mudcat.org: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?

DigiTrad:
ADMIRAL BENBOW (2)
BIRDS IN THE SPRING
BOLD GENERAL WOLFE (3)
CHARMING MOLLY
COME ALL YOU BOLD BRITONS
COME WRITE ME DOWN
CUPID'S GARDEN
DAME DURDEN
DRAWING NEARER TO THE MERRY MONTH OF MAY
DRIVE SORROWS AWAY
FOX WENT OUT (Den-O)
GOOD ALE
HARD TIMES OF OLD ENGLAND
HONEST LABOURER
INNOCENT HARE
LARK IN THE MORNING
MONTH OF MAY
OH MY LOVE IS GONE (Sussex)
OLD ADAM
OLD THRESHING SONG
PRETTY BABES IN THE WOOD
ROSE IN JUNE (2)
SHEEP-SHEARING SONG
SHEPHERD OF THE DOWNS
SPENCER THE ROVER
SPRING GLEE
STORMY WINDS
SWEET NANCY
THE BRISK AND LIVELY LAD
THE FORSAKEN MERMAID
THE MOLECATCHER
THE OLD SONGS
THE SEASONS ROUND
THRESHING SONG
TWANKY DILLO
TWO YOUNG BRETHREN
WARLIKE SEAMEN
WHEN JONES'S ALE WAS NEW (3)
WOP-SHE-AD-IT
YOU GENTLEMEN OF HIGH REKNOWN


Related threads:
BBC Arena - Copper Family (1980s) (21)
Music Hall and the Copper repertoire? (9)
New album 'Two Bob's Worth' released (5)
John Copper solo in Brighton, UK (3)
Bob Copper's 100th (1)
Bob & John Copper - Father & Son (1973) (4)
Copper Family House Concert photos (9)
Bob Copper Centenary Event - July 2015 (5)
Bob and Ron Copper album reissue (7)
New autobiog by Bob Copper, July 2013 (14)
Copper Family Video / Film (5)
Copper Family Article (15)
Lyr/Chords Req: Softly the Night (Copper Family) (10)
Copper Family in The Guardian (2)
Shepherd of the Downs (Copper Family) (19)
John Copper Interview (17)
Young Coppers (21)
Lyr Req: Bob Copper song The Life of a Man (15)
Oak, Ash & Thorn Opening for the Coppers(2000) (57)
A new honour for Bob Copper (4)
Help please:Copper fam. sleevenotes 2001 (3)
The songs Bob Copper collected-available? (5)
Coppersongs (5)
Bob Copper's birthday party tonight (8)
Bob Copper's memorial (9)
Obit: Bob Copper (1915-2004) (104) (closed)
Songs for Bob Copper (23)
Bob Copper (7)
BBC Radio 4 Bob Copper/Pete Seeger (27)
Bob Copper/Pete Seeger on Radio4(UK) NOW (6)
Bob Copper: Collecting in the 1950s (5)
Pete Seeger & Bob Copper! (2) (closed)
'New' Copper CD: Trad Lovers Alert (9)
Tune Add: Copper Family Songs on the DT (14)
Coppers discography (1)
Copper Family Songbook (15)
Bob Copper's 2000 Report (2)
Copper family (15)
Thousands and more sung by the Copper family (2) (closed)
Copper Family (10)


