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Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)

DigiTrad:
LIZZIE LINDSAY


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Leezie Lindsay (from The Corries) (16)
Thanx for Lizzie Lindsay (2) (closed)
Lizzy Lindsay (6) (closed)


GUEST 01 Apr 18 - 12:02 PM
GUEST,julia L 12 Feb 18 - 01:50 PM
Jim Dixon 10 Feb 18 - 07:56 AM
GUEST,Wee Jock 18 Apr 13 - 05:57 AM
GUEST,jacklfan 18 Apr 13 - 04:57 AM
sciencegeek 19 Feb 12 - 03:53 AM
GUEST,julia L 18 Feb 12 - 11:39 PM
GUEST,leeneia 17 Feb 12 - 11:56 PM
GUEST 17 Feb 12 - 03:37 AM
GUEST,Allan Conn 27 Jan 12 - 11:22 AM
Jim McLean 27 Jan 12 - 04:22 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 26 Jan 12 - 11:41 PM
GUEST,guest 26 Jan 12 - 05:00 PM
GUEST,Allan Conn 25 Jan 12 - 11:49 AM
GUEST,Dave Rado 25 Jan 12 - 09:03 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 25 Jan 12 - 02:53 AM
GUEST,Dave Rado 25 Jan 12 - 01:58 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Dec 09 - 09:32 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 19 Dec 09 - 09:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Dec 09 - 07:54 PM
GUEST,AllanC 19 Dec 09 - 06:33 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 19 Dec 09 - 01:47 PM
Joe Offer 18 Dec 09 - 10:59 PM
Tootler 06 Sep 09 - 05:37 PM
Bill D 05 Sep 09 - 11:09 PM
Bill D 05 Sep 09 - 11:00 PM
Joe Offer 05 Sep 09 - 10:45 PM
Fidjit 05 Sep 09 - 10:24 PM
Joe Offer 05 Sep 09 - 09:19 PM
GUEST,leeneia 04 Mar 08 - 11:21 AM
GUEST,D MacNeil 03 Mar 08 - 08:55 PM
GUEST,Sara Campbell 28 Oct 07 - 06:14 PM
Willie-O 23 Sep 06 - 05:41 PM
Helen 22 Sep 06 - 05:49 PM
Snuffy 22 Sep 06 - 04:41 PM
Maryrrf 22 Sep 06 - 11:51 AM
leeneia 22 Sep 06 - 10:18 AM
Snuffy 22 Sep 06 - 09:42 AM
Selchie - (RH) 22 Sep 06 - 09:29 AM
Snuffy 22 Sep 06 - 08:47 AM
Vixen 22 Sep 06 - 08:44 AM
Paul Burke 22 Sep 06 - 05:17 AM
Barry Finn 22 Sep 06 - 01:56 AM
GUEST,Angela MacDonald 22 Sep 06 - 01:19 AM
Jim McLean 12 Nov 02 - 01:52 PM
Teribus 12 Nov 02 - 09:17 AM
GUEST,BOAB 12 Nov 02 - 01:27 AM
Jim Dixon 11 Nov 02 - 09:46 PM
DonMeixner 09 Nov 02 - 03:03 PM
Joe Offer 09 Nov 02 - 02:44 PM
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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Apr 18 - 12:02 PM

I have brought the lyrics a bit more up to date in 2 of the verses:

Oh, I fear you must know very little
If you know not the lad ye gae wi',
For my name is Lord Ronald McDonald,
And I own a Fast Food Company

She's kilted up her skirts of green satin,
And she's kilted them up round her knee,
And she's gone with Lord Ronald McDonald,
His new Sales Director tae be.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,julia L
Date: 12 Feb 18 - 01:50 PM

here's the Maine/ NB version which seems to be the only one where she refuses. The tune is in a bouncy 4/4 rather than the usual 3/4

LIZZIE LINDSAY from British Ballads from Maine by Phillips Barry circa 1925 collected by Fanny Eckstorm from Margaret McGill Chamcook NB Canada / born in Galloway, Scotland

Chorus
"Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
Will ye gang tae the hielands wi' me?
Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
My bride and my darling to be?"

Oh what ha’e ye got in the hielan’s?
Oh what ha’e ye got, quo’ she
Oh what ha’e ye got in the hielan’s, kind sir,
Gin I gang tae the hielan’s wi’ ye?

Chorus

Oh I ha’e got a hoose in the hielan’s
Oh I ha’e got a fine ha’
Oh I ha’e got a hoose in the hielan’s
A hoose in the hielan’s for ye

Chorus

I’ll no gang tae the hielan’s wi’ you, sir
I’ll no gang tae the hielan’s wi’ ye
For the road it is lang an’ the nicht it is mirk
I’ll no gang tae the hielan’s wi’ ye


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Subject: Lyr Add: LIZIE LINDSAY (from Jamieson, 1806)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 10 Feb 18 - 07:56 AM

From Popular Ballads and Songs, Volume 2 by Robert Jamieson (Edinburgh: Archibald Constable and Co., 1806), page 149:

LIZIE LINDSAY.

