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Any glottal stops down your way?

Mark Cohen 22 Mar 04 - 02:23 AM
Allan C. 21 Mar 04 - 11:52 PM
Peace 21 Mar 04 - 09:34 PM
Cluin 21 Mar 04 - 07:50 PM
Mark Cohen 20 Mar 04 - 03:38 PM
Mark Cohen 19 Mar 04 - 11:48 PM
cowbun 19 Mar 04 - 02:59 PM
gnomad 19 Mar 04 - 01:32 PM
McGrath of Harlow 19 Mar 04 - 09:08 AM
GUEST,dulcimer 18 Mar 04 - 05:52 PM
GUEST 18 Mar 04 - 04:16 PM
GUEST,padgett 18 Mar 04 - 04:48 AM
GUEST,dulcimer 17 Mar 04 - 07:38 PM
Firecat 17 Mar 04 - 04:10 PM
open mike 17 Mar 04 - 11:06 AM
Cluin 17 Mar 04 - 09:05 AM
GUEST 17 Mar 04 - 07:51 AM
AKS 17 Mar 04 - 07:02 AM
InOBU 16 Mar 04 - 02:07 PM
Mark Cohen 16 Mar 04 - 04:48 AM
AKS 16 Mar 04 - 03:36 AM
Stephen R. 16 Mar 04 - 01:17 AM
GUEST,leeneia 15 Mar 04 - 11:40 PM
Jim Dixon 15 Mar 04 - 06:09 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Mar 04 - 04:42 PM
GUEST,Shlio 15 Mar 04 - 04:33 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Mar 04 - 02:46 PM
dick greenhaus 15 Mar 04 - 02:01 PM
McGrath of Harlow 15 Mar 04 - 01:48 PM
okthen 15 Mar 04 - 12:17 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Mar 04 - 12:11 PM
Lighter 15 Mar 04 - 11:50 AM
Pied Piper 15 Mar 04 - 11:50 AM
Jim Dixon 15 Mar 04 - 10:51 AM
Richard Bridge 15 Mar 04 - 09:25 AM
GUEST,Mike W 15 Mar 04 - 07:43 AM
An Pluiméir Ceolmhar 15 Mar 04 - 07:15 AM
Skipjack K8 15 Mar 04 - 06:50 AM
Doktor Doktor 15 Mar 04 - 06:14 AM
s&r 15 Mar 04 - 05:53 AM
pavane 15 Mar 04 - 05:10 AM
GUEST,Paul Burke 15 Mar 04 - 03:52 AM
Mark Cohen 15 Mar 04 - 03:29 AM
Hrothgar 15 Mar 04 - 02:17 AM
Rapparee 14 Mar 04 - 08:57 PM
Charley Noble 14 Mar 04 - 08:49 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Mar 04 - 08:45 PM
McGrath of Harlow 14 Mar 04 - 08:22 PM
Peace 14 Mar 04 - 07:47 PM
Amos 14 Mar 04 - 07:43 PM
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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 22 Mar 04 - 02:23 AM

Royal Pain, of course. No, actually I believe it's Received Pronunciation. I recall learning about that in a linguistics course in college. I'll let other more informed types give more details.

By the way, nobody noticed my gaffe earlier, when I called the Hebrew or German or Scottish ch a "glottal fricative." In fact, the sound is made by putting the back of the tongue against the palate, and doesn't come from the glottis at all. Arabic, though, has a couple of glottal consonants. I think that the Hebrew letter kuf, which was transliterated in older texts as "Q", once was used to indicate a glottal stop, as in Arabic, but modern Hebrew does not use this sound and kuf is now pronounced "k". That might be what Brucie was referring to up above.   I also think that the Hebrew letter ayin, now considered to be a silent letter equivalent to the aleph, once had a similar, but softer, sound, again as in modern Arabic.

But I may be wrong on all that as well.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Allan C.
Date: 21 Mar 04 - 11:52 PM

Please pardon my ingorance. I've seen numerous references to "RP". What does that mean?


