mudcat.org: WWI Trench songs
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4]


WWI Trench songs

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Dinky Di (Australian WWI song) (26)
WWI or Span Am War song? Mister moon-a-man (19)
Songs about World War I (148)
Lyr Req: World War One Naval Songs (17)
Other WWI Songs (39)
WW1 songs from other combatant nations (2)
Help - music/dance hall music (World War I) (22)
Lyr Req; Song of the Marines (Dubin/Warren) (11)
Chords Req: Let Ramensky Go - Ballad of WWI Eng (53)
(origins) Origins: A Chant of the Cooks (World War I) (9)
songs from the Great War? (17)
Req: Bawdy WWI parody of There Is a Green Hill Far Away (16)
Memorial to WWI 'cowards' (25)


Rincon Roy 20 Nov 02 - 02:00 AM
Jim Dixon 02 May 04 - 04:52 PM
s6k 03 May 04 - 07:05 AM
LadyJean 04 May 04 - 12:21 AM
Jim Dixon 16 Oct 04 - 10:54 AM
Lighter 16 Oct 04 - 11:45 AM
Joe_F 16 Oct 04 - 08:39 PM
Lighter 17 Oct 04 - 11:08 AM
The Fooles Troupe 17 Oct 04 - 07:47 PM
Wilfried Schaum 18 Oct 04 - 05:42 AM
GUEST,Paul P 29 Jun 05 - 07:03 AM
GUEST,Lighter at work 29 Jun 05 - 09:22 AM
The Walrus 29 Jun 05 - 02:01 PM
GUEST,Lighter at work 29 Jun 05 - 04:37 PM
GUEST,INKY 20 Nov 05 - 11:16 AM
Gurney 21 Nov 05 - 01:39 AM
Lighter 21 Nov 05 - 06:31 PM
GUEST,Barnacle 22 Nov 05 - 12:24 PM
GUEST 05 Mar 10 - 11:52 PM
LadyJean 06 Mar 10 - 12:04 AM
dick greenhaus 16 Apr 10 - 03:58 PM
Tootler 16 Apr 10 - 04:33 PM
GUEST,Matt_R 16 Apr 10 - 05:21 PM
Bugsy 16 Apr 10 - 09:10 PM
GUEST 30 Jul 10 - 04:11 PM
GUEST 30 Jul 10 - 05:15 PM
skipy 18 May 11 - 06:48 PM
BanjoRay 18 May 11 - 08:46 PM
GUEST,Buffy marxon - spencer 19 May 11 - 04:18 AM
Bugsy 19 May 11 - 08:18 PM
GUEST 15 Apr 12 - 11:55 AM
GUEST,Lighter 15 Apr 12 - 12:15 PM
GUEST,Chris C 19 Aug 12 - 05:43 PM
GUEST,ron d 02 Sep 13 - 04:22 AM
Old Grey Wolf 02 Sep 13 - 05:34 AM
GUEST,JTT 02 Sep 13 - 02:45 PM
GUEST,JTT 02 Sep 13 - 02:49 PM
MartinRyan 06 Sep 13 - 05:42 PM
Jack Campin 07 Sep 13 - 05:07 AM
C Stuart Cook 08 Sep 13 - 02:51 AM
Jim Dixon 06 Dec 13 - 11:35 PM
Keith A of Hertford 07 Dec 13 - 08:50 AM
Jim Dixon 07 Dec 13 - 01:59 PM
Lighter 07 Dec 13 - 04:48 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Dec 13 - 06:35 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Dec 13 - 07:25 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Dec 13 - 09:54 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Dec 13 - 10:28 PM
Keith A of Hertford 08 Dec 13 - 06:06 AM
Keith A of Hertford 08 Dec 13 - 06:09 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:








Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Rincon Roy
Date: 20 Nov 02 - 02:00 AM

refresh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: (PACK UP YOUR...AND) SMILE, SMILE, SMILE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 02 May 04 - 04:52 PM

Lyrics from The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music:

(PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES IN YOUR OLD KIT BAG AND) SMILE, SMILE, SMILE!
Words, George Asaf. Music, Felix Powell. 1915.

Private Perks is a funny little codger with a smile, a funny smile.
Five feet none, he's an artful little dodger with a smile, a funny smile.
Flush or broke, he'll have his little joke. He can't be suppress'd.
All the other fellows have to grin when he gets this off his chest. Hi!

CHORUS: Pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag and smile, smile, smile.
While you've a lucifer to light your fag, smile, boys; that's the style.
What's the use of worrying? It never was worthwhile;
So pack up your troubles in your old kit-bag and smile, smile, smile.

