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Genre bending?

GUEST,James 12 Apr 00 - 10:04 AM
Uncle_DaveO 11 Apr 00 - 09:35 PM
alison 11 Apr 00 - 09:25 PM
Terry Allan Hall 11 Apr 00 - 07:00 PM
JedMarum 11 Apr 00 - 04:44 PM
JedMarum 11 Apr 00 - 04:41 PM
M. Ted (inactive) 11 Apr 00 - 04:23 PM
Mooh 11 Apr 00 - 03:35 PM
Whistle Stop 11 Apr 00 - 01:43 PM
GUEST,Mbo_at_ECU 11 Apr 00 - 01:17 PM
Whistle Stop 11 Apr 00 - 01:06 PM
M. Ted (inactive) 11 Apr 00 - 12:47 PM
GUEST,Bartholomew 11 Apr 00 - 11:52 AM
Crowhugger 11 Apr 00 - 11:47 AM
Mooh 11 Apr 00 - 11:29 AM
Peg 11 Apr 00 - 11:13 AM
Callie 11 Apr 00 - 12:38 AM
sophocleese 10 Apr 00 - 11:30 PM
sophocleese 10 Apr 00 - 11:22 PM
Mooh 10 Apr 00 - 09:35 PM
Mbo 10 Apr 00 - 08:44 PM
McGrath of Harlow 10 Apr 00 - 04:34 PM
Peg 10 Apr 00 - 04:04 PM
MK 10 Apr 00 - 03:48 PM
Art Thieme 10 Apr 00 - 03:45 PM
Mooh 10 Apr 00 - 03:33 PM
SDShad 10 Apr 00 - 03:06 PM
Peg 10 Apr 00 - 02:01 PM
GUEST,aldus 10 Apr 00 - 01:58 PM
Wesley S 10 Apr 00 - 01:27 PM
M. Ted (inactive) 10 Apr 00 - 01:18 PM
Mbo 10 Apr 00 - 12:11 PM
Art Thieme 10 Apr 00 - 11:56 AM
Whistle Stop 10 Apr 00 - 11:15 AM
Mooh 10 Apr 00 - 09:03 AM
M. Ted (inactive) 09 Apr 00 - 10:09 PM
Lady McMoo 09 Apr 00 - 08:09 AM
Mbo 08 Apr 00 - 07:59 PM
TerriM 08 Apr 00 - 04:21 PM
Mooh 08 Apr 00 - 01:24 PM
The Shambles 08 Apr 00 - 01:03 PM
Mooh 08 Apr 00 - 10:37 AM
Clinton Hammond2 08 Apr 00 - 02:57 AM
Metchosin 08 Apr 00 - 02:14 AM
Metchosin 08 Apr 00 - 02:08 AM
alison 08 Apr 00 - 01:37 AM
Kelida 08 Apr 00 - 12:25 AM
MMario 07 Apr 00 - 11:49 PM
Mbo 07 Apr 00 - 11:48 PM
Eluned 07 Apr 00 - 11:44 PM
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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: GUEST,James
Date: 12 Apr 00 - 10:04 AM

What we really need is a Jethro Tull thread


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 09:35 PM

I was amused, when at the Maryland Banjo Academy this last weekend, at a concert with about a dozen banjo virtuosi performing, called "The World of Clawhammer", to hear Bob Carlin, a highly respected banjo player of the old-time persuasion, playing a boomy, bassy fretless banjo(a "folk instrument" if there ever was one), playing and singing a Beatles song, "He Said, She Said". A laff riot, as they say, and a crowd pleaser!

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: alison
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 09:25 PM

I heard a great version of "Spancil Hill" done to Prince's "when doves cry".... didn't think I'd ever be up boogying to Spancil Hill... *grin*

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Terry Allan Hall
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 07:00 PM

Pretty much my whole schtick! My definition of folk-music is "music played by folks"...a typical set can include 17th century Scottish murder ballads, Gyspy jazz, blues, "novelty tunes", country golden oldies, Alice Cooper, and John Gorka...just depends on the audience.

