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Sitting At The Kitchen Table

Related thread:
BS: Kitchen Table Reducks (19)


BusyBee Paul 27 Jan 09 - 05:17 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 27 Jan 09 - 06:56 PM
BusyBee Paul 28 Jan 09 - 03:15 AM
Waddon Pete 28 Jan 09 - 08:44 AM
Ron Davies 28 Jan 09 - 09:02 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 28 Jan 09 - 11:27 AM
BusyBee Paul 29 Jan 09 - 11:09 AM
Waddon Pete 29 Jan 09 - 11:31 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 29 Jan 09 - 12:33 PM
billybob 29 Jan 09 - 12:36 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 30 Jan 09 - 07:27 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 30 Jan 09 - 07:37 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 30 Jan 09 - 09:07 AM
BusyBee Paul 30 Jan 09 - 09:35 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 30 Jan 09 - 03:02 PM
BusyBee Paul 30 Jan 09 - 06:34 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 02 Feb 09 - 11:16 AM
Waddon Pete 02 Feb 09 - 03:36 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 02 Feb 09 - 04:04 PM
Georgiansilver 02 Feb 09 - 04:26 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 02 Feb 09 - 04:36 PM
Tootler 02 Feb 09 - 04:58 PM
BusyBee Paul 02 Feb 09 - 05:00 PM
Georgiansilver 02 Feb 09 - 06:04 PM
billybob 03 Feb 09 - 08:51 AM
BusyBee Paul 04 Feb 09 - 04:59 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 04 Feb 09 - 08:07 PM
Georgiansilver 05 Feb 09 - 02:27 AM
Waddon Pete 05 Feb 09 - 05:15 AM
BusyBee Paul 05 Feb 09 - 08:05 AM
GUEST 05 Feb 09 - 09:23 AM
GUEST,Billybob,lost my cookie 05 Feb 09 - 09:28 AM
BusyBee Paul 05 Feb 09 - 11:39 AM
Waddon Pete 05 Feb 09 - 04:52 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 05 Feb 09 - 07:02 PM
BusyBee Paul 06 Feb 09 - 01:52 PM
billybob 07 Feb 09 - 08:20 AM
BusyBee Paul 07 Feb 09 - 03:00 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 07 Feb 09 - 03:23 PM
VirginiaTam 08 Feb 09 - 02:49 PM
Waddon Pete 08 Feb 09 - 04:43 PM
VirginiaTam 08 Feb 09 - 05:24 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 08 Feb 09 - 10:31 PM
BusyBee Paul 09 Feb 09 - 05:07 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 09 Feb 09 - 07:34 PM
GUEST,billybob 11 Feb 09 - 10:29 AM
BusyBee Paul 11 Feb 09 - 02:08 PM
Waddon Pete 11 Feb 09 - 02:23 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 11 Feb 09 - 02:44 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 11 Feb 09 - 04:06 PM
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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 05:17 PM

Hey! I got 2200!

Sorry Elmer.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 27 Jan 09 - 06:56 PM

Elmer must be away hunting.
Speaking of guns, when I was a kid, we all had cap pistols, and when we got old enough, bb guns. We played cowboys and indians, and there was an eternal argument about who was better, Roy Rogers or Gene Autry (and Trigger or Champion.) The downside of being Roy Rogers was that some stupid girl in the neighborhood would want to be Dale Evans. If we allowed her at all, she had to stay in the bunk house kitchen and not get in the men's way. We were terribly politically incorrect. No wonder kids don't play cowboys and indians anymore. It would be cowboys and native Americans, and no one would want to shoot a noble savage, the original environmentalists. You couldn't relegate girls to the kitchen anymore, either.

Now, kids play Gangstas, drug dealers, pimps and whores. There isn't even the benefit of fresh air. They're all playing, sitting on the floor with their legs crossed Native American style.

In the 60's, cap guns, kids and the Vietnam War all got mixed together, and suddenly the root cause for the war was all those kids who played cowboys and indians. I always thought the connection between cap guns and serial killers was always a bit tenuous. The only ceral we killed was Wheaties and that was to get the box top to send in for cool (called "neat" back then" gifts.

