mudcat.org: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics

IanC 07 Jul 00 - 08:29 AM
Mike Regenstreif 07 Jul 00 - 08:21 AM
IanC 07 Jul 00 - 05:42 AM
TheOldMole 07 Jul 00 - 01:49 AM
katlaughing 06 Jul 00 - 11:29 PM
Jeri 06 Jul 00 - 10:16 PM
Helen 06 Jul 00 - 09:34 PM
Helen 06 Jul 00 - 09:15 PM
Jeri 06 Jul 00 - 07:32 PM
wysiwyg 06 Jul 00 - 06:34 PM
p.j. 06 Jul 00 - 06:13 PM
Peter T. 06 Jul 00 - 04:39 PM
Bagpuss 06 Jul 00 - 04:15 PM
p.j. 06 Jul 00 - 04:01 PM
Liz the Squeak 06 Jul 00 - 03:56 PM
catspaw49 06 Jul 00 - 03:28 PM
Mike Regenstreif 06 Jul 00 - 03:17 PM
katlaughing 06 Jul 00 - 03:16 PM
Whistle Stop 06 Jul 00 - 03:06 PM
p.j. 06 Jul 00 - 02:36 PM
IanC 06 Jul 00 - 12:28 PM
GUEST 06 Jul 00 - 11:40 AM
Rick Fielding 06 Jul 00 - 11:38 AM
IanC 06 Jul 00 - 11:35 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 11:24 AM
IanC 06 Jul 00 - 11:18 AM
IanC 06 Jul 00 - 11:09 AM
catspaw49 06 Jul 00 - 11:07 AM
jeffp 06 Jul 00 - 10:34 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 10:26 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 10:21 AM
Giac 06 Jul 00 - 10:13 AM
Giac 06 Jul 00 - 10:09 AM
Peter T. 06 Jul 00 - 10:08 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 09:59 AM
Morticia 06 Jul 00 - 09:57 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 09:50 AM
Giac 06 Jul 00 - 09:46 AM
Snuffy 06 Jul 00 - 09:40 AM
sledge 06 Jul 00 - 09:33 AM
Snuffy 06 Jul 00 - 09:31 AM
katlaughing 06 Jul 00 - 09:31 AM
katlaughing 06 Jul 00 - 09:16 AM
Patrish(inactive) 06 Jul 00 - 09:15 AM
Homeless 06 Jul 00 - 09:13 AM
Homeless 06 Jul 00 - 09:12 AM
IanC 06 Jul 00 - 09:10 AM
Mbo 06 Jul 00 - 09:10 AM
Bagpuss 06 Jul 00 - 09:05 AM
GUEST,andy mööer 06 Jul 00 - 09:04 AM
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 08:29 AM

Sorry Mike. Must have missed it in all those words up there!!!

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Mike Regenstreif
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 08:21 AM

Ian,

Just one thing. I did specifically mention "St. James Infirmary."

Mike Regenstreif


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Some answers
From: IanC
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 05:42 AM

Well done folks. Time for a summary.

By the way, I'm not really willing to die for these answers. They're just "the truth as I know it". Let me know if I'm desperately wrong (but please give me some information as to why).

Here we go

1. You got it pretty much right. The original Blankenship broadside had a price of 5 cents. A photograph of it is published in Johnson's book. What's quite nice is that it has folds on it exactly the same as you'd make if you had folded it up and put it in your pocket for a couple of days. By the way it's very scannable and I've got a copy. Anyone want it?

2. Again, pretty sharp. "Canny" in Scotland is an abbreviation of "Uncanny" whereas in Northumberland, "Uncanny" is the opposite of "Canny". It might be unwise to call the inhabitants of Northumberland "Geordies" though. That's reserved for people who live on Tyneside. Why is "Bonny at Morn" down as "Scots" in DT?

3. "The Unfortunate Rake" gets it. The version I like best – nobody mentioned it – is St James Infirmary.

4. Again, great. Carols are originally dances with singing. The biggest body of carols which don't belong to Christmas you completely missed, though. Many of them – The Holly and The Ivy, Down in Yon Forest … - are originally Easter carols.

5. Trick question, but you got it. Mouth music is found ALL OVER Northern Europe (as well as in other parts of the world). Origins are probably prehistoric, but there is evidence that it is used more in poorer communities where (often expensive) instruments can't be afforded. In England, it is widespread – occasionally accompanying instruments – and called "Lilting". By the way I know of no evidence that there ever was any ban on instruments anywhere in Britain or Ireland. This seems to be a myth that has been seriously promulgated on Mudcat through a number of threads. Tell me if I'm wrong (but give me some evidence too).

