybob 16 Apr 06 - 06:40 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 17 Apr 06 - 10:02 AM
Ebbie 17 Apr 06 - 10:57 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 17 Apr 06 - 12:47 PM
Ebbie 17 Apr 06 - 01:56 PM
jimmyt 17 Apr 06 - 08:52 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 17 Apr 06 - 09:00 PM
Ebbie 17 Apr 06 - 09:06 PM
Ron Davies 17 Apr 06 - 10:15 PM
jimmyt 17 Apr 06 - 10:18 PM
jimmyt 17 Apr 06 - 11:08 PM
freda underhill 18 Apr 06 - 05:48 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 18 Apr 06 - 10:57 AM
Ebbie 18 Apr 06 - 01:46 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 18 Apr 06 - 10:20 PM
Donuel 18 Apr 06 - 10:57 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 19 Apr 06 - 10:29 AM
Ron Davies 19 Apr 06 - 11:16 PM
Elmer Fudd 20 Apr 06 - 12:50 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 20 Apr 06 - 09:29 AM
Ebbie 20 Apr 06 - 10:13 AM
Elmer Fudd 20 Apr 06 - 10:53 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 20 Apr 06 - 11:24 AM
Donuel 20 Apr 06 - 05:03 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 20 Apr 06 - 09:51 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 21 Apr 06 - 11:50 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 21 Apr 06 - 01:24 PM
Ron Davies 22 Apr 06 - 12:28 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 22 Apr 06 - 12:52 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 22 Apr 06 - 06:18 AM
Ron Davies 22 Apr 06 - 10:30 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 22 Apr 06 - 10:45 AM
Ron Davies 22 Apr 06 - 11:49 AM
Leadfingers 22 Apr 06 - 12:36 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 13 Apr 06 - 10:27 PM

We're on the same page, Freda: That's a favorite song of mine that I've sung for most of my life... a good burr under the saddle song with a lot of truth to it. There's nothing like those old songs... One Morning in May, Mary Of The Wild Moore, Omie Wise, John Johanna..
It's funny. People started calling me a singer-songwriter a long time ago because I wrote a few songs. But I've never lost my love of traditional music. You make me feel like getting out my banjo, Freda.

Just got off the phone with a wonderful sounding man from a radio station in Florida. He heard our CD on the internet and asked for a copy. He's been playing it on his radio program and getting a wonderful response, and he just wanted to talk with me. Wants tyo get us down to Florida. He sounds like somebody I'd like to know.
I'll tell Joe and Frankie tomorrow and they'll be all excited. If this keeps up we'll end up selling 25 cds before it's all over... :-)

Great to have you stopping by, freda. I've missed talking with you..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: GUEST,Ron Davies
Date: 13 Apr 06 - 11:09 PM

That's just great, Jerry, that your CD is opening doors in Florida. I would bet that the more people hear it all over the country, the more of those calls you'll be getting.





Tonight I unfortunately have a serious question: what can you do for somebody who will not stand up for herself?

As I said earlier, Jan loves taking care of kids. And the parents keep asking her to do more. She can't say no. This week it was 4--just about all week--including 17 month old Henry, who is her usual charge. (She herself thinks society is screwed up that a woman can't stay home with her 17-month old) (But the family is heavily dependent on the mother's earnings--it's certainly not her fault.)

At any rate, she's had a terribly sore throat all week--partly from talking all day. Also the neck is trying to heal. And 2 days ago, Henry rose up unexpectedly and hit her in the face (unintentionally)--which forced her neck back. Added to that, last Thursday at the dentist, the dentist forced her neck into a painful position--for an hour and a half--since the dentist appears to have botched the job the first time--so it took much longer than it should have. Jan kept telling her over and over about the long plate in her neck (4 vertebrae). The woman kept apologizing--but then immediately forgot--it never registered. Jan's neck has not been the same since.

And I've just asked her what her plans are for next week. She has no plans to cut back.

Why?

What if anything can be done?


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 12:23 AM

That's a tough one, Ron. The problem with developing a solution is that the habit of thinking she can do it is a long-ingrained one. Even though she recognizes it as a problem she may not respond in time. Maybe the best thing would be for her to have a frank talk with her doctor and have him or her arm her with concrete facts.

It's a lot easier to say NO when you can quote an expert on what the long-term consequences could be.

In the meantime, I do hope her neck heals quickly with no further damage done.

Ebbie


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: freda underhill
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 12:32 AM

I would do anything for a family member or close friend, Ron. I minded a friends little girl while she finished her uni degree, and I babysit my own grandaughter weekly, or more if I can.

But.. I would not do it for someone out of my inner circle, especially if my own health was at risk.   I don't know what the answer is for Jan, but she is a very caring person.