Jim Dixon 18 Mar 13 - 05:13 PM
Lonesome EJ 19 Nov 12 - 07:08 PM
GUEST,Lighter 19 Nov 12 - 06:51 PM
Artful Codger 19 Nov 12 - 06:44 PM
Lonesome EJ 19 Nov 12 - 04:11 PM
Steve Gardham 19 Nov 12 - 03:21 PM
Lonesome EJ 18 Nov 12 - 07:40 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Nov 12 - 04:06 PM
Lonesome EJ 18 Nov 12 - 03:12 PM
Steve Parkes 10 Jun 11 - 06:19 AM
GUEST,Liam Collins 09 Jun 11 - 05:38 PM
GUEST,phillip t 18 Feb 11 - 04:26 AM
GUEST,phillip t 18 Feb 11 - 04:14 AM
MGM·Lion 17 Feb 11 - 04:19 PM
The Sandman 17 Feb 11 - 12:46 PM
Ruth Archer 17 Feb 11 - 12:28 PM
MGM·Lion 17 Feb 11 - 11:48 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Feb 11 - 11:17 AM
Ruth Archer 17 Feb 11 - 10:43 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 17 Feb 11 - 10:36 AM
Ruth Archer 17 Feb 11 - 09:21 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Feb 11 - 08:28 AM
MartinRyan 17 Feb 11 - 07:36 AM
Jim Carroll 17 Feb 11 - 07:34 AM
Ruth Archer 17 Feb 11 - 06:47 AM
GUEST,phillip t 17 Feb 11 - 06:31 AM
scowie 11 Feb 11 - 02:25 AM
Joe Offer 10 Feb 11 - 03:07 PM
Max Johnson 10 Feb 11 - 01:36 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 10 Feb 11 - 10:17 AM
GUEST,phillipat 10 Feb 11 - 10:00 AM
Tug the Cox 09 May 09 - 09:01 PM
GUEST,Sedayne (Astray) 09 May 09 - 01:05 PM
Ron Davies 09 May 09 - 12:34 PM
Tug the Cox 09 May 09 - 11:07 AM
mcgrathof altcar 01 Aug 04 - 05:23 AM
mcgrathof altcar 01 Aug 04 - 05:20 AM
GUEST,Jon Dudley 26 Mar 03 - 02:37 AM
GUEST,Q 25 Mar 03 - 07:54 PM
Malcolm Douglas 25 Mar 03 - 06:58 PM
GUEST,Q 25 Mar 03 - 06:45 PM
nutty 25 Mar 03 - 06:30 PM
greg stephens 25 Mar 03 - 06:16 PM
toadfrog 25 Mar 03 - 04:17 PM
Just Amy 25 Mar 03 - 02:22 PM
GUEST,Q 25 Mar 03 - 01:28 PM
GUEST,JohnB 25 Mar 03 - 01:03 PM
Steve Parkes 25 Mar 03 - 10:00 AM
GUEST,Jon Dudley 25 Mar 03 - 08:44 AM
GUEST,Jim Ward 25 Mar 03 - 07:35 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:










Subject: Lyr Add: THE INNOCENT HARE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Mar 13 - 05:13 PM

From London Lavender: An Entertainment by Edward Verrall Lucas (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1912), page 144:

[There is also a tune at that source.]
[No title is given.]

|: Ye sportsmen, rouse the morning fair.
The larks are singing in the air. :|
|: Go tell your sweet lover the hounds are out. :|
Saddle your horses; your saddles prepare.
Away to the covers to look for a hare.

|: We searched the fields that grows around
Our trail is lost; our game is found. :|
|: Then out she springs; through brake she flies. :|
Follow, follow the musical horn.
Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare.

|: Our horses go galloping over the ground,
Go breathing all after the torturing hound. :|
|: Such a game she has led us four hours or more. :|
Follow, follow the musical horn.
Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare.

|: Our huntsman blows the joyful sound.
See how he scours over the ground. :|
|: Our hare's a-sinking; see how she creeps. :|
Follow, follow, the musical horn.
Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare.

|: All on the green turf she pants for breath.
Our huntsman shouts out for death. :|
|: Hullo, hullo, we've tired our hare. :|
Wine and beer we'll drink without fear.
We'll drink success to the innocent hare.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 07:08 PM

Thanks, Artful. I will consider my knuckles appropriately rapped.
However, I certainly meant nothing negative by the "raucous" comment, but rather "high spirited", "enthusiastic", "uninhibited", which are all desirable traits in the right context.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 06:51 PM

I've checked various imposing dictionaries, including the English Dialect Dictionary of ca1900, and I find no trace of "relope."