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Peace
Date: 21 Mar 04 - 09:34 PM

I thought she was a character on Star Trek. The lady officer. Well, live and learn. It then isn't that time of the month fo girls? You know, when the egg drops? (As in, she's uvulating!)


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Cluin
Date: 21 Mar 04 - 07:50 PM

Mark, re the uvula... an old girlfriend of mine used to call hers the cumcatcher.

Oops, did I say that out loud?


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 20 Mar 04 - 03:38 PM

PS--AKS, you got me this time..."plosive" is the right word.

A,
M


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 19 Mar 04 - 11:48 PM

Uh, sorry, open mike, but the epiglottis is the flaplike structure that swings down to cover the glottis when you swallow. You can't usually see it without a laryngoscope, though I sometimes do in small children who can open their mouths very wide.

You may remember the Gary Larson cartoon, showing somebody looking at a test paper that said "Medical School Final Exam, Extra Credit Question: What do you call that thing that hangs down in the back of your throat?"

The answer is: the uvula. It means "little grape."

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: cowbun
Date: 19 Mar 04 - 02:59 PM

Oce went to Otley locals say O;leey funny its nea Bradford better known as Bra;fud


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: gnomad
Date: 19 Mar 04 - 01:32 PM

I'm surprised to see nothing from a Hull member. I grew up there and had a fairly ripe local accent, of which the dominant feature was the glottal stop (as my despairing parents were only too willing to tell me!).

I have pretty much lost it now after 20+ years away, but talking with natives reminds me, and I'm sure it will still be prevalent in the area.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 19 Mar 04 - 09:08 AM

the northern English practice of using a glottal stop instead of "the".

I'm not sure if it is a glottal stop technically or not, but if nt it's very similar.

And something that is also similar to that, in a way, is what Neil Armstrong said when he stepped on the Moon - it's always quoted as "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind", and there are all jokes about him for missing out the "a" before man. I don't think he did miss it out, I think he articulated it with a kind of glottal stop - "That's one small step fr ' man, one giant leap for mankind,"


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,dulcimer
Date: 18 Mar 04 - 05:52 PM

How bout Kitten, mitten, cotten?   Do you really say those t's? I admit to glottal stops in the middle of those words.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Mar 04 - 04:16 PM

Like Serbocroatian (if one still dares call it that) and Lithuanian, Latvian has preserved a tonal system. One of the three tones involves a glottal stop; pitch falls after the stop.

Stephen


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,padgett
Date: 18 Mar 04 - 04:48 AM

try the Yokshire 'tint in tin'
it isn't in the tin

werz tha bin?

where have you been?

hey up thee (hey up dee ~ Sheffield)

Hello, how are you?

Of course Eastenders have alot to answer for, the Londoners' accent is responsible for the lost 'T' in many cases a ~ definite deterioration/corruption of the English language


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,dulcimer
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 07:38 PM

I grew up in Michigan and ending "t"s were usually glottal stops. "What" was pronounced "Wha'" with that "stop" at the end of it.   Same with words like It, that, caught, bat, ...... on and on. Ending t was a glottal sound.    Maybe we were just lazy talkers in Flint, where I grew up.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Firecat
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 04:10 PM

Well, I'm in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, and I do tend to use glottal stops sometimes, especially when I'm chatting to my friends (my accent goes a lot broader then!!). Mind you, I tend to lose my accent a bit when I'm working, and I lose it completely when I'm singing, so it completely depends on what I'm doing.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: open mike
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 11:06 AM

I thought this was a thread about yodelling!
and there is a great song on cathy fink and marcy marxer's
kids album teaching a yodel....where they alternate
ahhh-eeee-ahhh-eeee with notes of a fifth interval apart...
little-old-lady-who ?

fascinating videos, mark,

the thing that hands down between the tonsils is the Epiglottis...
i remember a cartoon where some character was hitting it with
boxing gloves on as if it were one of those boxing thingies...

and yes, uh uh has a definate glottal stop between the "uh's"


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Cluin
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 09:05 AM

You hear a more pronounced glottal stop in the Glaswegian accent than the Edinburghian one, I found.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 07:51 AM

Nobody has mentioned the northern English practice of using a glottal stop instead of "the". This is usually written as a " t' " as in "down t'pit", but it sure isn't pronounced as a "t".