freda


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 10:21 AM

First, Ron, allow me to laugh at us. You often mention how you are out several nights a week practicing music, often not getting back until very late. Your posts on here are often after midnight. I often mention how many times I am out singing in one week. Let's see... I sang last Friday, had practice up here on Saturday, had practice on Monday night, cancelled doing a program/service at a nursing home on Tuesday because of my cold and went to another practice Wednesday night. Why is it that other people can't see that they're trying to do too much. Please permit a large GUFFAW! here. I think the truth is, Ron, anyone worth their salt does too much. It's not just the inability to say no. It's seeing something that needs to be done and stepping up and doing it. When I think of the people I most value in my lifem they're ALL like that... And so are we, Ron. And I suspect so are Ebbie and Freda and many others who we respect and enjoy. The catch is when you start destroying your own health by taking on more than your body or spirit can handle. It sounds like what Jan is doing. It's what my dear friend Joe has done most of his life, what my dear friend Willie C does, and my brother-in-law Irving and his wife Sarah do. It goes beyond not knowng how to say "no." It's a lack of concern for their own health. With some, like Joe, he took himself down by pushing his body endlessly after he had fallen and severely injured his back. He reached a point where he was in such pain where he couldn't stand up or even walk across a room. He ended up having serious back surgery and many months of recuperation. He's finally learned his lesson. Kinda. He does take better care of himself, and while it kills him to say "no" sometimes he does, now. But it took him completely breaking down to at least partially learn his lesson. I could give many other examples and unfortunately, it seems like it has taken a serious breakdown of health before there was a change in life style. Hopefully, Jan won't go that far.

I see my good health as a gift. I feel that I am responsible for taking care of it. I wouldn't buy a new sports car and never service the engine. And yet people do that all the time, with their bodies. Unfortunately, if we run our bodies into the ground, we can't go get another one. Not yet, at least. There are times (like this week) where I cancel a commitment to take care of myself. I figure that if I don't respect my body, it's not going to be available when I want to help someone.

All of this is the flip side of a wonderful quality in people... the desire to help others in an unselfish way. All of the people I respecdt and love most have that quality... humility and a desire to serve others out of love. It's a matter of helping people to understand that if they don't care for themselves first, they will not be able to care for others. People forget the second half of the golden rule"Do unto others AS YOU DO UNTO YOURSELF." Don't mean to yell, but I don't know how to underline or italicize. If you want to give love, or help others, you have to first love and take care of yourself. You can't do much for others if you[re flat on your back in a hospital bed.

If Jan really wants to help others, encourage her to be loving and caring of herself and her own body, first. Then she can have a long, loving, giving life of service. And only then.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Elmer Fudd
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 09:51 PM

It's Friday night and I'm beat, as in dog-tired. I'm a-gonna set down at the table with a cup of joe and listen to the rain on the roof and some restorative music. A friend just sent me a CD of Tracy Nelson singing soul music. She's still got industrial-strength pipes after forty-something years of delivering spectacular country, blues, gospel, and outside-of-any category songs to melt your heart. Wish I could turn up the volume loud enough for y'all to hear it.

I hope Jan takes care of herself. Blessed are those who also stand and wait. We're human BEings, not human DOings.

I hope you have a wonderful Easter, wherever you are.

Elmer


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 10:16 PM

Hey, Elmer:

Tracy Nelson! Man, I haven't heard her since the 60's. "We are Human BEings, not Human DOINGS." Great line.

One of the most powerful songs we sing in the Male Chorus I sing in offers the simplest of advice. The title is "Stand still." I noticve the advice is to either stand and wait, or stand still. I wonder whether it would be alright to sit for awhile..

Have a wonderful Easter too, Elmer..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Elmer Fudd
Date: 14 Apr 06 - 11:11 PM

Hey Jerry,

Tracy Nelson is touring these days with Nick Gravenites, Harvey Mandel, Sam Lay and Corky Siegel as the "Chicago Blues Reunion." How's that for some heavy wattage? They've got a website (www.chicagobluesreunion.com) with streaming audio, if you want to check them out.

Good point you make. I do believe the advise is to "Be still and know God," not to "run around like chickens with your heads cut off and know God." That's something of which I need to be reminded upon occasion in these hyperactive times. Your kitchen table is a good place to take a deep breath and remember, and I thank you for that.

Elmer


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 02:04 AM

Hi Jerry and everybody else at the table--

Just got back from my concert (actually about 2 hours ago), and tried to go to bed. But as frequently happens after a concert, I was really revved up. I'll tell you more about the concert later.

But I just got your CD (Gospel Messengers), Jerry-- and I decided to listen to it. Well, it's revved me up even more.   It's just DYNAMITE.!!!

I just absolutely love that kind of gospel-----almost entirely close-harmony voices with just bare-bones guitar.

How Much Do I Owe Him?--just hypnotic

Oh Why?--it's really fascinating how you can see the link between gospel and doo-wop. They're all so close, it seems--gospel, blues, and doo-wop.

Your own songs are so strong--the chorus to " Healing Water" seems so traditional---it'll go right into the tradition and everybody will be singing it.

And "When I Get To Glory"--   WOW!!!!!!!!!!!----it makes you feel so good to hear it--I'm gonna have to learn that one this weekend. I just love the way it changes from the slow verse to the rocking chorus.

I'm Just Waiting On Jesus--what a rouser!

Your voice-good rich baritone--a real joy to hear-sounds like you're about 35. And the other members of the group--what a good strong sound!

HEY EVERYBODY--YOU GOTTA GET A COPY OF THIS CD!!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: freda underhill
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 08:48 AM

Ron, I agree - I listen to the Gospel Messengers and love them, as I do all gospel music. Jerry's music will drench you with good vibes - just like the man himself.

it's saturday night here - i've had a very busy day doing bits & pieces. went out with friends tonight and talked over dinner. now its time for soft music and sleep.

keep that music happening in the kitchen!


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 09:21 AM

Hey, Freda: I posted words to a song that I wrote about the morning sunlight in response to a post of yours on the Today Is Beautiful thread..