Private Perks went a-marching into Flanders with his smile, his funny smile.
He was lov'd by the privates and commanders for his smile, his funny smile.
When a throng of Bosches came along with a mighty swing,
Perks yell'd out, "This little bunch is mine! Keep your heads down, boys, and sing. Hi!" CHORUS

Private Perks he came back from Bosche-shooting with his smile, his funny smile.
Round his home he then set about recruiting with his smile, his funny smile.
He told all his pals, the short, the tall, what a time he'd had;
And as each enlisted like a man, Private Perks said, "Now my lad, Hi!" CHORUS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: PASCHENDALE (from Iron Maiden)
From: s6k
Date: 03 May 04 - 07:05 AM

In a foreign field he lay
Lonely soldier unkown grave
On his dying words he prays
Tell the world of Paschendale

Relive all that he's been through
Last communioun of his soul
Rust your bullets with his tears
Let me tell you 'bout his years

Laying low in a blood filled trench
Kill tim 'til my very own death
On my face I can feel the falling rain
Never see my friends again

In the smoke in the mud and lead
Smell the fear and the feeling of dread
Soon be time to go over the wall
Rapid fire and the end of us all

Whistles, shouts and more gun fire
Lifeless bodies hang on barbed wire
Battlefield nothing but a bloody tomb
Be reunited with my dead friends soon

Many soldiers eighteen years
Drown in mud no more tears
Surely a war no-one can win
Killing time about to begin

Home, far away
From the war, a chance to live again
Home, far away
But the war, no chance to live again

The bodies of ours and our foes
The sea of death it overflows
In no man's kand god only knows
Into jaws of death we go

Crucified as if on a cross
Allied troops they mourn their loss
German war propaganda machine
Such before has never been seen

Swear I heard the angels cry
Pray to god no more may die
So that people know the truth
Tell the tale of Paschendale

Cruelty has a human heart
Everyman does play his part
Terror of the men we kill
The human heart is hungry still

I stand my ground for the very last time
Gun is ready as I stand in line
Nervous wait for the whistle to blow
Rush of blood and over we go

Blood is falling like the rain
It's crimson cloak unveils again
The sound of guns can't hid their shame
And so we die on Paschendale

Dodging shrapnel and barbed wire
Running straight at the cannon fire
Running blind as I hold my breath
Say a prayer symphony of death

As we charge the enemy lines
A burst of fire and we go down
I choke a cry but no-one hears
Fell the blood go down my throat

Home, far away
From the war, a chance to live again
Home, far away
But the war, no chance to live again

See my spirit on the wind
Across the lines beyond the hill
Friend and foe will meet again
Those who died at Paschendale


IRON MAIDEN (yes, its true) - PASCHENDALE


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: LadyJean
Date: 04 May 04 - 12:21 AM

My great uncle John Caldwell was an army surgeon in in WWI. He sang
"If you want to find the privates I know where they are"
"I know where they are"
"I know where they are."
"If you want to find the privates I know where they are."
"They're up to their eyes in mud."

I don't know if this is the American version, or if Uncle John bowdlerized the song for his family.

Mother always figured mud was a substitute for an overused monosyllable meaning excrement.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: KEEP YOUR HEAD DOWN, FRITZIE BOY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 16 Oct 04 - 10:54 AM

Transcribed from the sheet music at The Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music.
A 1918 recording by the American Quartet can be heard at The Virtual Gramophone.

KEEP YOUR HEAD DOWN, FRITZIE BOY
Lieutenant Gitz Rice
"Inspired by a Brave Tommy and written at the Battle of Ypres 1915."
Publication: New York: Leo Feist, Inc., 1917.

1. Over in the trenches, up to their eyes in clay,
Billy and Jack and Jimmie and Joe are singing all the day.
When they see a German sticking up his snout,
They give him a chance to get out of France when they all shout:

CHORUS: Keep your head down, Fritzie boy!
Keep your head down, Fritzie boy!
Late last night in the pale moonlight,
I saw you! I saw you!
You were fixing your barbed wire
When we opened rapid fire.
If you want to see your "Vater" in the "Vaterland,"
Keep your head down, Fritzie boy.

2. Soon the Boche got wiser, hearing this ev'ry night.
He sent us a bunch of rifle grenades to give us all a fright,
But he couldn't stop us; we let out a roar:
"We'll give you your fill of old Kaiser Bill and this d----* war!"