Presumably it's "elope" as misheard by somebody along the line, not necessarily at first in the song. Perhaps one of the Coppers or their acquaintances was in the habit of using it at one time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Artful Codger
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 06:44 PM

The Young Tradition version is far from "raucous"--it's only the natural edge in Peter's voice that may give that illusion; rather, it was appropriately spirited and the harmonies were tight. The lack of backing allowed the singers more lattitude to vary the rhythm and expression as needed. Listening to their rendition, even if you knew no English, you'd have a good idea what they were singing about, and you'd get some feeling of authenticity in the delivery. One can learn a lot about what to do and not do listening to such "raucous" performances.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 04:11 PM

Well, Steve, it's a Yank doing it you know, even if a southern-fried Yank. In England, I imagine it's as much a drinking song as a hunting one. I first heard it by mudcatters Rapunzel and Sedayne, who give it a rather haunting sound. When I went back and listened to Young Tradition doing it(after recording my track), I was a bit amazed by that raucous version. It now occurs to me that that is probably the traditional way of doing it.
I'm reminded of something Mitch Jane said about the coon dog song Old Blue. He said, to paraphrase, that the Dillards were at a concert where Joan Baez sang such a sad rendition of the song that people were all in tears over this old dog. But, he said, if you were ever trying to use the outhouse on a snowy winter night and some old coon dog was sheltering in there and blocking up the door, you were a lot less likely to sing the song the way Joan Baez does.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 03:21 PM

Very interesting interpretation. A pleasant sound and it makes a nice change to be able to savour the words. I've never heard it performed in such a laid-back way before, but I've been away from the scene for a long while. We always belted it out raucously with multiple harmonies back in the 60s, but it's good to hear other interpretations. I like it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 07:40 PM

Interesting, Steve. That result...the escape of the hare...makes the "success" salute to the animal much more reasonable, and gives the listener a more sympathetic view of the hunters as well. I like it!

For those who may have an interest, I have recorded a version of the song that can be viewed and heard at The Innocent Hare


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 04:06 PM

Whilst the jury is still out on this one, I have read through the whole thread and the most significant postings seem to be Jim Ward's of 25 March 2003, 7.35 AM which gives a version of the song that clearly uses the word 'elope'. Couple this with Jon's discovery that in Brasser's earliest book the term was 'alope' and we surely need not look any further, although the Leics use of the term 'relope' is tempting. Then if we take the next significant posting from mcgrathof altcar, 1 Aug, 2004, 5.20 AM the meaning of ELOPE that most fits the spirit of the song is 'a Halloo, to get hounds away, and also notice for men to come away.' then things look a lot clearer.

Joe, if the TBI entry hasn't been corrected yet, the description of the song needs altering. The meaning of the song is clearly that the hare is allowed to escape and so is not killed as stated in the description. For many huntsmen the thrill is in the chase, not the kill, so allowing a spirited hare to escape would make for perhaps a repeat performance at some later stage.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 03:12 PM

Fascinating discussion, as I in turn find the song fascinating. The song has a very catchy tune, but I am struck by the sense of ritual detailed by it, and the honoring of the prey. Whether this sport is and was cruel is left to the individual to assess, but there is no doubt it is as old as the friendship between mankind and the canine.

The term relope I have taken to refer to a return by the hare along its previous track and, in conjunction with the phrase "retiring hare", an implication that the hare has gone to ground under a rock, in brush, or a hollow tree, etc. In this situation the dogs would likely be called away to prevent complete destruction of the hare.

