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Origins: She Moves through the Fair

DigiTrad:
SHE MOVED THROUGH THE FAIR


Related threads:
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Help: Davey Graham: She moved through the fair (16)
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Chords Req: She Moved through the Fair (4)


Tony Rees 09 Mar 18 - 01:25 AM
Tony Rees 09 Mar 18 - 01:22 AM
Merritt 16 Mar 17 - 06:04 PM
eftifino 04 Mar 17 - 02:27 AM
GUEST,Les 03 Mar 17 - 06:26 AM
Thompson 02 Feb 17 - 02:07 PM
GUEST,Iain MacDonald 02 Feb 17 - 10:10 AM
Jerome Clark 07 Mar 15 - 10:03 PM
Dennis the Elder 07 Mar 15 - 08:47 PM
Jerome Clark 07 Mar 15 - 08:10 PM
Jerome Clark 07 Mar 15 - 08:07 PM
Lighter 07 Mar 15 - 04:51 PM
GUEST,leeneia 07 Mar 15 - 09:43 AM
mark gregory 07 Mar 15 - 07:05 AM
Jack Campin 22 Oct 14 - 08:29 AM
Joe_F 10 Jun 14 - 09:03 PM
Lighter 10 Jun 14 - 03:33 PM
GUEST,Dave Sharp 10 Jun 14 - 03:28 PM
GUEST,Bryan Murphy 05 Nov 13 - 06:35 PM
Jim Carroll 05 Nov 13 - 03:36 AM
Phil Edwards 04 Nov 13 - 03:35 AM
GUEST 03 Nov 13 - 06:32 PM
GUEST,banksie 23 Oct 13 - 03:46 AM
GUEST,Guest from Land of Oz 22 Oct 13 - 08:51 PM
Phil Edwards 20 Jan 13 - 04:08 PM
GUEST 20 Jan 13 - 01:50 PM
Dave Hanson 30 Nov 12 - 04:00 AM
GUEST,Sky 29 Nov 12 - 11:53 AM
MGM·Lion 24 Feb 10 - 11:21 PM
MGM·Lion 24 Feb 10 - 10:58 PM
Gallus Moll 24 Feb 10 - 07:10 PM
GUEST,Raz 24 Feb 10 - 05:27 PM
ard mhacha 05 Apr 09 - 07:00 AM
Canberra Chris 04 Apr 09 - 08:22 PM
meself 04 Apr 09 - 11:14 AM
meself 04 Apr 09 - 11:14 AM
GUEST,Oliver 04 Apr 09 - 10:56 AM
Owen an geal gael 04 Sep 08 - 07:24 AM
GUEST,Guest from Sanity 03 Sep 08 - 01:29 PM
GUEST,machree01 03 Sep 08 - 08:40 AM
GUEST,Guest from Sanity 03 Sep 08 - 03:13 AM
romany man 02 Sep 08 - 02:22 PM
GUEST 02 Sep 08 - 04:41 AM
Owen an geal gael 02 Sep 08 - 02:36 AM
Bryn Pugh 27 Nov 07 - 04:58 AM
Bryn Pugh 27 Nov 07 - 04:53 AM
GUEST,mac the knife 26 Nov 07 - 12:04 PM
Declan 27 Jun 07 - 02:34 PM
Jim Lad 27 Jun 07 - 02:31 PM
Taconicus 27 Jun 07 - 02:22 PM
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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Tony Rees
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 01:25 AM

And Count John McCormack's precursor here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-g_4yVxnQY


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Tony Rees
Date: 09 Mar 18 - 01:22 AM

In as it has not been posted before (or maybe on an expired link), you can hear Margaret Barry's version here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DZXRQLN3bs

Cheers - Tony Rees


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Merritt
Date: 16 Mar 17 - 06:04 PM

That's a song that goes to the bones.

I heard various recorded versions growing up. My favorite interpretation is by Tommy O'Sullivan of Dingle, County Kerry. He headlined a Wisconsin, USA festival some years ago - my buddy and I were closer to the bottom of the poster - and the night before the big show he played this song at a pub by Lake Michigan. Gave me chills. From his album, Song Ablaze:

http://www.tommyosullivan.net/05%20She%20Moved%20Through%20the%20Fa.mp3


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: eftifino
Date: 04 Mar 17 - 02:27 AM

I agree with Guest Les on the word Kine. It is an old word for cattle. A man's suitability for a daughter's depended on his wealth, measured in cattle. So the girl is telling her boyfriend that her parents won't send him away because he is not wealthy.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Les
Date: 03 Mar 17 - 06:26 AM

The version of the lyrics I recall, from Anne Briggs' recording:

My young love said to me, "My mother won't mind
And my father won't slight you for your lack of kine."
Then she laid her hand on me, and this she did say:
"Oh, it will not be long, love, til our wedding day."