Just thinking...


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 28 Jan 09 - 03:15 AM

You're right Jerry, kids aren't allowed to be kids anymore, or not for long anyway. Some friends of mine have let theirs remain children for as long as possible, but the sad truth is that the kids have to get street-wise fairly early on for their own safety, or else end up so coddled that it doesn't bear thinking about.

Long gone are the days when parents would kick the children outdoors after breakfast with the instruction not to come back until it was time for the evening meal.

Progress?

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 28 Jan 09 - 08:44 AM

Hello,

Is there any coffee left in the pot?

Now if we start talking about "the good ol' days" we'll get all misty eyed and inaccurate! Although it is true that nostalgia isn't what it used to be, I think there are a great number of children who have it just as good as we did, only in a different time frame and with different activities. The local kids have picnics on the green, ride their bikes all day and play football etc. just like we used to do. Differences are that there are many more cars about and so you can't play games in the middle of the road anymore and that children are exposed to too much adverse stimulation from TV etc. But by and large, kids round here are still kids at heart!

Didn't you write a song about gifts from cereal boxes, Jerry?

We used to play cowboys and indians too....now it's something called Power Rangers. Same difference..!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Ron Davies
Date: 28 Jan 09 - 09:02 AM

It's true that sometimes parents are overprotective--keeping the kids on training wheels long past the time the kids want them, driving them to school rather than having them walk to the bus stop, etc.

But sometimes everybody--including the kids--can be kids.   We had some snow yesterday. And lots of people were out sledding. Some on the hill right next to me--long before it was a good idea. Tearing up the hill--you could easily see the dirt--rather than waiting a few hours til there was a good surface.

But the best place was the steep road a few blocks away.   It was too slick for any reasonable motorist to try to climb--of course there were some unreasonable ones--so we had to keep an eye out.   But it was a great run--before the snowplow got there.   Lots of kids--and parents--doing it. Somebody stationed at the bottom to watch for cars--we slid right past the stop sign.   I did it--it was great--then I went to work. Jan said that she did it about 12 times--I told her she should think about the plate in her neck--but fortunately she didn't run into anything.   She said even after the snowplow came by the road was still good for sledding.   Albeit you couldn't use a real sled--only the plastic sleds would work--the runners on real sleds would cut too deep.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 28 Jan 09 - 11:27 AM

You're right, Pete: I did write a song about playing cowboys (and bad guys (no native Americans were harmed in our play.) How do you know all these things, Pete? You must be a side-kick. I'll have to see if I can round up the words, lasso them, hog-tie them and post them on this thread. It's been many years since I've sung the song.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 11:09 AM

You know, I'm almost wishing I was a kid again. These last few weeks, all I seem to hear about are friends either:

- being made redundant
- suffering some dreadful illness (generally cancer)
- dying (mainly acquaintances rather than friends, if I'm being totally honest).

Will someone please give me some happy news for once?.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 11:31 AM

Hello Deidre,

Some happy news?

Well.....the sun is shining after an absolutely dreadful day yesterday;
The first snowdrops are showing in the garden;
The boy John's pet rabbit is bounding around in his bijou residence waving a cabbage leaf about like a banner;
I've spent the week in the company of people I like and respect;
There's a good night on at the folk club tomorrow.

Simple pleasures, but they suit me!

Oh....and I forgot.....sitting round this kitchen table makes for happy news!


Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 12:33 PM

Happy days are here again too, Peter:

The sun is glistening on the black ice (a deadly invitation to go walking,) and there's even a little melting. My leg is healing fine and I will have the stiches removed on Moday. I had a long conversation today with my brother-in-law who could cheer up someone teetering on the railing of the Brooklyn Bridge. I just finished polishing up and editing two articles to submit to magazines (and they haven't rejected them yet.) My book is printing. I just had a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch.

