mudcat.org: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4]


Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières

Related threads:
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières -UK Version (32)
Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentieres PARODY (10)
Lyr Add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start) (6) (closed)


noyng 25 Jul 97 - 01:23 AM
Frank in the swamps 25 Jul 97 - 05:27 AM
Bill in Alabama 25 Jul 97 - 07:57 AM
Andy Geliher 25 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM
Alice 25 Jul 97 - 11:02 AM
dick greenhaus 25 Jul 97 - 11:11 AM
noyng 25 Jul 97 - 11:41 PM
Dick Wisan 25 Jul 97 - 11:44 PM
Ferrara 04 Sep 98 - 07:01 PM
dick greenhaus 05 Sep 98 - 02:19 PM
gargoyle 05 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM
gargoyle 05 Sep 98 - 03:23 PM
gargoyle 05 Sep 98 - 03:31 PM
dick greenhaus 06 Sep 98 - 11:15 AM
gmbst33+@cis.pitt.edu 27 Apr 99 - 10:12 AM
anna 27 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM
Joe Offer 27 Apr 99 - 02:04 PM
ddw in windsor 27 Apr 99 - 09:53 PM
Joe Offer 28 Apr 99 - 06:27 AM
Wotcha 28 Apr 99 - 06:37 AM
skw@worldmusic.de 28 Apr 99 - 08:37 PM
Joe Offer 28 Apr 99 - 09:20 PM
Joe Offer 28 Apr 99 - 09:27 PM
Snuffy 17 May 00 - 10:10 AM
Abby Sale 17 May 00 - 08:46 PM
GUEST,Matt 17 May 00 - 09:06 PM
GUEST,Gerald Bergen 19 Jun 00 - 10:25 PM
Lighter 13 Feb 04 - 01:19 PM
Snuffy 13 Feb 04 - 04:32 PM
Lighter 13 Feb 04 - 05:09 PM
Uke 14 Feb 04 - 07:12 PM
Lighter 15 Feb 04 - 01:34 PM
The O'Meara 16 Feb 04 - 08:21 AM
Lighter 16 Feb 04 - 12:34 PM
GUEST,razzoo 17 Feb 04 - 06:08 AM
The O'Meara 17 Feb 04 - 08:25 AM
semi-submersible 17 Feb 04 - 04:56 PM
Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 07:44 AM
GUEST,coxcomputing@bellsouth.net 18 Feb 04 - 10:48 AM
GUEST 18 Feb 04 - 12:11 PM
pavane 18 Feb 04 - 12:21 PM
GUEST 18 Feb 04 - 01:29 PM
GUEST,Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 02:28 PM
GUEST,Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 02:41 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Feb 04 - 07:14 PM
cobber 18 Feb 04 - 07:26 PM
Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 07:27 PM
Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 07:38 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Feb 04 - 08:01 PM
Lighter 18 Feb 04 - 09:10 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: noyng
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 01:23 AM

What are the lyrics to this childrens' song; It had the words "Mademoiselle or Armenteris and parlez-vous". Then ....rinky, dinky parlez-vous. Thank you!

Click for related thread


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Frank in the swamps
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 05:27 AM

I don't recall the lyrics, but I think you're mistaken about it being a childrens song. As I recall it was popular among soldiers in the Great War as a song about a prostitute...

" Madamoiselle from Armentierres, just 16 plus some forty years, rinky dinky par les vous..."

Good hunting,

Frank.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Bill in Alabama
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 07:57 AM

Indeed, this was, along with "Smile, smile, smile" and "Lili Marlene," one of the best-known songs of WWI. I had a friend who was a WWI veteran, and he sang the refrain as "hinkey dinkey parley voo." That's all I have to contribute; if you don't get some help soon, I'll check the university library.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Andy Geliher
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM

The following is quoted from The Long Trail, by John Brophy/Eric Partridge
(no ISBN on my 1965 copy)

The songs in the book, originally published ~1930, were collected by ex-servicemen, from ex-servicemen.
Brophy makes no claim that his work is definitive but the text is at least contempory.

