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Mixed up Folk

Greg Baker 08 Dec 98 - 11:47 PM
Steve Parkes 09 Dec 98 - 04:07 AM
Martin Ryan. 09 Dec 98 - 04:12 AM
Alice 09 Dec 98 - 10:09 AM
Animaterra 09 Dec 98 - 01:18 PM
Barbara 09 Dec 98 - 07:25 PM
dick greenhaus 09 Dec 98 - 08:03 PM
Barbara 09 Dec 98 - 08:59 PM
BSeed 11 Dec 98 - 03:47 AM
Bert 11 Dec 98 - 08:25 AM
AndreasW 11 Dec 98 - 08:59 AM
Gearoid 11 Dec 98 - 10:40 AM
MMario 11 Dec 98 - 10:53 AM
Vicki 11 Dec 98 - 01:19 PM
Roger in Baltimore 13 Dec 98 - 11:02 AM
Ritchie 13 Dec 98 - 11:13 AM
Roger in Baltimore 13 Dec 98 - 03:55 PM
Duane D. 13 Dec 98 - 04:28 PM
AndreasW 14 Dec 98 - 02:01 AM
Jerry Friedman 15 Dec 98 - 05:00 PM
Benson 15 Dec 98 - 09:02 PM
Vic 16 Dec 98 - 01:49 PM
Mr Happy 02 Jul 02 - 07:23 AM
Dave the Gnome 02 Jul 02 - 06:49 PM
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Subject: Mixed up Folk
From: Greg Baker
Date: 08 Dec 98 - 11:47 PM

The theme is to mix two folk songs that aren't sung together and should be for humorous effect.

Here's my contribution:

To the tune of "Joe Hill"

I dreamt I saw Sam Hall last night, As live as he could be, I said, "But Sam, you're three years dead" - "G**d**m your eyes," said he.


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 04:07 AM

Greg, this sounds like the kind of thing they do on "I'm sorry I haven't a clue", which I'll briefly explain for non-Brits. It's a radio show on BBC radios 2 and 4, which describes itself as "the antidote to panel games". It's hosted by Humphrey Littleton, who is an otherwise perfectly respectable jazz musician of many years' standing. The panel have, amongst other silly things, to sing one song to the tune of another; or sing alternate lines from two songs (panellist A sings line 1 of song A, panellist B sings line 2 of song B, and so on); or improvise a song a line at a time from a given opening line - like the game of consequences. The scope is fairly endless, and unfortunately the novelty never quite seems to wear off.

So, let's hear it from the rest of you folks ....

Steve


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Martin Ryan.
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 04:12 AM

A friend of mine, bored of belting out The Wild Rover at noisy pub gigs, ysed ot occasionally sing:

"She said I have whiskey and wines of the best
Then she whipped off her tee shirt and showed me her chest"

Regards


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Alice
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 10:09 AM

I come from Montana, I wear a bandana
My spurs are of silver, my pony is grey,
I wheel my wheel barrow, thru streets broad and narrow
Cryin, Cockles!, and Mussels!, I'm givin' them away.
------

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Animaterra
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 01:18 PM

It ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe- All the live-long day. It ain't no use to sit and wonder why babe- Just to pass the time away. When the rooster crows at the break of dawn, Rise up so early in the morn; Can't you hear the captain shouting: Don't think twice, it's all right.


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Barbara
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 07:25 PM

The itsy bitsy spider sung to the tune of the Mary Ellen Carter. Chorus: Rise again, rise again, like the itsy bitsy spider rise again; so whether your legs number two or four or six or eight or ten, be like the itsy bitsy spider, rise again.
Blessings,
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 08:03 PM

Barbara- Bob Blue wrote a very funny parody of Mary Ellen Carter based on the spider: check out "spider" at the DT.


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Barbara
Date: 09 Dec 98 - 08:59 PM

yep, that's the one, Dick. I should have said "And it's in the database..."


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: BSeed
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 03:47 AM

In one of my very infrequent visits to church twenty years or so ago I happened upon a folk service where the words of various hymns and anthems were sung to folk tunes. The only one I remember was "The Lord's Prayer" to the tune of "Waltzing Matilda." --seed


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Bert
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 08:25 AM

Greg,

You've started something here you know.

I go to thinking.

Tom Pierce, Tom Pierce, lend me your grey mare
They sang so high and they sang so low
For I wan'ts for to go to Widdecome fair
Along with the Wraggle taggle gipsies Oh!.

Then I realised it would work better the other way around.

Three gipsies stood at the castle gate
All along, down along, out along Lea,
The Lady sat in her chamber late
With Bill Brewer, Jan Stewer..........