What else is there>

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: billybob
Date: 29 Jan 09 - 12:36 PM

Happy news Deidre,
our little grandaughter is two weeks old today and there is nothing more beautiful than giving her a cuddle and feeling her little head cosy on my shoulder.
Wendy


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 07:27 AM

I've had conversations with two people in the last few hours that both led to the discussions of the gift of listening. I thought I'd share a chapter of my book on here on the topic. Because my book is about my faith, Jesus is mentioned a couple of times. If you find that off-putting, you can pass on this posting and the next one. It will take two posts for the whole chapter. I couldn't see any intelligent way to take the references to Jesus out of the chapter.

STORY LISTENERS (part one)

Listening is a gift that not everyone has. It requires stepping out of ourselves and into the life of someone else. Any urge to judge has to be set aside. When people need to talk, more often than not, it's not because they are seeking advice. Don't offer any, unless it is asked for. They just need to feel that someone understands them. In a way, it's not that important that you do. It just means a lot to them that you care enough to stop and listen. And who knows—maybe you'll learn something.
Everyone has a story to tell: a lifetime of stories. Stories are different than anecdotes. Anecdotes usually start out with, "That reminds me of the time . . ." Anecdotes tell about something that happened. Stories come from the heart. And every story requires a listener.
In The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Mr. Singer, who is a deaf-mute, lives a life of isolation, his stories buried inside of him. The only person he could "talk" to was his deaf-mute friend who was a child living in a man's body. But Mr. Singer was a story listener. He could read lips and he listened with rapt attention. Those who poured out their dreams and frustrations to him felt he cared about them in a way that no one else did. His compassion shone through, and they somehow knew that no matter how intimate a secret they shared with him, he would not judge them. But the best story listener was Jesus. No person was so lowly or unacceptable to others that Christ wouldn't open his heart to them.

Publicans, harlots, beggars and thieves
Jesus was a friend to them all
He ate at their tables and walked on their streets
And he comforted their weary souls

You never know when Christ will send someone to you, who needs to talk with you:

If you meet a stranger, welcome him in
Don't leave him standing at your door
You can never tell who Jesus will send
Whether they are rich or poor

Several years ago, I was walking across the parking lot of a Grand Union supermarket. It was a beautiful, sunny day and I had a bounce in my step when I heard a car horn blowing. I looked around to see where it was coming from, and saw a woman parked at the edge of the lot with her window rolled down, waving to me. I turned and walked over to the car, figuring that it was someone I knew. When I got close enough, I realized I had never seen her before. When I got up to the car, she said "Hello, I wanted to ask you to pray for my mother."
She had a story to tell. I stood there, leaning against the side of her car and she poured her heart out. Her mother was in the hospital and she was very concerned for her. I asked her mother's name and told her that not only would I pray for her, but that my wife and I would visit her in the hospital. I asked her why she thought that I would pray for her mother, and she said, "When I saw you walking across the parking lot, you looked like a minister." I told her that I wasn't, but she understood her needs better than I did. She needed someone to minister to her and somehow she sensed I would. We are all ministers, and you never can tell who Jesus will send to you for ministering.         
People seek out story listeners wherever they can find them. Supermarkets seem to be as good a place as any. More recently, I stopped at a Big Y on the way home to pick up a couple of items. I was standing in the Express Checkout line when I glanced back, and out of the corner of my eye saw a woman standing behind me. I made room on the conveyor belt and invited her to put her groceries down before noticing that all she was buying was a small greeting card. I smiled when I saw that and said, "I'd hate to have you standing in line holding that heavy card," and she laughed. And the floodgates opened. She told me that it was a thank-you card for her brother. She said, "He just bought me a new Chevrolet Suburban SUV and paid for my insurance, and I wanted to let him know how much I appreciate it." I said that she must have a wonderful brother, and she started talking about how she washes his clothes and cleans his house, and all the things that she does for him. I responded by saying "When you do something good for someone else, you'll get your reward when you least expect it." She needed to talk to someone. It just happened to be me. As I left, I told her to have a good day and to enjoy her car.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 07:37 AM

This is the rest of Story Listeners as written, Skip the parts that aren't of interest to you...

Sometimes a casual conversation can unexpectedly open up into an honest discussion of faith. A few weeks ago, I was at my podiatrist's for a checkup. Caring for someone's feet is a holy profession. After all, Jesus washed the apostles' feet and told them that they should do the same for others.

