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BS: British/American cultural differences.

GUEST,Jim Dixon 09 Feb 00 - 06:07 PM
Bert 09 Feb 00 - 06:17 PM
Áine 09 Feb 00 - 06:23 PM
Metchosin 09 Feb 00 - 06:32 PM
Bert 09 Feb 00 - 06:35 PM
Metchosin 09 Feb 00 - 06:37 PM
catspaw49 09 Feb 00 - 06:39 PM
sheila 09 Feb 00 - 06:40 PM
Metchosin 09 Feb 00 - 06:45 PM
Metchosin 09 Feb 00 - 07:05 PM
Lanfranc 09 Feb 00 - 07:18 PM
McGrath of Harlow 09 Feb 00 - 07:18 PM
Metchosin 09 Feb 00 - 07:51 PM
The Shambles 09 Feb 00 - 07:59 PM
The Shambles 09 Feb 00 - 08:02 PM
Amos 09 Feb 00 - 08:13 PM
Amos 09 Feb 00 - 08:13 PM
GUEST,Nancy 09 Feb 00 - 08:18 PM
Murray MacLeod 09 Feb 00 - 08:20 PM
Mbo 09 Feb 00 - 08:53 PM
Sorcha 09 Feb 00 - 08:58 PM
bbelle 09 Feb 00 - 09:07 PM
Mbo 09 Feb 00 - 09:11 PM
Sorcha 09 Feb 00 - 09:17 PM
Hotspur 09 Feb 00 - 09:42 PM
Gary T 09 Feb 00 - 10:36 PM
alison 09 Feb 00 - 10:53 PM
sophocleese 09 Feb 00 - 11:07 PM
ddw 09 Feb 00 - 11:12 PM
Rick Fielding 09 Feb 00 - 11:17 PM
Troll 09 Feb 00 - 11:38 PM
sophocleese 09 Feb 00 - 11:42 PM
ddw 09 Feb 00 - 11:44 PM
GUEST,T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird) 09 Feb 00 - 11:47 PM
Metchosin 10 Feb 00 - 02:42 AM
Steve Parkes 10 Feb 00 - 03:34 AM
GUEST,Roger the skiffler 10 Feb 00 - 04:53 AM
Lanfranc 10 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM
Lanfranc 10 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM
Lanfranc 10 Feb 00 - 05:09 AM
Murray MacLeod 10 Feb 00 - 07:30 AM
GUEST,Penny S. 10 Feb 00 - 07:34 AM
Chris/Darwin 10 Feb 00 - 07:35 AM
The Shambles 10 Feb 00 - 07:58 AM
GeorgeH 10 Feb 00 - 08:06 AM
GUEST,James 10 Feb 00 - 08:07 AM
Mbo 10 Feb 00 - 08:18 AM
Fortunato 10 Feb 00 - 08:40 AM
Fortunato 10 Feb 00 - 08:40 AM
GUEST,BV 10 Feb 00 - 10:01 AM
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Subject: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:07 PM

As an American who has traveled several times to Britain, I am fascinated with all the differences between American and British cultures. I have collected several guidebooks and dictionaries that explain British/American equivalents, for example: bonnet (of a car) = hood, boot (of a car) = trunk, biscuit = cookie, and so on. Such information is relatively easy to come by.

What I'm more interested in, and what is much harder to collect, and harder still to explain, are all the things that are well known on one side of the Atlantic and practically unknown on the other. In other words, things that have NO equivalent, and are untranslatable without a long explanation. Here are a few things off the top of my head:

BRITISH STUFF UNKNOWN IN AMERICA:

Irn Bru. Pork pies. Ploughman's lunch. Black pudding. Christmas crackers. Christmas pantomime. Kippers. Digestive biscuits (sort of like graham crackers, but thicker and round). Wax jackets. Jellied eels. Fruit machines (sort of like American slot machines, but with lots of complicated stuff that lights up--I never figured them out). Marmite. Electric teakettles.

AMERICAN STUFF UNKNOWN IN BRITAIN:

Root beer. Screen doors. Window screens. Pari-mutuel betting.