The adjective "innocent" I also find intriguing. To a modern audience, the term conjures an immediate sympathy with the hare, for it has done no wrong to bring on its death. But I think this may be a more archaic usage, implying ignorance, even dumb instinct in reaction to threat and the chase. Whatever the specific meaning, the song is quite remarkable in that we are shown not only the structure and flow of the hunt, but we also have a sympathetic view of the desperate flight and frantic actions of the prey. At the end of the song, the hunters drink to their success, but also to that of the hare, as if the hare's skillfull avoidance of capture were not only admirable but, in some form, an honorable achievement.

But "overthinking" is the flaw of us who are given to analysis of songs that were likely understood on an organic level in their past, and still carry that power, if we let them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 06:19 AM

And you probably know that a collier is like a beagler, but with a sheepdog.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Liam Collins
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 05:38 PM

A point worth mentioning might be the distinction between "hunting" and "coursing" hares, which are two distinct "sports".
The hare is "hunted" by scent with a pack of dogs called beagles which can take hours - as per the song "The Innocent Hare".
"Coursing" is a series of short competitive high speed hunts by sight, each competition with pair of dogs called greyhounds - as per the song "Master McGrath".
Both sports are still popular in Ireland.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,phillip t
Date: 18 Feb 11 - 04:26 AM

It's the Melton Carnegie Museum. What I saw was a one year long exhibit in 2005, However all the printed material still exists in the museum.There can't be too many books with a 45rpm record in the back cover!    happy hunting!   [sorry...bad taste, I couldn't help it!]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,phillip t
Date: 18 Feb 11 - 04:14 AM

Back to the Hunting Museum in Melton Mowbray, as you comme in from the direction of Grantham it's on the left hand side just before the town centre.
    Interesting the spate of chat about hunting. I once stood on Hadrian's Wall, looking down onto a group of men and some dogs hunting a hare, [the hare got away]and it seemed so ancient and 'natural'. [yes I know hopelessly romantic!] But it seems to me that once you add the element of horses it raises the whole class thing, and additionally makes the contest hideously uneven. I think it's no accident that both the Hare and the Fox are creatures surrounded by folklore and myth, approaching reverence. What about hunting the wren on St Stephen's day? Where do the anti hunting brigade stand on that one?
    If we had to kill our own meat for food, many many more would be vegetarians!   
    There is an ancient principle of law which says that " your right to swing your fist ends where my chin begins"   If the Fox [deer, Hare or whatever] is a wild animal then it belongs to me as much as to you, so your right to kill it ends where my right to have it alive to watch and marvel at, begins.
                   cheers


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 04:19 PM

As I might just have mentioned before, a poster on another forum to which I contribute commented "MtheGM, your pedantry is legendary"; she meant it as a put-down, I suspect, but I took it as an ambivalent sort of compliment.

So:~~ what Oscar wrote was "The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable" ~~ the assonance is lost otherwise.

~M~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 12:46 PM

the unspeakable in pursuit of the inedible[Oscar Wilde],Foxes may be inedible, but they are also unspeakable, they need to be controlled, around here they are a nuiscance, destroying my poultry, biting off the heads of my ducks and leaving the body, bad luck to foxes.
however I favour control by a good marksman, not hunting, if those upper class twats[huntsmen] came on my land , along with members of Fianna Fail,Iwould take great satisfaction in shooting them too


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 12:28 PM

Hi Jim,

I understand, and I'm not a big fan of the hunt myself. But I know a lot of people round here who shoot. Yes it's sport that they heartily enjoy, but they also eat what they kill (or give it to their neighbours, ie me). I do like a rabbit or a pheasant - or indeed, a hare, and would never turn one down if it was offered. While the person who killed it might have enjoyed the sport, the animal also had a better quality of life than many farm animals. It's also healthier than most meat.

I can understand vegetarians objecting to the whole business. But as a carnivore, I don't have a lot of trouble with the majority of people who shoot for sport, and for the pot, in the countryside.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 11:48 AM

I too do find the whole idea of 'blood sports' peculiarly disagreeable and would never dream of taking part. But there is a strong tradition behind them which many people respect. And I sometimes get reminded by some of the more vociferous opponents of Lord Macaulay's saying that the Puritans' objection to bull-baiting was not that it gave pain to the bull, but that it gave pleasure to the spectators. I once quoted that in a newspaper correspondence on the topic, and came home to four literal death threats on my ansafone; which I thought somehow ironic.