Ye call me Master and Lord; and ye say well; for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another's feet. (John 13:13–14)

I'm not sure how the conversation wandered on to miracles, but it was something that my podiatrist wanted to talk about. He asked me if I believed in miracles. I told him that I did, and that I didn't see any reason why miracles should have stopped after Christ's lifetime. He goes into private homes to care for elderly, home-bound patients and talked with emotion of a particular woman whose bedroom is like a shrine, filled with religious figures, pictures, and several burning votive candles. My podiatrist could understand how miracles happen to someone of such great faith, but he asked, "Why do miracles happen to people who aren't even very religious?" I thought of Paul on the road to Damascus being blinded by the light of Jesus Christ who appeared before him. Paul certainly was a "very religious" Jew, but he was persecuting the Christians. My answer to my podiatrist's question was, "Maybe it's the people who don't believe who are the most in need of a miracle. God has certainly used great sinners to do his will. If you had to be 'religious' to be used by the Lord, his work would never get done."
We had a wonderful conversation, as unexpected as it was enjoyable. It would never have happened if I hadn't taken the time to listen.
There's a wonderful line in a song by Carmen McRae:

Never stopped to listen,
Never missed a chance to speak

There are people all around us whose hearts are lonely hunters. They have a hunger to share their stories with someone who is compassionate and understanding. Don't turn them from your door. Take the time to listen to them, to encourage them, and to pray for them. Christ would do no less. Better yet, tell them about Jesus. No one listens as lovingly and with as much compassion as Christ.

The end of the chapter.

My wife Ruth and I go to visit the sick regularly. We're going to visit Lorettat, a woman who has had cancer and other serious health problems now for several years. She lives in the south but has stayed up here in Connecticut for the last couple of years taking care of her Aunt, who is crippled with rheumatoid arthritis. Loretta has a male friend where she lives back home but rarely has a chance to get down to be with him. She's devoted every ounce of strength to taking care of her Aunt. Now, she's in the hospital again. She doesn't have anyone to take care of her, and her friends and the rest of her family live down south. We're going to visit her, and we may be the only ones who do. Most people are uncomfortable visiting people who are not family or immediate friends who are seriously ill.
Most of the people we visit are strangers. People say to us, "I couldn't do that, I wouldn't no what to say." My answer always is, "It's not important waht you say. No one expects you be be brilliant and wise. They just appreciate that someone cares about them emough to listen." They need a story listener.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 09:07 AM

One more:

There's a woman who is a check out clerk at the Walmart down at the bottom of the hil where we live. I really enjoy watching her. As each person comes up to the counter, she greats them with a warm smile, and engages them in conversation. For some, it's not much more than a comment or two about the weather, but because she is so friendly, she has gotten to know many of the regular customers. They linger at the counter, talking about health problems, deaths in the family and whatever other burdens they are bearing, and always listens attentively and offers positive encouragement. She is a story listener, and she's in another chapter in my book titled The Cosmos and the Check Out Clerk. She's been widowed for ten years and while standing on your feet for 8 hours is an exhausting job, she's thankful for it. Her husband wouldn't let her work so when he died, she had no experience. I've gotten to know her on a three minute per conversation at the check out counter basis, and she was very excited when I shared the chapter where I'd talked about her.

Three weeks ago, she suddenly dissappeared. After a couple of weeks of never seeing her, I was concerned, as she lives alone. Finally, I asked the mananager if she was alright, as I hadn't seen her in two weeks. He told me that she'd asked to change her hours from mid-afternoon to closing time, and I was relieved. I don't stop in often in the evening, but the first two times I had to go to Walmart later in the day, she wasn't there.

Late yesterday I had to stop by Walmart and the first thing I did was see if she was at her normal check out counter, and she was. I stopped by for a moment and said, "Hello, stranger!" and she lit up.
After I'd shopped, I got in her line and talked with her while she was checking me out. She said a couple of times. "Everyone told me that you were concerned about me." The news had spread throughout the store. There is no romantic undercurrent. My wife thinks she is the sweetest woman in the store and I often stop by with Ruth. I guess it's unusual enough for a customer to express concern for someone who just works there that it was big news.

