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Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing

Related threads:
Bilingual Songs (14)
English/Irish lyrics (3)
Lyr Req: One Morning in June - Macaronic (3)
Manx Macaronic (2)
Lyr Req: Welsh Macaronics (5)


Thompson 06 Jan 17 - 05:42 PM
Felipa 06 Jan 17 - 05:01 PM
Thompson 04 Dec 16 - 12:25 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Dec 16 - 12:53 PM
Felipa 16 Oct 16 - 01:22 PM
JMB 16 Oct 16 - 12:59 PM
Felipa 16 Oct 16 - 08:39 AM
GUEST,Gerry 14 Oct 12 - 07:44 AM
GUEST,John Moulden 13 Oct 12 - 11:46 AM
MartinRyan 12 Oct 12 - 04:34 PM
MartinRyan 11 Oct 12 - 05:14 AM
GUEST,Philippa 10 Oct 12 - 07:30 PM
Jack Campin 14 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM
melodeonboy 14 Jan 10 - 03:35 PM
MartinRyan 14 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,Jill Rogoff 14 Jan 10 - 09:15 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 17 May 06 - 01:44 PM
Wilfried Schaum 17 May 06 - 10:27 AM
sian, west wales 12 May 06 - 03:22 PM
Jim Dixon 12 May 06 - 03:00 PM
MartinRyan 12 May 06 - 02:08 PM
Haruo 12 May 06 - 12:43 PM
sian, west wales 12 May 06 - 05:24 AM
Darowyn 12 May 06 - 04:00 AM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 11 May 06 - 05:05 PM
Kaleea 11 May 06 - 04:06 PM
GUEST,Darowyn 11 May 06 - 01:01 PM
Haruo 10 May 06 - 03:58 PM
Mary Humphreys 19 Nov 02 - 05:48 PM
Alice 19 Nov 02 - 11:43 AM
Joe_F 18 Nov 02 - 07:59 PM
Declan 18 Nov 02 - 01:27 PM
GUEST,Philippa 18 Nov 02 - 01:20 PM
Alice 18 Nov 02 - 01:03 PM
GUEST,Philippa 16 Mar 02 - 09:18 PM
GUEST,Liland qua guest 30 Sep 00 - 06:58 PM
Susanne (skw) 30 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM
Chocolate Pi 29 Sep 00 - 11:59 AM
Haruo 29 Sep 00 - 11:18 AM
Haruo 29 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM
30 Jul 99 - 11:07 AM
Philippa 30 Jul 99 - 10:42 AM
Philippa 30 Jul 99 - 10:37 AM
Philippa 22 Jul 99 - 02:05 PM
Philippa 22 Apr 99 - 07:47 AM
Alice 21 Apr 99 - 07:05 PM
Philippa 21 Apr 99 - 06:03 PM
johnm (inactive) 21 Apr 99 - 05:49 PM
Wolfgang 16 Apr 99 - 05:40 AM
Annraoi 30 Jan 99 - 12:19 PM
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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Thompson
Date: 06 Jan 17 - 05:42 PM

Perhaps I've been listening to too much Soft Machine, but Sén De don de for don te sounds like something Kevin Ayers would have composed.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 06 Jan 17 - 05:01 PM

from http://www.jewish-languages.org/jewish-english.html

Many [Orthodox Jewish] community members talk about "Yeshivish," as we can see in the title of a popular book (Weiser 1995) and in this song by the Orthodox band Journeys:

    In the hallowed halls of yeshivos ('Yeshivas') far and wide,
    Our young men have discovered a new way to verbalize.
    With Yiddish, English, Hebrew – it's a mixture of all three,
    And a dash of Aramaic – a linguistic potpourri!
    That's called: yeshivishe reyd ('Yeshiva speech'), yeshivishe shprax ('Yeshiva language'):
    Take ('really'), epis ('something'), grade ('in reality'), a gevaldike zax ('remarkable thing').
    It's called: yeshivishe reyd, yeshivishe shprax:
    It's the tawk of the town, mamish ('really') tog un naxt ('day and night').