Mademoiselle from Armenteers
Air:
French Music-hall Tune

Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
Parley-vous!
Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
Parley-vous!
Mademoiselle from Armenteers,
She hasn't been ---- for forty years,
Inky-pinky parley-vous.

This song was adopted in 1918 by American troops who that year arrived in France and during the peace-time years that followed innumerable stanzas were invented and perpetuated at and for American reunions of `veterans'. The stanza given above constituted the complete version of the song as sung by British troops in 1914-18 - but three other songs, of which the third may most closely resemble the prototype, were in favour. They are set out on the following pages. In all versions the final line was sometimes begun with `Ninky' instead of `Inky'.

Madam Have You . . . ?
Air:
`Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

Madame, have you any good wine ?
Parley-vous!
Madame, have you any good wine ?
Parley-vous!
Madame, have you any good wine Fit for a soldier of the line ?
Inky-pinky parley-vous.

Oh, yes, I have some very good wine,
Fit for a Soldier of the line

Madame have you a daughter fine ?
Fit for a Soldier of the line

Oh. yes, I have a daughter fine,
Far too good for a bloke from the line.

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Air:
`Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Parley-vous!
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Parley-vous!
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Swinging the lead behind the line,
Inky-pinky parley-vous.
The Sergeant-Major's having a time
Swigging the beer behind the line,

The Sergeant-Major's having a time
---- the girls behind the line.

Skiboo
Air:
Variation of `Mademoiselle from Armenteers'

A German officer crossed the Rhine
Skiboo! skibboo!
A German officer crossed the Rhine
Skiboo! skibboo!
A German officer crossed the Rhine
He was on the lookout for women and wine
Skiboo, skiboo,
Ski-bumpity-bump skiboo!
Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair ?
With lily-white breasts and golden hair ?

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair.
With lily-white breasts and golden hair ?

But my fair daughter is too young,
To be mucked about by a son of a gun.

Oh father, oh father, I'm not too young,
I've been to bed with the parson's son.

It's a hell of a song that we've just sung,
And the fellow that wrote it ought to be hung.

The origin of all these `Mademoiselle' and `Skiboo' songs may be an untraceabler parody, perhaps written for performance at `men only' smoking concerts, of a German song by the poet J.L.Uhland, `The Landlady's Daughter'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Alice
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:02 AM

As I recall, Jimmy Durante used to sing this in a version fit for early TV audiences... shouldn't be too hard to find lots of variations.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:11 AM

We haven't entered this yet because of the difficulty in collecting a reasonable number of verses. Let's consider this thread a CALL FOR VERSES!

I'll put in (from the top of my head) the WWII verse: The WACs and the WAVEs will win the war, Parlez vous The WACs and the WAVEs will win the war, Parlez vous The WACS and the WACES will win the war So what the hell are we fighting for? Hinky Dinky Parlez Vous


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Thanks for Mademoiselle...help
From: noyng
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:41 PM

Thanks to all for your versions! Andy, your education was most helpful; your first version was the one I was trying to find. What a great site!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Dick Wisan
Date: 25 Jul 97 - 11:44 PM

Some more verses:

The first marine went over the top
Parley-vous!
The first marine went over the top
Parley-vous!
The first marine went over the top
To buy the Captain a lollipop
Hinky-dinky parley-vous.

The second marine went over the top
And landed in a barber shop

Notes:

  1. I suppose any number of marines went over the top, but I never heard of any of the others.

  2. These strike me as the kind of verses you sang to the children, which is what I was when someone sang them to me.

  3. Hope this HTML comes out right. Copied most of it from Andy Geliher's


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: Ferrara
Date: 04 Sep 98 - 07:01 PM

It's "Armentieres," pronounced (more or less) "Ar'-mun-tyeers'". Mademoiselle is pronounced (more or less) MAD -um- wa-SELLE.

Here are the words, from my father's WWII Army songbook. Note that these are only the clean verses. Verse order probably doesn't mean much. And I'm sure every outfit had their own home-made verses.

A mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-voo?
A mademoiselle from Armentieres, paylay-voo?
A mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed for forty years,
Hinky-dinky-parlay-voo.

Our top-kick there in Armentieres, ... soon broke that spell of forty years.