6. Think you got most of this in the end. I've got a nice recording of Woody and Leadbelly singing "House of the Rising Sun". The last 2 verses of "This Land" are not usually published in US national or school songbooks. They go:

As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!

In the squares of the city - In the shadow of the steeple
Near the relief office - I see my people
And some are grumblin' and some are wonderin'
If this land's still made for you and me.

Gives a much better impression of the power of Woody's songs when you hear these as well.

7. I did say different TYPES of harmonica! In the European tradition anyway, for melodic use, harmonicas have different columns for the "blow" and "suck" reeds. Blues harps use the same column. I don't know how it will come out, but I'll try a diagram.

Blues Harp Folk Harmonica DF --D--F CE C--E--

The reason for the wider spacing is that it's easier to do tunes on the "folk" version. It's easier to do chords on the blues harp. Sorry for suggesting that blues isn't folk, by the way.

8. "Botany Bay" it was. Rolf Harris as a young Australian folk singer used to sing a version close to the original before he became rich & famous.The original version was written as "A Burlesque" but does have two verses in common with a transportation broadside published in 1820. I didn't have any idea what a "rum cull" was, so I was interested to learn it. Rolf Harris sang "numbskulls", I believe.

9. Mark Twain did work on Mississipi river boats, but as you said he was long dead…

10. Got it in one (eventually). North Country Maid. You need to slow the tune down and subtly change the rhythm but all the notes are still there. Older versions are often called something like "Home Boys Home" and refer to "North Americkay". There are also a number of different trees involved Oak & Ash (always), Ivy, willow … there's some discussion of this in a recent thread.

Thanks. I've really enjoyed reading your contributions.

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: TheOldMole
Date: 07 Jul 00 - 01:49 AM

and then, of course, there's

...if you get an outfit, you can be a cowboy too


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: katlaughing
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:29 PM

Geoff Kauffman, from the Mystic Seaport, has a nice version of "Home Dearie, Home" on his first cassette, "Fair Stood the Wind."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Jeri
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:16 PM

The song I was thinking of was David's Lamentation, as sung by the Waterson's and written by William Billings. Of course, Billings wouldn't have pinched the tune.

Helen, congratulations and thank you! The tune for the Waterson's version of the tune is just about exactly the same as Goddesses. I think the A and B parts (one time through each) are used for the verses, and the C part is the chorus.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Helen
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:34 PM

Oops! Why should I sit on my hands like a useless maiden and wait for some knight (or lady) in shining armour to arrive with the answer to #10. why don't I look it up myself.

Although I can only hear a vague similarity to the Goddesses tune.

The link to America is that some versions say North Amerikay rather than North Country.

Helen

http://wwwmcc.murdoch.edu.au/~gillard/watersons/earlyn.html 8. The North Country Maid

This familiar song can be found in a black letter copy also in the Roxburgh Collection. There, it's titled: The Northern Lasse's Lamentation: or the Unhappy Maid's Misfortune, and it's prefaced by a few melancholy lines:

Since she did from her friends depart, No earthly thing can cheer her heart, But still she doth her case lament Being always fill'd with discontent, Resolving to do nought but mourn Till to the North she doth return.

J. Collingwood Bruce and John Stokoe printed a set of the song in their Northumbrian Minstrelsey of 1882 noting how: Sir Walter Scott, in his novel Rob Roy, makes the narrator of the tale (Francis Osbaldiston) in recounting recollections of his childhood, tells how his Northumbrian nurse (old Mabel) amused him by singing the ditties of her native countie, and specially names O! the oak and the Ash and the bonny Ivy Tree as a Northumbrian ballad.'

The stately tune started life as a dance tune, found in many places and under many titles but especially in Sir James Hawkin's Transcripts of music for the virginals, and the Dancing master, of 1650, under the title Goddesses.

The refrain in all its home-sick nostalgia may be encountered, oddly enough, in the robust and unbuttoned sailor's song, Home, Dearie Home, or Rosemary Lane.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Helen
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:15 PM

So, who has the answer to #10 - I want to know that one. Everyone else beat me to the limited no. of answers I knew, so I'll just have to keep reading to find out the others.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Jeri
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 07:32 PM

Thanks for driving me nutser than I already was.

#10 - If you change the tempo,
it's a bit like the tune
used for Rosebuds in June.
Bet that's not it, though. I have some song running through my head, but I can't catch it. I think the Watersons may be singing that as well as Rosebuds. (In any case, it's a great tune, and I must learn how to play it.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: wysiwyg
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 06:34 PM

Peej--

THANKS!!!!