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Thompson
Date: 04 Dec 16 - 12:25 PM

Sean Duffy's Medieval Ireland, an Encyclopedia has a reference to Colmán moccu Cluasaig (died around 655), abbot and fear léigind (journal-keeper?) of the Monastery of Cork, whose composition Sén De don de for don te ("God's blessing, bear us, succour us") was composed to avert the Yellow Plague of 664/5 (obviously not successfully in the case of poor Colmán +RIP+) and is referred to as "one of the earliest pieces of macaronic verse in any western European vernacular, interspersing Latin phrases into an Irish adaptation of an early liturgical ordo for the dead. The list of Old Testament saints invoked, Abel, Elias and so forth, betrays Eastern liturgical influence: nothing like it exists elsewhere in Europe at this early date", plus more about Colmán.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DARLING, JE VOUS AIME BEAUCOUP (Sosenko)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Dec 16 - 12:53 PM

I enjoyed the challenge of transcribing this—with lots of help from Google Translate to make sure I got the accents and spelling right:


DARLING, JE VOUS AIME BEAUCOUP
Words and music by Anna Sosenko, ©1935.
As sung by Hildegarde in a British Pathé Pictorial.

SPOKEN: Now this song is about an English boy who falls in love with a French girl. Of course, not knowing the French language, he doesn't know just how to express his love, but this is how he manages it. Ooh-la-la!

VERSE: Je suis ici patrie long,
Mais, s'il vous plaît, écoute ma song.
Vous avez un grand appeal.
To speak my heart [n'est pas]* facile.
Permettez-moi
to expliquer
In my own peculiar way
Exactly what mon cœur would say:

CHORUS 1: Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
Je ne sais pas
what to do.
Vous avez completely stolen my heart.

Matin, midi et le soir,
Toujours
wondering how you are—
That's the way I felt right from the start.

Ah, chérie, my love for you is très, très fort.
Wish my French were good enough; oh, I'd tell you so much more.

Mais j'espère that you comprit
All the little things you mean to me.
Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
I love you.

CHORUS 2: Oh, my darling, vous êtes très jolie.
Qu'est-ce que c'est vous
do to me?
Absolutely je suis en la trance.

Tout le temps j'espère que vous
Dream of me a little too.
Ah, chérie, je pense this is romance.

Quand nous sommes alone and you are in my arms,
Je remercie le bon Dieu for all your lovely charms.

Dites-moi: do you love me too?
Je suis happy if you do.
Darling, je vous aime beaucoup.
Oh, I love you so, I do!
I do love you.


* I inserted "n'est pas" at this point to make sense of the line, but I couldn't make out what she really sings.

Nat King Cole recorded a shorter version of this in 1954. He sings only chorus 1 with a partial repeat, and some words given in French above are sung by him in English.

Wikipedia has the following comment:
When the song was written, "je vous aime" (using the respectful second person plural) was the normal way of saying "I love you" in French - until a threshold of intimacy had been reached, or in public. It has come to sound quaint, as now one would normally say "je t'aime" (using the familiar second person singular), regardless of the level of intimacy or location.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 01:22 PM

tapadh leibh Not fully macaronic, just refrain in Latin, at least in this version from the singing of Fiona Mackenzie
www.fionamackenzie.org/DuanNollaig.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2PytwSb4_w
(I prefer Mairi MacInnes version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkveZpFhniA )

IESUM DOMINUM

Sèisd
Iesum Dominum,
Venite, adoremus,
Iesum Dominum,

Rann
Biodh an trionaid ga Moladh
Gura Nollaig Mhic Dhè i!

Rugadh Ios' ar ceann-cinnidh
Ann an sgiothal na sprèidhe.

Bha an saoghal ro chumhang,
Ged a chruthaich E fhein e.

'N aona chùil bha gun urram,
Aite-fuirich Mhic Dè e.

E na shìneadh san fhrasaich,
Damh na fhaisge ri geumraich.

Ach, a Mhàthair na glaine,
'S gu bheil t'anam gun bheud air,

Bidh tu 'g ùrnaigh rid Mhacan
E bhith mathadh ar feuch dhuinn;

Oidhche choimheach na Nollaig
Anns a'bhothaig am Bèthlem.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: JMB
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 12:59 PM

Iesum Dominum is a macaronic song mixing Latin and Scottish Gaelic. The chorus in Latin, and the verses in Gaelic. It is a Christmas hymn in the genre of waulking songs. I learned it at a Christmas Ceilidh some years ago, and arranged a version that I do with the guitar.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Felipa
Date: 16 Oct 16 - 08:39 AM

Keberoxu just "discovered" another lyric, penned by early 20th century Scottish poet Murdoch Maclean and published in his "Songs of a Roving Celt" The verses in Gaelic mostly refer to the waves of the sea which separate the poet and (his) love/the isle of Skye, the poet singing while "na m'aonar s'mi ann so leam fhein" - alone here by myself

To sing thy praises would I try
    Cha bhard mi gus mo gradh a seinn
    Na m'aonar s'mi ann so leam fhein
So distant from the Isle of Skye.