After I checked out and paid for my purchases, she handed me my receipt and said, "It's nice to know that someone is concerned for me," and smiled broadly.

As the old song says, "little things mean a lot."

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 09:35 AM

Plenty there for me to read and catch up on when I get home from work later!.

Thanks Jerry, Pete & Wendy!

Deirdre :-)


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 03:02 PM

A final comment on my check out counter friend. As I was walking away last night, she called to me, "I don't work Mondays and Fridays." I had to smile, hearing that.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 30 Jan 09 - 06:34 PM

{Smile}

Great story, Jerry!.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 11:16 AM

Joe: My doctor is one of the funniest men I've ever known.
Moe: How funny is he?
Joe: He keeps me in stitches.

Well actually, he doesn't, because I had the stitches in my leg removed this morning. And all is well. He had to do a little excavating to get them out because my leg has healed so beautifully in the two weeks I've had the stitches that the skin had closed over the top of the stitches in a few spots. But no problem. All it did was hurt.

After he'd removed the stitches we talked for a moment. I told him how much I appreciated his calling me a week ago Friday at 6 in the evening to tell me that there was no sign of cancer. He said to the nurse who was assisting, "See how much it means to patients if you call them?" Apparently she doesn't want to do it. I said, "If the news is good, why wouldn't you want to call and relieve people from the anxiety of waiting?" "It's hard calling someone to tell them that there is a problem," my doctor said. You can't very well say, "There's a problem, you'd better come in and talk to me about it, and bring your family." His way of doing it is to call and say, "There's a problem that I need you to come in and talk about, but we'll take care of it." That's far more compassionate and reassuring.

"Now calling you was like music," he said to me. I almost fell over. I'd never mentioned music to him, and it was such an unusual way to say it.

"It was like music."

Amen.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 03:36 PM

Hello Jerry,

Good to hear that the leg is doing well.

You have to be careful of the Doctor Doctor jokes....once you get us kitchen tablers started..

"Doctor, Doctor, I feel like a pair of curtains!" (or drapes),

"Oh, come on.....pull yourself together!"


See what you've started?

Seriously, though, it's good to hear that all is well. I enjoyed the extracts from your forthcoming book. Don't forget to let us all know when it hits the news stands!

We have had a heavy fall of snow hear over the last couple of days and so the warmth of the kitchen is even more appreciated!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 04:04 PM

I see that London is covered with a heavy blanket of snow, and the double decker buses are all tucked away for the night. We have some snow coming again tonight (as I head down for Men's Chorus practice a 45 minute drive from here.) Two and a half weeks and baseball's spring training begins. (But not around here, you can bet.)

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 04:26 PM

Sitting at this kitchen table is a place I like to be.. and your stories can mention Jesus as many times as you want them to Jerry... I succumb to the comfort of your stories and live in constant expectations for the future. If ever I come your way, I want to sit with you at your kitchen table and just chat about this and that and the importance of life (and death). You are an inspiration Jerry and it is a pleasure knowing you.
Best wishes, Mike.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 04:36 PM

You're always welcome, Mike. I can't separate my faith from who I am, any more than I can my music. Or have any desire to.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Tootler
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 04:58 PM

Yes plenty snow here (NE England) as well and as usual Britain is thrown into chaos. Much more forecast for our part of England tonight.

The buses in London were off the road and my daughter was unable to get to work today, not that she seemed very upset.

We are not very good at dealing with snow, even worse these days as winters have little snow. When I was young you could expect a fair amount of snow every winter. That's not so these days.

I'm supposed to be going to Newcastle tomorrow afternoon. I'll have to see what the situation is at lunchtime.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 05:00 PM

Hi Mike, Jerry.

Mike - I managed to miss folk club on Friday so didn't get to see you. Comes to something when we live about half a mile apart and have to keep in contact in cyberspace!.

Jerry - pleased to hear the leg is mended and clear.

