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WWI Trench songs

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Keith A of Hertford 19 Mar 01 - 01:57 PM
Irish sergeant 19 Mar 01 - 03:05 PM
The Walrus 19 Mar 01 - 07:11 PM
Bugsy 19 Mar 01 - 07:50 PM
Uncle Jaque 20 Mar 01 - 12:07 PM
Mr Red 20 Mar 01 - 12:41 PM
GUEST,Irish Sergeant 20 Mar 01 - 03:24 PM
GUEST,jcf@world.std.com 20 Mar 01 - 06:55 PM
Susanne (skw) 20 Mar 01 - 07:03 PM
GUEST,Irish Sergeant 20 Mar 01 - 07:42 PM
GUEST,Joe Fineman 21 Mar 01 - 02:14 PM
GUEST,Frank Harte 21 Mar 01 - 04:45 PM
GUEST,Pete M at work 21 Mar 01 - 07:34 PM
GUEST,Gene 21 Mar 01 - 11:49 PM
Mr Red 22 Mar 01 - 08:19 AM
GUEST,Frank Harte 22 Mar 01 - 06:50 PM
bill\sables 22 Mar 01 - 07:10 PM
Irish sergeant 22 Mar 01 - 08:20 PM
Bob Bolton 22 Mar 01 - 09:30 PM
Bob Bolton 23 Mar 01 - 07:38 AM
GUEST,Frank Harte 23 Mar 01 - 06:43 PM
NH Dave 24 Mar 01 - 05:19 PM
NH Dave 24 Mar 01 - 06:03 PM
gnu 24 Mar 01 - 07:09 PM
Bob Bolton 28 Mar 01 - 10:58 PM
Bob Bolton 29 Mar 01 - 09:26 AM
Mrs.Duck 29 Mar 01 - 12:59 PM
dick greenhaus 29 Mar 01 - 04:54 PM
Bob Bolton 29 Mar 01 - 09:27 PM
dick greenhaus 29 Mar 01 - 09:58 PM
Metchosin 04 May 01 - 12:35 AM
Metchosin 04 May 01 - 12:40 AM
Lyndi-loo 04 May 01 - 04:25 AM
Micca 04 May 01 - 09:37 AM
Lyndi-loo 04 May 01 - 10:49 AM
Bugsy 06 May 01 - 08:36 PM
NSC 07 May 01 - 12:48 PM
NSC 07 May 01 - 12:54 PM
Mrs.Duck 07 May 01 - 05:12 PM
Lyndi-loo 08 May 01 - 10:59 AM
GUEST,maxarthurhistorian@hotmail.com 24 May 01 - 11:09 AM
Bugsy 25 May 01 - 05:57 PM
Genie 10 Nov 01 - 08:44 PM
Amos 10 Nov 01 - 10:05 PM
gnomad 11 Nov 01 - 10:10 AM
Deda 11 Nov 01 - 06:39 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 12 Nov 01 - 01:19 AM
Mr Red 12 Nov 01 - 07:05 AM
Amos 12 Nov 01 - 12:35 PM
Amos 12 Nov 01 - 12:36 PM
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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 19 Mar 01 - 01:57 PM

Have I missed it, or has no-one posted (Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and) Smile, Smile, Smile!?
Also We Are Fred Karno's Army and Far Far From Wipers. [a.k.a. Sing Me to Sleep]
Soldier on.
Keith.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 19 Mar 01 - 03:05 PM

Bugsy: How is the research coming? Irish Sergeant


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: The Walrus
Date: 19 Mar 01 - 07:11 PM

How about, all on the theme, I want to be elsewhere:
"Far, Far from Wipers (I long to be)" - or it's longer version "Sing Me to Sleep"/;"Soldiers' Lullaby"
"Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty" (The CEF had a version as "Take Me Back to Good Old Canada")
"I Want to Go Home"
The Middle East Lament [a.k.a. The Boys in Palestine] ("We came from Turkey's Mountains to Egypt's burning strand")
On Food:
"When the Stew Is on the Table"
"Jam For Tea" [or Ode to Tickler]
"Tickler's Jam"
"Plum and Apple"

Any Use?