My second list is much shorter because those are things I would never have noticed if some Briton hadn't pointed them out. That's where you can help. What can you add to my lists?


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Bert
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:17 PM

BRITISH STUFF UNKNOWN IN AMERICA: Pontefract cakes, Eccles cakes, Bath Buns, Chelsea buns, eel pie, Cheddar cheese (and a lot of other cheeses), Simnel cake, humor (says he, running and ducking).

AMERICAN STUFF UNKNOWN IN BRITAIN: Bagging groceries - in England you bring your own bags.
Returning goods - in England, you buy it - it's yours.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Áine
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:23 PM

In the US, jelly means jam without the fruit bits; in Britain it means gelatin, which in the US, we'd call jello.

In the US, it's pudding, in Britain it's soft custard

One thing we have in the US and they don't have in Britain - moon pies!

Correction - Jim, I can get digestive biscuits at the supermarket here in Texas; however, they call them 'tea cookies'! What a hoot!

-- Áine


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:32 PM

Gee guys, I live in Canada and there wasn't a darn thing on either of those lists that I didn't know except Wax Jackets and I'm not even first generation.

But I bet ya don't know what "skookum" is? Unless you come from Seattle.

My daughter tells me they make fun of touques across the pond too. Well because I knew everything on the list, I guess I've just got a "Skookum touque"

But lets not get the Aussies in on this or then we'll all be really confused.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Bert
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:35 PM

You used to be able to get moon pies - they called them 'wagon wheels'


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:37 PM

Ah! mushy peas, such a culinary delight!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: catspaw49
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:39 PM

Tell ya' what Bert...Down there in Aine's country, a 7-Course meal is a Moon Pie and a 6-Pack.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: sheila
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:40 PM

In the UK, the term 'pudding' is frequently used where a USian would say 'dessert' - it can be ice cream, cake, pie - even what an American would call pudding!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 06:45 PM

Up here Spaw, we might have a Mickey and a Mae West. Into the hard stuff you know.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 07:05 PM

Canadianisms: school marm, pecker pole, ogopogo, mooching, in the toolies, chuck and crummy. Non of which are what they might appear to be in the U.S. or U.K.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Lanfranc
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 07:18 PM

Just to make life interesting.

Black pudding is a sausage made with blood, fat and cereal!

Pond pudding is a dessert made with suet, flour, lemon and golden syrup (liquid cane sugar - is there a N American equivalent of that?)!

Us limeys soon learn never to ask a Yank or Canuck for a fag - to us it's a cigarette, to you, what in less tolerant times would be called a shirt-lifter over here !!

Here to "knock up" is to wake someone for work, in New York, as I discovered to my cost when I used it to a female colleague over there, something rather more pleasurable !

More anon, if I get time


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 07:18 PM

I read Jim and Bert's posting and I was thinking you poor bastards! Then I rememberwed asking aboput kippers and being told you've fgot them, but yiouy call them something different, and I decided you probabably had lots of them but called them different names, and the rest of the thread has borne that out.

If your shopping in a shop you normally get given bags in England these days, and you've the right to take things back, and most shops don't make a fuss about it. If you're shopping in a street market you normal.ly supply your own bag, and you'd be unlikely to able to take things back normally. But do you have street markets in America?

Learning about the different names is useful, but it's just words. But what is really interesting is learning where something you're used to having just doesn't happen in the same way.

Like, for example, a thread recently where someone in America lamented the fact that you don't have folk clubs in rooms attached to pubs (as opposed to sessions in the pubs).

Do you have darts? Snooker (as opposed to pool)? Milk and mail delivered to your door? Fish and Chips? Sausages (I mean the sort you fry)?

Most of these things come in to songs every now and again. Does this cause confusion? (Well it does soemtimes - I've met Americans who completely misunderstand the plot in From Clare to here when he talks about "Work hard for the crack" (though sometimes it's "for the brass" which is probably almost as confusing, though it makes for a better rhyme.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 07:51 PM

Alan, you can ask someone for a "fag" here in Canada, and they'll light it for you too, you just can't ask someone under the age of fifty.

