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Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?

The Shambles 23 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM
Martin _Ryan 23 Feb 00 - 08:34 AM
sophocleese 23 Feb 00 - 09:28 AM
John Moulden 23 Feb 00 - 11:48 AM
GUEST,Antaine 23 Feb 00 - 01:52 PM
wysiwyg 23 Feb 00 - 01:54 PM
GUEST,Phil Cooper 23 Feb 00 - 08:06 PM
The Shambles 24 Feb 00 - 04:08 PM
Molly Malone 24 Feb 00 - 04:28 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 24 Feb 00 - 04:59 PM
Osmium 24 Feb 00 - 06:58 PM
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Subject: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: The Shambles
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM

Can anyone help with info/comments on this tune and what to call it?

I have two recordings of it. One is a two- part tune called 'Frieze Britches'. Which is by that fine group Sin é, on their first CD called Sin é and forms part of a set called 'Freeze Bitches'. They jokingly claim that this is a 'gangsta rap' and so named when one of their members miss-heard the title of the traditional tune.

The other is as a five- part tune called 'The Friar's Breeches', by Dave Swarbrick.


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 08:34 AM

"frieze" is a coarse woolen cloth - hence the britches!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: sophocleese
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 09:28 AM

The woolen fabric was so coarse that great gaps were visible in it. Some people started calling it "freeze" but others began to refer to it as holey fabric. That may be where the Friar's Britches came from. :-)


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: John Moulden
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 11:48 AM

This is a frequent confusion - there is a five part jig - usually and probably originally known as the Frieze Britches. The first two parts are used as the tune of the Irish language song Cunla. By a process of mishearing it is known often as the Friar's Britches - so often that some young people in the sixties (of whom I was one) called it, among themselves - the Vicar's Knickers.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CÚNNLA
From: GUEST,Antaine
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 01:52 PM

Cúnnla

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá ag leagadh na gclaíochaí?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

Curfá
"A Chúnnla a chroí ná tar níos goire dhom!" (X3)
"Go deimhin muise tiocfaidh!" a deir Cúnnla.

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá ag buaileadh na fuinneoige?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá ag fadú na tine dhom?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá a' cur uisce sa gciteal dhom?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá ag tarraingt na pluide dhíom?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

"Cé hé siúd thíos 'tá ag tochas mo bhonnachaí?" (X3)
"Mise mé féin" a deir Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there knocking the (stone) walls?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

Refrain :
"Cúnnla dear don't come any nearer to me!" (X3)
"Surely I will!" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there knocking down the (stone) walls?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there knocking the window?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there fanning the fire for me?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there putting water into the kettle for me?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there pulling the blanket off me?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

"Who is that down there tiddling the soles of my feet?" (X3)
"Me, myself" says Cúnnla.

…………!!!!

Mmm! John!
I always was a little worried about you!
Heh! Heh!


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: wysiwyg
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 01:54 PM

Isn't this the spoonerism thread, or is that in Ohio?


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: GUEST,Phil Cooper
Date: 23 Feb 00 - 08:06 PM

There's also a great version of the tune played by Tom Gilfellon on his first Leader/Trailer LP "Loving Mad Tom."


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: The Shambles
Date: 24 Feb 00 - 04:08 PM

Many thanks to you all.

Phil. Was your recording, the 5 part one?


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: Molly Malone
Date: 24 Feb 00 - 04:28 PM

Not a spoonerism thread, but I can get you a copy of Rindercella and the three stegly upsisters...Jomio and Ruliet?


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 24 Feb 00 - 04:59 PM

A tune called "Frieze Britches" is in some of O'Neil's Irish collctions of the early 20th century. The tune was called "The Soup of Good Drink" in O'Farrell's 'Pocket Companion', Vol. I, 1804-6.


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Subject: RE: Freeze Bitches / Friar's Breeches?
From: Osmium
Date: 24 Feb 00 - 06:58 PM

The five part tune and harmonies for three of the parts are to be found in Sarah McQuaid's DADGAD book on guitar.


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