We're waiting for the next dollop of snow to hit so I'm snuggled up on the sofa in the warm, listening to folk music from a radio station up in Durham!. Don't think I'll put my nose outside until I have to in the morning. :-)

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 02 Feb 09 - 06:04 PM

Hi Dierdre... just about over my cough now... thank the Lord... and getting back to something like normal (whatever normal is!!!) Look forward to seeing you soon. Best wishes, Mike.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: billybob
Date: 03 Feb 09 - 08:51 AM

Morning all,
somehow, although it was forcast,in this neck of the woods we only had a light scattering of snow,maybe because we are at the coast? But it was a good excuse to put more logs on the fire and read a good book all day yesterday.Today the sun is shining, blue skies and the east wind that was really dreadful for the past four days, blowing the snow here from Russia, has gone away.So while the rest of Britain freezes at the moment it is quite pleasant here in Essex.

Billy always laughs when we get snow, the whole place grinds to a stop.No buses in London yesterday, hardly any underground trains?
( underground??) No trains in or out of Victoria station.Airports closed.He of course loves it, and finds as many reasons to go out in the car as possible, guess it reminds him of winter in New Jersey?

Good news about your leg Jerry,keep well.
Wendy


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 04 Feb 09 - 04:59 PM

Hi everyone,

Don't get too close, I've got a real hacking cough again. So, it's hot lemon and honey for please, no tea or coffee.

Wendy, we didn't get more than a sprinkling of snow either , we got off very lightly. There was a fair bit 15 miles north of us in Scunthorpe. The river seems to change our immediate environment so much. We might have more snow tonight - I'll just have to wait and see!.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 04 Feb 09 - 08:07 PM

They published my book today. They're sending my Author's copies to review before they print any larger numbers, and while they have a website up for me now, it may be as long as six weeks before you can order from there. If you're interested in buying a copy and are state-side, the price is $14.95 +$2.95 shipping and handling. I'll have copies before you can order them from my publisher. If you're overseas and interested, it would be easier to wait until they have my books up and running before ordering a copy.

I'll put up a thread when I've reviewed the author's copy and have ordered my first batch of books.

Mostly, it's just good to get there.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 02:27 AM

It must be a wonderful feeling Jerry, having a whole book in print and ready to be published. I have had poetry and short stories published in anthologies but that is not like having your own book I'm sure. Guess I had better think about writing one myself..... mmmmm now there's a thought!
Best wishes, Mike.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 05:15 AM

Hello Jerry,

That's good news! You must be as pleased as punch!

Sorry to hear you've gone down with the winter coughs Deidre. It's frustrating for any singer to suffer like that. I hope you are on song again before too long.

The weather here is very variable and you can choose your weather depending on which direction you drive, north, south, east or west!

I trust that you will be having a virtual book-signing at the kitchen table Jerry? With coffee, cookies, some of your delicious soup and one of Billybob's wonderful creations!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 08:05 AM

Hi Jerry,

Great news about the book, I'll have to get one ordered via my sister who is stateside for the next few months.

Wendy & Peter - we've more snow today and I've spent an hour this morning contacting 100 people to tell them that choir rehearsal this evening is off (school will be closed). I suppose that gives me another week to try to shake off the chesty cough and snuffles. :-)

It was nice to wake up to the sight of a snow storm on the river - quite eerie too. The ducks seemed reluctant to get their botties wet and were all huddled up on the bank. The water was steel grey - I'm always amazed at its' capacity to change - I've seen it brown, bright blue, sparkling and now dull, steely grey.

I think it's time for another cuppa (and more paracetamol).

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 09:23 AM

Deirdre, keep up the hot lemon, Iwill make some and join you, woke up yesterday with no voice at all and a horrid cough, so I have stayed in bed and dosed myself up with hot lemon and paracetamol,looking at the news we are still very lucky here, no snow to speak of, but it does look bad everywhere else.
I made a big chocolate cake at the weekend and a huge casserole with beef and winter vegetables in red wine, take your pick Peter, or maybe try both!
We had a health scare with the new baby on monday,she had picked up something nasty in the hospital, however all was well this morning when she saw her doctor, so I could open a bottle of wine to celebrate the good news, care to join me!
Wendy


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: GUEST,Billybob,lost my cookie
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 09:28 AM

oh that was me


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 11:39 AM

Pour me a glass, Wendy, especially if it's a mulled type of wine!. It'll make a change from the lemon barley and hot water. :O)

Good that she's doing ok. It's not the sort of weather to be carting a newborn out to the surgery.