~Michael~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 11:17 AM

"Jim, I've lived in the hunting heartlands for many years, and not yet seen the Quorn (now there's an ironic name) going hell for leather in hot pursuit of a cow. "
I think they would if the cow could run fast enough - no 'sport' in slaughtering anything that can't put up a bit of a show.
Sorry Ruth, I've got a bit of a 'thing' about the 'killing for pleasure' mob since I was taken to a coursing at Waterloo as an apprententice and was treated to a grandstand view of a 'string' - two dogs tearing a live hare into two pieces, watched by a mob of enthusiastic 'sportsmen'.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 10:43 AM

Mmmmm, a hare burger would do me nicely right about now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 10:36 AM

Now I'm drooling at the thoughts of an Innocent McHare Burger; a well-hung & well-marinaded relope served up with suitably rank-relish & tongue-piercing mustards - and all washed down with wine & root-beer drank with good cheer if only to toast good sportsmen all.

Quorn I do like, BTW, by the way, though avoid the Family Roast which is every bit as rancid as it looks on the box no matter how you dress it up (THIS for example).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 09:21 AM

Jim, I've lived in the hunting heartlands for many years, and not yet seen the Quorn (now there's an ironic name) going hell for leather in hot pursuit of a cow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 08:28 AM

Martin;
"Too deer"
Oh deer!
Regards back to you and J,
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 07:36 AM

Jim

Too deer, surely, in these recessionary times!

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 07:34 AM

"McDinld's"
Assume you mean McDonald's Ruth - how convenient; the beasts they're celebrating the slaughter of can be served up on their cotton-wool buns.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 06:47 AM

I love this thread.

I live near Melton and didn't even know about the hunting museum. Is it in the town museum, across from Morrisson's supermarket, next to McDinald's? I would like to have a look around, and get a copy of the book.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,phillip t
Date: 17 Feb 11 - 06:31 AM

Yes well said, they are some of the best and most descriptive songs.
    After I came across the book in the Museum in Melton Mowbray I compared the words of quite a few songs, many phrases of which would seem to be imitative of hunting horn calls, an example being in 'The Morning Looks Charming, the refrain is "Hark to the hounds, The morning is fair.." both of which seem to me to be exact copies of calls. So then the next question is which came first? ....not that it really matters!   But it would be an interesting study.
    For those interested I do have the name and author of the book, unfortunately it is in Canada and I am in England until May! But I will track it down. Cheers Phillip


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: scowie
Date: 11 Feb 11 - 02:25 AM

Interesting! In Lancashire "To slope off" is to creep away hopefully un-noticed, "To sidle off" is the same but more brazen, I always thought that "relope" was associated with the former, with an allowance for the differing dialects involved.
On the singing of Hunting songs, it is of course quite common to sing of say "Adultery" I have done it myself without feeling that I should go out and do likewise! So don't let's deprive ourselves of some of the most descriptive songs there are and of course their glorious tunes.
Perhaps we are looking at this too closely, the Irish say of such a critic that "they would cut a Skylarks throat to see what makes it sing" we should not do the same.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: DT Correction: Innocent Hare
From: Joe Offer
Date: 10 Feb 11 - 03:07 PM

I thought it might be worthwhile to post the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Innocent Hare, The