Regards

Walrus


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bugsy
Date: 19 Mar 01 - 07:50 PM

Irish Sergeant. At the moment, it's not. I am collecting the songs for a workshop I intend to add to my repertoire for festivals. The trouble is that there has been so much response, it will take me some time to get through the postings here and figure out which songs to ask for lyrics and tunes to. However I will get back to everyone as soon as I can find the time to "Get down to it" so to speak.

In the meantime, Thanks to everyone who has posted so far.

CHeers

Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Uncle Jaque
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 12:07 PM

Aww, gee; and I just saw a 1918 sheet-music booklet at an antique store with "For Our Boys In The Trenches" or something like that, with illustration of the brave lads in battle attire clutching their 1903 Springfields on the cover... and I passed it up! They wanted $5 for it, which I considered a bit much. Oh well..

I rather more folow music of the Civil War (1861-5) period, and actually have a "Civil War Musician's" Discussion Forum up on Delphi.

Yoy! That's a looooong one!

Havn't used it much lately (too much time in here!) but it picks up a thread every so often. We keep a few articles around for future refferance, or for the curious to dig around in. Come check it out if any of ye want to diverge a bit into that particular genre.

Uncle Jaque, Fifer, 3rd Maine Volunteer Infantry

Field Music (Fife & Drum Corps)


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Mr Red
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 12:41 PM

"Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant Major" Or was that in the Eddy Cantor film about WW1?

Not a trench song but- "Goodbye Dolly I must leave you. Goodbye Dolly Gray" hence - "Hello Dolly"


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Irish Sergeant
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 03:24 PM

Let Me know Bugsy:

Uncle Jaque; If you go to www.geocities.com/the12thus/ A rough draft of the Civil War song book I've been working on is there. I'll be sending it to the publishers tommorow. Kindest reguards, Neil


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,jcf@world.std.com
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 06:55 PM

Let's not have a sniffle, Let's have a bloody good cry, And always remember, the sooner you live, The sooner you bloody well die.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 07:03 PM

Not a trench song either, but genuinely WW1: Nobody's mentioned Salonika so far.
Then there is Christmas 1914, covering the same ground as Christmas in the Trenches.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ISN'T IT GRAND, BOYS^^^
From: GUEST,Irish Sergeant
Date: 20 Mar 01 - 07:42 PM

JcF: That is a great song! It's titled "ISN'T IT GRAND, BOYS" I have a version by the Clancy Brothers and I sing it at Reenactments (After hours)

Look at the Coffin,
With Golden handles.
Isn't it Grand boys, to be bloody well dead?
Let's not have a sniffle,
Let's have a bloody great cry.
And always remember the longer you live,
The sooner you'll bloody well die.

Look at the Flowers,
All bloody withered,...

Look at the mourners,
Bloody great hypocrites...

Look at the widow,
Bloody great female,...

The third through the last lines get added to each verse. It's a marvelous song. Kindest regards, Neil

HTML line breaks added --JoeClone, 30-Sep-01.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES
From: GUEST,Joe Fineman
Date: 21 Mar 01 - 02:14 PM

Since, astonishingly, I don't see MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES in DigiTrad, here are some verses I have happened on over the years:

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
Hadn't been fucked for forty years.

A German officer crossed the Rhine.
He loved the women, he loved the wine.

O farmer, have you a daughter fair
To wash a soldier's underwear?

He took her upstairs and into bed,
And there he cracked her maidenhead.

The first three months and all was well,
But the second three months she began to swell.

The general got the Croix de Guerre --
The son of a bitch was never there.

-- A remarkably insipid song, considering its notoriety.

HTML line breaks added --JoeClone, 30-Sep-01.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Frank Harte
Date: 21 Mar 01 - 04:45 PM

Bugsy.

You mentioned that you have the words to Suvla Bay....It is a long time ago since i first heard it in my father's pub...I have a verse and a chorus of it and i would very much like to have the complete words ....

Frank Harte


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Pete M at work
Date: 21 Mar 01 - 07:34 PM

Just a thought Bugsy, I believe that in the BBC TV series "The Great War" (I think) broadcast in 1964 there was a programme devoted to the songs and music of the troops. A quick squiz through the BBC site does show anything relevant but it may be worth giving them a bell.