I think I'll have a slice of that chocolate cake too please, if I may?. The casserole sounds lovely but too healthy - I need a bit of pampering!.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 04:52 PM

Hello Wendy,

I would love a glass of virtual wine and some of that virtual casserole!

It would go down a treat after being out in the cold weather!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 07:02 PM

The cold weather is definitely not virtual around here. I'm settling in with Old Bones by Aaron Elkin. Anyone read any of his books?

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 01:52 PM

Hi Jerry,

Afraid I've not heard of Aaron Elkin. I'm settling down with "Northwest Passage" by Kenneth Roberts, published in 1938. It's one of a number of old books I've inherited from my Dad. Now, over a year after his death, I've found I can read them. And I'm enjoying them too.

We've escaped snow today but it's still freezing and not very pleasant out. The footpaths are icy although the roads seem clear enough.

I think it'll be a quiet weekend, temperatures are set to plunge to minus 10 or so overnight Saturday / Sunday. Brrrrrrrrrrrrr!.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: billybob
Date: 07 Feb 09 - 08:20 AM

Back at work, beautiful sunny day and blue skies.
We have two lovely ladies in the salon having a spa day. This includes a luxury chocolate and mandarin oil body treatment, wrapped in chocolate and orange for 30 minutes and then a warm aromatherapy oil massage!
We are usually very professional and quiet,tranquility being the most important part of the treatments.Not this morning imagine a therapist walking though the door with a big bowl of hot choco;ate mix and then,,,ooops, bowl doing cartwheels in the air and chocolate carnage..up the wall ,all over the carpet.I laughed so much I cried.
Hot chocolate anyone?
Wendy


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 07 Feb 09 - 03:00 PM

Oh Wendy, what a waste!

Sounds a lovely treatment, I may have to book myself in for it as a treat one day. :-)

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 07 Feb 09 - 03:23 PM

I've been listening to two new CDS: Mule Variations by Tom Waits and Shelly Manne and His Men play music from Peter Gunn. I'm loving them both. Waits is an acquired taste I acquired a long time ago and then forgot.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 08 Feb 09 - 02:49 PM

I was going to start sharing some of the stories I took down from my Mom and Aunt Dot (octogenarians) we (thier kids) call The Twins. They were hilarious. But somehow when I was copying them off of floppy disk onto external harddrive.. they disappeared. Floppies are gone and so are the stories. And so are my university papers, and children stories and plays I have written and poems. I have printed copies of some early drafts. Some stuff is gone gone gone.

I am more than a bit nonplussed.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 08 Feb 09 - 04:43 PM

Pour yourself a cup of coffee while we sort this out!

They must be there somewhere!

If they haven't just copied to the wrong place, try one of the recovery programs. Google will find some good ones. Welcome to the kitchen table!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 08 Feb 09 - 05:24 PM

Thanks Pete

Sitting down, opening pack of cinnamon graham crackers. Sigh! We tried the recovery thing yesterday. My honey is a techie. All I can think is maybe I put them on CD, but I cannot find it anywhere.

Well it will be a project to rewrite them all from scratch. Something for my retirement.

Would you like a cinnamon graham?


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 08 Feb 09 - 10:31 PM

Welcome to the table, Tam. As Linus would say, AAAARRRRGGGHHHH!!!!!!!
I surely hope you can retrieve them. A couple of years ago I started to draw together family stories and songs I've written over the years to share with my mother and two older sisters. That in turn inspired many new family stories, as well as the chance to flesh out what I'd already written while my Mother was alive. She died a couple of months after her 99th birthday, and I was so thankful for the wonderful times we shared, her last year. My wife and I were a thousand miles away and she reached the point during that last year where she couldn't see well enough to read what I'd sent her but her dear friend (a young woman in her 80's) would read them to her every night. Two or three of the remembrances I wrote that last year ended up in the book I just published, along with the lyrics to some of the songs that were about her life as a child. Memories fade all too soon. I hope that you can recover what you've written, and now is the time to pull together everything that you have on paper.