But though the waves are raging white
    A's muir na'n tonn a'g eiridh ard
    Cur eadar mise a's mo gradh
To thee my fancy takes its flight.

And hours like fleeting moments speed
    Nuair smaoineacheas mi air do thlachd;
    Ged bhiodh mo chridhe fodh broin 's fodh smachd
What other balm could sufferer need?

Skill'd in poetic art were I
    Air te do chliu gu'n togainn fonn,
    Ach's ard na beann a's fuar na'n tonn
Between me and the Isle of Skye.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 14 Oct 12 - 07:44 AM

I don't think anyone has mentioned Fel Shara. From the liner notes of the Putumayo compilation, A Jewish Odyssey: "Fel Shara is a traditional Sephardic love song that effortlessly blends five different languages (Ladino, Italian, French, Englsh and Arabic). The languages shift in mid-phrase, switching between English and French or Italian and Arabic from one word to the next...." The recording is by KlezRoym.

The Susan McKeown, Lorin Sklamberg CD, Saints & Tzadiks, has several mixed-language songs. The first track has Yiddish and English versions of the Cruel Brother ballad. Another track combines Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye, Kh'bin Oysgeforn Felder, and Deus Meus Adiuva Me --- the last one is half Latin, half Irish. The Rattlin Bog alternates Yiddish and English. The Dark Slender Boy alternates English and Irish.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 13 Oct 12 - 11:46 AM

Pretty well all the macaronics on ballad sheets were done by Haly [Joseph] of Hanover Street, Cork. There is at least one printed by him entitled "The Flowers of Edinburgh" which has alternate verses in Irish and English - in the Bodleian Ballads - I only looked till I found one - there may be more.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 Oct 12 - 04:34 PM

Refresh...


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 05:14 AM

Hi Philippa

You can access a copy of The Young Sick Lover (in TCD library) via:

This link

Regards


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 10 Oct 12 - 07:30 PM

I've been looking, so far unsuccessfully, for digital copy of a broadside bilingual or macaronic song. Can anyone help out and expedite the search. Any song in the genre,an image of a printed broadside.
thanks in advance


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Jack Campin
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM

Uzbek/Persian macaronics in northern Afghanistan:

Afghan Teahouse Music


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: melodeonboy
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 03:35 PM

Some zydeco songs are macaronic (French/English).


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM

As it happens, I've recently been trying my hand at composing a macaronic, in connection with a course I'm taking (of study, not medicine...). While the references are very local and topical, the approach may be of interest;
----------------

Air: Tatterjack Walshe (a.k.a. The Price of my Pig)

Ar mo ghabháil tríd an Spidéil ar maidin, go moch
I chanced to fall in with a handsome young buck
Ag fágaint Tigh Hughes, is é ólta go leor
And he stood and he blinked - as he walked out the door!
"Do thosaigh an ceol ag leath-huair 'théis a sé
The trouble is I can't remember WHICH DAY
Idir polkas, mazurkas, barndances and jigs
Sure I clean forgot - I'd to sell off them pigs!"

Shíos ag an cros-bothair, is ann bhí an scléip
The Guards were all laying out scene-of-crime tape
Bhí muc ag rith soir – 's ceann eile 'dul siar
As the Sergeant called out "Lets have some order here!"
Bhí triocha haon Franncaigh ar gluaisrothair móra
On the way to a session beyond Ballyhoura
Sé dúirt a gceannródai "Mais amis! My friend -
There's no telling how this adventure will end!"


Ag oifig an phoist in In-der-eabhán
Two lads tried a raid – with the guards looking on!
Now, caithfinn a rá nach raibh siad ró-glic
As bank-robbers go, they were totally thick!
Ón Aifrica Theas a tháinig an beirt
And one of them said – causing much mirth?
"Bhí "getaway" réite – is b'shin é an seift
Sure we even remembered to drive on the left!

Ach anois tá muid gabhtha – is beimid go deo
It's off to the Gaol of Clonmel we must go
Ag gabháil tríd An Spidéal a bheimid anocht
Inside of a squad car, go daingean is docht
'S caithfidh mé innsint libh rud amháin eile
They won't think of us like they did of Mandela
Ní thiochfaidh aon cuireadh ó N-U-I-G
And we'll never get – any Galway Degree!

Regards

p.s. No doubt some alert 'catter will spot the deliberate mistake!