Transmitted to the Editor by Professor Scott of Aberdeen, as it was taken down from the recitation of an Old Woman. It is very popular in the north east of Scotland, and was familiar to the editor in his early youth; and from the imperfect recollection which he still retains of it, he has corrected the text in two or three unimportant passages.

"Will ye go to the Highlands, Lizie Lindsay,
Will ye go to the Highlands wi' me
Will ye go to the Highlands, Lizie Lindsay,
And dine on fresh cruds and green whey?"

Then out spak Lizie's mother,
A good old lady was she,
"Gin ye say sic a word to my daughter,
I'll gar ye be hanged high."

"Keep weel your daughter frae me, madam;
Keep weel your daughter frae me;
I care as little for your daughter,
As ye can care for me."

Then out spak Lizie's ain maiden,
A bonny young lassie was she;
Says,--"were I the heir to a kingdom,
Awa' wi' young Donald I'd be."

"O say you sae to me, Nelly?
And does my Nelly say sae?
Maun I leave my father and mother,
Awa' wi' young Donald to gae?"

And Lizie's ta'en till her her stockings,
And Lizie's ta'en till her her shoen;
And kilted up her green claithing,
And awa' wi' young Donald she's gane.

The road it was lang and weary;
The braes they were ill to climb;
Bonny Lizie was weary wi' travelling,
And a fit furder coudna win.

And sair, O sair did she sigh,
And the saut tear blin'd her e'e;
"Gin this be the pleasures o' looing,
They never will do wi' me!"

"Now, haud your tongue, bonny Lizie;
Ye never shall rue for me;
Gi'e me but your love for my love,
It is a that your tocher will be.

"And haud your tongue, bonny Lizie;
Altho' that the gait seem lang,
And you's ha'e the wale o' good living
Whan to Kincawsen we gang.

"There my father he is an auld cobler,
My mother she is an auld dey;
And we'll sleep on a bed o' green rashes,
And dine on fresh cruds and green whey."

* * * * *
* * * * *
"You're welcome hame, Sir Donald,
You're welcome hame to me."

"O ca' me nae mair sir Donald;
There's a bonny young lady to come;
Sae ca' me nae mair Sir Donald,
But ae spring Donald your son."

"Ye're welcome hame, young Donald;
Ye're welcome hame to me;
Ye're welcome hame, young Donald,
And your bonny young lady wi' ye."

She's made them a bed of green rashes,
Weel cover'd wi' hooding o' grey;
Bonny Lizie was weary wi' travelling,
And lay till 'twas lang o' the day.

"The sun looks in o'er the hill-head,
And the laverock is liltin' gay;
Get up, get up, bonny Lizie,
You've lain till its lang o' the day.

"You might ha'e been out at the shealin,
Instead o' sae lang to lye,
And up and helping my mother
To milk baith her gaits and kye.

Then out spak Lizie Lindsay,
The tear blindit her eye;
"The ladies o' Edinburgh city
They neither milk gaits nor kye."

Then up spak young Sir Donald,
* * * * * *
* * * * * *
* * * * * *

"For I am the laird o' Kincawsyn,
And you are the lady free;
And * * * * *
* * * * * *


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,Wee Jock
Date: 18 Apr 13 - 05:57 AM

Eddi Reader's version is a rewrite by herself and others thus making the song of today. Border Crossing folk duo which i am a member do this version, but also include two of traditional verses which combines with Eddi's rewrite thus making it a great song to sing.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,jacklfan
Date: 18 Apr 13 - 04:57 AM

I was looking for the words as sung by Eddi Reader. Why are they so different to what I see here? Please enlighten an ignorant Irish lass.
:-)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: sciencegeek
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 03:53 AM

Alex Campbell did this on his 1963 album, The Best Loved Songs of Bonnie Scotland, which I nearly wore out from constant playing.. lol.

His version only had the 3 verses & chorus. Gads! I just realized that I've been sing that song for close to 50 years....


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,julia L
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 11:39 PM

We do a version brought to Maine from Galloway where Lizzie refuses to go with Mac Donald "for the road it is lang and the nicht it is murk".
Very practical lassie, oor Lizzie.

Julia


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 11:56 PM

That's a lovely memory. I hope he lives that long, too.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 03:37 AM

I'm 24 and grew up listening to my great uncle singing me this song.... My name is lyndsey Elizabeth .... And have always understood that leezy was a pet name for Elizabeth .... When I get married I hope he will be around to sing it at my wedding! =D


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,Allan Conn
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 11:22 AM

Yes Jim the four surnames for the respective grand-parents of Burns were Burness, Keith, Brown and Rainie.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Jim McLean
Date: 27 Jan 12 - 04:22 AM

Burns's mother was Agnes Brown from Ayrshire.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 11:41 PM

Dave, I first learned this song from John Allan Cameron. I really don't know much about it's history. John Allan's Cape Breton home was in Glencoe, a place where MacDonalds and Campbells lived in harmony side by side on this side of the pond, despite the events of their forebearers in Scotland. He sang the MacDonald version. I do believe that Burn's mother was a Campbell.


