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Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières -UK Version (32)
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres PARODY (10)
Lyr Add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start) (6) (closed)


Lighter 27 Sep 19 - 10:41 AM
Lighter 27 Sep 19 - 10:39 AM
Lighter 26 Sep 19 - 10:06 AM
Lighter 26 Sep 19 - 09:57 AM
Lighter 25 Sep 19 - 08:07 AM
Lighter 22 Sep 19 - 01:25 PM
Mrrzy 19 Sep 19 - 05:41 PM
Jack Campin 19 Sep 19 - 02:18 PM
Lighter 31 Jan 17 - 06:01 PM
False Lankum 31 Jan 17 - 03:05 PM
EBarnacle 05 Nov 15 - 12:09 PM
Lighter 05 Nov 15 - 07:24 AM
False Lankum 05 Nov 15 - 06:22 AM
GUEST,Lighter 14 Sep 15 - 02:51 PM
GUEST,False Lankum 14 Sep 15 - 05:07 AM
GUEST 02 Jun 15 - 08:42 PM
Lighter 07 Nov 13 - 08:12 AM
GUEST 07 Nov 13 - 06:45 AM
Lighter 29 Sep 13 - 05:02 PM
GUEST,celticbhoyliam 07 Apr 12 - 01:00 PM
GUEST,Lighter 24 Mar 12 - 09:46 AM
mayomick 24 Mar 12 - 09:26 AM
GUEST,Lighter 13 Jan 11 - 06:17 PM
GUEST,DevilDog 13 Jan 11 - 06:04 PM
GUEST,Lighter 27 Dec 10 - 12:24 PM
fox4zero 26 Dec 10 - 01:10 PM
GUEST,Noah 25 Dec 10 - 10:12 PM
GUEST 17 Jun 10 - 05:41 AM
Lighter 11 May 10 - 01:20 PM
GUEST,Dorsi Diaz 07 Mar 10 - 09:14 PM
Joe_F 14 Nov 09 - 05:47 PM
GUEST,Lighter 14 Nov 09 - 04:49 PM
GUEST 14 Nov 09 - 10:23 AM
GUEST,maggie may 14 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM
GUEST,maggie may 13 Nov 09 - 09:27 PM
Helen Jocys 05 Nov 09 - 03:20 AM
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GUEST,Brian L 04 Nov 09 - 04:54 PM
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Gibb Sahib 14 Oct 09 - 01:14 PM
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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 27 Sep 19 - 10:41 AM

That should be, "But the suggestion doesn't pass muster.

Stupid "submit" button....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 27 Sep 19 - 10:39 AM

Ballad scholar Bertrand Bronson once offered half-serious “proof” that “Mademoiselle from Armentières” (both the character and the song) “is in the direct line from an Elizabethan daughter of Eve.”

THdoesn't quite pass muster. He prints a song from William Wager’s play "The Longer Thou Livest the more Fool Thou" (1568):


There was a mayde cam out of Kent,
Deintie love, deintie love,
Theere was a mayde cam out of Kent,
Daungerous be.
There was a mayde came out of Kent;
Fayre, propre, small and gent
As euer vpon the grounde went.
For so it should be.

“The Mayde of Kent” offers ribald possibilities akin to those of the Mademoiselle, but the resemblance goes not much further. The stanza form bears some similarity to that of the latter song, but the scansion, particularly in the final lines, is a bad fit – as is the presence of an extra line of description or narration. There is no genealogical textual relationship between the maid and the mademoiselle.

(Personality, of course, is a different story.)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Sep 19 - 10:06 AM

A blogger wrote,

"I can’t get 'The Little Marine Went Over the Top' out of my head.
Where did that little marine kick the Kaiser, I always wondered. My dad would never say. Somewhere in Germany, I assume."

Research reveals the whole couplet to have been,

"The little Marine went over the top...
To kick the Kaiser off the pot."

The alternative version involved castrating the Kaiser.

The "little Marine," of course, was the product of a physiological process described in prior stanzas.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Sep 19 - 09:57 AM

I found this children's rhyme in St. Johns only a couple of years back:

The Yankees say they won the war, parley-voo!
The Yankees say they won the war, parley-voo!
The Yankees say they won the war,
The Newfies won it the day before.
Inky dinky parley-voo!

