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Luthier question and Consensus

MK 11 Mar 00 - 07:18 PM
catspaw49 11 Mar 00 - 08:20 PM
GUEST,Jefe1946 11 Mar 00 - 08:39 PM
MK 11 Mar 00 - 09:04 PM
Midchuck 11 Mar 00 - 09:31 PM
Lady McMoo 12 Mar 00 - 05:35 PM
Crowhugger 13 Mar 00 - 06:28 AM
Chet W. 13 Mar 00 - 07:03 AM
Easy Rider 13 Mar 00 - 09:10 AM
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Subject: Luthier question and Consensus - M38
From: MK
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 07:18 PM

Hi all.

A week or two ago, I sought advice and opinions on an M-38 I was considering purchasing, and a few of you were kind enough to provide me with opinions on this instrument.

I have since purchased the instrument, and am enjoying it very much. I also had Rick check it out, and he can further corroborate my opinion on it. It has exceptional tone and playability.

However (and as I mentioned in the previous thread on this instrument) it is going to require a neck reset, and since the current bridge on it is shaved, and, with very little saddle to work with, I am contemplating replacing the bridge, and saddle as well, at the same time I have the neck reset done.

I am very leery to mess with this instrument right now, but also recognise that the neck reset and replacement rosewood bridge and saddle are inevitable in order for this guitar to continue to bring years of pleasure to me.

I admit that I am being overly paranoid about having this work done. I have already gotten an opinion from the 12th Fret Guitar shop in Toronto, and as well, a second opinion from Frank Ford, at Fret's website.

My paranoia has to do with anything that could somehow degrade the playability and existing tone of this instrument.

Both the 12th Fret and Frank Ford are in unanimous agreement that the neck reset and replacement bridge and saddle, will if anything, improve the tone and playability, and if anything make the tone even stronger and clearer...which given it's present sound is hard for me to believe.

I would like some more additional knowledgable opinions, from any Catter's here who know a lot about these types of restorative measures, and how they can affect an instrument...in either a positive or negative way. Let's assume that the work when done, will be thoroughly professional by experts.

Thank you, in advance.


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: catspaw49
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 08:20 PM

Michael....Get the ax fixed and see a shrink about the paranoia.

Who around here knows more than those guys?

You own a car that runs well and has been dependable. One day you notice your mileage is down and the engine is a little rough when its cold. You can drive it that way or take it to a qualified wrench who replaces a few parts and tweaks some adjustments. Now your mileage improves and its no longer rough.

What's the difference?

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: GUEST,Jefe1946
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 08:39 PM

Under rated guitar, One of my favorites Frank Ford is the final word bite the bullet set the neck etc and enjoy it Jefe


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: MK
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 09:04 PM

Thanks Boys. I know and respect anything Frank Ford says...just wanted a little more reassurance. *BG*


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: Midchuck
Date: 11 Mar 00 - 09:31 PM

Here's a wildcard suggestion.

Contact Bryan Kimsey

He lives New Mexico a million miles from anywhere and runs an actual no-fooling cattle ranch. And in the winter does elaborate repairs and improvements on guitars, usually Martins, and functions as Shurrf of the flatpick mail list. Everyone who has sent a guitar to him to work on thinks he's God, but costs less.

Just a thought.

Peter.


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: Lady McMoo
Date: 12 Mar 00 - 05:35 PM

Dear Michael.

As a one time instrument repairer I would second the opinions you have already received. For a variety of reasons the neck reset and raised bridge and saddle will almost certainly improve the sound even further provided they are carried out by a competent and experienced repairman.

All the best,

mcmoo


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: Crowhugger
Date: 13 Mar 00 - 06:28 AM

KnockMeOverWithAFeather! Luthiers and consensus...and I thought it was some kind of oxymoron.


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: Chet W.
Date: 13 Mar 00 - 07:03 AM

Resetting the neck should lower the action for a higher bridge saddle. The higher bridge saddle will transfer more energy to the sound board and should give you more volume and with more energy from each string, more tones to work with. Whether they are the tones you like you'll have to see.

Chet


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Subject: RE: Luthier question and Consensus
From: Easy Rider
Date: 13 Mar 00 - 09:10 AM

I know, from my own experience, that, since the bridge was shaved and the saddle lowered, the tone and volume must have suffered, even though you say it is fine now. A new, higher, bridge and saddle should greatly improve the volume and projection of an already great guitar. You're lucky to have really good luthiers available to you. Do it!

I had the plastic, adjustable bridge, on my vintage J-50, replaced with solid ebony and a bone saddle, and the tone and sustain improved by an order of magnitude. I was astounded.


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