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Subject: ADD Version: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 26 Jan 12 - 05:00 PM

The version of lizzy lindsay I sing is a composite of child versions

LEEZIE LINDSAY

Will ye gang to the highlands Leezie Lindsay,Will ye gang to the Highlands wi' me
Will Ye gang to the Highlands Leezie Lindsay my bride and my darlin' tae be.

Then he spoke tae Lizzie's old mother, And a cantie old body was she,
"Mon, if I was as young as my daughter,I wad gang tae the hielands wi' thee."

"But to gang to the Hielands wi' you, sir,I dinna ken how that may be,
For I ken no' the land that you live in,Nor I ken no' the lad I'm goin' wi'."

My name is young Donald McDonnal my name I'll never deny
My father is an auld shepherd, my mither she milks the kye

So she kilted her coats of green satin , and she kilted them up to her knee,
And she's of wi' young donald McDonald his bride and his darling tae be.

When they came near the end o' their journey to the hoose o' his father's milk dey
He said stay there a while Lizzie Lindsay till I tell my mither o' thee.
No mak, us a supper dear mither the best o' your curds and cream whey,
An mak us a bed o' green rushes, a pillow and coverin' o' grey.

Rise up , rise up Lizzie Lindsay, ye hae lain ower lang in the day.
You should have been helpin my mither tae milk her ewes and kye.

Then up spak the bonny young lady, as the saut tearsthey drapt frae her eye.
I wish I had bided at hame I can neither milk ewes nor kye.

I wish I had bided at hame, the Highlands I never had seen.
though I love young Donald Mc Donald the laddie wi' the bonnie blue een.
"Oh, Lizzie, you must hae kennet little, when you dinna ken me,
My name is Lord Ranald McDonald, I'm a chieften o' high degree."

Win up, win up lizzie Lindsay , fora fairer sicht we hae tae see
I'll show you Kingcaussie Castle an' Lady o' it ye will be.

I use the usual "singing together tune" for Lord Ranald verses and the one in "kist of riches" sung by Belle Stewart for Leezie' verses as it is too long in one tune. The story makes more sense in the longer versions and I wonder when it was shortened .Only ballad bores like me seem to sing the long song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,Allan Conn
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 11:49 AM

Thia is a version I have in a Scottish ballad collection. It's Childe 226C and called "Donald of the Isles" Childe collected various versions. In this one Lizie goes with Donald without knowing he's a clan leader. In fact he tells her he is very poor.

226C.1         WHAT wad ye gie to me, mither,
         What wad ye gie to me,
         If I wad go to Edinbruch city
         And bring hame Lizie Lindsey to thee?'
226C.2         'Meikle wad I gie to thee, Donald,
         Meikle wad I gie to thee,
         If ye wad gang to Edinbruch city
         And court her as in povertie.'
226C.3         Whan he cam to Edinbruch city,
         And there a while to resort,
         He called on fair Lizie Lindsey,
         Wha lived at the Canongate-Port.
226C.4         'Will ye gang to the Hielands, Lizie Lindsey?
         Will ye gae to the Hielands wi me?
         And I will gie ye a cup o the curds,
         Likewise a cup of green whey.
226C.5         'And I will gie ye a bed o green threshes,
         Likewise a happing o grey,
         If ye will gae to the Hielands, Lizie Lindsey,
         If ye'll gae to the Hielands wi me.'
226C.6         'How can I gang?' says Lizie Lindsey,
         'How can I gang wi thee?
         I dinna ken whare I am gaing,
         Nor wha I am gaing wi.'
226C.7         'My father is a cowper o cattle,
         My mither is an auld dey;
         My name is Donald Macdonald,
         My name I'll never deny.'
226C.8         Doun cam Lizie Lindsey's father,
         A revrend auld gentleman was he:
         'If ye steal awa my dochter,
         Hie hanged ye sall be.'
226C.9         He turned him round on his heel
         And [a] licht lauch gied he;
         'There is na law in a' Edinbruch city
         This day that can hang me.'
226C.10         It's doun cam Lizie's hand-maid,
         A bonnie young lass was she:
         'If I had ae crown in a' the warld,
         Awa wi that fellow I'd gae.'
226C.11         'Do ye say sae to me, Nelly?
         Do ye say sae to me?
         Wad ye leave your father and mither,
         And awa wi that fellow wad gae?'
226C.12         She has kilted her coats o green silk
         A little below her knee,
         And she's awa to the Hielands wi Donald,
         To bear him companie.
226C.13         And whan they cam to the vallies
         The hie hills war coverd wi snow,
         Which caused monie a saut tear
         From Lizie's een to flow.
226C.14         'O, gin I war in Edinbruch city,
         And safe in my ain countrie,
         O, gin I war in Edinbruch city,
         The Hielands shoud never see me.'
226C.15         'O haud your tongue, Lizie Lindsey,
         Na mair o that let me see;
         I'll tak ye back to Edinbruch city,
         And safe to your ain countrie.'
226C.16         RR'rrThough I war in Edinbruch city,
         And safe in my ain countrie,
         Though I war in Edinbruch city,
         O wha wad care for me!'
226C.17         Whan they cam to the shiels o Kilcushneuch,
         Out there cam an auld dey:
         'Ye're welcome here, Sir Donald,
         You and your lady gay.'
226C.18         'Ca me na mair Sir Donald,
         But ca me Donald your son,
         And I'll ca ye my auld mither,
         Till the lang winter nicht is begun.'
226C.19         'A' this was spoken in Erse,
         That Lizie micht na ken;
         A' this was spoken in Erse,
         And syne the broad English began.
226C.20         'Ye'll gae and mak to our supper
         A cup o the curds and whey,
         And ye'll mak a bed o green threshes,
         Likewise a happing o grey.'
         * * * * *
226C.21         'Won up, won up, Lizie Lindsey,
         Ye've lain oure lang in the day;
         Ye micht hae been helping my mither
         To milk the ewes and the kye.'
226C.22         Then up got Lizie Lindsey,
         And the tear blindit her ee:
         'O, gin I war in Edinbruch city,
         The Hielands shoud never see me!'
226C.23         'Won up, won up, Lizie Lindsey,
         A fairer sicht ye hae to see;
         Do ye see yon bonnie braw castle?
         Lady o it ye will be.'