The Yankees had to scrub the floor, parley-voo!
The Yankees had to scrub the floor, parley-voo!
The Yankees had to scrub the floor,
The Newfies marched right out the door.
Inky dinky parley-voo!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 25 Sep 19 - 08:07 AM

BTW, the familiar assertion that "MfA" is parody of Uhland's poem "The Landlady's Little Daughter" applies, if at all (long regarded as a masterpiece of German Romanticism) only to the tangentially related "German Officers" song, which predates World War I.

The number of public and literary figures who have noted their personal familiarity with the song include James Joyce, Oliver St. John Gogarty, Ernest Hemingway, William Roberts, Frederic Manning, Guy Chapman, Henry Williamson, Basil Rathbone, J. B. Priestly, Laurence Stallings, Everett Dirksen, Eric Partridge, John Brophy, David Jones, the Duke of Windsor, C. S. Lewis, John Dos Passos, Carl Sandburg, John Jacob Niles, Count Ciano, William Faulkner, Douglas MacArthur, Tennessee Williams, George Orwell, and of course the ballad hunters John A. Lomax and Alan Lomax, who took two opportunities, more than a dozen years apart, to publish words and music.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Sep 19 - 01:25 PM

The end credits of Peter Jackson's otherwise brilliant feature documentary, They Shall Not Grow Old (2018) are backed with an endless, *endless* performance of "Mademoiselle from Armentieres."

Three points, which only extreme Mudcat Pedants will appreciate (all others get away! Not kidding!) :

The melody used is not the authentic British Army tune printed (for the first time) in Lieutenant F. T. Nettleinghame's "More Tommy's Tunes" (1918), "Learnt from Sergt. Paise, Middlesex Regt." Instead, it's the more sophisticated tune of an elaborate music-hall rewrite, "Mademoiselle from Armentieres," written and composed by Harry Carlton & J. A. Tunbridge, Copyright 1919 by B. Feldman, London, England.

It is, regrettably, also the melody that was used in "Oh! What a Lovely War!"

Every stanza, moreover, regardless of topic, begins with a repeated "Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlez-vous!" That pattern has never been typical and appears to be very much postwar.

So do most of the lyrics, few of which were ever attested to by British or Empire veterans of the war - during it or afterwards.

In fact, most of the movie's version appears to have been unwisely drawn from Hugh de Witt's "Bawdy Barrack-room Ballads" (1970), which includes lyrics like

"The way Mademoiselle could work her pelvis!
This was long before any sign of Elvis!"

(I didn't catch that one in the film!)

Simply as a point of interest, novelist John Brophy and lexicographer Eric Partridge, both BEF infantrymen, recalled that the "forty years" stanza of "Mademoiselle" was the *only* one that was well known to British soldiers during the war.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Sep 19 - 05:41 PM

Um, for alla y'all who think Parlez-vous means Do you understand, you're wrong. It means Do you speak.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 Sep 19 - 02:18 PM

This mademoiselle really needs her own song:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/black-panther-roof-france-video-pictures-armentieres-a9112351.html


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 31 Jan 17 - 06:01 PM

Thanks for that, Ian.

The song takes two forms: a straight narrative lifted directly from "The Three German Officers" and random collections of a few topical, satirical verses each.

The satirical versions collected after 1918 are rarely more than three or four stanzas long. It would seem that "Parlez-Vous" was sometimes sung in limerick fashion, with the participants contributing ad-libbed stanzas.

While the song unquestionably began in the British army, most of the random stanzas that have been noted seem to be of American origin.

Am hoping I can finish my pedantic study of the whole song family some time in the next few months.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: False Lankum
Date: 31 Jan 17 - 03:05 PM

Just came across the following in the book 'Your Dinner's Poured Out' (Dublin, 1981), which documents the Dublin based childhood of Paddy Crosbie (p.57);

'Towards the end of the war, in 1918, we were singing songs that came over from the trenches:

        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres, Parley Voo,
        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres, Parley Voo,
        'Madamoiselle from Armentieres,
         Hasn't been kissed for forty years,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, Parley Voo,
         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, Parley Voo,
         The Prince of Wales is gone to jail,
         For ridin' an ass without a tail,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

         Up the stairs and into bed, Parley Voo,
         Up the stairs and into bed, Parley Voo,
         Up the stairs and into bed,
         Throw your oul' wan over your head,
         Inky Pinky Parley Voo.