She might have been young for all we knew, .. . When Napoleon flopped at Waterloo.

She got the Palm and the Croix-de-Guerre (Croy dee Gair)... for washing soldiers' underwear.

She never could hold the love of a man, ... For she took her baths in a talcum can.

The mademoiselle was dressed in blue, ... The souvenir came in blue too. {Potassium permanganate?- Ferrara)

With her I flirted, I confess ... But she got revenge when she said yes.

The doughboy he had beaucoup jack ... till Mademoiselle got on his track.

My Froggie girl was true to you, ... she was true to the whole damned army too.

O Mademoiselle from gay Paree, you certainly did play hell with me.

You might forget the gas and shells, ... but you'll never forget these mademoiselles.

...That's all about the mademoiselle, but it gives more verses about army life and the was in Europe:

The French, they are a funny race, ... they fight with their feet and save their face.

The Cootie is the national bug of France, ... No matter where you hang your pants.

I didn't care what became of me, ... So I went and joined the Infantry.

The Yanks are having a hell of a time, ... wading around in the mud and slime.

The doughboy he went over the top, ... because he had no place to stop.

The medical corps they hold the line ... with C.C. pills and iodine.

The officers get all the steak, ... and all we get is a belly-ache.

Our grease-ball is a goddamn bum, he bails out swill and makes the slum.

The tin-hat, he ain't totin' a pack, We hope to Christ he breaks his back.

The General got a croix-de-guerre, ... the son of a bitch was never there. Hinky-dinky parlay-voo.

Notes from the book: "'Hinky-Dinky' was undoubtedly the real 'folk-song' of WWI. The British 'Tommies' sang it first, then the Marines picked it up, and finally the entire U.S. Army sang it, and sang it with gusto. The number of stanzas each single outfit made up for itself is legion, and most of them, alas, are completely unprintable."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 02:19 PM

In WWII, they sang:

Tha WACs and the WAVEs will win the war.. So what the hell are we fighting for?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:13 PM

From http://alts.net/ns/625/quotes.html

Columbo's Concise Canadian Quotations 1976

Gits Rice, Nova Scotian sergeant in the Canadian Army sat down in a little cafe in Armentieres; a small French town near Lille, in 1915 and watched a chic barmaid serve drinks. He composed the words - then and there- and performed it a few days later before the 5th battalion Montreal - stationed in France.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:23 PM

A friend has some tattered mimeographed sheets with hundreds of verses. Most of them wonderfully rude, crude or ribald. I will contact him and post when they arrive. In the meantime here are a few more. The first was the one I learned as child.

Many a cootie came over from France
In an undershirt and pair of pants

Oh, landlord, have you a daughter fair
To wash a soldier's underwear?

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair
With lily-white hands and golden hair

She never could hold the love of a man,
For she took her baths in a talcum can.

Mademoiselle from Armentieres
You'll never get the the Croix de Guerre
If you never wash your underwear

Mademoiselle from Orleans,
She made me sell my Liberty Bonds

The French, they were a funny race,
They fight with their feet and save their face.

The cootie is the national bug of France
The cootie's found all over France,
No matter where you hang your pants

Our grease-ball is a goddam dirty bum,
He bails out swill and makes the slum


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: gargoyle
Date: 05 Sep 98 - 03:31 PM

Oh, the seventy-seventh went over the top,
A sous lieutenant, a Jew and a Wop.

The medical corps, they held the line,
With C.C. pills and iodine.

The general got a Croix de Guerre,
The son-of-a-bitch was never there.

An American soldier on the Rhine,
He kissed the women and runk the wine.

The little marine fell in love with his nurse,
He's taken heer now for better or worse.

My Froggie girl was true to me,
She was true to me, she was true to you
She was true to the whole damn army, too

The Pretoria passed a ship today,
For the ship was going the other way.

Where are the girls that used to swarm,
About me in my uniform?

There's many and many a married man,
Want's to go back to France again.