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,Dave Rado
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 09:03 AM

Hi Sandy - you're not adding to the confusion, you're just adding detail that I should really have included at least some of in my post - thanks.

In point 5) of my sequence above I should also have said that when the Campbells nicked the four verses and chorus that they liked from the 8-verse version, and made it into their own song, they must at that point have added the references to Argyll, who, as you say, was the head of their clan, and their equivalent in status to Lord Ranald McDonald.

One thing that does add confusion is that it strikes me as unlikely, now I think about it, that the one-verse poem attributed to Burns, which now forms the chorus of the song, could really have been written by him - it's not up to his usual standards, especially as a complete poem. But he was a collector as well as a writer of folk songs, so maybe he just collected what was then a one-verse ditty, published it, it got wrongly attributed to him, with the remainder of the sequence of events still being as I postulated above?

Do you agree that the sequence of events I described seems likely?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 02:53 AM

To add to the confusion:
Argyle is a county in the Highlands but it is also the old clan title for the chief of the Campbell clan. The chief carried the title "Duke of Argyle." He would hace been a "chief" , not a "chieftain."
The chief of the clan Donald (MacDonald)carried the title "Lord of The Isles" and he would also be a chief.
There is a difference between "chief" and "chieftain" that perhaps should be defined:
A chief is the overall leader of the clan while a chieftain is the leader of a subordinate group. A subordinate faction of Clan Donald was Clanranald (Ranald's family), and it was probably its most powerful cadet. The Gaelic pronounciation for Ranald sounds like Ronald to an English ear. Therefore he would have been a "chieftain" of highest degree. All of that being said I don't know who Lizzy was!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,Dave Rado
Date: 25 Jan 12 - 01:58 AM

The DT lyrics are unlike anything I've ever seen anywhere else - it's really weird that DT should have used those ones. And given their stated source doesn't seem to use those lyrics either, it's even stranger.

I'm very curious about the origin of the song. Did Burns really write what is now the chorus and nothing more? One of the posts in the thread implies that's the case, and also, I note that only the chorus appears on any Burns website. But if Burns put the words to the "old highland melody" then that seems very odd - how could he have done so without writing at least one verse? Or did Burns write a one verse poem that was later converted into the chorus of a song by Robert Allan, who also wrote the rest of the song and added the music to it, all after Burns died?

These days there seem to be basically two versions sung: the version attributed to Robert Allan in a post above, with its references to MacDonald, but no mention of deer, and no mention of feasting and joy (which is basically the version Gaberlunzie, among many others, sing); and the version posted by Kendall above, which is the version The Corries sing (although Ronnie Browne sometimes sings the other version.) The Corries'/Kendall version with its mention of Argyll is clearly a Campbell song, while the other version is clearly a MacDonald song (reflecting the feud between those clans).

But then Teribus posted a version that basically contains all of the verses used in both of the other two versions, including the references to red deer and feasting (but not the DT outlier verses which seems to be a very strange anomaly); but the version Teribus posted is clearly still a MacDonald version rather than a Campbell one.