There was another song which came back from the Front, but which is best left out. It certainly could not be mingled with children's rhymes.'

All the best,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: EBarnacle
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 12:09 PM

I am surprised that nobody has commented on the verses about hearing a nickel drop are almost certainly of either American or Canadian origin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 07:24 AM

Not at all, Ian. Thanks for the clarification.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: False Lankum
Date: 05 Nov 15 - 06:22 AM

I meant to get back on here to say thanks for your reply Lighter!

I should have explained more clearly - Máire Johnston didn't claim to have heard the verse in 1885 - indeed she was not born at this stage and only wrote the book in 1985! I get the feeling that she heard the verse at some stage growing up (the book contains many snippets of such verses) and being unaware of the various precedents, presumed that it stemmed from the said visit.

Hope that clears things up a bit and sorry if my original post was misleading!

Regards,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Sep 15 - 02:51 PM

Thanks, Guest. I have collected three other, independent examples of the "Prince of Wales" verses, though one involves the "King of France" and one a "horse." That's enough to show that the words were once fairly well known.

All are sung to the "Hinky Dinky" tune, though yours is the only one with "stinky" in the refrain.

The later George V was Prince of Wales in 1885. (He was 20 years old.) The future Edward VIII, in his early 20s, was Prince during World War I.

If the alleged 1885 reference is correct, the verses (without "Inky...") must antedate WW1. If so, they could easily have been set later to the soldiers' tune, which, esp. in the American army, tended to attract couplets from all over.

I can only guess at the meaning of the verses. "Put in jail/ For riding an ass [or even 'horse'] without a tail" suggests, however, a fairly obvious sexual metaphor.

The "tank" stanza usually has "Three German soldiers" in it. Your version may be the earliest one noted, which suggests an origin in WW2 or even later.

My problem with "Mlle. from Armentieres" is *too much information.* However, I am making progress in assembling it. There's so much good stuff it's difficult to leave so much of it out!

Thanks for asking.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,False Lankum
Date: 14 Sep 15 - 05:07 AM

Stumbled onto this very interesting and informative thread while looking for information re: 'The Fart Song/The Old Woman of 92' which I learned in Dublin as a child in the 80s. Two years ago I heard the following verse being sung in a pub;

11 soldiers in a tank, Parley vu,
11 soldiers in a tank, parley vu,
11 soldiers in a tank,
Reading the Beano and having a wank,
Inky, pinky, parley vu.

Also, Máire Johnston, in her book 'Around the Banks of Pimlico' mentions the following verse, which she dates to a visit of the Prince of Wales to the Liberties in Dublin on Thursday, 9 April, 1885 (although in light of the above, this seems unlikely);

The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, parley vu,
The Prince of Wales is gone to jail, parley vu,
The Prince of Wales is gone to jail,
For riding an ass without a tail,
With your inkey, stinkey, parley vu.

Have you ever published your findings on this Lighter? I would be very interested to get a copy if so.

Regards,

Ian


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 15 - 08:42 PM

My dad used to sing:

The YMCA went over the top
To pick up the nickels the doughboys dropped
Hinky-dinky parley-voo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 07 Nov 13 - 08:12 AM

Acronyms (initial letters strung together and pronounced not as letters but as a word) hardly existed before the Second World War. (The first one appears to be DORA - the British Defense of the Realm Act of 1914).
"SNAFU" dates from 1941.

"Skiboo" is probably just nonsense. Early versions of the "German Officer" song sometimes have "snapoo" instead. More recently there's "Yo ho!" and under the influence of "Mademoiselle from Armentieres," "Hinky dinky parlez-vous."

And at some point, for some singers, the "German Officers" got mixed up with the tune of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Nov 13 - 06:45 AM

I wonder if skiboo is an acronym like SNAFU or BUMPF that meant something to those at the time but has become obscure. Lots of military slang was based on the everyday bureaucracy they endured.