DESCRIPTION: Sportsmen and hounds hunt the hare; after searching, the game is found. She takes off running; the huntsman blows his horn; the hare is killed. The singer declares she has led them a noble run, drinks success to all sportsment and to the "innocent hare"
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1952 (recorded from Mark Fuller & Luther Hills)
KEYWORDS: death hunting sports drink animal dog
FOUND IN: Britain(England(South))
REFERENCES (1 citation):
Kennedy 251, "The Innocent Hare" (1 text, 1 tune)
Roud #1216
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Hare of Kilgrain" (theme: fatal hare hunt)
cf. "The Granemore Hare" (theme: fatal hare hunt)
cf. "The White Hare" (theme: fatal hare hunt)
cf. "Bold Reynard the Fox (Tallyho! Hark! Away!)" (theme)
cf. "The Echoing Horn" (theme)
cf. "Joe Bowman" (theme)
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Sportsmen Arouse
Sportsmen Arise
File: K251

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2010 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Roud Index Search


Here are the Digital Tradition Lyrics, which I think could use some correction:
    INNOCENT HARE
    or SPORTSMEN AROUSE
    from the singing of the Copper Family

    Sportsmen arouse, the morning is clear
    The larks are singing all in the air
    Sportsmen arouse, the morning is clear
    The larks are singing all in the air
    Go tell your sweet lover, the hounds are out
    Go tell your sweet lover the hounds are out
    Saddle your horses, your saddles prepare
    We'll away to cover to seek for a hare

    We searched the woods the groves all around
    The trail being over, the game being found...
    We searched the woods the groves all around
    The trail being over, the game being found...
    Then u-up she springs, through brake she flies...
    Then u-up she springs, through brake she flies...
    Follow, follow the musical horn
    Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare

    The huntsman blows his joyful sound
    Tally ho, me boys, all over the down
    The huntsman blows his joyful sound
    Tally ho, me boys, all over the down
    From the woods to the valleys, see how she creeps
    From the woods to the valleys, see how she creeps
    Follow, follow the musical horn
    Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare

    All along the green turf she pants for breath
    The huntsman he cries out for death
    All along the green turf she pants for breath
    The huntsman he cries out for death
    Relope, relope, retiring hare
    Relope, relope, retiring hare
    Follow, follow the musical horn
    Sing follow, hark follow, the innocent hare
    This hare has led us a noble run
    Success to sportsman, every one
    This hare has led us a noble run
    Success to sportsman, every one
    Such a chase she has led us, four hours or more
    Such a chase she has led us, four hours or more
    Wine and beer we'll drink without fear
    We'll drink a success to the innocent hare

    @English @hunt
    recorded by Young Tradition and Copper Family
    filename[ INNOHARE
    TUNE FILE: INNOHARE
    CLICK TO PLAY
    SOF

Corrected Lyrics Below
Here are the lyrics from Bob Copper's A Song For Every Season (p. 281). You'll note that several words are different.

INNOCENT HARE
or SPORTSMEN AROUSE

from the singing of the Copper Family

Sportsmen arouse, the morning is clear,
The larks are singing all in the air.
Sportsmen arouse, the morning is clear,
The larks are singing all in the air.
Go and tell your sweet lover, the hounds are out,
Go and tell your sweet lover the hounds are out.
Saddle your horses, your saddles* prepare,
We'll away to some cover to seek for a hare.

We searched the woods (and) the groves all round,
The trial being over, the game it is found.
We searched the woods (and) the groves all round,
The trial being over, the game it is found.
Then off she springs, through brake she flies,
Then off she springs, through brake she flies.
Follow, follow the musical horn,
Sing: follow, hark forward, the innocent hare.

Our huntsman blows his joyful sound,
Tally ho, my boys, all over the downs.
Our huntsman blows his joyful sound,
Tally ho, my boys, all over the downs.
From the woods to the valleys, see how she creeps,
From the woods to the valleys, see how she creeps.
Follow, follow the musical horn,
Sing: follow, hark forward, the innocent hare.

All along the green turf she pants for breath,
Our huntsman he shouts out for death.
All along the green turf she pants for breath,
Our huntsman he shouts out for death.
Relope, relope, retiring hare,
Relope, relope, retiring hare.
Follow, follow the musical horn,
Sing: follow, hark forward, the innocent hare.