Pete M


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Subject: RE: MY BUDDY/Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Gene
Date: 21 Mar 01 - 11:49 PM

additional lines to My Buddy -

* CLIK TO: OLD MUDCAT POST/MY BUDDY *


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Mr Red
Date: 22 Mar 01 - 08:19 AM

In my experience with the BBC it depends who you contact. It didn't work for me & I had the name of the particular producer to go on.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Frank Harte
Date: 22 Mar 01 - 06:50 PM

To. Bob Bolton,

You mentioned that you had a song called Suvla Bay in your reply to Bugsy, I would very much like to have a copy of the words of it if you could take the time to send them on. It is a very long time ago since I first heard it.

The bits I remember are....

Why do I weep , why do I cry,
My love has gone far far away,
We had to part that Autumn day,
I left my heart on Suvla Bay.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE POWER OF A CIGARETTE
From: bill\sables
Date: 22 Mar 01 - 07:10 PM

THE POWER OF A CIGARETTE

Writen in 1915 by British Soldiers

'Tis Yuletide out in the trenches, the night is cold and drear.
With never a sign from our sturdy line, of the foeman who lurks so near.
Our boys they are staunch and ready, though chilled to the bone and wet,
But their eyes grow bright as they place a light to a Woodbine cigarette.

Merely a pinch of tobacco encased in a paper shell,
But it has a power in the midnight hour the soldier alone can tell
For it whispers of dear old England; of home, and his heart's desire
And it seems to show in its ruddy glow the gleam of a homestead fire.

It brings to his mental vision the faces of those he loves,
And he softly sighs as he clasps his eyes on his tattered and war torn gloves.
It speaks to him too of friendship, and colleagues who ne'er forget
And his heart grows glad as the soldier lad inhales from his cigarette

'Tis Yuletide out in the trenches, the enemy close at hand,
But he quite forgets while his cigarettes whisper softly of Motherland.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Irish sergeant
Date: 22 Mar 01 - 08:20 PM

There is a German Folk music sight that I found a couple of days ago that may very well help also. Has a lot of good stuff. Kindest reguards, Neil


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 22 Mar 01 - 09:30 PM

G'day Guest,Frank Harte,

I have the words at home and can easily pop them into Mudcat tonight, if they are not already on the DigiTrad (and if I can squeeze it in between getting Mulga Wire, the Bush Music Club magazine close to printing stage for next Tuesday).

It is a good old weepy ... and I am fascinated about Bill Scott's information that it was banned by the authorities and detrimental to morale!

Regards,

Bob bolton


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Subject: Lyr Add: SUVLA BAY
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 23 Mar 01 - 07:38 AM

G'day again, Frank Harte,

Here are the words - in their WWI version. The song was recycled in WWII to refer to Suda Bay, in Crete instead of Suvla Bay at Gallipoli.

I have not had a chance to key in the music, so I haven't posted a MIDItext tune to accompany. If you need that, I will do it next week: I still have the Magazine to finish and tomorrow is taken up with a memorial / wake for our premier folksong collector John Meredith. The gathering is down in the Southern Highlands and I won't get back until the Loaded Dog Folk Club starts ...and I still have to finish the magazine ...

Regard(les)s,

Bob Bolton

Suvla Bay

Inn an old Australian homestead with roses round the door,
A girl received a letter, just newly from the war.
With her mother's arm around her she gave way to sobs and sighs,
For when she read that letter, the tears came to her eyes.
Chorus:
Why do I weep? Why do I sigh?
My love's asleep so far away.
He played his part that April day
And left my heart in Suvla Bay
.

She joined a band of nurses underneath the cross of red
And swore to do her duty to the soldier who lay dead.
Many soldiers came to woo her but were sadly turned away
As to them she told the story of the grave at Suvla Bay,
Chorus:
Why do I weep? Why do I sigh?
My love's asleep so far away.
He played his part that August day
And left my heart in Suvla Bay
.