You mention the song, When I Get To Glory, Ron. Early on, not long after I started the Messengers, Frankie's sister-in-law died and his brother asked us to sing at her funeral. It was held in a very small church, and we sang with our backs against the casket at the front of the church. We sang When I Get To Glory, and some of the women got up and started dancing in the pews and into the aisles. I'd never experienced anything like that, but it seemed right.. it's a joyful song. As you've heard, the rhythm shifts abruptly between verses and the chorus. I've never written a song like that, but it's the way it happened. When we sing it. people start clapping enthusiastically during the chorus, and then the verse is very slow.. I didn't mean it to be frustrating to clap to. You can imagine dancing to it... kinda like shifting back and forth between the Charleston and a waltz. That didn't create any problem at the funeral, though. During the verses, the women would just move very slowly and expressively, and then joyfully during the chorus.

Whatever moves you..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 01:56 PM

And Ron: I understand the phenomenon of being too wound up to go right to sleep after a concert. There's something abnormal about having people focus all of their attention on you for a couple of hours, and you're trying to get through it without making a mistake. For me, two hours of not making a mistake is daunting, and ultimately very tiring. That's even more exagerated when I am doing a concert alone, or with the Messengers. In a 40 man Male Chorus, there's room to hide. That's not true with the Messengers. If you mess up a harmony, people are going to hear it. I don't get tired preparing for a concert, no matter how demanding the practices may be. Hey! You're expected to make some mistakes in practice. But after a concert, I am worth nothing for awhile...

Tell us how it went... sounds like it was a good night for you.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 06:34 PM

Hi Jerry and anybody else interested--

Yes, it was a good concert for me. Much less pressure than a lot of others--Mozart Requiem, one of my all-time favorite pieces. I could talk about it for quite a while--hope people don't get bored.

One of the things that jumps out at me is that the whole thing is really well-written and frequently moving. Yet all evidence indicates that Mozart did not in fact write the whole thing--a much lesser composer wrote most of the last 2 movements, at least. But I really can't tell--and I don't think many others can either. As I understand it, Mozart sketched out the whole thing, and may have written the bass line for the whole thing.   But it seems that's all he had to do--it sure came out right.

I only sang the Mozart--there was another piece you could volunteer to sing--but it was a modern (classical) piece about the Crucifixion. Fairly obviously going to be quite jarring--and take a lot of rehearsal. So I declined. Fortunately, there are a lot of people in the group with more tolerance for modern dissonance than I have. We (the Mozart only folks) didn't have to be at the concert as early as the others. As I was coming in, a couple in a car stopped me to ask about parking--I always park on the street--do not like parking garages---and don't ever mind walking (For one thing I can sing on the walk--something like Amelia Earhart's Last Flight, Lorena, Arthur McBride, Sammy's Bar--usually fairly long songs.) I've fallen off-topic already. Anyway, the couple wanted to know about parking for the Mozart--they had no intention of even trying to be on time for the modern piece.

And I sympathize with them, actually. I don't really want to go to a concert to hear a musical depiction of modern chaos--which is what happens when people break (musical) rules just for the sake of breaking them, and consciously assault the ear.

In some ways, I'm quite conservative--certainly musically--except that I like a huge array of different types of music.

I'm just not a big fan of classical music after Resphigi, Gershwin, (obviously edging into popular music), some Copland, and some Bernstein. Aside from these, the pieces that interest me after the early 20th century are few.

Sorry to keep rambling on--as I said I could talk about music forever--basically all the time I'm not making it.

Last night I also got a real compliment after the concert from a guy in the row ahead of me. The conductor is always saying "more consonants", especially beginning ones, and ending ones to some extent. A tenor ahead of me told me said "If my consonants were as strong as yours, I'd give myself a hernia." He was obviously impressed.

And a young woman (late 20's?) told me afterwards she'd heard many performances of the Mozart--ours was the best. It was really fun talking to her--and she was wearing a stunning evening dress. As a married man, I suppose I shouldn't get TOO interested in talking to her--but it sure was easy to do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 07:55 PM

Nice to see you posting to this thread before 2 in the morning, Ron.
I'm very impressed with your ability to sing complex music. I only read music at gun point. Actually, I'm getting a little bit better, over the years. I just was never motivated, because the music I want to sing doesn't exist in sheet music.

Many years ago, I did a version of Cryderville Jail. I say "a version" because I learned it directly out of the Folk Music Of North America Lomax book. The first time Dave Van Ronk heard me do it, he really liked it. He asked where I'd learned it because he'd never heard anyone sing it the way that I did. I told him that I learned it out of the Lomax book. He said, it doesn't anything like that the way it's written down by Lomax. That's one of the little known benefits of not being able to read sheet music very well. You can discover totally original variations in the commonest of song books :-)

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 15 Apr 06 - 09:41 PM

... just sitting here enjoying listening to the quiet....

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 16 Apr 06 - 10:59 AM

Just sauntered home this morning to sit peacefully at my window with my coffee, listening to the early morning birds and breezes. It is Sunday morning and the world is slow to wake up.

Last night I walked my Cairn Terrier, Meggie, to a friend's house for dinner and a pleasant evening. They have two Cairns of their own and the three dogs look like short-legged sheep as they cast about together.