Twas a hell of a war as we recall,
But still, 'twas better than none at all.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 06 Sep 98 - 11:15 AM

Good start!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: gmbst33+@cis.pitt.edu
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 10:12 AM

Dear folks:

I'm trying to get a song title, a book where the song appears, or the lyrics to the folling song:

This is the first verse:

The first marine went over the wall, parlez-vou, The second marine went over the wall, parles-vous, The third marine went over the wall/ God hit in the ass with a cannon ball/ Oh, Inky dinky Parlez-Vous...

Any help would be appreciated. Please respond to this thread and E-Mail me if you have any answers.

Best regards,

G. Bergen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: anna
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 11:48 AM

I can help I think. The song is called

Madamoiselle(?) from Armentieres(?) (?) = I'm not sure of the spelling.

It was an old WWI song. I've always loved it. Not that I was alive during WWI, but I've heard the song ;-)

Anna


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 02:04 PM

I guess this one isn't in our database yet, because Dick Greenhaus is still looking for verses. See above for what we have so far.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: ddw in windsor
Date: 27 Apr 99 - 09:53 PM

When I was in the service this was sometimes used as a marching song, usually with a call-response format and -- as far as I know -- verses being made up on the spot. It could get pretty ribald at times.

I had also heard it as a kids' "dirty" song that wasn't to be sung around adults for fear of a thick ear. A couple of the verses from those days are:

The first marine went over the fence, parley-vous
The second marine ....
The third marine went over the fence and milked a cow with a monkey wrench.
Hinky-dinky parley-vous

The first marine whittled the bean...
The second marine cooked the bean....
The third marine he ate the bean
And blew a hole in the submarine
Hinky-dinky .....

That's all I can remember. Maybe it's better that way....

cheers, ddw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIÈRES
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 06:27 AM

MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIÈRES

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

WORLD WAR I
(from John & Alan Lomax, Folk Song USA, 1947)

Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years.

She never could hold the love of a man,
For she took her baths in a talcum can.

She might have been old for all we knew,
When Napoleon flopped at Waterloo.

Mademoiselle from Orleans
She made me sell my Liberty bonds.

The seventy-seventh went over the top,
A sous-lieutenant, a Jew and a Wop.

The medical corps they held the line,
With pinky pills and iodine.

The officers get all the steak,
And all we get is the bellyache.

The general got the croix-de-guerre,
And the son-of-a-gun was never there.

An American soldier on the Rhine
He kissed the woman and drank the wine.

'Twas a hell of a war as we recall,
But still 'twas better than none at all.


WORLD WAR II (Lomax)

The Waves and Wacs will win the war
So what the hell are we fighting for?

The permanent party will have to go,
The Wacs are here to run the show.

Mississippi (or whatever) is a hell of a state,
The garbage can of the forty eight.

We're the boys from Keesler Field (or whatever)
We never had a decent meal.

Once we had a decent meal,
It took the general to swing the deal.

They say this is a motorized war,
So what the hell are we marching for?

OTHER VERSES
(Jerry Silverman, Songs & Ballads of WWI, 1997)

Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Gay Pa-ree,
You certainly did play hell with me,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

Mademoiselle from Armentieres,
She hadn't been kissed in forty years.

The sergeant-major from Armentieres,
He broke the spell of forty years.

Oh, landlord have you a daughter fair
To wash a soldier's underwear

Oh, yes, I have a daughter fair
With lily-white skin and golden hair.

Mademoiselle from St. Nazaire
She never heard of underwear.

Mademoiselle who comes from Brest
She's just the same as all the rest.

Mademoiselle from Orleans
She gypped me out of my Liberty bonds.

The French they have some customs rare,
they sit and drink in the public square.

The First Division went over the top,
They make the Kaiser take a flop.

The medical corps they held the line
With C.C. pills and iodine.

CANADIAN CONTRIBUTIONS
(Anthony Hopkins, Songs from the Front & Rear, 1979)

She had the form like the back of a hack,
When she cried the tears ran down her back.

She could beg a franc, a drink, a meal,
but it wasn't because of sex appeal.

She could guzzle a barrel of sour wine,
And eat a hog without peeling the rind.

The MPs think they won the war,
Standing guard at the café door…

The officers get the pie and cake
And all we get is the bellyache.