Pigeon-holes are for pigeons!


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: JedMarum
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 04:44 PM

oh yeah, I almost forgot, we just worked up an awsome version of Brennan on the Moor to the tune of Ghost Riders in the Shy!


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: JedMarum
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 04:41 PM

I live for genre busting! At my Irish pubs I have been singing (Lately) Under the Boardwalk of all things. They love it! I have no idea why ('cept 'cause it's a great song). One night I was playing there and someone in the audience asked for it. I hadn't played in 15 years, but gave it a go and they loved it! LOL - who can explain it!

I usually have one or two genre busters I throw in for fun, and they change over time. I used to sing Stand by Your Man, not because I supported the male chauvanist pig wrapper the somng came in - but the underlying lesson in acceptance of loved ones, and the vocal challenge it offered. I have always sung spirituals to all my audiences; and used to end my blues club nights with a real straight up, three part vocals version of Amazing Grace - reminding the Catholics in the audience (and there were many in Boston) that this song did not relieve them of their obligation, even if they sang all four verses with us!

It's a gas to see what audiences will accept, and what songs they respond to, outside of their expected genre. I never could color inside the lines, either.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: M. Ted (inactive)
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 04:23 PM

Webber needs to work with a lyricist who can keep him in line--none better than Tim Rice--otherwise he decomposes quickly--


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 03:35 PM

WhistleStop, Really? I think I've heard that before about Love Me Tender, but most folks in these parts know it only by its Elvis connection. Obviously I don't live and play in the States then, but the historical perspective is interesting, and useful. Leslie West (ex of Mountain) has also done an instrumental version of it. Thanks for the peek at your culture.

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Whistle Stop
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 01:43 PM

Sorry Mbo, I had no wish to offend. Then again, you're the guy who loves ELO, so...

(everyone holds their breath as Whistle Stop beats a hasty retreat)


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: GUEST,Mbo_at_ECU
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 01:17 PM

Schmaltzy or not, I love it all the same! And don't talk bad about The Phantom while me or Barky are around...big trouble! **BG**

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Whistle Stop
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 01:06 PM

Mooh, Love Me Tender actually borrowed the melody of an old Civil War song, so even though we all know it as an Elvis tune, doing a fingerpicked solo version of it is less of a stretch than it might seem.

Peg, I have to agree with you about the phenomenally successfull Andrew Lloyd Webber -- a talented man with progressive schmaltz disorder. But I'm more interested in your "attempts to put together a traditional/folk/rock/psychedelic/gypsy/trance/goth/pagan band in Boston". I'm a Boston-area resident myself (Holliston, to be precise), and I'm intrigued; care to elaborate? You can send me a personal message if you prefer. Or were you just joking and assuming nobody would take you seriously?


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: M. Ted (inactive)
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 12:47 PM

Livingston Taylor has an offhanded sort of talent that is so good that it is scary--he does a little banjo bit called "songs that should never be played on the banjo" that includes a demented rendition of "You're so Vain"


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: GUEST,Bartholomew
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 11:52 AM

Many years ago I heard Livingston Taylor at a wonderful club in Chicago called the Quiet Night. He was (relatively) unknown at the time - the name "Taylor" had just begun to emerge through his brother James' first post-Apple album - and the place was deserted except for a handful of us. He asked for requests(?!?), and a friend of mine from Virginia asked for "Dixie". He said he didn't do it and proceeded to play the most amazing version of it that I had ever heard, reminiscent of the Oh Susannah that James included on his afore-mentioned album. He has his brother's talent for finger-picking and for finding passing chords to support a song's melody - and he infused a lot of soul. He transformed the song from a march/rallying song to a lament and really touched the hearts of those present. In short, I learned that night that any song can turn out to be just right for the moment.

I've always felt that moments like that turn live performances into cathartic experiences. Although he may have dropped a word or chord here or there, that song meant more to us there that night than all the perfect technical recitations of his well-rehearsed repertoire.