So I'm wondering what order these versions evolved in? For instance was this it:

1) Burns writes a one-verse poem.

2) After Burns dies, Robert Allan turns the poem into the chorus for a song, adds four verses and attaches a traditional melody. (As in this post).

3) Four more verses get added, making 8 verses in all (as in this post).;

4) Members of the MacDonald clan mostly don't sing the four new verses, even though they're poetically-speaking the four nicest verses in the song (which seems strange, but I can't think of a better theory) - but instead stick to the original Robert Allan verses.

5) On the other hand, members of the Campbell clan love the tune, but hate the Allan verses with their references to MacDonald, so pinch the chorus, the tune, and the four verses that had been added after Allan wrote it, dropping the four verses that Allan wrote. Thus through a quirk of fate, the Campbells end up singing the poetically more beautiful verses, although they were probably written by an anonymous MacDonald; and most MacDonalds end up singing the less poetic verses.

6) A small minority of MacDonalds continue to sing all 8 verses (hence that's the version Teribus was taught).

7) 20th century folk singers almost all sing one of the two 4-verse versions (the Campbell or MacDonald versions), not based on clan loyalty any more, but just based on which version they happened to hear, or if they've heard both, on which they preferred.


Does that seem like an accurate summary? Or can anyone suggest a more likely sequence of events?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 09:32 PM

Right, trademark; my error.

Results of suits over 'Mc' something-or-other have been mixed. Win a few, lose a few.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 09:05 PM

Q, you can't copyright a name but you can sometimes trademark it. I believe that Croc and his legal enforcers tried to shut down any restaurant carrying the name. It seems that there was a court case involving a real MacDonald that was thrown out putting an end to any ownership claim on the name.
Something like this:
    Judge to defendant: "What is your name?"
             defendant: "Joseph MacDonald."
    Judge to complainant:" What is your name?"
             complainant: "Ray Croc."
    Judge: "Claim denied and case dismissed!"
Simplified of course but the gist of the case in a nutshell. Croc did however successfully trademark the Golden Arches symbol.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 07:54 PM

Digression- Sandy McLean brings up McDonald's restaurants, the name of which comes from Dick and Mac McDonald who opened a Bar-B-Q in San Berrardino, California, in 1940. The restaurant name has nothing to do with Scotland.
In 1954, Ray Croc found out the brothers were looking for a national franchising agent, and in 1965 opened one in Des Plaines, Illinois.
Of course the name was copyrighted to protect it for the restaurants, the number of which increased rapidly, carrying the Golden Arches around the world.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: GUEST,AllanC
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 06:33 PM

"a Gaelic speaking Highlander using Lowland dialect or accent"

I don't really see what would be so unusual in that. In versions of the ballad it is one of the Highland clan elites visiting Edinburgh. We're not talking ordinary MacDonald clansmen so surely some of the Highland chiefs would have been bilingual? Speaking not only Gaelic but getting by in Scots too. How else would they have communicated with ordinary women in Edinburgh?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 01:47 PM

Well Ronald MacDonald would have been a Gaelic speaking Highlander but the song has him speaking in the first person using Lowland dialect or accent. That just never fit with me.
Not only did McDonalds fast fooders make a clown out of Ronald but they tried to trademark his last name for their exclusive use.


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Subject: ADD Version: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 10:59 PM

Joe Hickerson sent me his version. Lets' see how close it is to the version in the Digital Tradition, which is alleged to come from the singing of Joe Hickerson.

(Joe Hickerson Version)
LIZZIE LINDSEY

Will you go to the Hielands Lizzie Lindsey
Will you go to the Hielands with me
Will you go to the Hielands Lizzie Lindsey
My bride and my darling to be.

Well to go to the Hielands with you sir
I dinna ken how that might be
For I know not the lands that you come from
Or the laddie that I would gaun wi.

Then up bespoke Lizzie's best woman
And a fine looking lassie was she
Had I but one mark in my pocket
It's Ronald that I would gaun wi.

Well lassie I think you're not clever
If you say that you dinna ken me
My name is Lord Ronald MacDonald
And I'm a laird of high degree.

Well she's kilted her skirts of green satin,
She's kilted them up to her knee
And she's gone with Lord Ronald MacDonald
His bride and his darling to be.

He took her high up on the mountain
And bade her look out to the sea
These lands are Lord Ronald MacDonald's
And his bride and his darling are ye.
(DT Version)
LIZZIE LINDSAY

"Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
Will ye gang tae the hielands wi' me?
Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
My bride and my darling to be?"

Then I spoke tae Lizzie's old mother,
And a cantie old body was she,
"Mon, if I was as young as my daughter,
I'd gang tae the hielands wi' thee."

Then I spoke tae Lizzie's wee sister,
And a bonnie wee lassie was she,
"Mon, if I was as old as my sister,
I'd gang tae the hielands wi' thee."