[*Printed as shown in the sheet music, but sung as "darned" in the recording.]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Lighter
Date: 16 Oct 04 - 11:45 AM

The chorus of "Keep Your Head Down, Fritzie Boy" was widely sung by English-speaking troops in World War I. Robert W. Gordon received several identical texts from U.S. and Canadian veterans when he was writing his "Old Songs" column for "Adventure" magazine in the mid '20s.

Canadian Lt. Gitz Rice was also the author of the even more popular "I Want to Go Home" There is a persistent claim - without evidence - that he also wrote "Mademoiselle from Armentières."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Joe_F
Date: 16 Oct 04 - 08:39 PM

The coffee that they serve us
They say is mighty fine.
It's good for cuts and bruises
And tastes like iodine....

*

Keep your shades down, Mary Ann.
Keep your shades down, Mary Ann.
If you want to keep your secrets from your soldier man,
Keep your shades down, Mary Ann.

*

O say, can you -- imagine, mother?
Your boy is in the guardhouse now.

(Takes off from "The Star-Spangled Banner)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Lighter
Date: 17 Oct 04 - 11:08 AM

Joe, "Mary Ann" is from WW I, but I'm pretty sure "Gee, Ma, I Wanna Go Home" is from WW II.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 17 Oct 04 - 07:47 PM

"Keep Your Head Down, Fritzie Boy"

Reminds me of a 60's "Top of the Pops" -
"Hold Your Hand Out, Naughty Boy"

The lines

"Late last night in the pale moonlight,
I saw you! I saw you!"

are identical.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Wilfried Schaum
Date: 18 Oct 04 - 05:42 AM

Look through the Squaddie Songs, some are marked (WWI).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Paul P
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 07:03 AM

I think the Australian version goes:

Madamoiselle from Armentiers, parlez vous
The boys from Wagga and Gundagai, parlez vous
Madamoiselle from Armentiers, hasn't been kissed for 40 years,
Inky Pinky parlez vous...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 09:22 AM

Foolstroupe, "Hold Your Hand Out, Naughty Boy" first appeared about 1913. "Fritzie Boy" is a wartime parody.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: The Walrus
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 02:01 PM

GUEST,Lighter,

"...Foolstroupe, "Hold Your Hand Out, Naughty Boy" first appeared about 1913. "Fritzie Boy" is a wartime parody..."

I think that you will find that "Fritzie Boy" is a slightly later version of the parody (late war) or possibly an American variant.

The earliest vesion of the parody I've come across was:
"Keep your head down Allyman"
('Allyman' derivd from the French for German 'Allemand')
The rest of the chorus is the same (Jim Dixon's post was the first time I'd seen verses for it).

Regards

W


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Lighter at work
Date: 29 Jun 05 - 04:37 PM

Walrus, you may well be right. The "Fritzie Boy" version was sung by Americans in 1918.

The next verse went something like,

Keep your shades down, Mary Ann !
Keep your shades down, Mary Ann !
Late last night,
In the pale moonlight,
We saw you!
We saw you!
You were standing by the chair,
Taking off your underwear.
If you want to keep your secrets from your future man,
Keep your shades down, Mary Ann!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,INKY
Date: 20 Nov 05 - 11:16 AM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Gurney
Date: 21 Nov 05 - 01:39 AM

Hanging on the Old Barbed Wire, I've heard a verse:

If you want to find your Colonel, I know where he is,
I know where he is, I know where he is,
if you want to find your Colonel, I know where he is.
He's shagging the Adjutant's wife!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Lighter
Date: 21 Nov 05 - 06:31 PM

Tell us when and where you heard that verse, Gurney?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Barnacle
Date: 22 Nov 05 - 12:24 PM

a new song, but my favourite is Bill Caddick's "The Writing of Tipperary" - a good history lesson too!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST
Date: 05 Mar 10 - 11:52 PM

Hello! Does anyone know the name of either of these songs??
The lyrics are as such and I don't not know country of origin unfortunately...

1. "Oh we have seen better days, better days." then something about "down by the wayside" (NOT much I know but the words aren't easy to understand on the recording I have. [see She May Have Seen Better Days]

2. "Down in the trench the private dreamed of sailing on the sea, riding the waves, the wind in his face. {A verse that is not understandable then...} But even though his love of the sea was never meant to be, as he sits in his trench you can hear the poor lad sing. Yo Ho Ho! A Sailors life for me, A foggy old trench with a stone for a bench?? is not my cup of tea. Yo Ho Ho Sailing wide and free, if only his ??belly?? agreed."