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: p.j.
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 06:13 PM

"Uhh-haw-haw-haw-haw...." If only I could get the knack of Muddy's exquisitely pained expression...I tend to look more like a lizard being squeezed out of a tube of toothpaste...Yet another reason why white chicks shouldn't try to sing the blues...

Peej


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Peter T.
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 04:39 PM

You haven't really lived until you have had a lesson in mouth music from p.j. I speak as a witness. I was reminded of Muddy Water's immortal extended vocalizations on "I Got My Mojo Working"......

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Bagpuss
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 04:15 PM

another out of season carol is The Angel Gabriel - should be sung 9 months before christmas.

Bagpuss


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: p.j.
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 04:01 PM

Ah, dear 'Spaw, if only you knew about his Tiddle-a-dum-dee, you wouldn't have to ask...

PJ


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 03:56 PM

We three Kings is Epiphany, after Christmas (about 2 years after if you want to be pedantic) not Advent, which is the (logically) 9 months expecting him to arrive.....

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 03:28 PM

Geeziz Pam.............

Smart-ass retorts elude me. Very well done indeed. I feel as though I've gone back to college, although that was rarely as interesting.

It does however beg the question, what the hell are you doing with Dave???

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Mike Regenstreif
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 03:17 PM

1) The broadside of "John Henry" was published by Blankenship with estimated dates ranging from 1900-1920. I'm not sure what it cost new, but it's currently valued at $300.00.

3) Songs related to "Streets of Laredo" include "The Unfortunate Rake," (from which "Laredo," these and others are descended) "St. James Infirmary," "St. James Hospital," "Whore's Lament."

6) Arlo Guthrie. Arlo's father used the melody of "Redwing" for "Union Maid" and was a friend and collaborator of Lead Belly's.

7) I respectfully reject the question. Blues is a form of folk music.

9) I believe that Samuel (Mark Twain) Clements was long-dead by the time that Robert Schmertz wrote "Monangahela Sal."

Mike Regenstreif


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: katlaughing
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 03:16 PM

LMAO, ask Spaw, indeed! Good one, WS!

P.J.! I hope you get your computer sorted out soon and come into HearMe to give us some more instruction and examples! (We'll even welcome your bodhran, too!**BG** )That is absolutely fascinating...thanks!

kat


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Whistle Stop
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 03:06 PM

I'd venture that the difference between folk harmonica and blues harp is not in the instrument (everybody uses Hohner Marine Bands), but in the way you play it. If you're a folk musician, you play "straight" harp -- the tonic is played by blowing out. If you play blues, you play "cross" harp -- the tonic is played by sucking in. If you're playing folk in the key of C (major), you play a C harp; if you're playing blues in the key of C, you play a G harp.

If you don't know the difference between blowing and sucking, ask Spaw.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Mouth Music
From: p.j.
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 02:36 PM

Would you mind a little essay on mouth music? It's a real passion of mine. A good friend did her doctoral dissertation on the subject, and another teaches it at The Gaelic College on Skye. I've been collecting and singing as much of it as I can in the last year, and have a great affection for many of it's styles.

There are actually many types of mouth music around the world, but since the question was specifically about Northern European mouth music, there are several styles even there. Their origins are as varied as their uses...

Puirt-a-beul (literally "tunes from the mouth") is one of the oldest Scottish forms, containing Gaelic verses interspersed with vocables (non-lexical syllables which are sometimes based on or related to Gaelic words). Some were connected to incantation, some to work songs, some for dance.

Working songs are another type of mouth music, each of which evolved relative to the kind of work being done. Chanties, milking songs, weaving songs and songs used while waulking wool each have their own traditional rules and formulas.

Mouth music for dance predates the Scottish ban on instruments, it had been used for centuries by folks who could not afford an instrument, or when musicians got tired, or when emigration made it impossible to carry along instruments. When instruments were banned or burned, though, mouth music played a critical role in history, by making it possible to keep traditional tunes alive.

Mouth music for dancers uses a very different set of vocables than you find in work songs. The rhythm of work songs is generally a little slower, usually includes verses as well as vocables, and there is often a call-and-response element. These factors make it easier to pace your breathing, and are less taxing on the singer.

When you sing for dancers the vocables in the tunes substitute for the fiddle or pipes, so every note has to be sung clearly and up to speed, including the ornaments typical to that instrument. It's a lot like singing a tounge-twister as fast as you can! Also, since an unbroken rhythm is critical for the dance, lots of attention has to be paid to where you can grab a breath so that you never miss a beat. There are sometimes Gaelic verses in a dance tune, and when there are you'll find some lovely internal rhymes and alliteration that complement the rhythm. The meaning of the words is less important than the rhythm, but some of the songs are cleverly written to tell a story as well. Most mouth music dance tunes, however, are all vocable-- especially in the Irish tradition. Diddling, lilting, cantering and jigging are Irish terms for this style of mouth music, or it's sometimes called nudling in the Cape Breton style.