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Jill Rogoff
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 09:15 AM

I'm working on a couple of quadrilingual songs from Sarajevo, from the Sephardic tradition. One is in Ladino (Judeo-Spanish), Hebrew, Turkish and Greek (four lines to a verse, each line in a different language); the other song is Ladino, Hebrew, Turkish and Serbo-Croat... No wonder they're scarcely sung anymore!

Many years ago, I also came across a song in Hebrew and Italian, but neglected to copy it down (thinking the book would always be available to me again -- big mistake!). I'm still looking for it.

In the medieval repertoire, there are some other macaronic songs: of course, there's the chorus ('Deo Gratias!') in the famous Agincourt Song, but also Nova Nova (a Scots song in Lallands and Latin, if I'm remembering correctly) and then the lovely There Is No Ros of Sych Vertu -- Middle English and Latin.

There are also occasional French shanty songs with English lines in them, or lines in Breton.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 17 May 06 - 01:44 PM

There is a Breton/French macaronic song which includes a bilingual pun. It came up when I asked about its tune on the ABC list. Turns out the tune is a nameless "an dro", used for a broadside ballad from 1871 which was recorded (1980s?) by the Breton group Tri Yann. It's about Breton soldiers being used as cannon fodder for the French at the time of the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune. I have the full story and lyrics at home, but I'm 3000 miles away at the moment - maybe anyone who's still interested could email me directly (jack dot campin at gmail dot youknowwhat)and I'll fish it out.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 17 May 06 - 10:27 AM

A medieval student song from the Carmina Burana I posted in the wrong thread, look here


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: sian, west wales
Date: 12 May 06 - 03:22 PM

Haruo

The Macaronic principle has invaded the internet.

I like to think, however, that I have that effect on people. What is that Inuit saying? "A woman who does not lie with a husband is a dangerous thing." ... or something like that.

sia^n (if that helps)

p.s. I think the gibberish is connected with me using the Welsh accents software which comes with the Welsh spellchecker. Maybe. Dunno, really.

s


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 May 06 - 03:00 PM

As I said in the thread Lyr Add: Multilingual Native-American Medley, when I listen to radio station WOJB, "Woodland Community Radio," in northern Wisconsin, I occasionally hear macaronic songs mixing English with some Native American language(s) which I don't recognize. (The Indians in that area are Chippewa/Anishinabe, but I don't think we can assume that all the music they play is in their language.)

I will pay more attention in the future and try to come back with some names of songs and singers.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 May 06 - 02:08 PM

APC

Heard one recently alternating German and Yiddish. No idea what it was about.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Haruo
Date: 12 May 06 - 12:43 PM

That was weird, I was trying to see the diacritic on "siân", which was coming out on my screen as a capital A with an accent followed by a US cent sign (c + /). I checked the encoding and it was defaulting to "Western-Windows" so I clicked on Unicode, but it went automatically to 16-bit, and the whole thread suddenly turned into Chinese gibberish with occasional sentences in a mixture of Georgian, Korean and Devanagari. When I clicked on UTF-8 it finally showed me the circumflex I craved.

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: sian, west wales
Date: 12 May 06 - 05:24 AM

Mary and the original poster mentioned Welsh songs - and Mary gave the words to one of the prettiest and perhaps best known. There are actually quite a few, and many of them 'fit' a lot of the theory above.

A Ei Di Deryn Du (Blackbird, will you go?) as posted by Mary

Bachgen Bach o Dincar - which was discussed in another thread some time ago, I think in connection with some Australian songs

Y Ferch o Fedlam (The Girl from Bedlam) - a variation of Dives and Lazarus

Ar y Ffordd wrth Fynd i Rymni (On the Road to Rhymni) - which I always tended to avoid in public singing due to the repeating line, "Very Well done Jim Crow". I recently found out that, in the area from which it came, there's a historic cottage known to everyone as "Jim Crow Cottage" so this may require some further research ...

Dingl Ding Joseph - a children's song

A number of ballads from the 18th C, particularly those of Jac Glan Gors

Can Merthyr, which is the only one that I have to memory, first verse being:

Ye lads all through the country
Gwrandewch (listen) unto my story:
You'd better go dros Ben y Graig (over Pen y Graig)
Than go with gwraig (wife) to gwely (bed).

