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Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?

In Mudcat MIDIs:
An Paistin Fionn


GUEST 19 Apr 07 - 02:20 PM
GUEST 20 Apr 07 - 03:35 PM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 20 Apr 07 - 03:52 PM
GUEST 21 Apr 07 - 09:42 AM
GUEST 25 Apr 07 - 04:48 PM
Declan 26 Apr 07 - 03:26 AM
George Papavgeris 29 Sep 09 - 03:14 PM
GUEST,AnCiotog 28 Oct 11 - 05:54 AM
GUEST 04 Jan 14 - 11:09 AM
MartinRyan 04 Jan 14 - 06:08 PM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Apr 07 - 02:20 PM

Oops! Something went badly wrong there!:

To some extent it depends, these days, on where you learned your Irish! As a rough phonetic guide, just run together:
vie    (as in seek someone's attention)
ing    (as in willing)
shuh    (as at the front end of "shovel"!)

As to why.... see Felipa's comments earlier in the thread.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Apr 07 - 03:35 PM

thanks! i'm trying to learn the chorus of "moll dubh a' ghleanna" and got stuck where it goes "'s d'a bhfaighinnse fe'in mo roghainn de mhna' oga deasa 'n domhain".
and what does bhfa...whatever mean?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 20 Apr 07 - 03:52 PM

It's a conditional tense of the verb "to get" . So your example means "Were I to get my choice of all the nice young women of the world.." or, less formally, "If I had my choice...".

Regards

p.s. You might check the spelling of "roghainn" in that line - I suspect it may be rogha (pr. row (as in fight!) - ah!)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Apr 07 - 09:42 AM

The two Irish love songs - "Siúl a Rún" and "An Páistín Fionn" do have somewhat similar airs, but they appear to have been mixed together in some of the above posts to this thread. i'm quite sure Niamh Parsons isn't to blame for this, someone has made a blunder.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Apr 07 - 04:48 PM

nope, it's "roghainn" in my translation, while i'm at it i may as well ask how that's pronounced too :)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: Declan
Date: 26 Apr 07 - 03:26 AM

Gaelic pronunciation varies depending what part of the country you come from. Roghainn could either be pronounced like round with no d at the end or as row-win (with a quick win at the end - and we should always look for quick wins).   

I suspect roghain has morphed from rogha so as to rhyme with Domhain in the next line, so whichever way you choose to sing romhain, you should pronounce domhain to match.

With an ulster accent both words would be pronounced (roughly) to rhyme with coin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: George Papavgeris
Date: 29 Sep 09 - 03:14 PM

Well, it's about to acquire yet another pronunciation, Greek this time. I was with Niamh Parsons in Dublin last Friday and although she did not sing it, she gave me her live CD from Fylde with it on. Fatal, lethal mistake... I have now fallen irreparably in love with the bloody song, and the only way for me to get over it is to learn it. I promise to do my best accent-wise. But I don't apologise for wading into unusual and sacred territory like this - I just have to, no two ways about it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST,AnCiotog
Date: 28 Oct 11 - 05:54 AM

I'd love to sing this song at my wedding to my husband to be. I know it can be seen as a song sung to a child, or to a woman. Is it appropriate to sing to my then husband


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jan 14 - 11:09 AM

where did the song originate from ?? :D


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: An Paistin Fionn: English words?
From: MartinRyan
Date: 04 Jan 14 - 06:08 PM

Lots of background earlier in the thread, GUEST.

Regards


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