Hope I haven't waxed too poetic. But I feel this relates to your question and to Neo's query about technique/soul (another thread), too.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Crowhugger
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 11:47 AM

Jim,

Yes I do. When busking - I'm just getting familiar with stages and microphones - I like to have both guitar and cello with me. Between folk stuff, some blues and the odd old swingish tune like King of the Road, I use the cello for a couple of fiddle tunes, not fast ones mind you, and then a couple of Baroque, Classical or Romantic pieces I learned in my Royal Conservatory cello lesson program. Some really need accompaniment to work, but some don't or will be fine with the odd double stop to fill in the musical picture. People love it.

Within a month or two, I expect my mother and I will do violin/cello duets between our usual blues, train songs and wimmins music. When we're in the same town.

CH


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 11:29 AM

Sophocleese,

You won't be happy to hear then that Simon and Hilary are not appearing at the Goderich Celtic Festival this year. However, their popularity may bring them back.

Btw, do we know each other? I have only missed an hour of the GodFest since its inception, and am usually at as many afterhours things for which I can stay awake.

Hilary has borrowed my double bass and I consider it a blessed instrument now. She always thanks me with a cd. These folks are as gracious as any people I've ever met. Three generations of my family have been charmed by them now.

For the crossover list: Chuck Berry songs like Little Queenie, CCR songs like Bad Moon Rising, Spanish takes on House of the Rising Sun, Love Me Tender as a fingerpicked solo, national anthem (in my case O Canada), the theme from Hockey Night in Canada gets them every time...


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Peg
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 11:13 AM

Mbo;
Well, not all of Tull's stuff has that pagan bent, but a fair amount does, especially those albums with the lyric emphasis on English folklore and the countryside, etc.
as for Andrew Lloyd Webber, of course he is brilliant and I have my old favorites (was in "Joseph" in college, sang choral roles in "Evita" etc.) and love JC Superstar, etc. but in recent years he has become so stupidly ubiquitous and overplayed (Cats, Phantom, etc.)--I miss the days when he was a bit more original with his melodies, etc.--his music just sounds trite and schmaltzy to me now...maybe it is me...

peg


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Callie
Date: 11 Apr 00 - 12:38 AM

In my vocal quartet, our emphasis is on eclecticism. We sing mainly to folky audiences and so do all the standards - Pete Seeger stuff, Hard Times etc, but also do a mix of: Purcell, Prince, Lennon-McCartney, The Kinks (weird arrangement of), Tom Waits, Early music, a Georgian love song, Billy Joel (I admitted, ducking tomatoes).

I also play in a jazz group and attempted to introduce Mo Ghail Mear (pardon spelling) to the repertoire, but my colleagues weren't into it.

--callie


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: sophocleese
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 11:30 PM

Okay it doesn't appear to be working so I'll try it one more time Please be Simon Mayor

If it doesn't work the address is http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/AcousticsRecords/smdiscog.html


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: sophocleese
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 11:22 PM

Mooh, Simon Mayor is wonderful. I heard him and Hilary two years running now at the Goderich Celtic festival here in Ontario and they manage to blow the audience away and charm them completely at the same time. If my tired brain got itright this should be a link to Simon Mayor's Mandolin Pages. He's is well worth listening too. Simon Mayor


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 09:35 PM

I have neglected to mention SIMON MAYOR. He mixes classical, folk, originals, swing, blues, and bluegrass, sometimes all at once, and mostly on mandolin though he's a fab guitarist, fiddler, and whistle player as well. He plays the whole mandolin family of instruments so well it's scary. I can't advise you all more than to say, "Listen to him!". His website is easy to find through Acoustics Records or simply let your engine find his name. I promise you that if you love a variety of music you'll love this guy. I've seen him live a number of times and he can pull it off without benefit of studio tricks too. His wife HILARY JAMES has one of the best voices in folk music and can sing trad and original songs as well as Simon plays them.

Perhaps a link from here to them would be appropriate? I don't know how to set such a thing up myself, that would require my 13 year old to do, and she's in bed right now.

Anyway, he's SIMON MAYOR, and he's the biggest influence on my musical development in my adulthood.