Bill Scott, in The Second Penguin Australian Songbook, says he learned the WWII version ("Suda Bay" and "August day") from an RN sailor in a Navy wet canteen in Brisbane in 1944. He says many older people, including his mother, knew the WWI version.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,Frank Harte
Date: 23 Mar 01 - 06:43 PM

Dear Bob,

Thank's for taking the trouble to post the words to Suvla Bay....if yu get time I would very much like to hear the tune. I only have the air to the chorus which does not seem to fit the verses.

Thank's again...........Frank

PS. Is that Penguin Australian Songbook Book still in print and available.??


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: NH Dave
Date: 24 Mar 01 - 05:19 PM

Some years ago there was a book Kiss me Goodnight Sgt Major, with a foreword by Spike Milligan and cartoons by the chap that cartooned The Cloggies. British Catters can probably furnish the name of the person who compiled it from memory, but my recollection followed my copy of the book off the back of a lorry. This was a compilation of British Troop Songs and Poems of WWII, organized by campaign and location.

This book suggests that many of the songs we have noted were popular in WWII as opposed to WWI, but the WWII versions may have been updated versions of the WWI song. For example, I have heard a version of Dinky-Di updated to cover the Vietnam War.

It is my recollection that it had a version of Christmas in the Workhouse, relocated to Christmas in the Mess, with words like Paupers, Workhouse, Master and Veteran changed to Soldiers, Mess, Major, and Corporal.

Then up stepped a sharp young corporal
Small he was but bold as brass,
"You can take your Christmas pudding,
And you shove it up your arse!"

Dave


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: NH Dave
Date: 24 Mar 01 - 06:03 PM

The wonders of the Internet. A quick search of several out of print book sellers reveals that it was collected by Martin Page, illustrated by Bill Tidy, and can be had from $9 US to $25 US depending on where I obtain it.

Dave


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Subject: Lyr Add: AND THE BAND PLAYED WALTZING MATILDA
From: gnu
Date: 24 Mar 01 - 07:09 PM

Scanned the thread quickly, so I may have missed this tune and I apologize if it was cited above, but it is my favourite. A buddy of mine, now living in Iqaluit, Nunavut sings a soft, slow version of this tune and I weep every time I hear it. I've got him on tape from a kitchen session and just listened to it again, sob !

THE BAND PLAYED WALTZING MATILDA
(Eric Bogle)

Now when I was a young man I carried me pack
And I lived the free life of the rover.
From the Murry's green basin to the dusty outback,
Well, I waltzed my Matilda all over.
Then in 1915 my country said, "Son,
It's time you stop rambling, there's work to be done."
So they gave me a tin hat and they gave me a gun
And they marched me away to the war.
And the band played Waltzing Matilda,
As the ship pulled away from the quay
And midst all the cheers, flag waving and tears,
We sailed off for Gallipoli

And how well I remember that terrible day,
How our blood stained the sand and the water
And of how in that hell that they called Suvla Bay
We were butchered like lambs at the slaughter.
Johnny Turk, he was ready, he primed himself well.
He showered us with bullets, and he rained us with shells,
And in five minutes flat, he'd blown us all to hell,
Nearly blew us back home to Australia.
(But) And the band played Waltzing Matilda,
As we stopped to bury our slain,
We buried ours, the Turks buried theirs,
Then we started all over again.

And those that were left, well we tried to survive
In that mad world of blood, death and fire.
And for ten weary weeks I kept myself alive
Though around me the corpses piled higher.
Then a big Turkish shell knocked me ass over head
And when I awoke in me hospital bed
And saw what it had done, well I wished I was dead.
Never knew there were worse things than dying.
For I'll go no more Waltzing Matilda,
All around the green bush far and free
To hump tent and pegs, a man needs both legs,
No more waltzing Matilda for me.

So they gathered the crippled, the wounded, and maimed,
And they shipped us back home to Australia.
The legless, the armless, the blind and insane,
Those proud wounded heroes of Suvla.
And when our ship pulled into Circular Quay
I looked at the place where me legs used to be
And I thank Christ there was no body waiting for me
To grieve, to mourn and to pity.
But the Band played Waltzing Matilda
As they carried us down the gangway,
But nobody cheered, they just stood and stared,
Then they turned all their faces away.