She laid her hand on me, and she moved through the fair.
And fondly I watched her move here and move there.
Then she laid her hand on me, and this she did say:
"Oh, it will not be long, love, til our wedding day."

Last night she came to me, my dead love came in.
And so softly she came, her feet made no din.
Then she laid her hand on me, and this she did say:
"Oh, it will not be long, love, til our wedding day."

Though I must admit I always heard the second line as "And my father once liked you...", until I came here and read the correct ones, which do make more sense.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Thompson
Date: 02 Feb 17 - 02:07 PM

Padraic Colum told me that he wrote it, and said it for me. I was about… let's see… from where we were living I must have been about 14 then. Remembered it always.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Iain MacDonald
Date: 02 Feb 17 - 10:10 AM

re 'dead love': before Margaret Barry, John McCormack sang it that way in (according to Wikipedia) 1941, and Father Sydney MacEwan sang it that way in a recording from 1936, released on Parlophone - possibly the earliest commercially released recording of the song?


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Jerome Clark
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 10:03 PM

Try

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXdnixp7lFg


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Dennis the Elder
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 08:47 PM

My favourite version of this beautiful song is that of Joe Brown, with his daughter Sam.
It certainly surprised my when I first heard it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Jerome Clark
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 08:10 PM

In that second to last verse, that should be "Oh she looked so fair," not "far."


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Jerome Clark
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 08:07 PM

One morning some two decades ago, as I was shaving, I got to thinking, for no apparent reason, about Hank Williams's "Mansion on the Hill" and "She Moves Through the Fair" at the same time. The result was a set of lyrics which, with melody and arrangement supplied by Robin & Linda Williams, became a song titled "The Other Side of Town."

The Williamses recorded it twice, most recently on their album Back 40 (Red House, 2013). It was also cut by the bluegrass band Seldom Scene on its Like We Used to Be (Sugar Hill, 1994), and nearly covered by The Trio (Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton). The lyrics go:

On the other side of town there is a great mansion
Where my love lives, I know
On the other side of town they all dress in fashion
And no one ever gets old.

On the other side of town sweet music plays
And dancers glide through the air
On the other side of town
Old friends embrace and live with no care.

Chorus.
On the other side of town
The bright lights glow
On this side of town
The chilly winds blow
I feel them as I wait for my time to come round
When I'll go to the other side of town.

From the other side of town she came in a dream
Dressed in pearly white
Oh she looked so far that to me it seemed
Her face lit up the night.

From the other side of town I heard her speak
Though her voice made no sound
She said it won't be long until we meet
On the other side of town.

Chorus.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 04:51 PM

> Padraic Colum didn't write the poem,

In fact he did. All but the last stanza. The poem appears as his own work on p. 26 of Colum's "Wild Earth and Other Poems" (1916).

Colum and the musician Herbert Hughes combined the poem with a melody that Hughes had collected in County Donegal. Colum's lyrics "adapted from an old ballad" first appeared in Hughes's "Irish Country Songs" (1909), pp. 46-48.

Colum wrote in 1970 that only the final stanza had been from tradition.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 09:43 AM

Padraic Colum didn't write the poem, he was the editor of the book in which it appeared. I've had the book (an Oxford compilation of Irish verse) in my hands myself. Borrowed it from the public library.

We'll probably never know if it was kind, kine, or coin that the father cared about. Come to think of it, they all mean the same thing - wealth.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: mark gregory
Date: 07 Mar 15 - 07:05 AM

I came across this version of the song in the Sydney newspaper the EveningNews of Saturday 28 December 1912 p. 3. indicating how popular it was in Australia.

Irish Country Song

My young love said to me, "My parents won't mind.
And my brothers won't slight you for your lack of kind."
Then she stepped away from me, and this she did say,
"It will not be long love, till our marriage day."

She went from me and she moved through the fair.
And fondly I watched her go here and go there :
Ten she went away homeward with one star awake
As the swan in the evening moves over the lake.

The people were saying no two were e'er wed
But one had a sorrow that never was said.
And I smiled as she passed with her goods and her gear,
And that was the last that I saw of my dear.