"But to gang to the hielands wi' you, sir,
I dinna ken how who that may be,
For I ken no' the land that you live in,
Nor I ken no' the lad I'm goin' wi'."

"Oh, Lizzie, I maun you you maun ken little,
When I see that you dinna ken me,
My name is Lord Ranald McDonald,
I'm a chieftain of high degree the chief of the highland degree."

So she kilted her coats of green satin,
And she kilted them up to her knee,
And she's off of wi' Lord Ranald McDonald
His bride and his darling tae be.


Now, I have to say that the quirky bits about the mother and sister sound like something Joe would like, but maybe the DT version isn't from Joe.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Tootler
Date: 06 Sep 09 - 05:37 PM

I found this set of words. They are attributed to a Robert Allan who lived from 1774 to 1841

"Will ye gang tae the Heilands, Leezie Lindsay?
   Will ye gang tae the Heilands wi' me?
Will ye gang tae the Heilands, Leezie Lindsay,
   My bride and my darling tae be?"

"To gang to the Heilands wi' you, Sir,
   I dinna ken how that may be,
For I ken nae the road I am gaeing,
   Nor yet wha I'm gaun wi'."

"O, Leezie, lass, ye maun ken little,
   Syne ye dinna ken me;
For I am Lord Ronald MacDonald,
   A Chieftain o' high degree."

"Oh, if ye're the Laird of MacDonald,
   A great ane I ken ye maun be;
But how can a chieftain sae mighty
   Think o' a puir lassie like me?"

She has gotten a gown o' green satin.
   She has kilted them up tae her knee,
And she's aff wi' Lord Ronald MacDonald,
   His bride and his darling tae be.

Copied from www.rampantscotland.com

The various versions in Child tell a similar story but with added detail which takes off the romantic gloss somewhat.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 11:09 PM

...but I don't seem to have a Joe Hickerson version....


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 11:00 PM

I have some recorded choices of this. Alex Campbell has a nice, short one.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 10:45 PM

That's a constant problem with this song, Chas. Is it better to change it and not distract the audience with anachronistic hamburger references?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lizzy Lindsay (Child 226)
From: Fidjit
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 10:24 PM

Lord Ranald McDonald

Is he that chap you see sitting outside the Big Mack and Cheese Burger places?

Chas


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Subject: DT Corr???: Lizzie Lindsay
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 09:19 PM

I'm looking for a singable version of this song that won't make me sound ridiculous attempting a Scottish accent, so a Joe Hickerson version might suit me well. Vixen asked above but didn't get an answer. Is there a Joe Hickerson recording of the song? Apparently, it's his version that appears in the Digital Tradition, and it's quite different from all the rest. Is it an authentic traditional version? The second and third verses make me wonder.

-Joe-

Here's the DT version. I've added a couple of proposed corrections to what I view as mistakes. Am I correct in my corrections?? Maybe the DT IS correct. I dunno.

LIZZIE LINDSAY

"Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
Will ye gang tae the hielands wi' me?
Will ye gang tae the hielands, Lizzie Lindsay,
My bride and my darling to be?"

Then I spoke tae Lizzie's old mother,
And a cantie old body was she,
"Mon, if I was as young as my daughter,
I'd gang tae the hielands wi' thee."

Then I spoke tae Lizzie's wee sister,
And a bonnie wee lassie was she,
"Mon, if I was as old as my sister,
I'd gang tae the hielands wi' thee."

"But to gang to the hielands wi' you, sir,
I dinna ken how who that may be,
For I ken no' the land that you live in,
Nor I ken no' the lad I'm goin' wi'."

"Oh, Lizzie, I maun you you maun ken little,
When I see that you dinna ken me,
My name is Lord Ranald McDonald,
I'm a chieftain of high degree the chief of the highland degree."

So she kilted her coats of green satin,
And she kilted them up to her knee,
And she's off of wi' Lord Ranald McDonald
His bride and his darling tae be.

from singing of Joe Hickerson 1984
@Scottish @courtship
Child #226
Roud-94
recorded by Belle Stewart and Nye Early English Ballads
filename[ LIZLIND
TUNE FILE: LIZLIND
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 04 Mar 08 - 11:21 AM

There's dancing and joy in the Sheilin
There's piping and gladness and glee
For oor Chieftan's brought hame Lizzie Lindsay
His bride and his darling to be.


Jim McLean observes: 'That last verse doesn't sound right. The sheilin is a mountain hut where shepherds shelter in bad weather.'

Well, Jim, careful reading of what Ronald McDonald has to offer yields no mention of a stately home or even an old castle. Perhaps he's going to roll her in his plaid every night.

Serious question - what sort of dwelling would a Highland chieftain have had in the late 17th to early 18th centuries?

Further, when she says, 'For I'm bound to the green fields and woodlands
And the streams of my ain country,' she is referring to the abundance and comforts of life in a fertile, agricultural district. In the Hielands, she will have to forego the traditional two veg with her baron of red deer.