McGrath, I don't know about down in the States, but out here in the last Bastion of the British Empire, we play pool and snooker, milk and mail is still delivered to the door in some areas, Fish and Chips come wrapped in newspapers, and I'll cook you up some bangers and mash, dressed only in an apron and a Pork Pie, any day, as long as you don't knock me up in the morning.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: The Shambles
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 07:59 PM

Of course the 'wild' folk in the English Midlands eat faggots with peas. Jolly nice they are too.

A rubber means something else too.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: The Shambles
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:02 PM

Bert is understood and is well known on both sides of the Atlantic.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Amos
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:13 PM

Well, Yanks not familiar with life in England should be warned that they are probably not even aware of their U.S. habituation to central heating and individual plumbing.

Over there, it's exactly the other way around!

A


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Amos
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:13 PM

Well, Yanks not familiar with life in England should be warned that they are probably not even aware of their U.S. habituation to central heating and individual plumbing.

Over there, it's exactly the other way around!

A


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,Nancy
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:18 PM

Well........I heard those Brits call a chin a "pecker" and it's not uncommon for one to say "keep yer pecker up!" Also, THEY call pants trousers, and pants over there are what WE call underpants. Hmmmm, when my husband and I were in Australia (off to another geography!) during the Worlds Cup we said we were "rooting" on the couch for Australians to win. We learned later what "rooting' was there:) Not "Yeh, go team go!" Nancy


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:20 PM

You know what continues to amaze me, even after being a US resident for almost two years? That people put stickers on their rear bumpers (fenders?)saying "My child is an Honor Student at XYZ School". NOBODY in Britain would do that.British reserve, don't y'know......


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Mbo
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:53 PM

Here are some great North Carolina-isms:
Heifer-dust
To "get up" with someone
Down East
Hoi-Toiders
Buggy
Goober Paste
Inundate


I think so folks would have difficulty with these!

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Sorcha
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 08:58 PM

VEGGIE-MITE!! It amazes me that people put any kind of stickers on their cars....I put them on instrument cases. FLOATING ISLAND!!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: bbelle
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 09:07 PM

Meebo ... now you're talking Outer Banks lingo. Lived on Hatteras Island for three years ... my dad's last duty station in the Navy ... and had to relearn American when we left ... hoi toid on the soundsoid ... moonchild


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Mbo
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 09:11 PM

Ahh...so you know about Harker's Island then! My dad just retired from the Marine Corps--we're still here by Camp Lejuene. But then again, a guy like me here in Carolina with a Philly accent puzzles people, too. They don't know what I'm saying!

--Mbo (who knows exactly what Cocoa Marsh is)


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Sorcha
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 09:17 PM

Oceans be blessed! Americans don't even know what other Americans are talking about!! Happens all over. Auto-gate=cattle-gaurd; sack=bag, LOTS of regional differences. We had a problem with our son & his teacher in grammer school when the little worksheets with pictures on them had the "wrong" word on the answer code!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Hotspur
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 09:42 PM

I usually can stumble along fairly well with British lingo, but I get totally lost whenever someone starts talking about schools, coursework, exams, etc. A friend from Leicester sent me a letter about her kids' schoolwork, and i was COMPLETELY lost. Can anybody help me? What's a GCE and a CSE? What's a thirteen-plus? What's the difference between an O level and an A level? Aack!

One thing i definitely noticed is that the chocolate you can get in England is much much better than the American version you'd get at an equivalent price.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Gary T
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 10:36 PM

Well, McGrath, to answer these questions: Do you have darts? Snooker (as opposed to pool)? Milk and mail delivered to your door? Fish and Chips? Sausages (I mean the sort you fry)?