I dreamt it last night that my young love came in,
So softly she entered her feet made no din
She came close beside me, and this she did say,
"It will not be long love, till our marriage day.

—P. Colum

cheers

Mark


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Jack Campin
Date: 22 Oct 14 - 08:29 AM

Not much on this thread about the origins of the tune.

It sounds rather chant-like to me, though I don't know liturgical chant well enough to point to a specific antecedent.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Joe_F
Date: 10 Jun 14 - 09:03 PM

"Kind", as you might suspect & the OED reveals, has had a complicated history, and projecting current usage into an old song is risky. For a long time it overlapped with "kin", and so a plausible guess at the meaning of the line is "And my father won't bother about your not being of a good family".


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Lighter
Date: 10 Jun 14 - 03:33 PM

Makes sense but, since the poet Padraic Colum did write "kind," you're doing a wee bit of "folk processing."


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Dave Sharp
Date: 10 Jun 14 - 03:28 PM

Don't know if this subject has been posted before, if so I apologise, but -

Far be it from me to challenge accepted authority :-), BUT when I listen to Margaret Barry's recording line 2 to me is

And my father won't slight you for your lack of COIN

Makes more sense too!


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Bryan Murphy
Date: 05 Nov 13 - 06:35 PM

Thanks Phil and Jim. I will have to research this further. My own feeling is that both "Our Wedding Day" and "Out of the Window" are later than and have borrowed from "She Moved Thro' the Fair", but I could be totally out to lunch. I will need to do more digging.   Perhaps you have better info about these two ballads. Neither of them appears in the 1873 book "Ancient Irish Music" which comprises "100 airs hitherto unpublished, many of the old popular songs, and several new songs", but that may mean nothing I suppose. They could have been collected after 1873.

More anon.

A correction to my previous (and first ever) anonymous "GUEST" submission: W. B. Yeats published his poem "Down by the Salley Gardens" in 1889, not 1899 as I had misremembered - Yeats was then about 24. Apologies for the off-topic digression.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 05 Nov 13 - 03:36 AM

This is Paddy Tunney's version as I remember it - not sure who the singers is here, but a nice rendition, and it's Paddy's tune.
http://songsskirtsandscones.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Out-of-the-window.mp3

Jim Carroll

Out of the Window.
My young love said to me, my mother won't mind
And my father won't slight you for your lack of kind
And she stepped away from me and this she did say:
It will not be long, love, till our wedding day

She stepped away from me and she moved through the fair
Where hand clapping dealers' loud shouts rang the air
The sunlight about her it did sparkle and play
And it will not be long love until our wedding day.

When dew falls on meadow and moths fill the night
When the glow of the ashes in the hearth throws half light
I'll slip from the casement and we will run away
And then it will not be long love until our wedding day

According to promise at midnight I rose
But all that I found were the down folded clothes
The sheets they lay empty it was plain for to see
That out of the window with another went she

If I were an eagle and had wings to fly
I would fly to my loves castle and it's there I would lie
On a bed of green ivy I would lay myself down
And it's with my two fond wings I would my love surround


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 04 Nov 13 - 03:35 AM

GUEST - agreed in principle about the later additions... except that some of them may not be additions at all. Certainly anything to do with death seems to have been grafted on later, but the desertion verse harks back to the song noted down by Sam Henry as "Our Wedding Day" - which seems fuller and is probably just as old.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Nov 13 - 06:32 PM

It was collected in Donegal around 1903 by a team that included the musicologist Herbert Hughes who had been brought up in Belfast (Hughes was then 22). He collected traditional airs and transcribed folk songs in North Donegal in August 1903 with his brother Fred, the extraordinary F.J. Bigger, and John Campbell, all from Belfast.    "Dedicated to seeking out and recording such ancient melodies as were yet to be found in the remoter glens and valleys of Ulster, he produced in 1904 Songs of Uladh (ancient name for Ulster) with Joseph Campbell, illustrated by Joseph's brother John Campbell and paid for by Bigger, who freely spent his own money, time and inexhaustible energy in supporting and publicising the creative talents and endeavours of others involved in the Irish Cultural Revival" - Bigger was an Anglican who lived on the Antrim Road in Belfast.

F.J. Bigger was an incredible man, and was probably the prime mover and financer behind these and other collecting endeavours. See http://www.ardrighbooks.com/fjb.html .

The version of "She Moved..." collected by Hughes, Campbell and Bigger was adapted by the Irish poet Padraig Colum, and was published by Hughes in 1909. Later Colum decided another verse was needed between the existing second and third verses. He often claimed to have written all four verses, but there seems to be no doubt that he simply adapted the original three (see next paragraph).