Another thought - maybe the reason northern maidens were always running off with gypsy laddies was that their cute little wagons looked so snug and warm.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: GUEST,D MacNeil
Date: 03 Mar 08 - 08:55 PM

Check out Black Pool's version.... band from Halifax,NS no longer together but worth a listen....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: GUEST,Sara Campbell
Date: 28 Oct 07 - 06:14 PM

I'm only sixteen, so what do I know, but my Da always sang it the way Kendall reported it. "Gallant Argyll is my name." The Corries sing it that way also. BTW, if you like the Corries, there are lots of their songs on youtube.

I've NEVER heard the MacDonald versions before, ever. The Argyll version completely avoids thoughts of beefburgers...

OMG! I just saw that "Will ye gang tae the burgers Fast Leezie?" posted by sophocleese! That is too funny! I'm going to show it to Da!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Willie-O
Date: 23 Sep 06 - 05:41 PM

Sentimental Mudcat Note:

When I acquired a certain guitar from the now sadly missed Rick Fielding, he told me "Leazy Lindsay" was the first song he ever played on it for Heather when courting her. And the only request he made of me (aside from offering the guitar back to him if I ever tired of it!) was to play it now and then so the guitar would remember.

Well I have yet to get around to it and am now totally confused as to what lyric to use!

One of these days...lovely song always. I have Barry's same reaction to the "Lord Ronald McDonald" line though...a justifiable change is in order.

W-O


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Helen
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 05:49 PM

My first exposure to live folk music, when I was about 16, was a concert in our country town with performers who I later found out were local legends in the folk scene, associated with the Maitland Bush Band, like Bobby Campbell and Brad Tate and a wild looking red-haired, red-bearded bloke by the name of Bill Morgan. And it was Bill Morgan who sang an unaccompanied (I think) version of Leezie Lindsay.

When I went to Uni a couple of years later I found the Child Ballad books in the library and the first song I looked up in it was Leezie Lindsay. I also sought out the Newcastle Folk Club and started going to the Newcastle Folk Festivals.

So this song is special to me.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Snuffy
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 04:41 PM

What's wrong with "Lizzie"? An affectionate shortening of Elizabeth. Desirability has little to do with your name: "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet."

Lindsay is one of those names that belong to both boys and girls: Hilary, Vivian, Jordan, etc. Many girls are Lindsey (with an E)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Maryrrf
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 11:51 AM

I really like that song and my version is similar to Kendall's. But I never sing the Ronald McDonald part. I substitute "I am the young laird McDonald".   The clown image would ruin the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: leeneia
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 10:18 AM

I decided to see what my unabridged dictionary has to say about "leesy" as an adjective.

The closest it comes is "leesome," which means "pleasant" and is "obsolete except Scotland." It's easy to imagine leesome becoming leesie.

I find it hard to believe that a desirable woman would be called "Lizzie." To me it sounds almost derogatory, as in "Tin Lizzie" for a model-T Ford or the deathless line:

Go get the axe; there's a flea in Lizzie's ear...

On the other hand, isn't using Lindsay for a given name a recent development?

Curiouser and curiouser.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Snuffy
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 09:42 AM

I know :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Selchie - (RH)
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 09:29 AM

I do :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Snuffy
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 08:47 AM

Or even simpler - change Ronald to Donald


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Vixen
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 08:44 AM

Any body know where can I get a recording of Joe Hickerson singing this song??? I have 3 or 4 of his CDs, and it's not on any of them. I've heard him do it twice -- at NOMAD and at Old Songs -- and it's become one of my favorites.

V


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Paul Burke
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 05:17 AM

Just change McDonald to McGregor.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Barry Finn
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 01:56 AM

I can never sing "Lord Ronald MacDonald" I just crack up (& some of the listeners too) thinking it's assocated with hamburgers when it's such a beautiful, even if at some times overdone, song. It scans very well by just dropping the "Ronald" from the tradition.

I sing the version that's in the DT but KenDoll, I do like your version. Why don't you come to the Getaway & sing it. "HINT". PLEASE

Barry


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: GUEST,Angela MacDonald
Date: 22 Sep 06 - 01:19 AM

I first heard this song being sung by a guest singer on the show,The Irish Rovers,back in the mid 70's. I thought the singer said, Will ye go to the Highlands,pretty Lindsay. I was pregnant at the time and loved the melody and the lyrics so I decided to name my baby Lindsay if a girl. Well, I had a son , but several years later, I did have a daughter who is now 24 years old named Lindsay and as beautiful as the melody of this old song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Jim McLean
Date: 12 Nov 02 - 01:52 PM

That last verse doesn't sound right. The sheilin is a mountain hut where shepherds shelter in bad weather.
Jim McLean


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Subject: Lyr Add: LIZZIE LINDSAY
From: Teribus
Date: 12 Nov 02 - 09:17 AM

Years ago, when I learned this song the name was Donald Clanranald (Clanranald, being the senior sept of the MacDonalds)

The Mac Donalds of Clanranald take their name from Ranald, younger son of John, 1st Lord of the Isles. In 1373 he received a grant of the North Isles and other lands, and from him are descended the families of Moidart, Morar, Knoidart and Glengarry.