This hare has led us a noble run,
Success to sportsman, every one.
This hare has led us a noble run,
Success to sportsman, every one.
Such a chase she has led us, four hours or more,
Such a chase she has led us, four hours or more.
Wine and beer we'll drink without fear,
We'll drink a success to the innocent hare.

*On the Copper Family recording, it sounds like one voice is singing "saddles" and the other "hurdles." Kennedy has "harness," which makes more sense.
Source: Bob Copper's A Song For Every Season (p. 281)
Peter Kennedy's source is his 1955 recording of Bob and Ron Copper, and Kennedy's transcription in "Folksongs of Britain and Ireland" is almost identical to the lyrics in the Bob Copper book.

@English @hunt
recorded by Young Tradition and Copper Family
filename[ INNOHARE
TUNE FILE: INNOHARE
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Max Johnson
Date: 10 Feb 11 - 01:36 PM

Well done. I've always vaguely wondered what it meant. I know a few people who go foxhunting, but have never asked them because the ones who aren't prime shits are a bit thick and probably wouldn't know.
Always loved the songs, though. Echo, bright echo!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 10 Feb 11 - 10:17 AM

Excellent! So there is truth after all!

By the way, The Innocent Hare is Rapunzel & Sedayne's contribution to Bradfordian's Mudcat Blue Plate CD project...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,phillipat
Date: 10 Feb 11 - 10:00 AM

If you go to the Museum of Hunting in Melton Mowbray Leics, uk you will find a book of hunting horn 'Calls' It identifies a call named as 'Relope' used when the fox or the hare turns back on it's own tracks thereby confusing the hounds. The huntsman then blows a call which by onomatopoeia is 'Relope' There is in the book a 45 rpm disc and thankfuly a CD so one can hear this and many other calls.
      Though personally I abhor Hare and Foxhunting,there are some damn fine songs about them!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 09 May 09 - 09:01 PM

Hey, I wasn't after any ultimate truth,, which is why I usee the word
'imply'. I've always loved the word 'relope', and will never stop singing it, but now know( thanks to the postings above) that there has never been such a word, that there was a hunting term 'elope' and it might imply what I suggested above.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Sedayne (Astray)
Date: 09 May 09 - 01:05 PM

ultimate truth shouldn't necessarily be the goal here.

The wisest words I've read on Mudcat for a long time!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Ron Davies
Date: 09 May 09 - 12:34 PM

But "relope" just sounds like an old hunting term--whether it is or not. And the fact that it sounds like an archaic term just adds to its appeal.

I'd think that ultimate truth shouldn't necessarily be the goal here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 09 May 09 - 11:07 AM

The last two posts would seem to imply that in the song, the huntsmen are calling off the hounds and letting the hare run free. ( I know this is an old thread, but curiosity led me to try and find the meaning of relope, 40 years after first hearing it!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: mcgrathof altcar
Date: 01 Aug 04 - 05:23 AM

Forgot to include this blue clicky.

A link to a glossary of hunting terms

click here


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: mcgrathof altcar
Date: 01 Aug 04 - 05:20 AM

The Jorrocks sites has a useful glossary of hunting terms and gives two definitions for the term elope.

ELOPE: A halloo, to get hounds away, and also notice for men to come away.

Elope, or Elope forward awawoy (sic): When some hounds are gone away, to call the rest.

These definitions actually seem to contradict each other.

Whatever the word elope, it seems, is an actual hunting expression. Though none of the beagling or harrier people I know are familiar with the term.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Jon Dudley
Date: 26 Mar 03 - 02:37 AM

Oh!, for goodness sake...I can't leave this alone! Conventional (sic) dictionaries might not have picked up on the meaning of 'mondegreen' but yourDictionary.com certainly has, viz....

A series of words that result from the mishearing or misinterpretation of a statement or song lyric. For example, I led the pigeons to the flag for I pledge allegiance to the flag.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
[After (Lady) Mondegreen, a misinterpretation of the line (hae laid) him on the green, from the song "The Bonny Earl of Murray".]