The sergeant ought to take a bath…
The sergeant ought to take a bath…
If he changes his underwear
The frogs will give him the Croix-de-Guerre…

You might forget the gas and shells…
You might forget the gas and shells…
You might forget the groans and yells
But you'll never forget the mademoiselles…

Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Mademoiselle from Armentieres, parlay-vous?
Just blow your nose, and dry your tears,
We'll all be back in a few short years,
Hinky-dinky, parlay-vous.

JRO


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: Wotcha
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 06:37 AM

Inky Pinky Parlez-vous was (is?) a song that was sung in rugby clubs long after the Armistice of 1918. The verses are to be found in the ubiqitous 1970s "Rugby Songs" and "More Rugby Songs" paperback contributions to world kulture -- not that I play rugger anymore ... cheers, Brian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: skw@worldmusic.de
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 08:37 PM

Thanks for this thread! I've wondered about the song ever since I came across its title in 'General Guinness' (see DT). - Susanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 09:20 PM

Still more verses:
Many and many a married man...
Wants to go back to France again.

The captain he's carrying the pack...
Hope to the Lord it breaks his back.

The little marine in love with his nurse...
He's taken her now for better or worse.

Mademoiselle all dressed in white...
Mademoiselle all dressed in white...
Mademoiselle all dressed in black
'Cause her little marine, he didn't come back.
Some verses aren't so happy, are they?
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Mademoiselle from Armentieres
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Apr 99 - 09:27 PM

There's also a labor version:
The bosses are taking it on the chin...
because the strikers won't give in.

The scabs are having a heck of a time...
trying to cross the picket line.

The boss is shaking at the knees...
He's shaking in his B.V.D.'s

We're going to win the union shop...
We'll clean the floor wiht a union mop.

We're staying on the picket line...
until we get the boss to sign

(source: Songs of Work and Protest, Edith Fowke & Joe Glazer, 1960)
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: THREE GERMAN OFFICERS
From: Snuffy
Date: 17 May 00 - 10:10 AM

In the British Army in the 60s, the 3 German Officers was a separate (though related) song, which we sang to the tune of When Johnny Comes Marching Home.

3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
Taboo, Taboo
3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
Taboo, Taboo
3 German Officers crossed the Rhine
To f**k the women and drink the wine
Taboo, Ta-bye, Ta-bollicky-eye
Ta-bollicky-eye, Taboo

They came upon a wayside inn
Smashed the door and barged right in

The landlord had a daughter fair
Lily-white tits and golden hair

They tied her to a feather bed
F**ked her until she was dead

They took her down a shady lane
F**ked her back to life again

Add more verses here ad lib

3 German Officers went to Hell
F**ked the devil's wife as well

'Twas on the Resurrection morn
3 German Officers still had the horn

Wassail! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: Abby Sale
Date: 17 May 00 - 08:46 PM

Now, you know this is a bawdy song in its home grounds - the army.  Not just "off color" or suggestive.

A. From Legman/Randolph, an example typical of of verses improvised by soldiers on the march.  It's collected in Arkansas in 1953.  He says it was the most popular song for both British & American troops in WW I.  I'd note that this is a "dynamic" song - it's nature includes the creative spontaneity as well as known standard verses.

            Oh, the French they are a funny race,
                    Parlay-voo?
             The French they are a funny race,
                    Parlay-voo?
             The French they are a funny race,
             They fight with their feet
             And fuck with their face ---
                    Hinky-dinky, parlay-voo?!

(He points out these French marital and martial arts (cunnininctus & savate) were both quite unfamiliar to most Yankee doughboys.  I think this upgrades the song in cleverness beyond the usual.)
 

B.  From a 1929 set version learned by children from returning soldiers.  (Compare with Silverman, above.)

            The First Division went over the top,
                    Parlay-voo?
            The Second Division went over the top,
                    Parlay-voo?
            The Third Division went over the top,
            To circumsize the Kaiser's cock --
                    Hinky-dinky, parlay-voo?!

       From two 11-year-old girls from the northwest coast, 1929 - what he calls a classic version:

            Mademoiselle from Armenteers, (3 times)
            She hasn't been fucked for forty years,

            She was true to me and true to you, (3)
            And true to the whole damn Army too.