If anyone can help I know you folks can!

Cal


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: LadyJean
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 12:04 AM

Sometime back in the 1920s, great uncle John Caldwell's son teased my mother with, "Keep your skirts down! Keep your skirts down! keep your skirts down Mary Ann. Just because you have a dimple on your knee. It wasn't put there for the whole world to see."
Mom's name was Mary Ann.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 03:58 PM

Greentrax has issued a fine 2-CD set of music of WWI titled Far, Far From Ypres.
tracklist:
CD1: Your King and Country Need You (Spoken Word - Iain Anderson) * Your King and Country Need You (Song - The Scottish Pals Singers) * Regimental Tunes (The Army School of Piping and Highland Drumming) * The Last Mile Home * It's a Long Way To Tipperary * Mademoiselle From Amenities * Fred Akron's Army * We're Here * Living in a Trench * Raining * Minor Worries * If The Sergeant Steals Your Rum * Oh! It's a Lovely War * Hush! Here Comes The Whizz-bang * Bombed Last Night * Gassed Last Night * Fritz Boy * Forward Joe Soap's Army * Pack Up Your Troubles * Whiter Than Whitewash * Far, Far From Wipers I Long To Be * Take Me Back to Dear Old Blight * I'll Make a Man of You * I Wore a Tunic * Goodbye * When this Bloody War is Over * I Don't Want to be a Soldier * I Want to go Home * The Old Battalion * The Bells of Hell * It's a Long Way to Tipperary * Keep The Home Fires Burning * Sister Suzie Sewing Shirts For Soldiers * The Only Girl in The World * Roses of Peccary (All The Scottish Pals Singers) * Keep Right on to The End of The Road (Harry Lauder) * The Flowers of The Forest (Corporal Neil McNaughton) * The Last Post (John Samson). : : CD2: The Bloody Fields of Flanders Set (The Army School of Piping and Highland Drumming) * In Flanders Fields (Poem - Iain Anderson) * The Green Fields of France / No Man's Land / Willie McBride (The Corries) * Jimmy's Gone Tae Flanders (Jim Malcolm) * Black is The Sun (Steve Palmer) * Mothers, Daughters, Wives (The McCalmans) * Geordie McCrae (Robin Laing) * And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda (Eric Bogle) * In Memorium (Poem - Iain Anderson) * An Eala Bhan (Roddy MacLeod) * Halloween (Sheena Wellington and Karine Polwart) * Why Old Men Cry (Dick Gaughan) * As If He Knows (Eric Bogle) * Jimmy Waddell / Battle of The Somme (Malinky) * Letters From Wilfred (Alan Bell) * Only Remembered (The McCalmans) * Cha Till MacCruemen (Poem - Iain Anderson) / MacCrimmon's Lament (Heather Heywood) / MacCrimmon's Sweeheart (Dougie Pincock).

Available from CAMSCO Music (800/548-FOLK) for $20 + S&H


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN VEREY LIGHTS ARE SHINING
From: Tootler
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 04:33 PM

I know it's a long time since the original thread, but my wife did some searching for WWI Soldiers' songs for a U3A group she belongs to. She found a couple of sites but I extracted the one below and sang it at a U3A meeting along with pack up your troubles when she did a short presentation on what she had found.

I also sang at it [around] Remembrance Day at a local folk club. It's not as vulgar as some, but it does seem to convey some of the soldiers' feelings about their experience of being under attack.

WHEN VEREY LIGHTS ARE SHINING
Tune: When Irish Eyes are Smiling.

When Verey lights are shining,
Sure they're like the morning light
And when the guns begin to thunder
You can hear the angel's shite.
Then the Maxims start to chatter
And trench mortars send a few,
And when Verey lights are shining
'Tis time for a rum issue.

When Very lights are shining
Sure 'tis like the morning dew,
And when shells begin a bursting
It makes you think your times come too.
And when you start advancing
Five nines and gas comes through,
Sure when Verey lights are shining
'Tis rum or lead for you.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Matt_R
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 05:21 PM

In Martin Middlebrook's "First Day on the Somme," he indicates that "Little Grey Home in the West" was a favorite of Kitchener's new army.

It was later altered in the trenches to "My Little Wet Home in the Trench" as seen here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Bugsy
Date: 16 Apr 10 - 09:10 PM

That link doesn't seem to work Matt.