In Irish Country Songs, Volume 1, 1909 by Herbert Hughes, the earliest published version that I have so far found, "She moved thro' the fair" is on page 46. Hughes states that the words are by "Padrẚic Colum adapted from an old ballad". That seems to be pretty definitive. It contains only these three verses, which I have copied here from the 1909 original as follows:

My young love said to me, "My mother won't mind
And my father won't slight you for your lack of kind",
And she stepp'd away from me and this she did say,
"It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."

She stepp'd away from me and she went thro' the fair,
And fondly I watch'd her move here and move there,
And then she went homeward with one star awake,
As the swan in the evening moves over the lake.

Last night she came to me, she came softly in,
So softly she came that her feet made no din,
And she laid her hand on me and this she did say
"It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."

The song is spread over pages 46 to 48, and includes the music for the melody and a piano accompaniment. The melody is the same as the one that I have always known.

I don't see anything in those words to suggest she had died, or gone away, or disappeared. Just two devoted lovers. Anything added later is just not being true to the simple and beautiful original, including Colum's subsequently added verse which includes the spurious "and that was the last that I saw of my dear".   Did he do this (and other subsequent wording changes to the original three verses) just to spice up the song a bit?

What a debt we owe to these chaps and all those other collectors who went out and about the country to listen and write down what they heard. Hughes and Campbell also collected "My Lagan Love" in Donegal in 1903. They are also credited with collecting the tune for "Down by the Salley Gardens", from which the familiar song was arranged by Hughes in 1909 using the poem of that name written by William Butler Yeats in 1899. (The tune used was the reel called "An Traigh Mughdhorna", or "The Moorlough Shore". I have listened to this reel and it is identical to "Down By..." except for the pace.)

The Irish musical heritage is filled with such achingly beautiful melodies. But what of the wonderful tunes and songs that have been missed and lost forever?


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,banksie
Date: 23 Oct 13 - 03:46 AM

I have read before (somewhere...I thought here on Mudcat) that the sorrow was TB, which was (so I read) both quite common in Ireland and not spoken about publicly.

It is one of the finest examples of telling a complete story in a truly concise fashion. And if it is TB then I thing the story is complete. A `time line' would then go something like this:

Boy meets girl, they fall in love, plan to marry. Her parents are OK with this idea despite him not being that well off.

They meet at an event of some kind (a fair) and go about their separate business. But this happens to be the last time they meet because she has TB and by the time she gets home she falls ill with it and dies.

He dreams she comes to him (or she does as a ghost) and tells him (`it will not be long love till our wedding day') that he too has TB and will soon die. The word `dream' here might be appropriate actually, as I assume the latter stages of TB might lead to hallucinations and/or delirium.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Guest from Land of Oz
Date: 22 Oct 13 - 08:51 PM

Having waded through the posts and being still not much wiser, I have to agree that the bare bones of the story is what makes it haunting and captures our imagination, distinguishing traditional folk songs from more anecdotal ballads.

I don't know much about medieval Irish culture but we only need to look at cultures around the world today to imagine that perhaps this young woman was not in charge of her own destiny and had naiively misjudged her family's reaction. She does not appear to have actually broached the subject of marrying the impoverished young man so perhaps she went home and dropped the bombshell. It also seems rather strange for a young woman to be going home from market alone in the small hours of the morning carrying her goods - was she attacked? Maybe she was already pregnant, maybe she was hastily married off to an older man (the thistle in the longer version?) Maybe she was unhappy at being unable to marry her young love and killed herself or maybe she died in childbirth. There are no end of possibilties but it does feel more like a song of thwarted love of the Romeo and Juliet genre than one of betrayal. It invites the listner to fill in the gaps.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 20 Jan 13 - 04:08 PM

I recorded Out of the window a while back; it's a lovely song, but (perhaps because of the unfamiliar title) it's attracted a complete lack of interest from the listening public. Here it is, though:

Out of the window


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Jan 13 - 01:50 PM

Here it is being sung.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 30 Nov 12 - 04:00 AM

I remember listening to a recording of Margaret Barry singing this song, she introduced it saying ' this is a very old song, and it continues to be old ' amazing wonderful woman.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Sky
Date: 29 Nov 12 - 11:53 AM

Can't help with origin but enjoyed the very learned discussion,
Youse guys is marvellous so yez are!