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mbo
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 08:44 PM

Pre-Andrew Lloyd Webber! Oh oh! Well, this "romantic, sentinemtal, lovelorn type" LOVES Andrew Lloyd Webber! Sorry, not into the pagan stuff!

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 04:34 PM

At the National Fok Festival near Nottingham yesterday I bought a remaindered tape by a trio of Irish musicians called Dordán which, as well as the odd reel and polka and pieces by O'Carolan, Mozart, Bach, Handel, and Purcell. Played it in the car all the way baclk to Harlow. Brilliant stuff. It was how that knd of stuff was meant to be played.

We get so used to playing the occasional O'Carolan in sessions that it never occurs to us that we're blending in music from a classical tradition into a folk tradition. That doesn't matter- except that it stops us thinking about doing the same with pieces by other classical composers that would fit as well. Up until Moxart, and including him much of the time, most of the secular music was music for dancing or singing, and it had the kind of structure which people playing in Irish sessions are used to.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Peg
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 04:04 PM

Michael;
of course those are classic Tull albums, the one for its strong rock/blues songs and establishment of Tull's "king of catchy melodies and awesome guitar leads" reputation...the other its most dramatic and memorable foray into the "concept album" over which many a teenage boy has drunk his choice of fruity Schnapps and silently wept in sheer unadulterated angst...
but I do like the "pastoral albums" meself (SFTW, HH, SW, A) and would venture a guess that most true Tull freaks count those among their favorite albums...
re: torch song accompaniment? actually a pianist/composer friend and I toyed recently with this idea...but she did the piano bar scene years ago and is kinda burned out on it...since my attempts to put together a traditional/folk/rock/psychedelic/gypsy/trance/goth/pagan band in Boston are not moving too quickly, I am open to making music music any old way...where do you live?

peg


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: MK
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 03:48 PM

Peg, I've always considered the two quinessential Tull albums to be Thick As A Brick and AquaLung. I've always liked their version of Bouree as well.

Careful though, I have a weakness for jazz standards and torch singers, and have accompanied many fine ones over the years (on piano).


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Art Thieme
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 03:45 PM

Mbo,

You'll have to find Frank's old record. I can't pick at all currently.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 03:33 PM

I'm the Ocean and Mansion on the Hill by Neil Young, Lady Madonna by the Beatles...My brain still hurts...Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: SDShad
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 03:06 PM

One of the reasons Beth and I so enjoy working as volunteers every August at the Sioux River Folk Festival (aside from seeing the concert free for 2 1/2 hours of work, the feeling of community, the cameraderie, camping near the concert area, etc.), is the impromptu jamboree that usually happens involving both concert attendees and paid musicians from the Fest, up by the forest observation tower that sits at the highest point of the Newton Hill State Park in South Dakota.

One year there was a fellow playing banjo there whose name I never did catch. At one point very late that night, he ripped into a bluegrass version of "Me and Julio Down By the Schoolyard," the words to which I've known since early childhood, so I jumped in on harmony and did just did my damndest to keep up with him. I don't think I could recreate even the feel of it to save my life, but that night it felt wonderful. It worked. It really worked.

I tend to tread all over musical boundaries, so I've done, either by myself or with coconspirators, more 'n a few non-folk songs in at least nominally "folk" settings:

Locomotive Breath (Tull, aforementioned)
Moondance (Van Morrison)
Here Comes a Regular (Replacements--my bro.-in-law and I used to do this one together)
Driver 8 (R.E.M.)
Many a Grateful Dead song
Helpless, Heart of Gold (Neil Young)
Behind Blue Eyes (The Who)

To name a few....