Darts, yes. Snooker, no (at least not generally--it may be played in some specific areas). Milk delivery, generally no, although it's still available in some areas. Home delivery used to be common, seemed to phase out around 1960. Mail delivery, yes (though in rural areas, it's typically to a mailbox out by the road). Fish and chips, in some places, although it's seldom called that. Sausages, yes.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: alison
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 10:53 PM

Yep.. don't tell an Ausiie you were "rooting around in a cupboard"

Ask for a "poke" in Belfast and see what you get..... very pleasant (or a "slider" or a "99")

First time I ordered pizza over here in Oz I hadn't a clue what I was ordering... it had "capsicum"(green peppers).....and "cabanossi" (like salami)...

aubergine = egg plant courgette = zuchini

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: sophocleese
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:07 PM

Oh dear, I'm the Canadian daughter of English parents, who hadn't really intended to live in Canada for as long as they have and will continue to do so. I got used to translating the lingo from one place to another. But how many English, or maybe American, people would know what a 'bush bash' was? What the hell are public and priavte schools in Britain and what are they in Canada? I never had a meal served to me in a Canadian school, until Highschool cafeteria, but had school dinners in England. Recess in a Candian school meant all of the kids from all grades outside running around and playing in small groups, but at the same age in an English school, with a much more resticted playground, the class was sent out and tended to separate severely into boys only and girls only. Immunization schedules are different which can cause havoc when you shift back and forth between. Most Canadian schools don't require uniforms, but in England we had to wear them. Is that still necessary? In Canada the general population doesn't go so crazy for the Royal Family, expatriate Brits might, but the most avid fan I've met was a Canadian of Dutch descent. Then again there is also far less criticism of them as well. The Canadian family were silent and awed through Charle's and Di's wedding, my English born mother said "Well they didn't pick the brood mare for her nose did they?" Neither I nor my English cousins were grief stricken by the death of Princess Di, it was a pity and we would rather it hadn't happened, but we weren't prostrated by it, some friends without English parentage were mightily upset by it. I used to consider myself English-Canadian but now call myself Canadian. All English people drive on the wrong side of the road and are unused to going in a straight line for more than a couple of kilometers at a time. Rights of way are strongly contested, "This is an ancient route used since Roman times." in Britain but, without the centuries of pedestrian traffic "Pardon me, but do you think that we could possibly make a trail through this unused woodlot?" in Canada, are less so here. I'm sure if I thought about I could come up with other small differences. A Fish Called Wanda did point out a few of them as well.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: ddw
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:12 PM

As an American married to a Brit and living in Canada, I've been a little amused at some of the things posters think are limited to one side of the pond or the other. Most of the things in Jim's initial post as being available only in the U.K. are readily available here (and in the parts of the U.S. I've lived), you just have to know where to look.

Cheddar cheese? Electric teakettles? Pork pies? Digestive biscuits? Give me a break! I have been familiar with all of those since the 1960s.

I agree with some other postings, that in many instances the things exist on both side, they're just called different names.

But it's fun to compare notes.

cheers

david


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:17 PM

Well here's a bumper sticker or two that are common ONLY to Canada: "MY CANADA INCLUDES QUEBEC". Here's one from Alberta,) "FREEZE IN THE DARK, ONTARIO BASTARDS". 'Course we're not immune to "HONK IF YOU LOVE JESUS" but you can also see: "JESUS SAVES but MOSES INVESTS". Vive la difference.

Rick


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Troll
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:38 PM

Two words. Beer and Cider

troll


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: sophocleese
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:42 PM

Oh yes, I like Marmite. I have peanut butter and Marmite sandwiches and have had them for thirty years in Ontario, surely a transcontinental luxury. Canadian Cheddar has been available for my lifetime and is very good.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: ddw
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:44 PM

Mbo,

"Inundate" an NCism? I don't know how long I've known the word, but you can bet it's in the vernacular of most literate people who live close to a large body of water. It certainly is around the Great Lakes and along most sea coasts.

As for the others, they may just be regionalisms and you can find equivalents everywhere you go.

One of my favorite memories of a difficuly caused by them was watching and Air Force mate of mine from Boston getting slapped by a waitress in an Oklahoma City restaurant when he asked her for a frappe. She later told him she had no idea what it meant, but it sounded dirty.

cheers

david


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird)
Date: 09 Feb 00 - 11:47 PM

In Britain (so I understand) the cat panthera onca is called a "jag-you-are". Where I grew up in upstate New York, we called it a "jag-wawr". Many here in Oklahoma call it a "jag-wire".