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: AndreasW
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 08:59 AM

Hi Bert,

Do you have the complete lyrics of the song with the 3 gipsies at the castle gate?
I can't find it in the DB, and look for it since the Irish Folk Festival was here in Munich this year.
Can you supply them?

Thanks in advance,
Andreas


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSIES
From: Gearoid
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 10:40 AM

Andreas

It's called THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSIES (I got this from the DT)

Gearoid

There were three gypsies a-come to my door,
And down stairs ran this a-lady, O.
One sang high and another sang low
And the other sang bonny, bonny Biscay O

Then she pulled off her silk finished gown,
And put on hose of leather, O
The ragged, ragged rags about our door
And she's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies O

It was late last night when my lord came home,
Inquiring for his a-lady O
The servants said on every hand
She's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O

O saddle to me my milk-white steed
And go and fetch me my pony, O
That I may ride and seek my bride,
Who's gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies O

O he rode high, and he rode low
He rode through wood and copses too,
Until he came to a wide open field,
And there he espied his a-lady O

What makes you leave you house and land?
What makes you leave you money, O?
What makes you leave you new-wedded lord,
To follow the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

What care I for my house and land?
What care I for my money,O?
What care I for my new-wedded lord,
I'm off with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O!

"Last night you slept on a goosefeather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O.
Tonight you'll sleep in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O."

"What care I for a goose-feather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O.
For tonight I'll sleet in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

Dorothy Scarborough in her "Song Catcher from the Southern Mountains" says that in the earliest edition of the ballad, the gypsy is called Johnny Faa, a name common among gypsies. When the gypsies were banished from Scotland in 1624, Johnny Faa disobeyed the decree and was hanged.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE WRAGGLE-TAGGLE GYPSY-O
From: MMario
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 10:53 AM

andreas - another version - as sung by the Minstrels of Mayhem

There were three old gypsies by the ale house door,
Picking brave and boldy-o.
One sang high and another sang low,
And the other sang a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o.

It was late that night when my lord came in,
Inquiring for his lady-o.
The servant girl, she said to the lord,
"She's away with a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o."

"Well, saddle for me my big white steed.
My black horse is not speedy-o.
Tonight I ride 'til I see my bride.
She's away with a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o."

He rode east, he rode west,
He rode north and south, or so,
Until he came to a wide-open plain.
It was there that he spied his lady-o.

"How can you leave your goose-feather bed,
Blankets strewn so comfy-o?
How can you leave your newly wedded lord,
All for a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o?"

"What care I for my goose-feather bad,
Blankets strewn so comfy-o?
Tonight I lie in a wide-open field
In the arms of a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o?"

"How can you leave you house and your lands?
How can you leave you money-o?
How can you leave your newly wedded lord,
All for a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o?"

"What care I for my house and my lands?
What care I for my money-o?
I'd rather have a kiss from the yellow gypsy's lips,
and away with a wraggle-taggle gypsy-o."

MMario


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Vicki
Date: 11 Dec 98 - 01:19 PM

I put together two of my favorite folk songs in a duet, but it took some manipulation.

Here goes:

Take "Rambler Gambler" as sung by Joan Baez, and switch the lyrics to the woman's point of view. e.g. He's a rambler, he's a gambler.

Take "Pretty Mary" as sung by Peter, Paul and Mary

Put them in the same key.

Have a woman sing "Rambler" while a man sings "Pretty Mary"

You have to switch some lines around, so that the whole thing stays logical...but that's only if you like logic in your lyrics.

Have fun!


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 11:02 AM

My favorite is to sing "Amazing Grace" to the tune of the "House of the Rising Son" (The Animals version). You can do the opposite, but it does not work well.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Ritchie
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 11:13 AM

Roger, Thats like patting your head and rubbing your tummy at the same time.....or is it rubbing your head and patting your tummy...never mind.... here goes....

" Amazing Grace how sweet the sound , in a believers ear it's been the ruin of many a poor boy.... " ..... nah pass me another beer.

love and happiness

Ritchie


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 03:55 PM

Ritchie,

Yes, it is just like patting your head and rubbing your tummy at the same time, but much more rewarding. It becomes easy with practice. I think it also allows the audience to hear the words of "Amazing Grace", as many get caught up in the tune. And "House of the Rising Sun" is more passionate in a bluesy way and allows you to put more passion to the words.

Try it, I think you'll like it. You will also amaze your friends, even moreso than if you pat your head and rub your belly at the same time.