The singer goes on to complain about his wife who gives him thin soup and no tobacco.

siân


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: Darowyn
Date: 12 May 06 - 04:00 AM

You are just thinking about basques, aren't you?
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 11 May 06 - 05:05 PM

Yiddish poses problems because it's an inherently macaronic language itself, being German in structure with roughly one part German, one part Hebrew and one part Russian/Polish vocabulary. Does that mean we've discovered metamacaronics? ;-)

BTW, I've sometinmes wondered if Hickory dickory dock isn't a thinly-veiled reference to sex. Have I a warped mind, or just read too much Freud in my formative years?


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Kaleea
Date: 11 May 06 - 04:06 PM

Don't know about hickory dickory dock, but my 1 1/2 year old neice & I watched someone sing (& dance) "Do the Macaroni" on Sesame Street this morning.


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixing
From: GUEST,Darowyn
Date: 11 May 06 - 01:01 PM

On the off-chance that somebody might be able to trace the source, I remember reading somewhere that the nursery rhyme "Hickory,Dickory Dock" was a macaronic verse, and that the apparently nonsense words were either Basque or (more romantically) "the secret language of the Witches"
Does this strike a chord with anyone?


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Subject: RE: Macaronachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixin
From: Haruo
Date: 10 May 06 - 03:58 PM

I just posted a quadrilingual Chinook Jargon/Skokomish/Clallam/English VBS-campfire-type ditty. It was posted yesterday to Chinook List by David Robertson, a Victoria BC linguist, and tentatively attributed to Myron Eells, noted 19th-century NW missionary/linguist. Robertson found it in the BC Provincial Museum archives, along with a couple of other religious songs (one in Skokomish i.e. Twana, the other in Nisqually i.e. Southern Lushootseed).

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Mary Humphreys
Date: 19 Nov 02 - 05:48 PM

This thread started with a mention of Welsh macaronic songs. Here is a good example which has not been posted yet:
A ei di'r deryn du?

A ei di'r deryn du
To my dearest love
O cais fy nghangen gu
For I'm so deep in love.

Ni welaf yn un man
Such a damsel in my sight
A'r ferch mor lan o liw
She is a beauty bright

Mae'i gwallt yn felyn aur
Just like a ring of gold
A'i phryd fel eira gwyn
The truth it must be told.

Collected fromW. Sylvanus Jones of Llanllyfni , Sir Gaerfyrddin & published in 1941.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 19 Nov 02 - 11:43 AM

Philippa, thanks for adding that link. I didn't trace the thread and couldn't find it yesterday.

This thread makes me sad, one of the most fun threads with Annraoi, may he rest in peace.

Alice


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Joe_F
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 07:59 PM

I think there was a tradition of German-Latin macaronic carols. In addition to "In Dulce Jubilo" mentioned earlier in this thread, I remember from high school

Psallite unigenito
Christo Dei filio
Redemptori Domino
Puerulo jacenti
In praesepio.

Ein kleines Kindelein
Liegt in dem Krippelein.
Alle liebe Engelein
Dienen dem Kindelein
Und singen Ihm fein.

Psallite, etc.

(You will pardon me if I have gotten some of the endings wrong.)

The following English--dog-Latin one, which I remember from college, is probably 18th- or 19th-century British:

Amo, amas, I love a lass
As a cedar tall and sleder.
Sweet cowslip's grace is her nominative case,
And she's of the feminine gender.

Rorum corum sunt divorum,
Harum scarum divo,
Tagrag merryderry periwig and hatband,
Hic hoc horum genitivo.

Can I decline a nymph divine?
Her voice as a flute is dulcis.
[line forgotten]
And soft, when I tacto, her pulse is.

Rorum corum, etc.

O how bella my puella!
I'll kiss secula seculorum.
If I've luck, sir, she's my uxor.
O dies benedictorum!

Rorum corum, etc.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Declan
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:27 PM

One of my favourite Macaronic songs is A Match was Making/Ta mo Chleamhnas a Dheanamh as sung on the first Altan album by Mairead and Aine Ni Mhaonaigh. The song possibly wouldn't be considered purely macaronic as the alternate verses in Gailge and English are translations of each other, but it is a beautiful version of a lovely song none the less.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:20 PM

Alice, how about the maidrín ruathread

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8906#56128


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 18 Nov 02 - 01:03 PM

refresh for "Maidrin Rua"


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 16 Mar 02 - 09:18 PM

seesion 16 March at Thran Maggie's, Derry, Ireland. Dick MacGabhann & Páidí Ó Mianáin sang "One morning in May agus mé dul ag spaisteoireacht", so Beathag Morrison tried to recall "Ciad Turas Mhic Dhòmhnaill a Ghlaschu" (see 11 Dec 1998 above). So I thought maybe it's time to refresh this thread


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: GUEST,Liland qua guest
Date: 30 Sep 00 - 06:58 PM

I have the Japanese first verses, romanized, of four Christmas carols including In Dulci Jubilo, which is why I mention it here, on my website at this location. But it's not macaronic, more of a Good Christian Men Rejoice approach.