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: AKS
Date: 17 Mar 04 - 07:02 AM

Of course, Mark, I seem to have tried to be a bit too brief...:-)

The glottal stop, btw, is called "laryngal plosive/stop" (laryngaaliklusiili in Fin) by the Fennists (those who study Finnish - academically that is) here.

AKS


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: InOBU
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 02:07 PM

Glottal stops? Nope, just the sound of pints going down at the Half King where... SORCHA DORCHA will be at the HALF KING restaurant and pub, this Wends. Saint Patrick's Day on 23rd street between 10th and 11th Ave. from 7 pm to 10 ... As expected Lorcan Otway on vocals uilleann pipes flute whistle bodhran and the great Jane Kelton on flute whistle and key board, Seanin An Fear on Mandolin, Joe Charupakorn on guitar... the joint is already rumbling, so stay from Give us a drink of water to An Phis Fluich, all yer ol' favs...
Cheers, Is mise, le meas, Lorcan Otway


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 04:48 AM

Well, let's see if we can straighten out some of you folks... [insert stupid little smiley face thing here]

AKS: You're half right, kind of. There are two vocal cords. (The correct anatomical term is "vocal folds" or "vocal ligaments," but even my pedanticism has its limits!) The organ that produces the voice is the larynx, which contains the vocal cords. The glottis is in fact the space between the vocal cords. Now you know!

Jim: First, you were right, of course. And I did catch somebody!

Second, you can tell precisely when you have executed a true glottal stop: you can't breathe. That is, no air can pass in or out of the trachea (windpipe) when the glottis is closed. Try holding your breath and you'll probably get it.

Third, you're right that the difference between a "hard" and "soft" glottal stop is related to air pressure. It's more like the difference between an initial "P" (the P in "Pa") and an ending "P" (the P in "up") for most English speakers. One ends with a puff of air and the other doesn't. The speech pathologists say that one consonant is "aspirated." (If you listen to a native Russian speaker you'll notice that they don't aspirate their initial P's and T's.) However, this is not like the difference between "P" and "B", which has to do with whether your vocal cords are vibrating when you make the sound. B is "voiced" and P isn't. But you were on the right track!

Here is a fascinating video of the larynx during breathing, taken through a laryngoscope, that shows the vocal cords opening and closing. At one point the glottis is closed. (I'm not sure if everybody will be able to see the movie.) Here is a diagram of what you're looking at in the video.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: AKS
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 03:36 AM

In Finnish, the words beginning with a vowel, in fact begin with a glottal stop, much the same way as in German. Then we have a few occasions where the glottal stop occurs at the end of the word, where it behaves just like the rest of the consonants (=assimilates with next c). It is not a "full" phoneme and there's no letter for it in ortography, though one could name some minimal pairs on it, eg Anna (name) vs anna' 'give!'(imperative singular).
The gs does not occur in the middle of the word, in Fin.

Glottis, btw, is the organ that produces the fundamental frequency of human voice, the vocal cord.

AKS


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Stephen R.
Date: 16 Mar 04 - 01:17 AM

No, it isn't right that classical Arabic lacks the glottal stop. It has glottal stops; the difference is that some colloquial dialects also substitute the glottal stop for other consonants, and that isn't classical.

Mark is right that properly the apostrophe is reversed in Hawaiian, but this will confuse you Arabists out there, because in romanizing Arabic the straight-ahead apostrophe is written for the hamzah (glottal stop) and the bass-ackwards one for the letter 'ain. If you think the glottal stop is fun, you will love 'ain; you make it be pulling the root of your tongue as far back toward the back of your head as you can and then trying to say something. If you practice it in public, someone will probably perform the Heimlich Manoeuvre on you.