Chris


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Peg
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 02:01 PM

shame on you, Mbo, for not knowing any songs by Jethro Tull! Especially being the romantic, sentinemtal, lovelorn type you are...It is classic Elizabethan-influenced progressive-folk art rock that defines genre melding, in and of itself!!! (the band has had 30+ plus years to do so...) Start with Songs From the Wood or Heavy Horses or Stormwatch and see if you aren't a convert by morning...
as for blending stuff, before I discovered I was best suited for singing traditional music, I studied musical theatre and got some classical voice training, too...so part of me still likes some of the good old musical theatre stuff (pre-Andrew Llowyd Webber of course!) but in performance, I would be most likely to mix in some good ole torch songs...anything sad and sexy from Cole Porter to big band stuff...like Stormy Weather, Since I Fell for You, Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man, My Heart Belongs to Daddy, Let's Misbehave, Black Coffee, etc etc etc...

peg


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: GUEST,aldus
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 01:58 PM

Jethro Tull is One of my all time favourites. I've done a number of his things as "folk"..especially stuff from Broadsword, Stand Up and Minstrel in The Gallery. I also do some Niel Young, Stones and Lidisfarne to mention a few. A good song surpasses genre, I think.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Wesley S
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 01:27 PM

Our group does a "bluegrass" version of "Me and Julio Down By The Schoolyard". We've also worked up a faster version of "Nearer My God To Thee"

But for me the all time prize winning genre benders are a local group called Brave Combo. They just won this years Grammy for best Polka Band. Try to imagine "People are Strange" by the Doors and "I Can See For Miles" by the Who as Polkas. Or "I Can't Get No Satisfaction" as a Cha-Cha. Or the "Hava Negela Twist". Or the heavy metal "Hokey Pokey" Or the Jimi Hendrix Polka medly. Toss in the Chicken Dance and you have the perfect wedding reception band. Nothing is sacred to these guys. Anything could end up as a Polka.To me the only way they are able to pull it off is because they are great musicians. Catch them if they ever come to your town.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: M. Ted (inactive)
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 01:18 PM

Miserlou!!! Art, I didn't know you played surf music!!

As per above, for reasons I won't go into, I earned my living for a while playing Russian and Gypsy music--When the balalaika plays "Blue Skies" you can hear the wind whistle across the Steppes--


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mbo
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 12:11 PM

YES Art! Miserlou on banjo! Cool! Can you do that for Mudcat Radio? Pleeeese?

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Art Thieme
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 11:56 AM

for years I'd toss off:

"Lazy Bones" vocal with banjo
"As Time Goes By" vocal & banjo
"Tammy" instrumental on banjo
"Bells of St. Marys" -- banjo
"Miserlou" intrumental on banjo (learned from Frank Hamilton's Concert Disc LP
"Meadowlands" as learned from Pete Seeger's & Franks LP Nonesuch on Folkways
"Blue Skies" on banjo as learned from Pete
"Stars And Stripes Forever" part of an instumental medley with "Meadowlands" and "God Rest You Merry Gentlemen" (a subtle plea for peace during the cold war)
These were all a bit of a break from my normal trad fare that tended, more often than not, to involve death !

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Whistle Stop
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 11:15 AM

Genre bending/borrowing from within the "folk" sub-categories can also be interesting. A couple of examples of this can be found on recordings by the traditional Irish band Altan (Dylan's "Girl From the North Country") and the Irish-traditional-influenced Solas (Woody Guthrie's "Pastures of Plenty").

I frequently intersperse arrangements of non-folk songs in my acoustic fingerpicking repertoire. The people who recognize them generally react with pleased surprise, because they're somehow "in the know" (I'm not above winking at them from the stage when I see that they "got it"). For the rest of the audience, it doesn't matter; what they don't know won't hurt them. I've recently added Blondie's song "Dreaming" to my repertoire this way, and it works out great.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 10 Apr 00 - 09:03 AM

M.Ted, Right. I spent alot of time about 25 years ago listening to Led Zeppelin 3 (still do) and at the time I thought that it was the future of folk.

Hangman, hangman...

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: M. Ted (inactive)
Date: 09 Apr 00 - 10:09 PM

I used to do a nice country-ish version of Purple Rain--and did "Just Because" a lot---

I have played in a lot of different musical genre and make a point of trying to recycle as much material as I can-- pop tunes from the early teens to the thirties seem to be the most resiliant, you can usually do pretty well sticking in Ain't Misbehavin', All of Me, Five Foot Two, and that sort of thing at a folk gig without raising an eyebrow--Country and Western stuff probably whouldn't even count, because the musical line is so thin--

I've had a lot of luck with "I'll see you in my dreams" and "The Glory of Love" as well..