Then there's the type of mouth music called canntaireachd. "Cantering" is singing for a dancer, using vocables to represent an instrument (usually fiddle-style). But "canntaireachd" is a much more codified set of vocables, used by pipers to teach tunes to each other. Rather than stressing the rhythm of the tune as you would for dancers, in canntaireachd a piper can sing or even write down each vocable that represents both the note and the technique used to play that note on the pipes. The vocable is constructed of the first sound, which can be a "releasing consonant" (e.g. "H" in HUN) or a "releasing vowel" (e.g. "E" in EYE) followed by a vowel that represents it's place on the scale (e.g. "U" in HUN) and an "arresting consonant" (e.g. "N" in HUN) or if it's an open vocable, an "arresting vowel" (e.g. "E" in DIE).

If a piper read HUN as the vocable, or heard someone sing HUN in canntaireachd, they would know exactly how that note was to be sounded on the pipe, and in what key. There are thousands of combinations of canntaireachd vocables, so it's like a little language of it's own!

All this is probably more than you're interested in hearing, but I find the tradition and singing of mouth music in all it's forms absolutely fascinating. I've been lucky to have some wonderful teachers to learn from and practice with, I'm especially grateful to Kim Hughes, Deborah White and Christine Primrose for their guidance and advice.

Thanks for indulging my little ramble here. If anyone's interested in more information, I can recommend some socko-boffo books and CDs...

Ho-ro-a-deedle-a-dum,
PJ


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 12:28 PM

re: Mark Twain. True, I'd forgot momentarily though and was referring to the fact that Shakespeare wrote a song called "Full Fathom Five" (set to music by Pete Seeger) wherease Mark Twain is only 2 fathoms (difference is 18 feet).

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:40 AM

Twain did not believe Shakespeare wrote all the plays, he wrote a paper called "is Shakespeare Dead"
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:38 AM

GREAT QUIZ IAN!!!!

I've been busy this week getting ready for the Mariposa Festival. (gotta get those strings changed!) That's ok, though 'cause I tended to hog some of the other quizzes. I'll just jump in on the last one though.

Sam Clemens was absolutely convinced that the actor/mgr/grain merchant, Shakespeare did NOT write the plays attributed to him. Rather than write about the factual inconsistancies as others of his time did (the Baconians) he took the psychological approach, and opined that "common sense" would indicate that another/others wrote the plays. Had he lived today and seen the evidence collected by the supporters of the Earl of Oxford (deVere) I think his opinion would still be the same. He didn't "name" the author....just said it wasn't the Shakespeare who left neither a book, a poem,(other than his awful epitaph) or one shred of literary evidence in his will. The fact that the tourist-hungry burghers of Stratford re-carved the bag of grain on the lap of the Shakespeare statue into a "writing pillow", made Twain chuckle a bit.

By the way Clemens' Martin guitar was played heavily all the way up to the 12th fret, indicating he was probably a decent picker.

Rick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:35 AM

Good start Patrish. What was the Shakespeare connection then? Tempestuous rather than tenuous link!

Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:24 AM

Sam Clemens was the real name of Mark Twain - hot or cold?
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:18 AM

Catspaw49

Sure. Will come back with a few answers tomorrow.

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:09 AM

Pretty good so far! Keep it up.

Surprised nobody's had a go at Sam Clemens. Did you know he also has Shakespearean connections!

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: catspaw49
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 11:07 AM

Ian my friend.......As Peter noted when mentioning Rick, we have played these things a lot and they're a ton of fun, but when you come to it late and read the posts as I did, you get really confused as to what has/is being answered and what's left and all that stuff. Could you come back and update us from time to time (often preferably) on where things stand regarding the questions answered/unanswered? I keep going back and forth and getting lost, but you know the quiz and what you're looking for.

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: jeffp
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:34 AM

The Bard of Armagh (Irish) is to the same tune as Streets of Laredo.

jeffp


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:26 AM

Re: Harmonicas - do some allow you to bend the notes to give the sound a bluesy moan?
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:21 AM

The word "carol" comes from the Greek choraulien which means dancing (choros) and playing the flute (aulien). In other words, the carol was a dance to flute accompaniment. In ancient times, this kind of dancing was extremely popular with the Greeks and Romans.