Stephen


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 11:40 PM

I used to know a teaching assistant from South Africa who used a glottal stop in "bottom," as in "Make sure to note the scale at the bot'om of the map." It was cute.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 06:09 PM

I don't know how you could tell whether the glottis stops the throat completely or only partially without sticking a video camera down someone's throat. Do you suppose that's ever been done?

By the way, I think the glottis is what cats use to purr. I understand no one knows for certain, because the minute you stick anything down a cat's throat to get a peek, it stops purring! I think you'd have a similar problem trying to observe a glottal stop.

Maybe an ultrasound image would work.

My hunch is, all glottal stops close the throat completely, and the only difference between a soft-subtle glottal stop and a loud-distinct one is the amount of air pressure you put behind it -- the same as any consonant, like B or P.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 04:42 PM

I have a feeling that you normally only get a proper glottal stop, London style anyway, when it's an "o" in front of a "t". When t;s some other vowel, or some other consonent, you don't
get that little twitch in your throat. Stick your hand on your throat, and I think you'll feel what I mean.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,Shlio
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 04:33 PM

Darn 'ere in essex ('speshly over in in Clacers (or Clacton)) we figure "t"s are way to much bover. Bu' we ain' gonna move our glo'is none, neiver. Wha'd we wanna do tha' for? If a le'er is too much efor', we jus' leave i' ou', alrigh'?


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 02:46 PM

Dick, a lot depends on definition and your background.
'glo'al' is not glottal, that's elision (many other examples given in previous threads).
My glottis does not close on silk, ilk or milk, nor does my wife's but I agree that I have heard it from non-British Isles descendants in NY.

Now what I said about a census question- Hmmm, are Bush supporters more or less glottal than Kerry suporters? Just as valid a question as many of those being asked in polls on CNN, etc.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 02:01 PM

In the New York area, at least, there's a plethora of glottal stops (how do you think folks here would pronounce "glo'al)
One that's less often noticed is in the single-syllable words like "silk" and "milk"--the "lk" becomes a swallow, rather than a sound involving the touching of the tongue to the front teeth.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 01:48 PM

Amazing stuff... "Where but on the Mudcat" indeed.

I was trying to imagine learning how to do a glottal stop from teh instruction bnook - "Now close your glottis partially/completely.!

Most people (by a very long way) haven't got a clue what a glottis is. I'm not at all sure myself (somewhere in the back of the throat, a flap of skin, or a muscle or something). And I'm not even sure when I'm closing it. But there probably are people for which this kind of explanation and instruction does actually help.

For me it'd have to be a question of "Try to make a sound like this" -and finally, when it comes right, "By George, you've got it!" But God knows how...

I think all this has implications for the way we learn other things to do with music. There are two basically different ways of doing it, and typically, a lot of the time, we find it hard to believe that there are other people who really are different to us, when it comes to that kind of thing.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: okthen
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 12:17 PM

Q, the similarity between New York accents and Eastend of London accents is no accident, when America was used as a penal colony a lot of London's criminals were transported to the USA. Also the modern Australian accent is very similar to the Suffolk accent, due to the fact that a lot of Suffolk magistrates owned land in Australia and they sent a lot of their "customers" there as cheap labour.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 12:11 PM

Looks like some of this is a matter of degree. The glottis does not completely close on 'mountain' or 'happy easter.' I would consider neither of these as having a glottal stop.
Lighter, trying out the 'u' words, my glottis doesn't completely close
The comments about 'uh-uh' intrigued me so I went to the neighbors last night. I found that I actually do insert the glottal stop. My wife says it with partially open glottis. Of two neighbor females, one came close to uh-(h)uh with open glottis, another (from Ireland) closed her glottis.

Now if the next census includes this on the questionaire.....