CHeers

Bugsy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: OUI, OUI, MARIE
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 04:11 PM

I'm surprised that no one mentioned "Lili Marlene," the music for which might be older than WWI, but the lyrics, I think, were written around 1915. Wikipedia mentions that and seems to indicate that it was a WWII song more than one for WWI.

It might not be a "trench song" sung by the troops, but there is a song from the era called "OUI, OUI, MARIE." It was sung in the 1947 movie, "When My Baby Smiles at Me," which I saw so many times that I memorized the lyrics, which are very much like this:

Oui oui, Marie
Will you do this for me?
Oui oui, Marie
Then I'll do that for you.
I love your eyes, they make me feel so spoony
You'll drive me loony
Stop teasin' me.
Why don't we parlez-vous
Like other sweethearts do?
I want a kiss or two
From my cherie.
Oui oui, Marie
If you'll do this for me
Then I'll do that for you
Oui oui, Marie.

Oh -- I just googled the song and, among others, this page came up:
   http://www.firstworldwar.com/audio/ouiouimarie.htm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 05:15 PM

Has anyone mentioned:

Over There
Goodbye, Broadway, Hello, France
(Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and) Smile, Smile, Smile!
America, I Love You
Smiles ("There are smiles that make us happy...")
Oh! Frenchy
Arrah, Go On, I'm Gonna Go Back to Oregon


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: skipy
Date: 18 May 11 - 06:48 PM

Anyone got the chords to "Vimy" as performed by the great Tanglefoot?
Skipy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: BanjoRay
Date: 18 May 11 - 08:46 PM

My grandfather, an artillery man in WWI, used to sing a song to the tune of "The Old Rugged Cross" that included the lines:

At the cross, at the cross
where the Kaiser lost his 'oss
And the Eagle on his helmet flew away
oh he ran and he ran,
Till he saw the British van
Then he turned around and ran the other way

These are the only words I have, but I'd love to hear the rest. Anyone come across this song?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Buffy marxon - spencer
Date: 19 May 11 - 04:18 AM

Yer can get reprint edition of Wipers time on ebay.

http://shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p4522.m570.l1313&_nkw=wipers+times&_sacat=See-All-Categories


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: Bugsy
Date: 19 May 11 - 08:18 PM

The last survivor of the Great War died recently and will have a naval funeral in Perth today.

The last link is no more

Bugsy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST
Date: 15 Apr 12 - 11:55 AM

My Grandfather sang with the Dumbells during the war and he used to sing a song Lousy Shirts after the war - does anyone have the lyrics or melody for that song.

Thanks in advance Barbara


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 15 Apr 12 - 12:15 PM

Sorry I can't help, but let me ask you this: what version did he sing of "Mademoiselle from Armentières"?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,Chris C
Date: 19 Aug 12 - 05:43 PM

I find it very hard to believe that the Germans didnt have their own trench songs?
Does anyone know of any ?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,ron d
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 04:22 AM

does any one know of a song starting My pals and I were in a public house one night    when the blooming pub caught fire


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE OLD DUN COW CAUGHT FIRE (H Champion)
From: Old Grey Wolf
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 05:34 AM

It's called "The Old Dun Cow Caught Fire" by Harry Champion

Some mates and I in a public house
Were playing dominoes last night
When all of a sudden in the pot-man came
With his face all chalky white
"What's up?" says Brown. "Have you seen a ghost?"
"Have you seen your Aunt Mariah?"
"Me Aunt Mariah be blown," said he.
"The bloomin' pub's on fire!"

Oh there was Brown, upside down
Knocking back the whiskey on the floor
"Booze, booze," the firemen cried
As they came knocking at the door
Oh don't let 'em in till it's all mopped up
Somebody shouted "MacIntyre!"
And we all got blue blind paralytic drunk
When the Old Dun Cow caught fire

Old Johnson rushed to the port wine tub
And gave it just a few hard knocks
He started taking off his pantaloons
Likewise his shoes and socks
"Hold on," said Tibbs, "If you want to wash your feet
There's a tub of old ale here
Don't wash your feet in the port wine tub
When we've still got some old stale beer"

Oh there was Brown, upside down
Knocking back the whiskey on the floor
"Booze, booze," the firemen cried
As they came knocking at the door
Oh don't let 'em in till it's all mopped up
Somebody shouted "MacIntyre!"
And we all got blue blind paralytic drunk
When the Old Dun Cow caught fire

instrumental

Just then there came such an awful crash
Half the bloomin' roof gave way
We were doused with a fireman's hose
But still we were all gay.
So we got some sacks, and some old tin tacks
And we bunged ourselves inside
And we all got drinking good old Scotch
'Til we was bleary-eyed

Oh there was Brown, upside down
Knocking back the whiskey on the floor
"Booze, booze," the firemen cried
As they came knocking at the door
Oh don't let 'em in till it's all mopped up
Somebody shouted "MacIntyre!"
And we all got blue blind paralytic drunk
When the Old Dun Cow caught fire

Fire! x8 during instrumental

And we all got blue blind paralytic drunk
When the Old Dun Cow caught fire.