So now every April I sit on me porch
And I watch the parade pass before me.
And I see my old comrades, how proudly they march
Reviving old dreams and past glory,
And the old men march slowly, all bone stiff and sore
They're tired old heroes from a forgotten war
And the young people ask "What are they marching for?"
And I ask myself the same question.
But the band plays Waltzing Matilda,
And the old men still answer the call,
But as year follows year, more old men disappear
Someday, no one will march there at all.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda.
Who'll come a-Waltzing Matilda with me?
And their ghosts may be heard as they march by the billabong
Who'll come a-Waltzing Matilda with me?

Copyright Larrikin Music, Ltd.
@war @soldier @Australia
filename[ BANDPLAY
Tune file : BANDPLAY


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 28 Mar 01 - 10:58 PM

G'day again,

Frank Harte: Sorry that i have not yet got back with tune. Mulga Wire (Bush Music Club Magazine finally off to printers last night ... I can get back to music queries. MIDItext soon!

gnu: Lovely song - but written by Wee Eric in the late '60s ... and Bugsy, being in Australia, has probably heard it 297 times too many to weep, other than out of frustration!

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 29 Mar 01 - 09:26 AM

G'day again,

Frank Harte: I did the MIDItext of the tune (Bill Scott's version) ... and decided to post it in its own Lyr Add Suvla Bay (Suda Bay) Australian Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 29 Mar 01 - 12:59 PM

A friend of mine sings a very moving song about a Canadian soldier who survives the war but loses his friends. I can only remember the last line which goes

And I will end my days in Montreal. [Vimy]

If anyone knows that I'd love to know the words-a real tear jerker. Not sure if it was first or second war though.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 29 Mar 01 - 04:54 PM

Please. If you're going to mention a song, a) See if it's already in DigiTrad, and if not, b) post the damn words!


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 29 Mar 01 - 09:27 PM

Err ... G'day Dick,

I take your remark above refers to someone else ... I can't see Suvla Bay in the Digitrad.

(And I can't see anything in DigiTrad that matches Mrs Duck's request.) Regard(les)s,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 29 Mar 01 - 09:58 PM

Present correspondent excluded. I was stating a general request.


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Subject: Lyr Add: GASSED LAST NIGHT
From: Metchosin
Date: 04 May 01 - 12:35 AM

GASSED LAST NIGHT (Bombed Last Night)
(Chilton)

Gassed last night, and gassed the night before.
Going to get gassed tonight if we never get gassed anymore.
When we're gassed, we're sick as we can be
'Cause phosgene and mustard gas is much too much for me.

They're warning us, they're warning us.
One respirator for the four of us.
Thank your lucky stars the three of us can run
So one of us can use it all alone.

Bombed last night, and bombed the night before.
Going to get bombed tonight if we never get bombed anymore.
When we're bombed, we're scared we can be.
Oh God stop the bombing raids from High Germany.

They're over us, they're over us.
One shell hole for just the four of us.
Thank your lucky stars there are no more of us
'Cause one of us can fill it all alone


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Subject: Lyr Add: JOE SOAP'S ARMY
From: Metchosin
Date: 04 May 01 - 12:40 AM

JOE SOAP'S ARMY
(Chilton)

Forward Joe Soaps army
Marching without fear
With our old commander
Safely in the rear

He boasts and scapes? from morn til night
And thinks he is so brave
But the men who really did the job
Are dead and in their grave

Forward Joe Soap's
Marching without fear
With our old commander
Safely in the rear
Amen

Sung to the tune of Onward Christian Soldiers, this WWI trench song is from the original cast recording of the 1964 Musical "Oh What a Lovely War".


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Lyndi-loo
Date: 04 May 01 - 04:25 AM

How about

I don't want to be a soldier I don't want to go to war I'd rather hangaround Picadilly underground Living off the earnings of a .........high born lady

Sorry don't know any more verses


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Micca
Date: 04 May 01 - 09:37 AM

Lyndi do you mean this

" I don't want to Join the Army
I dont want to go to war
I'd rather stay at home
around the streets to roam
and live on the earnings
of a Navy Typist

I dont want a bayonet in my belly
I dont want my bollocks shot away
I'd rather stay in England,
in merry merry England
and Forincate my bleeeding life away
There is more, but I will send it PM if you want, its a bit vulgar....