(Situation Normal All F'ed Up / Brakes Undercarriage etc. - essential pre-flight pilot checks)

Back in the east of London in the 50s and 60s it was amazing how many young kids knew these songs. probably because older relatives would sing them when drunk.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES
From: Lighter
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 05:02 PM

It is often claimed that "Mademoiselle" was the result of a team effort in the spring of 1915 by Canadian Sgt. Gitz Rice (who contributed the tune)and British Sgt. Edward C. H. "Red" Rowland (who claimed the words).

Little evidence was ever adduced to support this assertion, so I was extremely skeptical of it for many years. Extensive research, however, has unearthed some detailed testimony from Rice and corroboration from Rowland which makes their claim to combining *one* seemingly early set of the words and an adaptation of the melody all but proven.

There's no space to go into detail here, or into the song's earlier history in other guises, but what follows is probably as close to Rowland & Rice's composition as we are ever likely to find.

Nova Scotian Gitz Rice, a graduate of McGill University in Toronto, was a successful songwriter and a vaudevillian. He copyrighted "Keep Your Head Down, Fritzie-Boy!" "I Want to Go Home!" and "Dear Old Pal of Mine." Rowland had been a music hall comedian; he told a journalist in 1939 that he and Rice had produced "Mademoiselle" in "about fifteen minutes" - which is entirely believable.

The following text (no tune) appeared in "The McGill University Song Book" in 1921. It is possibly the earliest printing of the song with "mademoiselle" and "forty years" in it, and it seems to me to be just naughty enough for presentation by enlisted men at a British Army concert party in Armentieres in 1915 without risking any disciplinary measures from the brass hats.

But it is clear, in any case, that this "Mademoiselle" was inspired by earlier bawdy songs of the "Three German Officers" type.

                MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, Parlez vous,
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, Parlez vous,
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hasn't been kissed for forty years,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time, Parlez vous,
The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time, Parlez vous,
The "Forty Thieves" they have a good time,
They steal our rations behind the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh Landlord have you any good wine, Parlez vous,
Oh Landlord have you any good wine, Parlez vous,
Oh Landlord have you any good wine,
Fit for a soldier of the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh yes, I have some very good wine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes, I have some very good wine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes, I have some very good wine,
To cheer the soldiers of the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh Landlord have you a daughter fine,
She breaks our hearts while up the line,
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Oh yes I have a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes I have a daughter fine, Parlez vous.
Oh yes I have a daughter fine,
But not to waste upon the line.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

But dear father I love them all, Parlez vous.
But dear father I love them all, Parlez vous.
But dear father I love them all,
Thin and fat and short and tall.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

They come to save our country fair, Parlez vous.
They come to save our country fair, Parlez vous.
They come to save our country fair,
Et a la guerre comme a la guerre.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.

Go to your room, oh daughter mine, Parlez vous.
Go to your room, oh daughter mine, Parlez vous.
Go to your room, oh daughter mine,
And leave the soldiers to their wine.
Hinky dinky, Parlez vous.



(I believe that the "Forty Thieves" was a nickname for the British Army Service Corps.)

Claims of authorship by other writers turn out, upon investigation, to refer to quite different sets of words, most or all of them written for the London stage at the very end of the Great War.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,celticbhoyliam
Date: 07 Apr 12 - 01:00 PM

celtic fc inky pinky parle vous lyrics !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

the rangers dont know what to do parle vous
the rangers dont know what to do parle vous
the rangers dont know what to do they havent got a fucking clue inky pinky parle vous

the rangers are looking for miracle cures parle vous
the rangers are looking for miracle cures parle vous
the rangers are looking for miracle cures i think they better go to lourds inky pinky parle vous

rangers futures looking grim parle vous
rangers futures looking grim parle vous
rangers futures looking grim i think they better sign a TIM inky pinky parle vous



hail hail , celtic fc champions 2012


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 09:46 AM

"Inky pinky" appears in children's rhymes in the 19th century.

At least one pre-1914 version of "The Derby Ram" contains "hinky dinky" in the chorus.

In the U.S. for many years before the war, "hinky-dinky" meant contemptably small or inconsequential.