Hope that helps. I don't think it is a trench song though.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 02:45 PM

Robert Graves, in Good-Bye to All That, writes about the refrain of "I don't like ham, lamb or jam, and I don't like roly-poly" and the chorus "'s nice, 's nice, 's nice, 's nice, 's nice, 's nice 's pie".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: I DO LIKE A S'NICE, S'MINCE, S'PIE
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 02 Sep 13 - 02:49 PM

…and indeed, here it is:


I DO LIKE A S'NICE, S'MINCE, S'PIE

I'm so fond of what I like,
And what I like, I like it
Some like this, and some like that
Some like lean, and some like fat
Some like pudding, some like pie
With which to fill their phiz
But there's one thing I like best
I'll tell you what it is

Chorus: Oh I do like s'nice s'pince s'pie
Oh I do like s'nice s'pince s'pie
Don't like lamb, ham or jam
And I don't like roly-poly
But when I see a s'nice s'pince s'pie
Then I ask for a helping twice
For I do like a s'nice s'pince s'pie
'Cos it's s'nice, s'nice, s'nice

I've a sweetheart all my own,
There's no one else would have her
Her face I've not tasted yet
It's so slobbery and so wet
We sat in the Park, last night
She nudged my arm and sighed
'What do you like the best of all?'
I grinned, and then replied

Chorus:

Once I went to Parliament
I'd been sent there to dust it
Found a meeting on inside
One young member loudly cried
'Matters we'll no longer mince
Our country must be led
We can't mince matters' I said 'No
Lets all mince pies instead'

Chorus:

PDF Sheet music (link)

Written and composed by Worton David & Bert Lee - 1914
Performed by Jay Laurier (1879-1969)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trench Songs of World War I
From: MartinRyan
Date: 06 Sep 13 - 05:42 PM

This thread has reappeared in nice time for the centenary... Any further contributions? And can anyone point me towards a good general source of WW1 songs - either in print or online?

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WW1 Trench songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 07 Sep 13 - 05:07 AM

In another thread I mentioned that there are a great many Turkish songs from WW1, both about Gallipoli and about the Mesopotamian campaign. There is an album of them by Ruhi Su, "Seferberlik Turkuleri" (Songs of Mobilization). And "Burasi Mustur", which I don't think Su recorded, became something of an anthem, covered by many singers, after the US started blasting the hell out of Iraq, because of its historical parallels.

But I can't think of any song from the British side in Mesopotamia. Are there any? You'd think there'd be a song about the Siege of Kut, at least.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WW1 Trench songs
From: C Stuart Cook
Date: 08 Sep 13 - 02:51 AM

Robert Service, the Yukon poet was an ambulance man in WW1. He published a book of poems from Paris. Certainly one of them 'Back to Blighty' [Going Home?] has been sung by myself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: WE ARE FRED KARNO'S ARMY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 06 Dec 13 - 11:35 PM

This song was mentioned by Keith A of Hertford back on 19 Mar 01 - 01:57 PM:

WE ARE FRED KARNO'S ARMY
Tune: "The Church's One Foundation."
As sung by Fitzrovia Chorus & John Mealing on "Songs from the Great War" (2009)

We are Fred Karno's Army, the ragtime infantry.
We cannot fight; we cannot march; what earthly use are we?
And when we get to Berlin, the Kaiser he will say:
"Hoch! Hoch! mein Gott! What a jolly rotten lot are the ragtime infantry."

We are Fred Karno's Army; a jolly lot are we.
Fred Karno is our Captain, Charlie Chaplin our O.C.
And when we get to Berlin, the Kaiser he will say:
"Hoch! Hoch! mein Gott! What a jolly fine lot are the boys of Company C."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WWI Trench songs
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 08:50 AM

Thanks Jim.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: I WANT TO GO HOME (Gitz Rice)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 01:59 PM

Several people have mentioned a song called I WANT TO GO HOME, but I'm not sure whether they're referring to the following song, or GEE, MA, I WANNA GO HOME (which Bard Judith posted earlier in this thread, but which, I believe, is actually a World War II song), or some other song.