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 24 Feb 10 - 11:21 PM

... tho, altho Barry's phrasing was much redolent of McCormack's [on youtube], it shd be noted that her version differed from his in the 2nd verse: he sang the "The people were saying 'no two were e'er wed'" version; while she sang the "She stepped away from me ... swan in the evening moves over the lake" one; so she would appear to have learned a reworking [the Padraic Colum one?] from somewhere. Neither of them sang both these verses, tho many singers [see thread passim] do.

Worth mentioning perhaps also that Rosamond Lehmann's memoir of the death of her beloved daughter was pubd 1967 under title of The Swan In The Evening.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 24 Feb 10 - 10:58 PM

Nobody has recorded on this long thread ~ tho ard mhacha just above comes nearest ~ that when we were all singing this song in mid-50s when Margaret Barry's famous rendition hit the Revival, Karl Dallas (or Fred, as he was known then) asked her in an interview where she had learned it ~ parents, other Travellers?. "Oh no," she replied' "I learned it off a gramophone record by Count John McCormack". Karl reminded of this during the recent BBC4 Folk Britannia series.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 24 Feb 10 - 07:10 PM

Many years ago I heard Adam MacNaughton sing this parody (at Glenfarg Folk Festival I think)- if I remember correctly!:

My young love said to me, as she moved thro' the flair,
Through a hole in the linoleum tae the flat doon the stair,
As she moved away from me, this she did say -- Aaaaaaaaarrrggghhhh!!!

(Adam sang it most meaningfully - resultant hysterics!)


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Raz
Date: 24 Feb 10 - 05:27 PM

I am no expert but the melody of "She Moved Thru' the Fair" reminds me of Molly Ban, which is also about a young maiden being shot because she was mistaken for a swan. Although I believe that she was going to visit her uncle, so... this may have no relevence to your myth. But there seems to be a little connection.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: ard mhacha
Date: 05 Apr 09 - 07:00 AM

So strange not to find any reference to John McCormack`s singing of this song, McCormack singing the last verse adds "my dead love came in".
You can be sure this recording is much older than any of the recordings mentioned here and by far the best rendition of this song.
On You Tube.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: Canberra Chris
Date: 04 Apr 09 - 08:22 PM

Mudcat is great for collecting such strings of comment and information on songs, so thanks. Songs such as this work for me because they remain ambiguous, and don't spell out the story. So I tend to stick with versions that don't add extra explanatory verses or words to round it off - as also Dominic Behan did with Carrickfergus for example, but that is several other threads.

This is just personal preference of course, those who want to straighten picture frames live here too, and it is often only through their intervention that we have the song at all and can then trace it back.

Our minds want to recognise or project patterns, so we clothe what we hear with meaning and in our imagination we fill out a picture or create a story, and that is part of the pleasure of our response in hearing or singing a song. So we practice being sad about an imagined grief, just as a kitten practices being fierce, or scared, or brave. With a song lke this, it can be the grief we choose.

Chris


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: meself
Date: 04 Apr 09 - 11:14 AM

(Which is to say, either/or/both).


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: meself
Date: 04 Apr 09 - 11:14 AM

Precisely.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves through the Fair
From: GUEST,Oliver
Date: 04 Apr 09 - 10:56 AM

Interesting to read the thoughts about this song, which I have been practising in countertenor voice. I heard a very nice version on Youtube by a countertenor here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAA3KewWfFQ.

My take on it is that she died, presumably of an illness - and that is the "sorrow" that is referred to. It might have been TB, as that was common in the 19th Century, but to say that the "sorrow that never was said"always meant this, seems a bit unlikely as the verse says "no two ever were wed... but one had a sorrow" etc, which would suggest "no two people ever get married, but one is dying of TB.."

What do you think is meant by "goods and gear" - was she trading in the fair/ been buying things in the fair?


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Owen an geal gael
Date: 04 Sep 08 - 07:24 AM

OK?....Perhaps "want" is a little strong?
Hand up those who 'prefer' her dead!


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 01:29 PM

machree01 , Thank you!..very nice version!..Maev and Anthony should sing together, someday!!!