Liland


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 30 Sep 00 - 12:10 PM

'Mein Ruheplatz' only becomes macaronic in translation, probably because it is very difficult to translate in its entirety without loss of its special flavour. There is a complete Yiddish text, though. - Susanne (glad to have her cookie back)


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Chocolate Pi
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:59 AM

English/Yiddish: Mein Ruheplatz.
"Don't look for me where myrtles blossom,
You will not find me there, mein schatz.
At the machines, where lives are withered
Dorten iz mein ruheplatz, dorten iz mein ruheplatz."
In the Digitrad in a number of variations.

My highschool Spanish teacher delighted the class by playing fragments from a sort-of-rap-song which went:
"First you tell me one thing than you tell me otra cosa
How can I believe you when you are a mentirosa?"


Chocolate Pi


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Haruo
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:18 AM

My macaronic Latin/Esperanto version of In Dulci Jubilo is the latest addition to my online hymnal.

In dulci jubilo (Latin/Esperanto)

Enjoy.

Liland
Esperanto hymnologist, hymnodist and hymnist


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Subject: Lyr Add: VER MI O
From: Haruo
Date: 29 Sep 00 - 11:17 AM

Ver mi o

This is William Auld's perhaps macaronic Gaelic/Esperanto version of, I am guessing, "Sad am I without thee" as given in Marta Evans' Kantfesto I (Kanada Esperanto-Asocio, 1982?), in the compilation of which I collaborated, with slight emendations of the punctuation and h for circumflex; I'm pretty sure it had appeared previously in one of Auld and Hill's collections (probably Kantanta mia bird' or Floroj sen kompar'), but I don't have them at hand. I think the Gaelic has been respelt for non-Gaels (e.g. "Ver" might be "Bhair" or some such)... And I should say I don't consider this true macaroni; I think of true macaroni as much more integrated where it switches tongues, as in In Dulci Jubilo or the Boar's Head Carol.

REF: Ver mi o---ro van o
Ver mi o----ro van i
Ver mi o-ru o ho
Mi malghojas sen vi.

1. Se mi so-las kaj la mar'
nok-te hur-las en de-fi',
gvi-das lu-mo de_l' am'
mi-ajn pa-shojn al vi.

2. Mi-a har-po de la ghoj',
Mi-a ko-ra me-lo-di',
gvi-da lu-no de_l' nokt',
vi lu-ma-das al mi.

My MIDI of the tune is accessible at Melodio de "Ver mi o".

I don't know what the Gaelic says, but the Esperanto means more or less:

REF: ?(Gaelic)? / ?(Gaelic)? / ?(Gaelic)? / I am sad without you.

(aka, of course, Sad am I without thee!)


1. If I'm alone and the sea / howls at night in challenge, / the light of love guides / my steps to you.

2. My harp of joy, / My melody of the heart, / guiding moon of the night / you keep shining on me.

Now I'll go to the Digitrad Database and see what the English singing version looks like... (I'm a native anglophone of an eighth Gaelic (also half Sassenach, a quarter Norsky, and an eighth undecided) ancestry, but this song has hitherto been part of my Esperanto cultural heritage only.)

Liland
Esperanto hymnodist
Christmas Carols in Esperanto

PS: HTML test: Mi malĝojas sen vi (Encoding: Unicode UTF-8)


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLAN ABHAILE (Dermot Henry)
From:
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 11:07 AM

SLAN ABHAILE (words and music by Dermot Henry; recorded by Cathie Ryan, bi-lingual chorus)
Dermot Henry, ASCAP/ACORN

The sun is down; the moon is blue
I think they know that I'm missing you
But time will heal this heartfelt pain
As soon as I see you again

Chorus
Slan abhaile.
Slan go foill
Safe home, good luck until we meet again
Beidh mo chroi seo briste gan thu a stor
This heart of mine will be broken without you my love
No go gcasfad aris orainn
Until we meet again
Eist is bi ag smaoineamh
Listen and be thinking
Ar an gceol 'ta ag teacht
On the music that is coming
O mo chroi seo amach
From the depths of my heart.