Lyrics copied from the sheet music a the Levy Collection:

I WANT TO GO HOME
Words and music by Lieut. Gitz Rice, 1st Canadian Contingent
"Written at the Battle of Ypres, 1915."
New York: Leo Feist, Inc., ©1917.

1. When first I joined the army, not so very long ago,
I said I'd fight the foe,
And help Sir Douglas Haig, you know.
I've been in France just sixteen months and fighting now as yet,
I haven't seen a German; all I've seen is mud and wet.
Tomorrow when the off'cer asks, "What would you like to do?"
I'm going to stand right up and say, "If it's all the same to you—

CHORUS: I want to go home.
I want to go home.
The whizzbangs and shrapnel around me do roar.
I don't want this old war any more.
Take me far o'er the sea
Where the {allemand/Prussian guard} cannot get me.
Oh, my!
I don't want to die.
I want to go 'ome.

2. From measles I have suffered, and had twelve attacks of flu,
And meningitis too,
But then no one ever knew.
The rain and mud has given me the 'meditus' of the spine.
I get it ev'ry time they ask me to go up the line.
I've got rheumatism of my hair, a dislocated face.
I think it's really, really time that someone should take my place.

Additional lyrics by Percival Knight
Sung with striking success by Percival Knight in the British-Canadian recruiting play "Getting Together"


1. I'm married now for seven years and it don't seem a day.
Since first I went away,
For two years I've been gay.
My missus heard that I was dead and married my pal Jim.
It really is the first time that I've sympathized with him.
I wouldn't be unkind to them and break their lives apart.
I think I'd better stay right here; 'twould be cruel to break her heart.

CHORUS 1: I don't want to go home;
I don't want to go home.
The whizzbangs and shrapnel around me do roar.
I don't want that old face anymore.
Take me over the sea
Where the missus will never get me.
Oh, my!
I'd much rather die;
I don't want to go home.

2. In learning foreign languages I never made advance
Until I got the chance
To study here in France.
I know the French for mustard and can say comme ci, comme car.
I know that every Frenchman eats his patty dees foros grar.
The French for house is maison; a potato's pomme de terre.
Your aunty is a tanty and your father is a pear.

CHORUS 2: Je veux aller home;
Je veux aller home.
Les whizzbangs and shrapnel do sound effrayant,
Je don't want this old war plus longtemps.
Take me over la mer,
Where the Germans can get me nevaire,
Oh, Lor',
I don't want la mort,
Je veux aller
home.

3. Now every soldier's got a sense of honor that is dear.
It keeps away the tear,
And keeps away his fear.
I've got a white-haired mother waiting for me 'cross the foam.
Thank God she's never heard me say that I want to go home!
Although I'm dying to see her, and I pray for her each night,
I'm never going home until we've won this blinking fight!

CHORUS 3: Then I'm going home;
Then I'm going home,
But not until Belgium is Belgium again,
And not until France has got Alsace-Lorraine.
When we've got Germany,
And we've dumped her into the sea,
Then when all's well
And we've given them h——,
Then, I'm going home.

[I'd love to hear this song, but recordings are hard to track down, because many other people have written songs with the same title.]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WWI Trench songs
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 04:48 PM

The chorus of Rice's song, occasionally altered in various small ways, seems to have been one of the best known "trench songs" of the war in the English-speaking armies. It was still being sung in WW2.

Lines 3 and 4 go to a melody very much like that of lines 3 and 4 of "Bless 'em All."

Rice, a post-war vaudeville performer in Canada and the U.S., penned several wartime hits. Testimony and circumstantial evidence strongly suggest that he and E. C. H. Rowland created, but never copyrighted, "Mademoiselle from Armentieres" for a behind-the-lines concert party early in 1915.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THE BOYS IN PALESTINE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 06:35 PM

The Walrus above referred to a song he called "The Middle East Lament," but the first line he quoted is nearly like this one:

Lyrics copied from More Tommy's Tunes by F. T. Nettleinghame (London: Erskine Macdonald, Ltd., 1918), page 26:


THE BOYS IN PALESTINE
Tune: "From Greenland's Icy Mountains."

(The following verses were sent by some of the boys, from Richmond and district, who were then fighting in Palestine.)

We came from Turkey's mountains,
    To Egypt's blazing strand,
Where Afric's sunny fountains
    Are mostly choked with sand.
We've seen its ancient river.
    We've seen its palmy plain.
Our greatest hope is never
    To see the place again.