So I don't think these words stand for any particular French words in the song (though "Dis-donc!" "Hey, you!" might have called "hinky-dinky" to somebody's mind).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: mayomick
Date: 24 Mar 12 - 09:26 AM

It's the "Inky Pinky" part of the chorus that I always liked most. I don't know what inky pinky is supposed to mean but it comes across like it's mocking the sound of some French words that the composer of the song doesn't understand .George Orwell said that the history of English poetry has been determined by the fact that the English language lacks rhymes , but don't English language poets make up for it whenever they come across a bit of a foreign language to throw in ? Orleans rhyming with Liberty bonds and Croix-de-Guerre with underwear . Very funny


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 13 Jan 11 - 06:17 PM

Guest Devil Dog, that's exactly how I first heard it, in 1977.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,DevilDog
Date: 13 Jan 11 - 06:04 PM

This is the way my Dad taough me this song:

The first Marine found a bean Parley-vous...

The second Marine cooked the bean parley-vous...

The third Marine ate the bean and blew a hole in the submarine...

Hinky-dinky-parley-vous.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 27 Dec 10 - 12:24 PM

Noah, my estimation is that the "bean" stanza is one of the top two known today.

I concur that it's probably a post-1918 kids' creation, if only because marines don't have much to do with submarines.

Fox4zero, there's not much that's off-topic here. But did your patient know any songs?

Thanks for the two posts.

And for refreshing the thread.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: fox4zero
Date: 26 Dec 10 - 01:10 PM

Lighter pm
In reference to your '04 post about soldiers being charged by the "Y"
for edibles. Some years ago had a VA patient who had served in the Spanish-American War, Boxer Rebellion, and WWI. In 1919, when he was in Russia with the Siberian Expeditionary Force he told me bitterly that the Red Cross charged them for coffee and doughnuts.
A little off the subject, but I thought interesting.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Noah
Date: 25 Dec 10 - 10:12 PM

This is a version my grandmother's been singing for 50-plus years

The first marine he ate the bean
Parlez-vous
The second marine he ate the bean
Parlez-vous
The third marine he ate the bean
He pissed [or alternately farted]all over the submarine
Inky-pinky parlez-vous

This is probably a children's satire from WWII


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 05:41 AM

The Farmer came out to milk the cow, parley-vou...
The Farmer came out to milk the cow, parley-vou...
He pulled the tail instead of the tit,
And all she got, was a bucket of shit.
Inky dinky parley vou.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 11 May 10 - 01:20 PM

Several cleaned-up/ rewritten music-hall versions of "Mlle. from Armentieres" were copyrighted by different composers after the Great War. They're not a much like what the soldiers sang.

I keep finding references to one in which the Mademoiselle slaps a general's face. The slap seems to be an important part of the action. But there's no trace of the lyrics.

Does anybody know them?

I've checked the 'Net: no luck.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Dorsi Diaz
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 09:14 PM

What an interesting thread! I am actually going to write an article about my version of this song, which my mother sang to me growing up. My dad was a WW2 vet, and this is the way they sang it ( I am now singing it to my grandson, age 1) My mom was originally from Canada and my dad from New Jersey.

The scotch marines went over the top
Parlez Vous
The scotch marines went over the top
Parlez Vous
The scotch marines went over the top,
Because they heard a penny drop
Inky Pinky Parlez Vous.

Doo-doo-Doo-doo (I think my mom ad-libbed that last line..lol)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Joe_F
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 05:47 PM

There were bits of it floating around my highschool (1950-1954), or else I wouldn't have known the tune. But IIRC I got most of my words out of John Dos Passos's _U.S.A._


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 04:49 PM

At some point, I suppose many years after World War One, some people changed the tune to that of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again."

Which is essentially a minor-key version of the "Mademoiselle" song.

Interesting that nobody here who learned "Mademoiselle" via tradition (instead of from a folksong book) seems to have heard more than one or two stanzas.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 10:23 AM

My dad taught me this. He learned it from his grandfather, WWII vet.

The first marine he found a bean, parley-vou,
The second marine he cooked the bean, parley-vou,
the third marine he ate the bean and PBBBBTH(rasberry noise) all over the submarine,
Inky dinky parley vou.