I see an island, you're on the pier
I see you crying in the misty air
You look so lonely and there's no one near
Wish I could hold you, wish you were here

Chorus

Look out your window when you're feeling blue
You'll see a bluebird looking in at you
Lay down your head, let yourself be free
Take in your deepest breath and sing with me

Chorus


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Subject: Mícheál Mór, bi-lingual song
From: Philippa
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 10:42 AM

the link didn't work, but you can just go to http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/corpus/dain/


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Subject: Lyr Add: MÍCHEÁL MÓR (David Mackenzie)
From: Philippa
Date: 30 Jul 99 - 10:37 AM

verses submitted by David Mackenzie to the Gaeilge-B mailing list in 1997. I found the the poem (without those annoying translations in brackets!] at:
www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/corpus/dain/micheal_mor.html


MÍCHEÁL MÓR

I heard this story ó mo athair [from my father],
(if you haven't Gaelic it doesn't matter)
This rural Ireland tragic tale
Narrates a sad seductive scéal [story]
Concerning lust without discretion
Agus beagnach rudaí eile freisin.[and a few other little things]

Uair amháin - fadó, fadó, [once upon a time]
On a little farm near Carraroe,
Lived [a] buachaill maith [good boy] named Mícheál Mór,
An only son of thirty four.
When work was done at end of day
He'd settle down with cupán tae [cup of tea]
And seldom felt the call to stroll
Or spend the evening time ag ól[drinking],
His intellectual needs were drawn
From books like Peig and Iosagán.

And so it was bliain in, bliain out [year in, year out]
Our Mícheál hadn't moved about.
He dreamt of cailíns [girls]- most men do-
But never sinned, an dtuigeann tú [do you understand]?

Meanwhile - up in Átha Cliath -
a cailín deas had a bright idea
When laethanta saoire [holiday] time came by
decided she would like to try
áit beag, ciúin,[a quiet little place] like Carraroe.
No foreign food - not far to go
and there to meet the native clan
Agus b'fhéidir{perhaps], find herself a man.

This cailín deas [pretty colleen] with eyes so blue
Was known in town as City Sue.
The lusty buachaillí [lads]came crawling
And all agreed she was go h-álainn.[beautiful]
She left her men in state of shock
Oh Mícheál Mór - bí cúramach ![be careful]

This scarlet woman knows each trick
She's heading west - beware a mhic [sonny]!
The lights shone in the Parish Hall
For the local Fáinne*-wearers Ball.
Bhí Mícheál ann..... Bhí Susie ann....{Micheal was there, susie was there]
Dressed in a most seductive gown.
[*the Fáinne is a badge indicating that the wearer is an Irish-speaker]

Our brave Cuchulainn of the West
His hurling medals across his chest
Exclaimed - when City Sue came in;
"In ainm Dé ! - well féach ar sin !"[in the name of Gaod, well, look at that!]
Though nervous - still - he took a chance
"Céad Míle Fáilte [100,000 greetings] - will you dance ?"
Go luath [quickly], on the floor they strut
Cheek to cheek - from mouth to foot.
She whispered into Mícheál's ear:
"Éist liom [listen] now, let's disappear,
We'll use my place, - the door's unlocked,
You'll stay the night - Seomra a h-ocht".[room 8]

Chríost ! Mícheál's ceann [head] was in a spin,
Ní raibh sé thinking thoughts mar sin ![he wasn't thinking such thoughts]
He blessed himself - this Jezebel
Would surely damn his soul to Hell.
He stood aghast - could hardly stutter
So off he bolted - ar a rothar [on his bike]
And straight abhaile [home] - into bed
Decades of the rosary said.

Mícheál Mór still sleeps alone
In his leaba bheag [little bed]- Ochón Ochón [alack and alas]!
He often dreams of Seomra a h-ocht ....
What might have been, Oh Mícheál bocht[poor] !

shades of Ros na Rún [Irish tv soap with a lot of Bearla thrown in]. Being bi-lingual does extend the range for rhymes!