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Lighter
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 11:50 AM

Plenty of New Yorkers pronounce the words "bottle," "Italy," and some others with a glottal stop in place of the "t." Maybe the most commonly pronounced glottal stop in America occurs in the middle of "mountain."

Most any English word that starts with a vowel, when pronounced WITH EMPHASIS or IN ISOLATION FROM OTHER WORDS, will actually begin with a glottal stop. Try it.

When carefully pronounced, all German words beginning with a vowel start with a glottal stop.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Pied Piper
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 11:50 AM

Mike W are you being tong in cheek? Or do you really believe that elitist drivel.
For my part I'm proud not to be an RP speaker and, revel in the regional diversity of accent and dialect.
If you ever come eo' to see Jeano' you must say iyo'.

TTFN
PP


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 10:51 AM

An Pluiméir Ceolmhar is correct. Glottal stops are often used in American English to separate words, where the first word ends with a vowel and the next word begins with a vowel. Try saying "Happy Easter" without a glottal stop and the words run together – "Happeeeester." The glottal stop is more likely to be used when you are trying to speak very distinctly or in a dignified manner. It sounds sloppy without, relatively speaking.

Most people are unaware of this. Elementary school teachers – from whom we get most of our ideas about "right" and "wrong" pronunciations – usually don't call attention to such things unless there is a "problem" – not everyone is pronouncing things the same way.

Glottal stops aren't difficult for Americans to pronounce; it's more difficult to get people to notice them.

By the way, I think Mark Cohen was pulling your leg.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 09:25 AM

Jean Redpath used to tell a story about a cricket match in Cowdenbeath. The light was fading and the defending batsmen were being careful to play out to a draw. A voice came from the pavilion exhorting the batsmen to "'i' oo' a' i'".

In RP, that would be "hit out at it".


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,Mike W
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 07:43 AM

Mcgrath of Harlow i think you are attributing too much respect to the practice of ommiting the T sound from pronuciation to infer that the speaker actually makes an effort to substitute the consonant with some form of throat muscle spasm.

Surely it is just laziness on the part of those who speak like this and the sound is left out altogether.

Difficult to do if you are an RP speaker as it goes against the grain.

Let's hope it is just a passing fashion and they will grow out of it.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 07:15 AM

Beg to disagree with Mark's "Does American English have glottal stops? Uh-uh. No way."

There are plenty of glottal stops in American English, and in every other variant of English that I can think of, but not with the value of a separate consonant. They serve as a "grace note" on the following vowel, making it more distinct. Consequently they often pass unnoticed. I imagine most Americans would insert a glottal stop before the second "uh" of "uh-uh" without even realising they were doing it.

The glottal stop is a characteristic feature of German pronunciation too, but also only with this grace-note function. But because it occurs much more than in English, teachers of German tend to emphasise it when teaching English-speakers.

Arabic, incidentally, apart from the "cutting hamza", also has a consonant which as far as I can determine is a glottal fricative, but teachers and manuals don't seem to have hit on the idea of describing it in those terms. As a result, people trying to learn Arabic make a bigger thing of it than warranted and wrongly imagine they are incapable of pronouncing it at all.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Skipjack K8
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 06:50 AM

What is the origin of the hard 't' that now features in Estuary? It is the opposite of the glottal stop, in that it exagerates the 't', as in 'that bloke's a nuTTer' and 'shuT it!' Maybe that's just it, hard; hard pronounciation by hard men.

Also, I'm a little confused, as I am a mongrel RP/accent sponge, and a Southerner living in 'the north', to know why my children refer to our local market town as 'Ba-u', when local youth dialect knows it as 'Barton'. My children's lazy speech is meant to crave acceptance by their local peer group, but by sounding different. Is it Albert Square cachet?


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Doktor Doktor
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 06:14 AM

Norfolk UK - as in "Noarf'k 'n good" & "eye gott'a goe there" ... "well yew want'a be careful then"


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: s&r
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 05:53 AM

Bra'ford?

see earlier thread

stu


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: pavane
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 05:10 AM

They are a feature of the London accent(s), but rather overdone in the soaps.