Contrary to what someone mentioned above, there are a lot of folk and traditional songs that do work really well in rock, pop, and jazz genres, the truth of the matter is that most genres have a lot of folk and tradtional music in their "songbooks'

St. James Infirmary seems like it works in almost every genre--


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Lady McMoo
Date: 09 Apr 00 - 08:09 AM

I'm mixing genres all the time with examples too numerous to mention. My favourite though is of a friend of mine, Lee Collinson, a superb fingerstyle guitarist and singer who often during an otherwise predominantly folk gig will often slip in a knockout acoustic version of TAFKA Prince's "Kiss".

Peace,

mcmoo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mbo
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 07:59 PM

Seven Nations ROCKS on The Rights of Man! Sorry...don't know any Tull...I've heard of different NAMES of songs and albums, but never actually HEARD any of their music. Back when I first discovered rock & roll 4 years ago, I used various books to read about bands...see who was worth checking out. I remember Jethro Tull....flute player...stands on one leg...named after English farm machinery inventor....anti-organized religion songs...I said NEXT! What's this? The Move? Hmmmm...

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: TerriM
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 04:21 PM

We mix it up all the time, chucking in parodies, blues, Prince , Kinks, Beatles and so on..... just at the moment we're trying to perfect Bat of Hell, most audiences think we're weird but fun ( I think!)and seem to quite enjoy trying to predict what we'll do next.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 01:24 PM

The Shambles,

No, but I know where I can hear it. I once played The Rights of Man (I played acoustic guitar) with a very good fiddler for a church service and when informed afterwards of the title, some choristers took offence at the title. I think they thought it anti-woman...I never had given it any thought at all.

Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: The Shambles
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 01:03 PM

Mooh.

Have you heard 'The Rights Of Man' By Eileen Ivers, on The CD, Wild Blue?

If you have not, from your description above, you would like it very much. Not distorted guitar but fiddle.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mooh
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 10:37 AM

The Rights of Man with wound out electric guitar distortion is pretty cool to my ears...

Mbo, no Tull? Wow, Jethro Tull was a bigger influence on me than the Beatles. Thick as a Brick bridged the gap between childhood and adult music for me when I was a 14 years old. The reason I started to play flute (but not the reason I quit it). Locomotive Breath would sound good in any style...

Great thread btw. Peace, Mooh.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Clinton Hammond2
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 02:57 AM

Mbo...

Not wierd.. but it's yer loss mate!

Tull is one of the absolute best things of the last 50 years in music...

{~`


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Metchosin
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 02:14 AM

My brother's band does an incredible Celtic? version of Pipeline by the Chantays? on fiddle and mandolin. Love it!


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Metchosin
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 02:08 AM

oh jeez Mbo, you're in need of a bit of an education. Aqualung says it all.


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: alison
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 01:37 AM

I heard a lovely verion of "S.O.S." by ABBA.. done as a challenge on a radio station over here..... they finger picked the chords during the verse... and in the chorus added a shakey egg..... sounded lovely.. very folky.

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Kelida
Date: 08 Apr 00 - 12:25 AM

Mbo- You don't even know "Aqualung" or "Heavy Horses" or. . . *goes into seizure caused by shock that Mbo doesn't know anything by Jethro Tull*


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: MMario
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:49 PM

Mbo - I am So so disappointed in you.....


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Mbo
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:48 PM

Would you folks think me weird if I said that I don't know one song by Jethro Tull?

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Genre bending?
From: Eluned
Date: 07 Apr 00 - 11:44 PM

I don't do it myself, but I know some who do play or sing almost all of Jethro Tull's stuff folk-style. Of course, their roots are basically folk (even though they went punk at one point), and some of their earlier music never went far from folk. Think of "One Brown Mouse" and some of their "Songs From the Woods"....


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