This morning Meggie is still asleep- she got to bed late.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: billybob
Date: 16 Apr 06 - 06:40 PM

Easter Sunday, woke up to the dawn chorus, we have a wren nesting in Billy's shed so we cannot close the door.
We have four days holiday so we should have rested, but on Good Friday I had this urge to spring clean! Washed down the paintwork in the dining room then saw the curtains(drapes) so washed them,washing machine gave up and sprayed black oil into wash drum....new curtains? Washed all the china on dresser,dresser needed tender loving care, very old.Polished! Sitting room, washed all the crystal in cabinet, noticed paintwork looked sad....sent Billy out for paint,took down paintings, mirrors and photos, took 5 hours to transform room from green to coffee and cream,had to send out for take away supper no time to cook!
Back to this morning , woke up to dawn chorus, lept out of bed, photos, paintings back on wall,crystal back in cabinet, no time to worry about no drapes!!Ma and Pa coming for Easter lunch at 2.0 ,madness in kitchen, lamb undercooked, potatoes burnt!
Sitting after lunch over coffee in sitting room with CD of Pavarotti playing.Ma and Pa loved food,have not noticed change in colour scheme, just happy to share Easter Sunday with us!
count my blessings again! Happy Easter, with love to you all around this table, Wendy.( black coffee please, strong, thanks!)


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 10:02 AM

My life makes sense. For much of my life, it didn't.

I guess I've been thinking about that because I wonder how you folks ended up where you are, doing what you are with whoever you're doing it with (if you're doing it with someone.) I've talked to so many people whose life turned out to be a real surprise to them. Most of my life I've lived with the reality of the statement, "If anybody told me ten years ago I'd be doing what I am now, I would have told them they were crazy." And yet, my life makes sense. Even the stupid, self- destructive things that I've done, and the times when my life seemed to be spinning out of control.. times when I could make no sense ouf of my life. All of my life seemed to be preparation for my life today. I wonder if any of you feel that way.
How did you end up in Alaska, Ebbie? When you were a little girl, did you think... "When I grow up I want to live in Alaska?" Or are you a "native?" When I was a little boy, I surely didn't think, "When I grow up I want to be married to a black woman, living in a little back-water town in Connectiut." It not only makes me reflect on how I got here, but WHY I ended up where I am. And who I am. For me, it all makes perfect sense. I could be more specific, and may end up being, but mostly I'm wondering if your life makes sense to you. In a way, it doesn't really make any difference what you're doing in your life, where you're doing it or who you're doing it with (if you're doing it with someone.) The only thing that really matters is if you have the comfort of knowing that your life has some purpose, not matter how modest that might be in someone else's eyes.

Anybody want to share anything around the table? I promise it won't go out of this room.. :-)

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 10:57 AM

Interesting you should bring that up, Jerry. I've been examining my life in that context for some time. Sometimes I look around outdoors and ask myself what I'm doing in Alaska, of all places. The answer invariably is that I am more at home here than I've been anywhere in my life. I don't have family here and every one of the people I know and love here I met after I was 52 years old but my roots have sunk deep.

Actually, my first dream was Australia but eventually I decided Alaska was easier to get to!

I wrote a song some time ago that kind of addresses life's trip. I call it Sun and Rain although its working title was 'Opposites'. I tried to find and pair gradations of emotion.

"As I dwell on the mem'ries of so many years
And on the lives of most people I know
It surely does seem that we learn from extremes
Let me show you that it's really so.
There is sun, there is rain, there is pleasure and pain
There is friend, there is foe, there's the stranger that I know
Laughter and tears, hopes mingled with fears
The joy and the grief, the rapture and woe.

"There are giggles and sighs, hellos and goodbyes
So many of each in our lives
Promises broken and words left unspoken
Things idolized or despised
Anger and gladness and happy and sadness
The loves and the hates, the births and the fates
The pathway supernal, the broad road infernal
The blink of a day such long years away...

"Through the years I could see my life blown by the wind
Soaring high and then dashed to the ground
Finally I wondered just how much I'd squandered
Having every wind that blows toss me around
A good man's not always right, nor the bad one always wrong
Things are not always black or white as I'd thought my whole life long
Instead of haste, I've learned patience, deep gratitude for questions
The answers can wait. That, at last, I have found.

"I don't know all the reasons for life's changing seasons
But whate'er they may bring is what must be
So in all of my dreams through all of life's extremes
I'll take each moment and let it shape me
I'll take the sun, face the rain, take the pleasure, bear the pain
Love the friend, love the foe, love the stranger in my home
Life's extremes are the means, fertile seeds that we need
To live and to love, to give and to grow

Yes, there's anger and sadness and happy and sadness
The loves and the hates, the births and the fates
The pathway supernal, the broad road infernal
The blink of a day such long years away
The blink of my day a thousand years away."


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 12:47 PM

Thanks for sharing that, Ebbie: It's a very wise song.

When I look at the things that have shaped me in my life, I think that it's the failures and the mistakes that have changed me the most. Sometimes I feel like a mule that has to be hit between the eyes with a two by four in order to get its attention. Of course, it's the love of others when I couldn't love myself that had the most lasting change. There have been times in my life where I prayed for (and received) pre-hindsight. I think that we all can look back at dark times in our lives and see the good that came from them in hindsight. There've been times when I didn't feel that I had the luxury of waiting years for hindsight. I needed it up front... needed to understand what was good about something that seemed so bad at the time. Through time, I evolved into realizing that understanding will come in its own time. I don't feel that I have to understand everything as it's happening. I believe that all will be revealed when I have been prepared enough to understand. As your song states beautifully, if we can embrace life in all its "goodness" and "badness," and understand that all things can work for our good, with time is takes a lot of anxiety out of life.
I wrote a song many years ago that I'll share...