I understand that although they are common in most Arabic dialects, Classical (Quran/Koran) Arabic does NOT have them, being based on the dialect spoken by the prophet. (If I am wrong, as usual, someone will tell us)


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: GUEST,Paul Burke
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 03:52 AM

The glo'al stop was used a lot in Salford (Lancs) back in the 50s and 60s, but largely by kids who wanted to be considered a bit hard. I can't recall adults using it. There was also another linguistic variant... much of Salford was deprived, but Bringle Eaf (Brindle Heath) was considered even below Hanky Park. The inhabitants used to have cangles in bockuls on the manklepiece.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Mark Cohen
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 03:29 AM

Does American English have glottal stops? Uh-uh. No way.

Brucie, the "ch" sound in Hebrew or in German is not really a glottal stop, since there's a sound. I believe it would be called a glottal fricative.

Oh, and the apostrophe to indicate the glottal stop in Hawaiian is actually written as a backwards apostrophe, and it's called an okina.

Aloha,
Mark


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Hrothgar
Date: 15 Mar 04 - 02:17 AM

Is this catered for in:

Oh, dear, wha' can the ma'er be
Trouble's a brewin' away down in Ba'ersea,
For'y-four coppers go' ba'ered on Sa'urday
Down a' the Suicide Arms.

???


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 08:57 PM

There's one right down the block. The glottal stops there every half hour and will drop you off downtown or at the mall or at the University.

Linguistically, however, I haven't noticed any here in Idaho. On the other hand, years back my youngest brother was studying Hebrew and taught me to say "bubble gum" and "I crave your body." The first has no glottal stops, but the latter does. I can't reproduce them, but there are three or four in the phrase.

No, I do not know Hebrew beyond those two things and "shalom."


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Charley Noble
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 08:49 PM

Glottal stops are important sounds in Ethiopia's national language Amharic, which we were introduced to in our Peace Corps training back in the 1960's. I haven't had much use for them since except as parlor tricks and entertainment on long car rides.

There were the CHE, TE, KE (and seven other varients of each) and the non-explosive versions of the same syllables would have entirely different meanings. Took me the longest time to learn to do them correctly.

Besalam,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 08:45 PM

The 'apostrophe,' when indicating a glottal stop, is more correctly labeled a 'hamzah.' It is the conventional way of marking a glottal stop in words from the Hawaiian language. It must NOT be confused with the apostrophe in contractions such as didn't or won't, where the glottis is not closed. Stephen R explains its sometimes 'k' equivalent in other Polynesian tongues, but it is not the same as English 'k' in lock, because the glottis is not completely closed, as brucie points out.
Brucie, the word LOCH in Scottish pronunciation does come close, a good approximation for English-speakers who do not have the glottal stop.
In written Hawaiian, the hamzah is important; e. g., ao is light whereas a'o is to teach. Ia is he, she or it while i'a is a fish.

Some Hawaiian words are fairly easy (Hawai'i), others are very difficult without practice (ake'ake'a, to hinder). We have to slow down between the syllables, distorting the word.

Elided words, such as many of the examples given in this thread, are not examples of words with glottal stops. We really don't have them in English. Meagher, pronounced mah er, is elided, without any glottal stop.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 08:22 PM

Yodelling involves something very close to glottal stops.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Peace
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 07:47 PM

GUEST: Had to check a spelling.

Le'chaim is a toast from the Hebrew language. It's hard to say if you're a North American English speaker.

Where the apostrophe is is where the glottal stop will occur. (It is just by chance that the apostrophe falls there.)

luhKiam. Said properly, people in elevators will duck figurin' you have a gob on the way out.


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Subject: RE: Any glottal stops down your way?
From: Amos
Date: 14 Mar 04 - 07:43 PM

At's roigh'. inni'? Sure i' is!!

A


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