            The first three months and all was well,
            The second three months she began to swell,
            The third three months and she gave a grunt
            And a little Marine jumped out of her cunt!

He refers to and agrees wit the comments in Brophy above but calls the text "sadly expurgated."  Gordon's Inferno collection has some good verses, too.  I'll have a look there tomorrow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: GUEST,Matt
Date: 17 May 00 - 09:06 PM

There was a book published in Canada in the 1970's called 'Songs from the Front and Rear' that had this piece and many other WW I and II soliders songs. I do not know if it is still in print, but it should be listed on one of the on-line book sellers (like www.chapters.ca).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Mademoiselle of Armenteris
From: GUEST,Gerald Bergen
Date: 19 Jun 00 - 10:25 PM

Well, here's another line for the discussion...hope this verse gets included.

The first Marine went over the wall,p-v,/ The second Marine went over the wall,p-v/ The third Marine went over the wall/ Got hit in the ass with a cannon ball/ Oh, inky-dinky-parles vous.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 01:19 PM

It's taken me a while, but I've "collected" over 100 versions of this song and its obsolete relative, "Snapoo," most of them fragmentary, mostly from printed references. If it's in a song book, in Mudcat, or on the Net, I've almost certainly found it. (That includes the song about "The Fart," which BTW I haven't been able to date before the 1960s; also have the rugby song about "Yo-ho, yo ho!" to tune of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home.")

Does anybody know any texts or verses not already in the 'Cat learned from oral tradition? That includes anything with a refrain ike "hinky-dinky parlee voo," "inky-pinky," etc., or "snapoo," "skiboo," or similar.

Somebody's grandfather must have passed something on from World War I, no? PM me if you'd prefer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Snuffy
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 04:32 PM

Lighter,

That version of The Fart that I posted in the other thread was what I learned at the latest in the 1954/55 school year, before we moved out of the Manchester conurbation into Pennine solitude.

WassaiL! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 13 Feb 04 - 05:09 PM

Snuffy: Outstanding. Many thanks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Uke
Date: 14 Feb 04 - 07:12 PM

Just an aside to this discussion that you might be interested in Lighter, considering your large collection of versions.

An Australian, Cecil Harry Winter (1883-1969), who later settled in New Zealand, claimed authorship of the original words of 'Mademoiselle from Armentieres' in a series of letters and articles in the newspaper Sydney Bulletin, some time after WWII.

He reckoned he'd composed them during WWI, though I'd know whether this was ever proved, either way. Being something of a balladeer, whose poems, usually published in newspaper under the name 'Riverina', it's possible. A few of these apparently entered the oral tradition in the Australiasian area. He was also a short-story writer on the side, so had a familiarity with 'fictionalising'...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 15 Feb 04 - 01:34 PM

Thanks, Uke. Winter is new to me as a claimant. There have been many.

There were a number of polite versions specially written for the stage. You can hear a recording of one sung by Jack Charman, purportedly in 1915 (a very early date if accurate) at

http://firstworldwar.com/audio/1915/htm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: The O'Meara
Date: 16 Feb 04 - 08:21 AM

I learned a sanitized version from my father, and later the "real" words in the U.S. Army in the early 60s. Most of the verses are posted here - One from me old man:

The Scotch brigade went over the top
They thought they heard a nickle drop

Chorus was Hinky - dinkey parlay - voo

Timeless folk music, by God!

O'Meara


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 16 Feb 04 - 12:34 PM

Thanks much, O'Meara. Do you remember when and where you heard the "real words" and what the social situation was?

Yours is the latest reported singing of the song in the U.S. Army. It was a big hit in France in 1918, but wasn't much sung in WW II.

I assume that your version was less than the epic strings of bland verses reported (with a straight face) in so many songbooks.

Mainly the Canadians, Brits, and Australians have kept it going in various forms, esp. as a rugby song.

If I ever publish on this topic, any 'Catter who helped out gets an acknowledgment (real name or alias, your choice) and a free PAPER COPY! Wotta deal!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: GUEST,razzoo
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 06:08 AM

I recall it from junior high days in the 50's, a good song for building a lad's vocabulary.