Pebble, Wheel & Seed

Take a pebble in your hand
Crush it in to a grain of sand
And maybe then you'll understand
Life is never ending

The truth is there for all who yearn
Spin the wheel and watch it turn
All things that pass someday return
Life is in the spinning

Share the water, plant the seed
All who hunger to be freed
And all who ask will be released
Love is the beginning

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 01:56 PM

I love the image of crushing the pebble, Jerry. So many things affirm that nothing ever dies- or is wasted. Thank you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: jimmyt
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 08:52 PM

I am back for a while I had just been home for a couple days when Jayne got called to Ohio with serious family health issues. Her mom was having chest pains etc (84) and her sister was taken in for emergency surgery with both arm SUbclavian arteries totally blocked with plaque and still in danger of losing one or both arms. All kinds of issues goin' on up there. Carrie, my youngest, and I went to Ohio on Thursday evening and just got back last night and JAyne is on her way right now having come a day later.    Some times family issues are really difficult to deal with. I feel very blessed with good health and same with Jayne.   Her sister has had some real issues, having a son killed by a car when he was 5 and losing her husband last year. She is seriously depressed and has some compromised health issues. Y'all keep us in your thoughts! It is a little difficult right now!   Miss you all! jimmyt


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 09:00 PM

Ahhhhh, Jimmy:

That's part of kitchen table conversation, too.. concern for those we love.    There's something completely draining about dealing with serious health concerns. Somehow everything else shifts back into its proper perspective.

I know hearts will go out to you, Jane and your family Jimmy. Some, like Ruth and I will lift up prayers. Others will light a candle or just send positive vibrations and concern. It's all love. Just comes in different sizes and shapes...

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 09:06 PM

Somebody once said, You mean, as a last resort you're going to pray? And someone answered, No, it's the first resort.

{{{{{Hug for Jimmy}}}}


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 10:15 PM

Wow, Jimmy--her son was killed by a car at age 5?--that is really rough to take. All our best to her and the rest of your family.



Welcome back.

You're an impressive guy--both a dentist and a skilled musician--even writing your own musical revues. How's the latest one coming--the one you were talking about?


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: jimmyt
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 10:18 PM

Thanks from you 2 wonderful catters! I love you !


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: jimmyt
Date: 17 Apr 06 - 11:08 PM

U2 Ron! THanks for the kind words! Always wanted to perform the Requium. Instead i do mindless Do-wop! Oh well,


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: freda underhill
Date: 18 Apr 06 - 05:48 AM

and a hug from me, jimmyT.

Ebbie and jerry, I would like to hear those songs some day.

freda


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 18 Apr 06 - 10:57 AM

Maybe someday, freda: That would be quite an accompishment to get you, Ebbie and me in the same room. Take about 10,000 miles of traveling, I think. But you never know.

Now that I've put my Gospel Messengers CD to bed, I'll finish a CD of my folk songs... I've already mastered the CD and just have to complete the art work. It will have Pebble, Wheel & Seed on it..

Do you have a tape or CD with your song on it, Ebbie?

I must say, I'm really appreciating the respite from all the controversial threads. When I read of Jimmy and Jayne's problems and think about all the people we're keeping in prayer with life-threatening health problems it makes all the in-fighting in here seem very inconsequential.

"You better come on, in my kitchen
You know it's going to be raining outdoors."

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 18 Apr 06 - 01:46 PM

Thanks. I want to hear your Pebble, Wheel and Seed, Jerry. I'll be watching.

I'm not a performer. I decided some time ago that when your heart thuds high up in your throat, your system is trying to tell you: This ain't fun!

However, my singing partner and I use my mini disc recorder from time to time. In the past we have created a CD and sent it to a friend we used to sing with and who moved to Spokane when he retired. I could teach her 'Sun and Rain' and we could record it and put it on a CD. (I'm speaking very tentatively here!)

I'm very glad that other people do enjoy performing and that I can hear them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 18 Apr 06 - 10:20 PM

Tired. Drove down to Frankie's for practice tonight. It's a one hour drive. When I got there, Frankie was nowhere to be found, but his daughter's friend was just leaving and let me in. I'd spoken to Frankie earlier today so I was pretty sure that he hadn't forgotten. I'd also left a message on Joe's machine reminding him of practice at 7. By ten after I was the only one there when the phone rang. It was Frankie, and he was on his way. I called Joe and he had forgotten all about practice and was out buying groceries. So, I sat around practicing guitar and working on a new song. Frankie arrived first, a half hour late (to his own house.) He was really feeling terrible... he has severe alergies and this time of year he is usually wiped out by the end of the day. He runs a paving business, despite soon turning 80. Joe came in another ten or fifteen minutes later, totally stressed out and so exhausted that he refused food. Joe refusing food is like... hmm, can't think of anything as radical as that. And, he was too beaten down to even want to sing... which is even rarer than not wanting to eat. So, we just sat around and talked. And Joe and Frankie unloaded. Joe felt badly that I had driven all the way down when we couldn't practice, but I told him I was glad that I came. When life is dragging a friend under, that's when you want to be there. And I know so many friends who are struggling just to stay above water. But it was good. We talked about Joe's problem and I encouraged him to do some things (and get some help) to try to deal with his situation, and Frankie was encouraging, too. And being who we are, we also spent some time in prayer.