We sing it to "when johnny comes marching home again"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,maggie may
Date: 14 Nov 09 - 12:55 AM

Sorry. I am still new at this computer stuff.

As a child in Manitoba in the late forties or v. early fifties, I learned this verse, which I have not seen on this delightful thread:

We saw the train come down the track, parlez-vous
We saw the train come down the track, parlez-vous
We saw the train come down the track
And hit the station a helluva whack
Hinkey-dinkey parlez-vous

I hadn't thought of this song in many years and then this morning it was running through my head. There were other verses... Maybe they will come back to me later.

Of course we always sang the 'helluva whack' part really loud. Mum told us not to sing it around polite company.

Thanks for the wonderful discussion and the fun. Now, if I can just make the message go...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,maggie may
Date: 13 Nov 09 - 09:27 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Helen Jocys
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 03:20 AM

My father, who served in the Cheshire Yeomanry in the 14/18 war, said they used to sing 'Mlle. from Armentieres,
                  Picaninni for souvenir.' etc. etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Paul Burke
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 06:35 PM

Wee wee masheree, parleyvoo, ally coochee coochee? Napoo? san fairy ann.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Brian L
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 04:54 PM

My grandfather used to sing a version that i haven't seen anywhere on this forum. It went:

Nathan Hale went to jail, parlez vous
Nathan Hale went to jail, parlez vous
Nathan Hale went to jail, 'cause he sat on a horse's tail
Inky Dinky Parlez Vouz

I also remember him singing:

The scotch marines went over the top, parlez vous
The scotch marines went over the top, parlez vous
The scotch marines went over the top, because they heard a nickel drop
Inky Dinky Parlez Vous


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 01:28 PM

Gibb, I believe that Hugill erred when he suggested that the refrains (in "Gals o' Chile" and "Saltpetre Shanty") were conscious imitations of Spanish. I strongly suspect that the pattern of the shanty came from "Snappoo," which is the ancestor of "Three German Officers."

Robinson's text of "Hero Bangidero" (rptd. by Colcord) is the only other one I know of. He may have altered it just a little for publication - or a lot. From what he says (vaguely) in "The Bellman" (where it first appeared) a few words in the refrain(s) had to be altered.   

BTW: most future shanty-singers will be getting a lot of their material from your YouTube videos. Keep up the good work!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 01:14 PM

OK thanks, Lighter, for that breakdown.

You know, what I was thinking of with regards to "Ja Ja" (just brainstorming) was, like you said, the "similar stanzaic shape" but also in terms of the overall "gesture" of paradigm of the song. "Mlle" has "hinky dinky" ("hinky stinky" from the version I remember hearing when I was younger) and "Ja" has "inkum stinkum."

But beyond those specifics, I was thinking maybe many of these "pseudo-" refrains (never mind the verses), no matter what language they are supposed to reference, all amount to the same thing. That includes "snapoo" and the "pseudo-Spanish" words (that sound absolutely nothing like Spanish IMO) in the "Hero Bangidero" songs.

So yeah, probably not much there, but I was just wondering if, after looking at such a large body of texts that reflect transformations in different directions, any sort of big picture like that might have emerged.

Gibb


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 12:49 PM

Gibb, "Ja, Ja, Ja!" has a similar stanzaic shape, which leads to a similar insistent rhythm, but I don't see much resemblance otherwise.

"Mlle." has the pseudo-French "hinky dinky Parlez-vous" refrain, but I've never heard of any verses that were actually sung in a mock "Anglo-French" like the imitation Plattdeutsch of the shanty.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 14 Oct 09 - 12:43 PM

Thanks for your interest, Gibb. I'm trying to "make sense" of about 400 texts (not different stanzas) of these songs. The three most important facts:

1."German Officer"-type versions were known in America and elsewhere from before 1850.

2. The "Mademoiselle/ Parlez-Vous" offshoot was sung in the British Army in France by 1915 or '16.

3. Most versions that were actually sung (rather than printed in folksong books) were only a few stanzas long.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 01:22 PM

Lighter,

You mentioned in an earlier post how you'd been collecting related songs on this theme. Have you published anything on it by chance? Would make an interesting read.