I should rightfully note that I was told of this possibility by Marie Connor.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Duane D.
Date: 13 Dec 98 - 04:28 PM

To Barbara and dick greenhouse, I went to a really great concert last night at the Walkabout Clearwater concert series in Katonah, NY. The concert featured Bill Staines and the warmup act was Nancy Tucker. I think Nancy is from CT. Anyway, she sang all of Bob Blue's version of the Itsy Bitsy Spider. I thought it quite a coincedence since I only read your threads on this subject yesterday. I talked to her after her set and told her all about Mudcat and tried to steer her here.

Regards, Duane D.


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: AndreasW
Date: 14 Dec 98 - 02:01 AM

Thanks to Gearoid and MMario!!!
Andreas


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE GYPSY LADDIE
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 15 Dec 98 - 05:00 PM

A poem made of lines from other poems is called a cento. That name might apply to these songs too. I tried to think of one and couldn't, so I'm impressed by the excellent ones people came up with!

I wonder if the following is Dorothy Scarborough's "original" version of "The Raggle-Taggle Gypsies." It's very similar to "The Gypsy Laddie" and "Gypsy Laddies" in the DT. I'm just entering it because it mentions Johnny Faa. (Also an early use of "wow.")

From The Harper Anthology of Poetry, edited by John Frederick Nims. He got it from A. Ramsey's The Tea-Table Miscellany, Vol. IV (1740).

THE GYPSY LADDIE

The gypsies came to our good lord's gate,
And wow but they sang sweetly!
They sang sae sweet and sae very compleat
That down came the fair lady.

And she came tripping down the stair,
And a' her maids before her;
As soon as they saw her well-far'd face,
They coost the glamer o'er her.

"Gae tak frae me this gay mantile,
And bring to me a plaidie;
For if kith and kin and a' had sworn,
I'll follow the gypsy laddie.

"Yestreen I lay in a well-made bed,
And my good lord beside me;
This night I'll ly in a tenant's barn,
Whatever shall betide me."

"Come to your bed," says Johnny Faa,
"Oh come to your bed, my deary;
For I vow and I swear, by the hilt of my sword,
That your lord shall nae mair come near ye."

"I'll go to bed to my Johnny Faa,
I'll go to bed to my deary;
For I vow and I swear, by what past yestreen,
That my lord shall nae mair come near me.

"I'll mak a hap to my Johnny Faa,
And I'll mak a hap to my deary;
And he's get a' the coat gaes round,
And my lord shall nae mair come near me."

And when our lord came hame at een,
And speir'd for his fair lady,
The tane she cry'd, and the other reply'd,
"She's away with the gypsy laddie."

Gae saddle to me the black, black steed,
Gae saddle and make him ready;
Before that I either eat or sleep,
I'll gae seek my fair lady."

And we were fifteen well-made men,
Although we were nae bonny;
And we were a' put down for ane,
A fair young wanton lady.

According to Nims's notes, "hap" means a covering such as a quilt or a coat, and "speired" means "asked".


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Benson
Date: 15 Dec 98 - 09:02 PM

I always thought it was fun to do "This Land is Your Land"....snd "Midnight Special" at the same time.....and at the end add "America The Beautiful"....3 in1...like oil.


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Vic
Date: 16 Dec 98 - 01:49 PM

Roger in Baltimore--

I did the Amazing House thing at an open mic coffeehouse, my first performance. My first set was a disaster, since my guitar pickup was cutting in and out, and my hearing aids were feeding back so I couldn't hear anything. When the host asked me to do a second set, I didn't have anything ready and thought I'd about blown it badly enough for one night, but then I decided I had nothing to lose, so I'd (gasp) JUST HAVE FUN! So I did it unplugged and a capella.

At the end, I thought I was going to be lynched it was so quiet...And then the audience went *WILD*! Talk about leaving them wanting more! As far as I'm concerned, patting the head and rubbing the tummy are more than worth the effort!


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Mr Happy
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 07:23 AM

sid kipper does 'spencer the rover' + 'the wild rover' in a simultaneous version


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Subject: RE: Mixed up Folk
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 02 Jul 02 - 06:49 PM

Ted Edwards got fed up of th earguments about Waltzing Matilda and Who'll be a soldier (For Marlborough and Me) so he did a parody which combined the two. Can't remember much apart from something about waiting for Billy's boil to burst.

Funny why that should be...

Cheers

DtG

BTW - I just heard that Marborough is the worlds richest brand name. Any want to do a parody incorporating that as well?

Who'll be a soldier (cough, cough)

Who'll be a soldier (cough, cough)

Who'll be a soldier (cough, cough)

For twenty Marlborough and me...


Nah - perhaps not.


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