Life is fragile. Beautiful, but precarious at times. Joe, Frankie and I are closer than most brothers and we give thanks that we can just sit around (not at the kitchen table) and just minister to each other in conversation and music.

So, now I'm home and worn out, and deeply appreciative for this evening. It's a blessing to have a chance to lift someone up who is sinking down.. especially, beloved friends. And this thread is a blessing too.. a place to come and plunk down knowing that you are among friends. Let the controversies rage, and I wish all well who are caught up in them. As for me, I'll just kick off my shoes, relax here at the table and give thanks for friends to share my days with.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Donuel
Date: 18 Apr 06 - 10:57 PM

I told my friend CT about a blind guitarist I met at a grade school family night. I had introduced myself of course but knew in the back of my mind that he was certainly a musician and probably a sting player, which turned out to be correct. It turned out CT is a chair person of a guitar concert series so I gave him Kevin's number and he went over to hear Kevin play. He was very moved by Kevin's orginal composition called River. Kevin's wife Boo from Tunesia is also blind and is amazingly asute politically and historicly. The only sighted person in the family is their daughter.
Unfortunetly when CT was going to bring them all out to dinner he discovered his car was towed. Those damn garden apartments have these kidk back deals with A&G towing and soak the residents and vistors for thousands of dollars. CT called me up for a ride home. I dried off from the hot tub and drove over to get CT, said hi to Kevin and went on to Potomac. Back at CT's house he didn't want his wife to know he had lost his car... then he played the new CD of his violin concerto that Public TV had recorded and that I had written the program notes for. The second movement was like following arroyos of the great southwest with gushing water that opened up into a grand oasis meadow and blue green water falls.

I came back home and opened the mudcat to jot down my latest experiment and decided to put it on the kitchen table.


WHICH IS>>>
I have been drawing with a power washer.

I leave the old patina of dark concrete for the dark contrast and paint with the clean light color the power washer leaves. So on one back yard patio I have done a sun compass with a smiling visage and the solar system as well as an abstract cubist theme. Next I'll do a series of Hirshfeld portraits on the sidewalk out front. The power washer lends itself nicely to line drawing but it does an amazingly good job of gradient shading too!


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 19 Apr 06 - 10:29 AM

Hey, Donuel:

The power washer thing is fascinating. Last summer, I tackled a concrete walkway around the above ground pool we have (it came with the house..) Much of the walkway is in the shade and in places it was almost black. A cherry tree also added a nice dark maroon patina to the concrete. I used bleach and a stiff brush first, and then power washed it, an my wife was really excited about how great it looked. She wants me to do the front sidewalk soon. Of course, not everyone is a fine artist. Maybe I could do a ducky and a doggie on ours..

Many years ago I met a wonderful woman at a folk-gospel festival, Kathy Lee Johnson who happens to be blind. Not that it has ever slowed her down. Her life story is so horrible that it would have destroyed a lesser person. After the festival, we kept in touch through a marvelous machine he had that could "read" a typed letter out loud. She ended up meeting a wonderful man who is a minister, a musician, and also happens to be blind. I was very joyful for her, and him... two beautiful people who seem gifted to see better than the "sighted."

Thanks for stopping by..


Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 19 Apr 06 - 11:16 PM

Hi Jerry and anybody else here--

Just wanted to tell you, Jerry, that the Gospel Messengers CD is a huge hit here--not just with me. Jan loves it--wishes you could bring the whole group to the Getaway. And Henry, her 17-month-old charge, also really likes it.

My group has started work on our next concert--a combination celebration of our conductor's 70th birthday and the group's 40th anniversary. So we'll be doing a lot of our "greatest hits", referring to events in the group's history. Like Va Pensiero (Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves) from Verdi's Nabucco--you may not know the name, but I bet you know the song. Wonderfully stirring.   Suggested as the Italian national anthem--it's a lot better music than the one they now have. And Ave Maria from the Rachmaninoff Vespers (in Russian). Again a really emotional piece--so evocative of Russian churches--and our trip there in 1993.

Anybody who can sing is truly lucky and blessed--and those who don't are missing so much. And the more types of music you appreciate, the better.

During the break at rehearsal last night, I heard about a 93-year old who goes to nursing homes just to lead the singing.

We all decided that's what we'll aim for.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Elmer Fudd
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 12:50 AM

Good evening Jerry, Ron and others around the table,

I wanted to call your attention to a thread I posted today above the line which I think is up your alley, but might not be obvious from the title: "Threshold Choirs, Inspiring Volunteers." It is about choirs that sing at the bedsides of the sick, the dying, women in childbirth, people in comas, in neonatal units, wherever their presence at a bedsides of people in need of comfort are requested. Their website URL is given.

One such choir sang to a musician friend of mine as she died after a long, hard struggle with lupus. They sang to her throughout the night until the end of her life on earth. They had come to her several times in the hospital in the previous weeks, and their singing brought her great joy.

Elmer


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 09:29 AM

Thanks for drawing the thread to my attention, Elmer. I've been singing in hospitals and nursing homes all myu life (almost) but it never occurred to me to sing at a bedside. (Frankie and I did go to visit Joe after he had very extensive back surgery, and walked into his room singing Roll Jordan, Roll.) Then, we got Joe to sing with us and we sang another two or three songs for the nurses and his roommate. It was a lot of fun and really lifted Joe's spirits.