We've climbed up both the pyramids.
    We've fished in the canal.
If we haven't got the sunstroke,
    No doubt in time we shall.
They've placed us near to Suez.
    Our heads are fit to burst,
And we quite agree with Kipling
    That a man can raise a thirst.

We've felt those gentle showers
    Whose very rain is sand.
We've seen, like Joseph's brethren,
    The bareness of the land.
We've tried the plagues of Egypt.
    We've known the flies and lice,
And we sympathise with Pharaoh,
    Who hadn't any ice.

What though the spicy breezes
    Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle,
They ain't much good to us blokes
    Who sweat beside the Nile.
In vain with lavish kindness
    They issue Tickler's jam.
We're blinking with sun-blindness
    And no one cares a damn.

From Sidi Bishr to Kubri,
    From Suez to El Shatt,
There's nothing here but niggers,
    Each blacker than your hat.
The sun has scorched our noses,
    And our idea of bliss
Is for another Moses
    To take us out of this. Amen.


[For the tune, see Franklin Square Song Collection, No. 2 by J. P. McCaskey (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1884), page 115.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN THE STEW IS ON THE TABLE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 07:25 PM

The Walrus also mentioned this one:

From The Long Trail: What the British Soldier Sang and Said in the Great War of 1914-1918 by John Brophy & Eric Partridge (A. Deutsch, 1965), page 57:

WHEN THE STEW IS ON THE TABLE
Tune: "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder"

When the stew is on the table,
When the stew is on the table,
When the stew is on the table,
When the stew is on the table, I'll be there.

When the beer is in the tankard,
When the beer is in the tankard,
When the beer is in the tankard,
When the beer is in the tankard, I'll be there.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: ODE TO TICKLER
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 09:54 PM

I suppose this is the song that The Walrus referred to as "Jam for Tea."

Lyrics and footnotes copied from Tommy's Tunes by F. T. Nettleingham (London: E. Macdonald, 1917), page 27:

ODE TO TICKLER.*
Tune: "Sweet Genevieve."

Oh, jam for tea! Oh, jam for tea,
I'm jolly sure it don't suit me;
I've tried for years, and now in tears,
I'll sing it to you mournfully.

Oh, jam for tea! Oh, jam for tea!
The world knows how you've tortured me;
I've frills and squills, you've made me bills,
And filled the dentists' empty tills.

Oh, jam for tea! Oh, jam for tea!
Fried bully** and Maconochie;***
But when we get back to Blighte-e-e-e....
We will have ham and lamb for tea.

* Jam maker to the Army.
** Bully beef—otherwise corned beef.
*** The maker's name: a tinned food issued to Tommy, consisting usually of tinned tomatoes, haricots, potatoes, some sort of meat, usually fat, and some shiny stuff that might be gravy or jelly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: TICKLER'S JAM(?)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Dec 13 - 10:28 PM

This song, without a title, is quoted in Hunting the Hun by Capt. James Belton & Lt. E. G. Odell (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1918), page 207. I suspect it is the one The Walrus referred to as "Tickler's Jam":

Tickler's Jam, Tickler's Jam,
How I love old Tickler's Jam;
Sent from England in one pound pots,
Tracked it is in ten ton lots;
Every night when I'm asleep,
I'm dreaming that I am
Forcing my way through the Dardanelles,
With a pot of Tickler's Jam.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WWI Trench songs
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 08 Dec 13 - 06:06 AM

Posted by Lighter 26 Mar 09 - 06:23 PM
Far, Far From Wipers, or Sing Me To Sleep.
British Army parody from World War I:

Sing me to sleep where bullets fall,
Let me forget the war and all;
Damp is my dug-out, cold my feet,
Nothing but bully and biscuits to eat.
Over the sandbags helmets you'll find
Corpses in front and corpses behind.

CHORUS: Far, far from Ypres I long to be,
Where German snipers can't get at me,
Think of me crouching where the worms creep,
Waiting for the sergeant to sing me to sleep.

Sing me to sleep in some old shed,
The rats all running around my head,
Stretched out upon my waterproof,
Dodging the raindrops through the roof,
Dreaming of home and nights in the West,
Somebody's overseas boots on my chest.

Patrick McGill published this in his "Soldier Songs" (1917). He ascribed authorship to Anonymous. Other, briefer versions exist.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: WWI Trench songs
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 08 Dec 13 - 06:09 AM

In my head the chorus ends,

Damp is my dug out,
Wet are my feet,
Waiting for whiz-bangs
To sing me to sleep.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 8 August 8:56 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.