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: GUEST,machree01
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 08:40 AM

Anthony Keaarns singing She Moved Through the Fair.

          http://ie.youtube.com/watch?v=N2CVdm5iRpo


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 03 Sep 08 - 03:13 AM

This version, she sings like glass!!!Turn it loud, and enjoy!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCpajl7UH3w


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: romany man
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 02:22 PM

Nearly every romany singer has this song in their list of songs. though they dont often sing the old songs in public, there are thousands of songs that most people wont hear and a few songs they will, will there be travellers in heaven is a great song but not widely known


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 04:41 AM

There was a thread around a while ago about songs which "got to you". My personal unit of measurement is whether the short hairs on the back of my neck, move.
I have heard many versions of this song but one which had the short hairs jumping up and down is by Joe Brown on his "Hitting The High Spots" album.
He is accompanied by his daughter, Sam and the backing includes such unexpected instruments as ukulele and didgeridoo??
I've been an admirer of Joe as a guitarist since the 50s and have heard various jaunts by him into folk music (he is an accomplished fiddler as well) but this goes down as my all-time favourite Joe Brown track.
It starts off rhythmically and powerful and goes UP from there.
I've searched for a link but can't find one.
If the idea of Joe Brown + folk music is a difficult one for you, Try keeping an open mind and give it a listen if you come across the album.

Eddie


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Owen an geal gael
Date: 02 Sep 08 - 02:36 AM

Here's an Idea...Hands up all those who want his love to be "dead"!...Mines uP!!


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 27 Nov 07 - 04:58 AM

PS :

(that'll learn me not to press the 'transmit' so quick !)

apart from never having come to terms with DADGAD (notwithstanding many years of trying, in both sense of the word), played in DADGAD it sounds very 'harsh' to me, and not at all in keeping with the gentleness of the melody.

It was my understanding that Padraig Colum wrote, or made, the song. I am happy to accept that his might have been a re-working of earlier material, if not a translation from a Goidelic Celtic language.

Again, despite trying, Brythonic Celtic is the only stream I have mastered - sorry for thread-creep, fellow 'Catters !


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Bryn Pugh
Date: 27 Nov 07 - 04:53 AM

It is possible to play the tune 'melodically' using open G - 1st - 6th D B G D G D

or, as I prefer, open C

1st - 6th E C G C G E, or 'low' C, at your preference. Try a D minor shape at the 5th, for effect. I have chords other than the F barre at 5th position, and G barre at 7th, if any one wants 'em : there is Am, F, G, Caug and Bb.

Bryn, the aspiring guitarist (!)


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Subject: tab
From: GUEST,mac the knife
Date: 26 Nov 07 - 12:04 PM

am looking for a version of the music as played by a guy called scholley on youtube or somthing similair. have got a couple of versions, one in dadgad thats nice but want somthing "fuller". any suggestions?


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Declan
Date: 27 Jun 07 - 02:34 PM

That's Les Barker's parody posted by Snuffy earlier in this thread.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Jim Lad
Date: 27 Jun 07 - 02:31 PM

I'll shut the door behind me.


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Subject: RE: Origins: She Moves Through the Fair
From: Taconicus
Date: 27 Jun 07 - 02:22 PM

Jim asks what it's about. I agree, most of the versions (including the four-verse one currently popular) don't make much sense. Is it supposed to be a maxim that "two never wed but one had a sorrow that never was said"? I never heard that before.

I think the following seven-verse version makes more sense, yet retains a delicious ambiguity. Did she run away with another? Did she kill herself? What was the "sorrow that never was said"? Did she return, or (more probably) is that his fantasy or a dream? We're never quite sure--but the words make sense in any of those cases.

Our Wedding Day/She Moved Through the Fair

My young love said to me, "My brothers won't mind.
"Nor will my parents slight thee for thy lack of kind."
Then she placed her hand on me and this she did say:
"It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."

Then she stepped away from me and moved through the fair.
And fondly I watched her move here and move there.
Then she turned her way homeward with but one star awake.
Like the swan in the evening moving over the lake.

The neighbors were saying we two ne'er would wed
For one had a sorrow that never was said.
But I smiled as she passed with her goods and her gear.
And that was the last time that I saw my dear.

Then according to promise at midnight I rose,
But I found nothing of her but linen and clothes.
The window was open; my young love was gone.
And I left behind to wander alone.

Oh love, my young love, what is this path you chose?
You have taken the thistle; forsaken the rose.
The thistle will wither; it soon will decay,
While the red rose turns fallow, and its petals fall away.

Now if I had two wings, like an eagle I'd fly.
I would fly to my young love's side, and it's there that I'd lie.
In a bed of green ivy I'd leave myself down,
And with my two folded wings I would my love surround.

Last night she came to me, my young love came in.
So softly she came that her feet made no din.
Then she lay down beside me, and this she did say:
"It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."


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