One of the most memorable "concerts" we ever did was for a woman who inexplicably had gone blind, just a year or so after her husband died. She was in her early 90's (She's now in her later 90's) and living alone, so the concert was just for her and her health care provider. We have to do that more often. We've started occaswionally inviting others to our practices (Col K and Leadfingers came to our last practice before our tenor moved away.) That's something we should do more often... practice in the home of people who are housebound.

Thanks for inspiring me, Elmer.

And Ron... I couldn't agree more about loving a variety of music. You may be the first person I've ever met (who I haven't yet met in person) who has a wider musical taste than mine. I made a crazy cassette a few years ago that I had a lot of fun with titled "Huh?"
It was a free association flow of music, letting each song suggest the next, with no boundaries. It had everything from rhythm and blues and soul music to folk, jazz, rockabilly, classical, blues...
I pulled it out recently to play it in the car after not having listened to it for years, and it jammed in the player and broke. I still have the box, though and may end up making a "Huh? II" one of these days. Except I'll put it on CD and send you a copy. I don't remember if I sent you a CD I put together titled The Gospel In Black And White. It's ten gospel songs done by a white group and a black group, in wildly different styles. Like Wade Mainer and His Mountaineers and The Swan Silvertones both doing Working On A Building. Or how about The Carter Family and the Staples Singers both doing Will The Circle Be Unbroken?

Anyone else want a copy, if you PM your mailing address, I'll glad send you one.

What is music, if not to share?

What a great way to start the morning..

Gerald Elmer Rasmssen


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ebbie
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 10:13 AM

My brother Elmer was a musician and my greatest inspiration. He didn't write songs but loved hearing them and suggesting new avenues. We 'collaborated' by long distance telephone on several songs. And he had the most retentive memory for lyrics I've ever known. I could call him out of the blue and say, In the second verse of so and so how does the third line begin? He might not have heard the song in 50 years but he never failed me.

He and I were the two youngest of a large family, and except for one time when I knocked him down, we never quarreled. We debated lots of things though because we rarely agreed. If most of the time I have learned to stick to the subject rather than attacking the person he is responsible. He died at age 62 in 1999 of lymphoma after 12 years of battle.

So you can see why I'm fond of the name, Elmer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Elmer Fudd
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 10:53 AM

Good morning, y'all! You have just made my day and I'm only revving up to face the world, or at least my tiny corner of it (which is daunting enough).

Ebbie, your brother sounds wonderful. You must miss him terribly. I am sorry he left too early, but what a gift that you were so very close. Music is a transcendent bond. Thanks for describing him.

Jerry Elmer (Get OUT!! Really??!!), I posted something in response to your post on the "Threshold Choir" thread. Your "Huh?" compilations sound like a hoot. There is a local former DJ who makes CD compilations for his friends of eclectic music loosely linked bythemes. I've been the fortunate recipient of music inspired by a rainy day, "Life is Messy," a compilation he made for a friend who was going through relationship troubles, and "Bittersweet," a philosophical grouping of songs about life in general.

Have a great day.

Elmer (a name I will wear a little more proudly)


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 11:24 AM

Hey, Elmer: My father's name was Elmer Henry. When I got in trouble, he'd call me Gerald Elmer Henry Hornsbuckle Rasmussen. Never figured out where he got the "Hornsbuckle," although he always called Sears and Roebuck (before it became just Sears) Roe and Searbuckles. Of course, I rarely got in trouble, being such an ideal child. :-)

I just ordered The Five Bridges Suite by The Nice for their medly of Dylan's Country Pie and the Brandenburg Concerto. It was on my "Huh?" cassette and if I am going to recreat it, it's one of the essential tracks, leading from rock and roll to classical. One of the bridges. If I recreate the cassette on CD, I'll let you know, Elmer and share a copy with you..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Donuel
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 05:03 PM

At sixteen the accident left Kevin blind.
He might have settled down in his home town
but now without sight his horizons were infinite.
Soon he went to music school for the guitar among the rolling hills of Roanoke Virginia.
Now as he performs his own song 'River' I see aqua marine and waterfalls as he plays.
Beside him is his sightless wife Boo from Tunesia
and their 10 year old daughter whose eyes guide
both mother and father.
Boo is a most wise cosmoplitan yet very plain to see,
which makes me think that it took Kevin to go blind, to find a beautiful mind.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 20 Apr 06 - 09:51 PM

Starting working on a new version of "Huh?" Ordered a couple of CDs from amazon.com to fill crucial holes. It's interesting working on it because I've heard a lot of music in the ten years since I did the first one, and I find myself being carried in directions that didn't occur to me the first time around. Probably will have more jazz and blues on this one. Each track suggests the next one, and sometimes I get painted in a corner and have figure out how to get out..

Great fun..

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 21 Apr 06 - 11:50 AM

Out of appreciation for the night shift, I thought I'd just pop in for a moment. Being retired, I'm as likely to post here in the morning as at night. But, you working folks, or ones who are a different time zone, like ebbie may end up normally posting late at night. So, here's to the night shift... Ron is one who often ends up posting in the Midnight Hour, that Wilson Pickett used to sing about.