Updated "bring them on" version from somewhere in bama:

First Marine, over the wall, parlez vous,
Second Marine, over the wall, parlez vous,
National Guard, stay behind,
F**k the women and drink the wine,
Rinky Dinky parlez vous.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: The O'Meara
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 08:25 AM

Lighter;
I recall it quite well. During U.S. Army basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood MO, in Jan. of 1964 a bunch of us recruits were sitting around after some exercise or other and the subject of relatives in the military came up. My grandfather had been in the 69th New York (an Irish outfit) during WWI, and he had told a story about a famous newspaper photo showing the 69th marching to France, caption said they were watched over by a priest and were singing onward christian soldiers. He said no way, if they sang that protestant song the priest would have cursed them. They were actually singing a very bawdy tune called "Bangin' Away on Lulu!" I had overheard my father singing a couple verses of that tune, and I sang them. Several of the other guys knew the tune and had their own verses, and then the subject changed to bawdy old songs and the Madamoiselle and same thing - verses contributed by various guys - pretty rank stuff, although funny. I had no idea how bawdy it was a until then.

O'Meara


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: semi-submersible
Date: 17 Feb 04 - 04:56 PM

Timeless...

Isaac Asimov (top-flight sci-fi writer) in _The Caves of Steel_, has Earth citizens, some lifetimes hence, chant protest songs with "Dirty spacer, do you hear?" replacing an original "nonsense chorus of 'Hinky-dinky parley-voo.'"

Who knows which songs will survive in any given generation?

Maureen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:44 AM

A quick note of thanks to The O'Meara, Guest razzoo and semi-submersible. Every little bit counts.

Two very similar stanzas, authentically from the U.S. army in World War I:

               The S.O.S. they stayed behind,
               F****** the women and drinking the wine.

               The Y.M.C.A. went over the top,
               They thought they heard a nickel drop.


The "S.O.S." (Service of Supply) was the WWI name for the Quartermaster Corps.

With no USO in WWI, the YMCA set up numerous "canteens" behind the lines where off-duty soldiers could get coffee and doughnuts, cigarettes, etc. The American girls who workd there were also an attraction. Combat troops and others were understandably irked to find that the Y *charged* for refreshments.

Next to "Hinky Dinky / Mademoiselle" in the army's hit parade was "Lulu," with similarly ad lib stanzas. First DT version is pretty close to best-known WWI stanzas.

More later. Keep those posts a-comin'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST,coxcomputing@bellsouth.net
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 10:48 AM

I wonder why someone has not made the association of the French word "indiquez" ("Indicate" in English) with "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous"? Literally they are asking the Madameoselle to indicate that she understands.

Est-ce que je me demande pourquoi quelqu'un n'a pas fait l'association du "indiquez" du mot français ("Indicate" en anglais) avec Parlez-Vous "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous?" Littéralement ils demandent que le Madameoselle indique qu'elle comprend.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 12:11 PM

Literal translation aside, I don't think that's what they were asking of the Madamoselle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: pavane
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 12:21 PM

Looking for verses? There must be hundreds, mostly bawdy.
Tried Llewtrah's site?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 01:29 PM

I wonder why someone has not made the association of the French word "indiquez" ("Indicate" in English) with "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous"? Literally they are asking the Madameoselle to indicate that she understands.

Est-ce que je me demande pourquoi quelqu'un n'a pas fait l'association du "indiquez" du mot français ("Indicate" en anglais) avec Parlez-Vous "Inky-Dinky-Parlez-vous?" Littéralement ils demandent que le Madameoselle indique qu'elle comprend.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 02:28 PM

Doubtful - earlier British & Aussie versions uniformly have "Inky Pinky." The American chorus may have been influenced by awareness of the nickname of prominent Chicago politician "Hinky-Dink" McKenna.

Less frequent US refrains are "Inky Dinky" and "Rinky-Dinky."