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Lyndi-loo
Date: 04 May 01 - 10:49 AM

That's the one! Yes please a PM would be great (even if it is rude)


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bugsy
Date: 06 May 01 - 08:36 PM

Please pm me too.

Cheers

Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: NSC
Date: 07 May 01 - 12:48 PM

Micca,

it is important to post the whole song despite its "vulgarity". Soldiers who had been deprived of their loved ones company, were bound to be vulgar and despite the vulgarity the song you started is very funny. I have a somewhat different version which I will post later today.


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Subject: Lyr Add: I DON'T WANT TO JOIN THE ARMY
From: NSC
Date: 07 May 01 - 12:54 PM

As promised:I DON'T WANT TO JOIN THE ARMY

I don't want to join the army
I don't want to go to war,
I'd rather hang around Picadilly underground,
Living off the earnings of a high born lady.
I don't want a bayonet up my arse hole,
I don't want my bollicks shot away.
I'd rather stay in England, in merry fucking England,
And fornicate my bleeding life away.

Gorblimey.

Monday I touched her on the ankle,
Tuesday I touched her on the Knee,
Wednesday night success, I lifted up her dress,
On Thursday night we went to the pictures.
Friday I laid my hand upon it,
Saturday she gave my balls a tweek,
On Sunday after supper, I rammed the fucker up her,
And now I'm paying thirty bob a week.

Gorblimey

I don't want to join the army,
I don't want to go to war,
I'd rather hang around Picadilly underground,
Living off the earnings of a high born lady.
I don't want a bayoney up my arse hole,
I don't want my bollicks shot away.
I'd rather stay in England, in merry fucking England,
And fornicate my bleeding life away.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 07 May 01 - 05:12 PM

The song I mentionned earlier in this thread is called Vimy and was written recently by a member of the Canadien band Tanglefoot. It refers to a first world war battle but I have not had a chance to transcribe the words yet. I saw the band perform it at Whitby Moor and Coast festival this weekend and they were great!


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Lyndi-loo
Date: 08 May 01 - 10:59 AM

Mrs Duck Vimy ridge was a battle in Northern France near Arras in which huge numbers of young Canadian soldiers died. Today there is a beautiful white limestone memorial inscribed with thousands of names of Canadians whose bodies they never found and around it are acres of graves containing the bodies which were found. A very moving place.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,maxarthurhistorian@hotmail.com
Date: 24 May 01 - 11:09 AM

Dear Bugsy,

I have just discovered your website. In a week's time I am going to publication with a collection of over 150 First World War songs. They are mainly British with a few Canadian, Australian and American. I have a feeling I may have missed some gems that you may have collected. I would be most grateful if you would contact me. Best wishes, Max Arthur


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Bugsy
Date: 25 May 01 - 05:57 PM

maxarthurhistorian@hotmail.com - You have Email.

Walrus - You have Email.

CHeers

Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Genie
Date: 10 Nov 01 - 08:44 PM

Does anyone have any more verses to Mademoiselle from Armentières or the TUNE (MIDI) for Roses of Picardy?


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Amos
Date: 10 Nov 01 - 10:05 PM

No-one seems to have remembered Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition" which I am pretty sure was straight from the the First World War.

"Praise the Lord, and pass the ammunition (3x)
And we'll ALL stay free!!"

A


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: gnomad
Date: 11 Nov 01 - 10:10 AM

Genie: Further verses for Mademoiselle (or are these 2 songs that have got tangled by virtue of using the same tune?) inserted after 3 German officers having crossed the Rhine, repeats omitted for brevity;

They marched up to a wayside inn, Parlez-vous,
Pissed on the mat, and walked right in, Inky-pinky etc.

"Landlord have you a daughter fair?" P-v,
"With lily-white teeth (tits) and golden hair?" I-p, P-v,

"My daughter, Sir, is far too young," P-v,
"To be buggered about by the son of a Hun" I-p, P-v.

"Oh Father, dear, I'm not too young," P-v,
"To get a good shag from anyone." I-p, P-v.