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Subject: Mac Con Mara's macaronic
From: Philippa
Date: 22 Jul 99 - 02:05 PM

Usually in Irish/Gaelic-English macaronic verse, the lines in each language fit together without contradiction. The following ballad, however, is designed to deceive the monoglot. I have copied this song from James Healy. Ballads From the Pubs of Ireland. Cork: Mercier, 1965, 4th edition 1971. According to Healy's notes, the author Donnchadh Mac Con-Mara emigrated (in the 18th century) to Newfoundland and composed this poem on the spot when some English soldiers at a public house in St John's asked him for a song. Healy writes: "Extemporaneously he ran off the following to the delight of the sailor who understood the English part, and to the double-delight of the Irish present who understood it all. " I have copied the spelling from Healy's book; I suspect a couple of errors, but in most cases where the spelling deviates from the present-day standard I recognise a familiar archaic form. Mac Con-Mara's best known song is "Bán-Chnoic Éireann-ó"

MacNamara's Bilingual Ballad

As I was walking one evening fair,
Agus mé go déanacha m-baile Sheagáin [and I lately in St John's]
I met a gang of English blades
Agus iad da d-traohadh ag neart a námhaid [and they being subdued by the strength of their enemies]

I boozed and drank both late and early,
With those courageous 'men-of-war;'
'S gur bhinne liom Sasanaigh ag ruith ar
's gan do Ghaoidhil ann acht fíor bheagán. [and sweet it was for me to see English retreating and only a few Irish there]

I spent my fortune by being freakish,
Drinking, raking and playing cards;
Gidh ná raibh airgiod agam, 'ná greithe, [Although I had no money or jewels]
Na rád san t-saogal, achd nídh gan áird! [or anything in the world that was valuable]
Then I turned a jolly tradesman,
By work and labour I lived abroad;
'S bíoch ar m' fallaing-si gur mór an bhréag sin [And by my soul, but that's a great lie-]
Is beag dén t-saothar do thuit le m' láimh. ['Twas little work that I did]

Newfoundland is a fine plantation
It shall be my station till I die,
Mo crádh! Go m'fhearr liom a bheith a n-Éire [Alas, I'd rather be in Ireland]
Ag díol gáirteirighe, ná ag dul fá'n g-coill; [selling garters or taking to the woods]
Here you may find a virtuous lady
A smiling fair one to please your eye,
An paca staigionnadh is measa tréithe, [A pack of whores of the worst kind]
Go m-beireadh mé ar a bheith as radharc! [- may I be swept out of their sight!]

I'll join in fellowship with 'Jack-of -all-Trades,'

The last of August could I but see;
Atá fhios ag Coisdhealbhadh 's ar maghaisdir báid é, [Costello knows, and he's a ship's master]
Gur b'olc an láimh mé ar muir 'ná air tír; [that I'm no good on sea or land]
If fortune smiles, then I'll be her darling,
But if she scorns my company
Déanfad 'Bainistídhe an Toill anáirde.' [I'll manage myself a little hideout]
'S fada ón áit-si do bheidheadh mé 'rís [and it's far from this place I'll be again]

Come drink a health boys, to Royal George,
Our chief commander, nár órdaigh Críosd; [not blessed by Christ]
'S biodh bhúr n-athchuingidhe chum Muire Mhatair [And let your prayers to Mother Mary be]
É fein 's a ghárdaighe do Leagadh síos; [that he and his gansters may be struck down]
We'll fear no Cannon, nor 'War's Alarms',
While noble George will be our guide,
A Chríost go bhfeiceadh mé an bhrúid da chárnadh [O Christ; May I see the brute defeated]
Ag an Mac so ar fán uainn thall san bhFrainc [by this son {Prince Charles Edward Stuart,Bonnie Prince Charlie'} astray from us over in France]


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Subject: The Quiet Land of Erin
From: Philippa
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 07:47 AM

At Alice's behest, I've posted a singable English version, not a literal translation, at:
Ard Tí Chuain


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Alice
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 07:05 PM

Thanks for bringing this thread back. I was thinking of it when I posted to "lost loves" about The Quiet Land of Erin. Would it count? I would be interested in a translation to English of the Gaelic words in Quiet Land. I've only heard it as recorded by ... who else... Mary O'Hara.

alice in montana


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Philippa
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 06:03 PM

Annraoi has a copy of the book, johnm, but it was good of you to mention it.


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: johnm (inactive)
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 05:49 PM

Just came across a book in the Iona College Library called An tAmhran Macaronach by Diarmaid O Muirithe, Dublin 1980. it lists some 79 macronic songs. Introduction is in Irish, including two versions of An Maidrin Rua


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Wolfgang
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 05:40 AM

On the new Chieftains CD, Tears of Stone, there's 'Jimmy, mó mhíle stór' in two languages, a song perfectly fitting in this thread. And there's 'A stór mó chroí, when you are far away' on the same album.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Macarónachas / Macaronic Songs. Language mixi
From: Annraoi
Date: 30 Jan 99 - 12:19 PM

Good on you, Bobby Bob. I don't know what some people get out of this type of infantile rubbish. Annraoi


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