In the Middle Ages in England and France, carols were dances accompanied by singing. In the French Midi, for example, the "carol" was a kind of round dance. In time, the word "carol" changed its meaning, referring only to certain kinds of songs. The Anglo-Saxon tradition favoured gathering together small choirs on the village green to sing carols and Christmas songs for the pleasure of passers-by. A number of currently very popular American Christmas carols come directly from France and England.
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Giac
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:13 AM

Possible Leadbelly connection:

Woody and Leadbelly are both mentioned in
Dylan's Song to Woody.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Giac
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:09 AM

This Land is Your Land -

On the other side it didn't say nothin'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Peter T.
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 10:08 AM

Where is Rick "Never Met An Obscure Folk Tidbit I Didn't Like" Fielding?

yours, Peter T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:59 AM

Rum cull is someone who is a generous fool, the words are from the song "Botany Bay"
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Morticia
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:57 AM

Errrrr, can I phone a friend?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:50 AM

Q1
The Blankenship broadside was owned by Mrs. C. L. Lynn of Rome, Georgia. She sent it to Guy B. Johnson, author of John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend11 when he was advertising for information about John Henry. 4 7/8 x 8 1/2", it contains 12 verses and is signed in type, "W. T. Blankenship." No date is shown, and it has been dated 1900 to c. 1920s , and while this remains a possibility, the broadside is (perhaps!) the earliest printed version of John Henry and would be a highspot in any collection. ($300)
Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Giac
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:46 AM

I'd guess Arlo's connections are through Woody.

Redwing - tune to Union Maid

Seem to recall there's a reference in one of Woody's
songs to the opposite side of a Welcome sign, but
can't dredge up which one.

And I'd venture that the Leadbelly link also is Woody.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Snuffy
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:40 AM

Correction

LAREDST will only get you 7 versions, LAREDS* will get you 25

Wassail! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: sledge
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:33 AM

BRAIN HURT.

The tune used by streets of laredo was used prviously in a Napoleonic eara song called I believe " The rout has just come for the blues"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Snuffy
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:31 AM

#3 Loads of versions of "The Unfortunate Rake" "The Young Sailor/Man/Girl Cut down in his/her Prime" etc (enter LAREDST in the Digitrad Lyric Search for about 20 versions)

#4 The tune for Good King Wenceslas" is "Tempus Adest Floridum" (Now is the season of flowers), and my hymn book has a Flower Carol to be sung in Spring. And aren't ones like "We Three Kings" and "O come, O come, Emanuel" really supposed to be for Advent (i.e. pre-Christmas, following the star)?

#10 Didn't know there were words to "Goddesses" - great tune. Where can I find words?

Wassail! V


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: katlaughing
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:31 AM

Forgot to say, over here, descendending from Scots/Irish/English "canny" always has meant "wise/all knowing" or "onto" something.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: katlaughing
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:16 AM

No. 6 is that upstart kid, Arlo, ain't it?

Sheesh, ya don't want essays to go with these, do ya? Or, are these YOUR essay questions for an exam and you're trying to get us to do your homework?**BG**

It WILL be fun to read some answers...

katlaughing


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Patrish(inactive)
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:15 AM

Bonny at morn comes from Northumberland where canny means nice.In scotland it means careful leaning towards mean or frugal.

The only song I can think of at the momemt like streets of laredo is the road and the miles to dundee, both wistful songs perhaps transplanted and made indigenous by emmigrants.

Mouth music from scotland where the "wee free" church banned instruments and they used the mouth music to accompany there singing in church

Dont know who didn'want a pijkle, but I think strings are involved guitar 12 strings and string

Harmonicas, folk usually just two key and blues chromatic I think

Patrish


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Homeless
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:13 AM

Jingle Bells is the modern carol - it was originally for Thanksgiving.

Arlo Guthrie doesn't want a pickle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Homeless
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:12 AM

I know #4 - I was just telling Bill and Allen about it when they were here. I also know who doesn't want a pickle, but don't know the connections.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: IanC
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:10 AM

I thought it'd be interesting to see how the answers developed, so please post any bits of answers you have. Might help somebody else.

Cheers!
Ian


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Mbo
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:10 AM

This is pure insanity! Too much like my college homework!

--Mbo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: Bagpuss
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:05 AM

Looks like Im top of the class, if nobody else is playing!!!!!

Bagpuss


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Mudcat Quiz - Folk Olympics
From: GUEST,andy mööer
Date: 06 Jul 00 - 09:04 AM

I think you're being a bit hard on us. But for #3 I know a Christy Moore song that has the same tune as 'streets of Laredo',cant think of it's name though Can I pass on that answer??,please?.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

 


This Thread Is Closed.


Mudcat time: 28 October 11:30 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.