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 09 Feb 09 - 05:07 PM

Hi Everyone (she croaked).

I've been to the doctors today and have a bronchitis - it's offical!. I've antibotics and an inhaler so I can stop taking the paracetamol now, thank goodness.

The good thing for you is that, this being a cyber table, I'll not be infecting any of you as we sit here!.

You also don't have to put up with the horrible noise when I get a coughing fit, as I do quite regularly at the moment. :-)

I'll just sit here and participate as quietly as I can.

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 09 Feb 09 - 07:34 PM

If I had to take a parakeet moll, I'd choke, too.

Hope you shake it soon. My wife is on the fourth or fifth day of a lousy cold. I've been spared, so far.

I'm back to taking my morning river walk now that my leg is healed, and it's wonderful to get outside and enjoy what the Lord has created. I could do without some of the stuff along the walk that we created. Or even worse yet, what the dogs have created when they've been out for a walk...

Jerry


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: GUEST,billybob
Date: 11 Feb 09 - 10:29 AM

Deidre,
what is going on.. woke up Monday feeling grotty again, nagged to see the doctor by Billy and I too have the bronchitus,they gave me doxycycline, so I read the instructions!!! Take sitting up or standing, do not lie down for half an hour!!( whaat is that all about) No sunbathing( chance would be a fine thing)
so I have found the old lap top and am sitting up in bed evesdropping on the conversation at the table.
It is very sunny and nice to look out of the window but I really dislike being laid low.Maybe now is the time to start writing "the book" they ay we all have one?I wish I had kept a diary , some of the funny stories about Farningham Folk Club and the one at Headcorn would make quite good reading,plus the backstage goings on at the festival we used to organise.
I kept a diary when we were in Ireland two years ago, it is lovely to read as memories fade too quickly. Jerry do you keep a diary or do you have a remarkable memory?
cup of earl grey and a biscuit I think
Wendy


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: BusyBee Paul
Date: 11 Feb 09 - 02:08 PM

Hi Wendy!.

I didn't even get any instructions except "take one tablet, three times a day". I'm still going into work although I haven't really felt like it. That's the trouble of having to do the year end accounts on a ridiculously short turnaround. Auditor in this week so I've got to be there. It therefore looks like a weekend of resting up in the hope that the antibiotics finally kick in.

I'm still on the hot honey and lemon myself!.
Perhaps we'll just sit together in the background and no-one will know we're here (until we cough!).

Deirdre


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 11 Feb 09 - 02:23 PM

Who coughed?


Seriously though....I'm sorry to hear that you are both laid low. I don't think the weather helps at the moment, either! I think staying in the warm with hot lemon is just the ticket.

Take care of yourselves.......there's cinnamon toast on the table at the moment!

Tuck in....


Best wishes,


Peter


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 11 Feb 09 - 02:44 PM

Hey, maybe it's catching. My wife has had a lousy cold for the last week, although not as debilitating as bronchitis. May you both be up and running again soon...

I've never kept a diary, but I have been a foracious letter (and now e-mail writer) over the years. When I felt I'd written something worth remembering, I made a copy of the letter. I have copies of letters going back to the 60's. A while back, I went through all the letters and pulled out ever description of something my sons did when they were growing up. I combined them all into a small stapled book for my sons, and I have over 30 pages single spaced. My letters and e-mails are sprinkled with song lyrics and many of the chapters in my book grew out of old letters.

The last year or so of my mother's life, I pulled together everything I'd written (and some things she;d written) along with lyrics of songs I written that relate to the memories, and old photos. I ended up with a book substantial enough to publish if I feel the need in the future. The greatest thing was that I shared copies with my sisters, and mom's last year was one long kitchen table of memories that we all loved. It was a beautiful way to lovingly say goodbye.


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Subject: RE: Sitting At The Kitchen Table
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 11 Feb 09 - 04:06 PM

Foracious? Gracious!

Jerry


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