An orphaned verse can be found in Manning's "Her Privates We" :

Mademoiselle, she bought a cow, P-v,
To milk the brute, she didn't know how, P-v,
She pulled the tail instead of the tit,
And covered herself all over with -MILK...

Manning also mentions use of "Here we are again" as a marching song.

Bugsy: In "Goodbye to all that" Graves mentions the troops having a liking for singing mainly comic songs of the day, or hymns. Instances given include Slippery Sam, + I Do Like a S'Nice S'Mince S'Pie.

More obviously war-related songs mentioned are; I Want to Go Home (mentioned earlier in thread) and When we've wound up the watch on the Rhine [or When We Wind Up the Watch on the Rhine(?)].

He also gives the following as being sung about Company QM Sgt Finnegan, to the hymn tune Whiter than the Snow.

Coolness under fire,
Coolness under fire,
Mentioned in dispatches
For pinching the Company rations,
Coolness under fire.

Now he's on the peg,
Now he's on the peg,
Mentioned in dispatches
For drinking up the Company rum,
Now he's on the peg.

Chorus
Whiter than the milky cokernuts,
Whiter than the milky cokernuts,
Wash me in the water
That you wash your dirty daughter in
And I shall be whiter than the milky cokernuts,
Nuts,
Nuts,
Oooooh nuts.

Incidentally there exists somewhere a film clip (saw it on TV some years ago) of Graves singing Hanging from the Old Barbed Wire. Like Dennis Healey's version of D-Day Dodgers the strength of the clip seems to come from his having lived through what he's singing about, quite moving. I'm a bit new at this, but sure someone here will be able to point to likely archive sources for such clips if they are of interest.

In his autobiography "Sagittarius Rising", Cecil Lewis gives one verse of "Hanging from the old barbed wire" as follows:

If you want to find the Sergeant-Major,
We know where he is! We know where he is!
If you want to find the Sergeant-Major, we know where he is!
He's lying on the canteen floor.
We've seen him, we've seen him,
Lying on the canteen floor we've seen him,
Lying on the canteen floor.
Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh!
Covered all over with tissue paper, tissue paper,
Marmalade and jam.

The "missing" 3rd line at first suggested faulty memory to me, but he published in 1936 while still aged under 40, and the final 3 lines don't fit the usual tune. Could there be a different tune out there somewhere?

Finally, one or two chroniclers mention the troops as having sung "Aupres de ma blonde" and "Alouette", presumably pinched from their host country, or from the French troops who we sometimes forget were also present in large numbers.

Memo to self: It being 11/11, Remember, and remember that "Dulce et decorum est" is an old lie.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Deda
Date: 11 Nov 01 - 06:39 PM

Do these have to be British songs? George M. Cohan wrote during WWI, including Over There, You're a Grand Old Flag, (I'm a) (I'm a) Yankee Doodle Dandy, and all the music to the movie Yankee Doodle, starring Jimmy Cagney.

A verse that my mom sang to Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning:

Oh boy the minute the war is over
Oh boy the minute the foe is dead
I'll put my uniform away
And move to Phila delphi-ay
And spend
The rest of my life in bed.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 12 Nov 01 - 01:19 AM

OK this appears Canadian, but the bottom notes indicate WWI....keep it or throw it out, as you see fit.

North Atlantic Squadron

/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6759


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Mr Red
Date: 12 Nov 01 - 07:05 AM

Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition

Amos - I have the sheet music for this and SORRY to be a bit pedantic **snigger** but the date is 1940 or 42 and the origin is USA. When first finding the music I mention this to a folkie (who is old enough to know) who was astounded I didn't realise it was WWII.

Unless our old friend trad arr Mr XXXX was active. Actually I think it was a team of 2 Mr XXX & Mr YYY. I could dig out the evidence but it is buried deep.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Amos
Date: 12 Nov 01 - 12:35 PM

I stand correct, Sir Red -- thanks for the arcane knowledge. I coulda sworn it was WW I just from the sentiment.

A.


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Subject: RE: Trench Songs of WW1
From: Amos
Date: 12 Nov 01 - 12:36 PM

That's corrected, sorry.

A.


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