Unpublished stanzas and info always welcome.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Inky-Dinky Parlez vous?
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 02:41 PM

Yes. Of the dozens of stanzas that have been printed, most are insipid rather than bawdy. Rugby song collections are an exception, but they appear late and, when the song appears, it usu. seems to stem from the text in "Rugby Songs" ("The [Three] German Officers"), in 1967.


Roy Palmer has a slightly different set in his collection "What a Lovely War" in the early '80s. Gordon Hall, Palmer's source, sings something a little different still on the matching casette from Veteran Tapes.

A privately printed US collection dated 1930 and 1935 has some bawdy stanzas collected from WW I veterans - but they're arranged without regard to popularity. I'm almost ready to say something more discursive about the song and its relatives, but want to glean some more stanzas and opinions first. Texts from children & grandchildren of WW I veterans anywhere would be most welcome, regardless of contents.

And Joe: could the several "Mlle." threads be combined for simplicity's sake?
    I combined the three threads into two. and left only this thread open. That should help some.
    -Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:14 PM

It's obviously important to you, as you've resurrected some very elderly threads in order to add the same message to each; but I should imagine that it was seen at the time either as self-evident and not worth mentioning; or irrelevant; or perhaps both.

Sad to say, I recall a parody of the parody that I picked up in childhood, probably via the Scouts.

There was an old woman of ninety-two
Parlez-vous
There was an old woman of ninety-two
Parlez-vous
There was an old woman of ninety-two
She knit some socks and away they flew
Inky Pinky Parlez-vous

The socks went flying down the street
Knocked a policeman off his beat

The socks went flying on to Rome
Found the King of Rome at home

The King of Rome was drinking gin
He opened his mouth and the socks flew in

The King of Rome is dead and gone
But still the socks go flying on.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: cobber
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:26 PM

Growing up in post war England, I only knew the bawdy version for years before I realised there was actually a clean set of words. We would hear ex-soldiers singing these songs when they'd had a few and the women weren't around and of course they did the rounds at school. The words we sang as horrible little pre-pubescent youths were as follows, with some censorship that you can fill in yourself. Forgive my sensitivity.
Three German soldiers crossed the Rhine
They f***d the girls and drank the wine

They came upon a wayside inn
They pissed on the door and kicked it in

The innkeeper had a daughter fair
With little white tits and golden hair

They tied her to a rusty bed
And F***d her till she was nearly dead

They took her down a leafy lane
And f***d her back to life again

It's not exactly Shakespear, but if I can remember it forty years on, I must have heard it a lot.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:27 PM

Thank you, Malcolm. I am familiar with this (British only?) song in its scatological form only. The "socks" version is, so far as I know, previously unrecorded.

By way of reasserting my sanity, I resurrected this thread only. The others reappeared as though they had minds of their own.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyrics add: Hinky Dinky Parly Voo (start)
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 07:38 PM

Many thanks, Cobber, for both text and context. The only stanza I knew growing up was the familiar one about "hasn't been kissed in forty years."

Somehow no less than *three* "Mlle." / "Parley-Voo" threads are now in play. To keep the 'Cat tidy,I recommend any reader of these lines to direct further posts to "LYR REQ: Mademoiselle from Armentieres."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 08:01 PM

They have a way of doing that. When I said "you", I was addressing "GUESTcoxcomputing" (etc), and should have made that clear; your (Lighter's) revival of this thread is worthwhile and interesting.

There ought to be other people who remember the "socks" parody, but they may not make the Armentiers connection, perhaps. This was the mid 1960s, I think, and it would certainly be older than that. I should add that the "King of Rome is dead and gone" lines were generally sung very slowly, and in the minor key, returning to the major and a brisk pace for the final line.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mademoiselle from Armentières
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Feb 04 - 09:10 PM

Brilliant, Malcolm! Bsck in the '30s, R. W. Gordon observed the melodic (and formal)relationship between "Mlle."-type songs (in the major)and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (in the minor). A number of post-WW II texts of the former are reported as having been sung to the latter - but yours is the first in which *both* tunes are used in the same song!

It's also worth mentioning in regard to tunes that the usual U.S. "parley-voo" tune is rather plainer and more like a march than variants commonly sung elsewhere.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 7 December 10:52 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.