So, see you later, folks... I'm not sure where Elmer Fudd lives, or what time zone he is in. Maybe Leadfingers and I have to start encouraging people to post a member's profile. Doesn't seem like people are doing that any more...

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 21 Apr 06 - 01:24 PM

And speaking of mysteries, I have no idea where you are from, either nonuel. Jimmyt is in Georgia, and Ruth and I visited with him and his lovely wife Jayne last summer. They are the dictionary definition of Southern Hospitality. I've also had the pleasure of Terry's (Leadfinger's) company when he was over here at the Getaway last year. Looks like I won't be at the Getaway this year as Ruth and I had planned, as we're committed to the NOMAD festival here in Connecticut the same weekend, but I'll be surprised if we don't meet Ron and Jan Davies before the next Getaway... either up here in Derby, Connecticut, or down at their place. Sitting at a real kitchen table is definitely in our plans. So, Elmer and Donuel.. when you stopping by, here in Derby?

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 12:28 AM

The Gospel In Black and White sounds fascinating. I don't yet have a copy. But allow me to pay for it--how much?

I used to sing Sacred Harp all the time--at least once a month, anyway. But lately I find I can't do it more than about 20 minutes--it blows my voice out.   In style what it mostly reminds me of is sea chanteys--certainly the same full speed ahead, no holds barred approach. It sure is good gutsy stuff--hypnotic--it's easy to get caught up in it And it sure does capture the flavor of the early to mid 19th century--very Hobbesian view of life. Lots of people evidently had such trouble in this life that they really looked forward to the next. By far the most joyous, rollicking songs in Sacred Harp are about death.

But after having sung Sacred Harp for a long time, I had a chance to hear a black Sacred Harp group--some of the same songs--but a totally different approach musically--and not written down, as I recall. Of course, as you know, shape-note singing in general was to be in place of standard European notation. These days the Sacred Harp books are on the normal staff--so I find it's easier just to read the music. But you wouldn't need to read music--just recognize the shapes. Do you know of anybody who's learned music that way?

Anyway, the Gospel in Black and White sounds like a great idea.



One of the reasons I post so late frequently is that Jan also works all day and wants access to the computer at night. And of course she wants us to spend more time together--so doesn't want me to spend a lot of time on Mudcat. She's even written song parodies about spending too long on Mudcat. Ah well, there's just not enough time (as you also know).


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 12:52 AM

HAH!!!!!!! Ron:

Posting later than you, tonight. I'll include the Gospel In Black and White in my next installment when I finish the Huh? CD... got it all laid out and am just waiting for a couple of CDs to arrive in the mail that I picked up on the cheap on amazon.com.

Pay?

Hey, do you pay people for the Christmas presents they give you?

I didn't think so.

If I gave 100 CDs to friends, I'd still have given less than I've received. Just trying to catch up with the generosity of others.

I'm also burning a CD of some of my favorite, more obscure 45 rpms from the 50's... not the usual stuff, but mostly records that haven't been re-issued.

Just having a lot of fun up here.

Today has been a stressful day... good stress, I believe. But I'm having a hard time settling down, so I thought that I'd drop by the kitchen table. Gotta get up at 5 and have a full day. Should be interesting.

Life is never boring around here...

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 06:18 AM

Good morning. Or is it still yesterday? Not exactly sure.

I have a CD of black shape-note singers, Ron.

If you're interested...

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 10:30 AM

Jerry--

Yes, a CD of black shape-note singers sounds great. I suppose I can't ask my usual question about paying.

We're listening to the first R & B CD every day (roots of R& B). I've memorized "When the Swallows Come Back to Capistrano" (of course it helps that it only has one verse). There are so many songs, especially on that one, that I'd heard of but never heard all the way through. I only remember "When the Swallows.." from a Popeye cartoon, I think, when Popeye and co are on a beach and it's playing on their radio. Then a big wind comes up and sweeps them all away--so you only ever hear the first line.

Similarly with "You Only Hurt the One You Love"--I'd only ever heard the first line. So now I've memorized the song (again it only has one verse).

I'm also learning "Old Rocking Chair's Got Me" including the call and reponse part.


The Gospel Messengers CD, as I said, is a huge hit here. Jan plays it every day for 17-month old Henry, and claps along with it. So now Henry also claps along. Jan says it's the kind of gospel she's been looking for in the US--and used to hear in the UK when she went to a black church.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 10:45 AM

There's a great version of Old Rocking Chair's Got Me by Louis Armstrong and Jack Teagarden. When Jack sings, "Come here 'fore I tan your hide," Louis answers. "My hide is already tanned, Father."

Jerry


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 11:49 AM

LOL, Jerry.

I think Fats Waller and Jack Teagarden had some great duets too. I think one was "I'll Be Glad When You're Dead, You Rascal You".

I like it when somebody has a call and response in a song or comments on what the main singer is saying. I really like Bob Wills' comments--even though I understand it made it hard sometimes for Tommy Duncan to sing the song straight.

But Jan doesn't like Bob's comments at all--thinks he should let Tommy get on with the song. It's hard for me to explain the appeal of Bob's contributions to a serious song. But my understanding is that particularly if the song was depressing, Bob intended to undercut that--the Depression was depressing enough. And virtually all the Playboys' material was for dancing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Leadfingers
Date: 22 Apr 06 - 12:36 PM

I always liked Louis dueting with Bing ! They had a great rapport .
Oh and by the way , 400 Posts to this table !!


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