I'm sure you have the chantey "Oh Aye Rio", which Cray seems to connect with "Bollochy Bill" but seems to share more with "Madamoiselle" IMO. But I was wondering if you (or anyone else who'd care to) might also include the pseudo-Dutch chantey "Ja, Ja, Ja" in this category." I sense a resemblance.

Gibb


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Old Vermin
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 09:47 AM

Thought the correction on Lilli Marlene's timing was made earlier, but well worth repeating. There is of course the D-Day Dodgers version....

At a boys grammar school in Surrey in the early 60s, I remember an older boy saying - with a 14-year old world-weariness - that he was *so* glad 'Parlez-vous' was going out [of fashion].

As then sung

Three German officers crossed the Rhine, Parlez-Vous x 2
Three German officers crossed the Rhine
Fuck the women and drink the wine
Inky-pinky, parlez vous

Much as elsewhere quoted, with the minor variation of them kicking the fucking door right in.

This was in the days when 'fuck' was only used in all-male company, and out of earshot of authority. There was of course a CCF unit at the school....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 12:15 AM

One of my pedantic posts —

Don't think anyone has corrected statement made on about the 3rd or 4th post on this long long thread, 25 Jul 97, that LILI MARLENE was a popular *WWi* song. Although written as a poem in 1915, it was not set to music till the 30s, with some additional verses. And it was in **WWii**, not WWi, that a chance broadcast in 1941, as a programme filler on Radio Belgrade, the German forces radio programme, of a record made in 1939 by Lale Andersen, caught on, first with German, and then with Allied, troops. It was never a First World War Song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Joe_F
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 08:01 PM

Callie: That was current among naughty boys in Vermont, ca. 1950:

The maid went out to milk the cow, parley-voo...
She pulled the tail instead of the tit,
And all she got, etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Callie
Date: 12 Oct 09 - 02:03 AM

Have loved this thread!

Have just found a field recording of Carrie Milliner (Australian, 1926 - ) singing a version of this song she learnt from her dad who sang it in the army.

Madamoiselle she bought a cow parly-boo
Madamoiselle she bought a cow parly-boo
Madamoiselle she bought a cow
And how to milk it she didn't know how
Inky ponky parly-boo

She pulled its tail instead of its tits parly-boo etc
And all she got was a bucket of shit

cheers!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 10:47 PM

There was a craze in Belfast, apparently beginning in 1945, to chalk the word (or name) "Skiboo" on walls, often under a stylized line drawing of a man peering over a wall.   Something similar happened in America beginning about 1941-42. That message was "Kilroy Was Here."

Allegedly "skiboo" was applied some years earlier to minor gangsters in Chicago, so maybe there was an earlier Irish connection.

The origin of "Skiboo" is not known; it may or may not have anything to do with the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 09:47 PM

Guest John, could you give a little more information about how skiboo was applied?

Here is some background.
M. B. Carey, writing in Jour. American Folklore, 1934, vol. 47, p. 369, said that it was used by the British Army in the 1890s. Major Charles Ffoulkes, late Secretary of the Imperial War Museum, London, and others, recalled singing it c. 1891. It was mentioned as "Snippo" in Jour. American Folklore, vol. 36, with regard to a parody-translation of Uhland's "Der Wirtin Tochterlein," and included in "Tommy's Tunes," 1917, a collection of British Army tunes. Some trace it to the British Army in India, some to an English drinking song (not found).

Above somewhere, the version of "Mademoiselle..." in "Tommy's Tunes" with the line:
"Two German officers crossed the Rhine, skiboo, skiboo,...."

No one seems to know the meaning, if any- it could be one of those nonsense words found in choruses of many songs.

Coming to present times, the online Urban Dictionary (not always reliable, and American usages only), has an entry:
"Any punk ass wannabe. A male between 16-25, pants so low as to show his underwear; crotch halfway to knees. Wears false gold over a sports jersey. Goatee common. ..."

In England there are the 'Farmer Skiboo' stories. Oxford Press recently (2007) published a bundle of them. I am not familiar with them.

Can't answer your question, Guest John.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,John: Northern Ireland
Date: 28 Jul 09 - 05:51 PM

Does anyone know what or who skiboo actually is? it was used a lot in Belfast years ago when addressing young fellas. Thankyou


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