The song as I was taught is as folows:

LIZZIE LINDSAY

Chorus:
Will ye gang tae the heelands Lizzie Lindsay
Will ye gang tae the heelands wi' me
Will ye gang tae the heelands Lizzie Lindsay
My bride and my darling to be.

To gang to the heelands wi' you sir
Would bring the salt tear tae ma ee
At leavin' the green fields and woodlands
And streams of my ain country.

I'll show you the red deer a roaming
On mountains where stands the tall pine
And as far as the bound o' the red deer
Hill moorland and mountain is mine.

Chorus

Tae gang tae the heelands wi' you Sir,
Such a thing it never can be
For I know not the land that ye come from
Or even the name ye gang be

By what ye say Lass ye ken little
When ye say that ye dinnae ken me
For my name it is Donald Clanranald
I'm a Cheiftan o' High Degree

A thousand Claymores I can muster
Hilt, blade, and its bearer the same
When around their chieftain they rally
The Lord of the Isles is my name.

Chorus

She's kilted her gown o' fine satin
And pettycoats over her knee
And she's gone wi her Donald Clanranald
His Bride and his Darlin' tae be.


There's dancing and joy in the Sheilin
There's piping and gladness and glee
For oor Chieftan's brought hame Lizzie Lindsay
His bride and his darling to be.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: GUEST,BOAB
Date: 12 Nov 02 - 01:27 AM

Mark Cohen--according to my upbringing, that's IT!!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 11 Nov 02 - 09:46 PM

In an attempt to find a definitive spelling, I found the following recordings listed at AMG/All Music Guide:

Bonnie Leezie Lindsay - on Harry Lauder's "I Love a Lassie", 1980.
Leezie Lindsay - on North Sea Gas' "Power of Scotland", 1996.
Leezie Lindsay - on Ronnie Browne's "Scottish Love Songs", 1996.
Leezie Lindsay - on the Armstrong Family's "Wheel of the Year", 1992.
Leezie Lindsay - on the Campbells' "Power and Honesty", 1995.
Leezie Lindsay - on the Culture Ceilidh Band's "After the Ceilidh", 1995.
Leezie Lindsay - on various artists' "Jewels of Scotland", 1996 (performed by Carl Peterson).
Leezie Lindsey - on Carl Peterson's "Flowers of Scotland", 2000.
Leezy Lindsay - on the Fureys' "Celtic Collections", 1997.
Leezy Lindsay - on the Fureys' "Collection", 1992.
Leezy Lindsay - on the Fureys' "Essential Fureys", 2001.
Leezy Lindsay - on the Fureys' "Finbar & Eddie Furey/Lonesome Boatman", 1997.
Lizzie Linsey - on Noel McLoughlin's "20 Best of Scotland" 1994.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: DonMeixner
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 03:03 PM

Kendall,

Thats my favorite too. That is also the version The Corries used with small mofifications.

Don


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: lizzy lindsay
From: Joe Offer
Date: 09 Nov 02 - 02:44 PM

Here's the entry from the Traditional Ballad Index.
-Joe Offer-

Lizie Lindsay [Child 226]

DESCRIPTION: A young man comes to court Lizie Lindsay, asking her to come to the Highlands with him. Neither she nor her relatives are interested. He then reveals that he is a rich lord (the Lord of the Isles?); she changes her mind
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1796 (Scots Musical Museum)
KEYWORDS: courting
FOUND IN: Britain(Scotland(Aber)) US(Ap,MA,NE,So)
REFERENCES (9 citations):
Child 226, "Lizie Lindsay" (8 texts, 1 tune) {Bronson's #3}
Bronson 226, "Lizie Lindsay" (9 versions+1 in addenda)
BarryEckstormSmyth pp. 297-299, "Lizzie Lindsay" (1 text with variants, 1 tune) {Bronson's #6}
Flanders-Ancient3, pp. 269-271, "Lizie Lindsay" (1 text, 1 tune)
JHCoxIIA, #11, pp. 46-47, "Leezie Lindsay" (1 text, 1 tune) {Bronson's #2}
Brewster 20, "Lizie Lindsay" (1 text)
Ford-Vagabond, p. 314, "Leezie Lindsay" (1 short text)
Randolph 29, "New Yealand" (1 fragment)
DT 226, LIZLIND*

Roud #94
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Dugall Quin" [Child 294]
cf. "The Blaeberry Courtship" [Laws N19]
File: C226

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2007 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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