A case of Mudcatters in the lexicography department here methinks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 07:54 PM

Adding a little to the above by Malcolm Douglas on the Carnal and the Crane (Child No. 55):
"The carol had obviously been transmitted from mouth to mouth before it was fixed in its present incoherent and corrupted form by print.*" The asterisk is to the footnote quoted by Douglas.
Reading through the carol, "cardinal" is not beyond the realm of possibility.
The Webster's Dictionaries only have the adjectival form.

All this has little to do with relope. It seems that there ae no coursers or hunters with hounds among mudcatters so we are stuck with speculation.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 06:58 PM

The Webster entry is presumably an adjective rather than a noun?

"Carnal, cornicula, corneille, might be thought to have been long obsolete from the word not occurring in ordinary dictionaries, if in any: but it is hazardous to build conclusions on the omissions of dictionaries."

F. J. Child, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, vol. II p.7.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 06:45 PM

The OED gives the Carnal and Crow quotation and suggests that it is from the French corneille, thus crow; then questions it! The word also once meant a cardinal (religious, not the bird).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: nutty
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 06:30 PM

Sorry Greg but ...... Webster's 1913 Dictionary gives one definition of "carnal" as "flesh devouring" which could describe the crow


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: greg stephens
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 06:16 PM

The is a precedent for an English word only existing in a folk-song: the word carnal, probably meaning crow ,in "The Carnal and the Crane".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: toadfrog
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 04:17 PM

Seems to me changing from "relope" to "alope" because "alope" is in the dictionary is the ultimate act of pedantry. Who ever uses "alope" in everyday speech?

The Coppers do funny things with words. "To David's City, sin on earth"? That doesn't mean anything, but it sounds great! It's perfect - don't change it. And the Copper words to Admiral Benbow often don't make sense at all, but they sing so much better than the textbook words. Who cares what they mean? Who cares about the captains who ran away?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Just Amy
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 02:22 PM

Isn't it where you elope with a guy, divorce him, then elope with him again.. The second time being called "relope" ;-p


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 01:28 PM

Some nice mondegreens in thread 46820: mondegreen
The dictionaries haven't picked the word up yet. If someone would send the article picked up by Steve Parkes to the OED, it would be put in the pile of additions. Other dictionaries are limited in size and will only incorporate a word when it has achieved widespread useage.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,JohnB
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 01:03 PM

I only picked up the word "mondegreen" from here Jon so don't feel bad. I thought it was just me who didn't know it before. The above links give the full explanation. I do/would sing "lend an ear" though not frequently as it's not a song we do, that's the way I have it my mind though.
Friends, Romans, Countrymen lend me your rears. NO! I'm not like that.
JohnB.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 10:00 AM

Oh no, Jon (wow -- how's that for bona fides! You'll just have to join up!) I didn't feel chastised. I don't mind a bit of chastisement from, say, Liz the Squeak or Julie B, but this isn't the time or place!

Steve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Jon Dudley
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 08:44 AM

Well done Jim! See you next Sunday!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Innocent Hare' What does 'relope' mean?
From: GUEST,Jim Ward
Date: 25 Mar 03 - 07:35 AM

The Sussex County Magazine of February, 1931 gives the texts of some hunting songs collected by one G.B.Shiffner. During the forward he states the songs are "no doubt given in a perverted text owing, I think, to the habit of the rural singer of learning them by rote rather than from the printed word, and the fact that the sense of a sentence troubled him little, so long as the tune pleased him".
'Sportsman Arouse' was noted as a great favourite, and the verse in question is given as

All on the green turf she pants for breath
The huntsman, he shouts out "Tis death!"
Elope! Elope! We have tired our hare!
Wine and beer we will drink without fear
And drink success to the innocent hare.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 27 October 8:41 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.