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Metchosin
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 02:42 AM

please what is a wax jacket?

would it look nice with my pork pie?

And where is the "f" in lieutenant?

Damned if I know.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 03:34 AM

Outside my part of the English Midlands (South Staffordshire), they call pigs' pudding black pudding, for reasons I've never understood. It's probably the colour, but then why don't they call polony red pudding? If we call an orange an orange, why don't we call a banana a yellow?

And teakettle? I use mine to make coffe too - what do you Yanks boil water in? Mr Cofeee, I suppose.

You don't have to cross the pond to find you're separated by a common language. My mate's dad was in the Big Smoke (London to you -c.f. the Big Apple), where he bought a newspaper. He the newsagent asked if he'd got an 'ipe-nee'; after much confused discussion, he realised what the guy meant - "Yo' mane an airp-nee!". (Explanation available on request)

Steve


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,Roger the skiffler
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 04:53 AM

...and Steve, do you have trouble with Southerners in the great pikelet versus crumpet controversy?
We still can't agree after nearly 30 years of marriage (I'm from Brum [no, really, Roger, we'd never have guessed], while She Who Must Be Obeyed is from Bucks. However her Dad was brought up in Wolverhampton and her Mum in Coventry but She still calls 'em crumpets...
RtS


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Lanfranc
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM

Colin Scot (anyone else remember him?) used to say that American English was the only language where you could rhyme "romance", "dance" and "trousers".(Substitute "pants" for the last, and switch on a Brooklyn accent)

There are a couple (at least) of American/English lexicons around, at least one very light-hearted. They used to use them when running induction courses preparing English employees and managers to work in the US. That it was (1980's) considered necessary to do so says a lot.

I, for one, am glad that such differences exist and that the cultural holocaust of worldwide US TV, films and music hasn't eliminated them. Vive la difference!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Lanfranc
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 05:05 AM

Colin Scot (anyone else remember him?) used to say that American English was the only language where you could rhyme "romance", "dance" and "trousers".(Substitute "pants" for the last, and switch on a Brooklyn accent)

There are a couple (at least) of American/English lexicons around, at least one very light-hearted. They used to use them when running induction courses preparing English employees and managers to work in the US. That it was (1980's) considered necessary to do so says a lot.

I, for one, am glad that such differences exist and that the cultural holocaust of worldwide US TV, films and music hasn't eliminated them. Vive la difference!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Lanfranc
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 05:09 AM

Sorry Sorry

Didn't mean to duplicate duplicate

First submission allegedly failed!


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 07:30 AM

Jagwar v. Jag-yew-are is just one of a whole family of words containing the letter "U" which Americans pronounce differently eg. "news" (nooze / nyooze), "tube" (toob/ tyoob). Thinking about the way my usage has changed since living in the States, I ask for "candy" (sweets) in the "store" (shop)unless of course I am in the "lumber-yard* (timber merchant).


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,Penny S.
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 07:34 AM

School uniforms - some do, some don't. Secondary schools can legally insist, primary not. Public and private schools are private - others are state. Public schools may derive from originally charitable establishments, and probably have bursaries and scholarships for the less well off, based on merit. Scholarship children, the brighter, were looked down on by those nly there on account of their ancestors' financial skills. Break or play, (recess) - some schools seem to have children playing together, others not, depending on local culture. Boys tend to spend the time playing football (soccer), and some are inimicable to girls joining in. Read "Bill's New Frock" by Anne Fine for an insight.

Archaeological research has indicated that the Romans drove on the left (wagon ruts into and out of a quarry), and the whole of Europe did until Napoleon. Just because everyone else kowtowed to a self appointed emperor doesn't make it right, only the right.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Chris/Darwin
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 07:35 AM

Australians have tended to absorb bits from both American and British ("Yank" and "Pom") cultures, so that most of the above references (except the very localised ones) are familiar to Aussies.

There are quite a few local differences within Australia too, but some differences with both USA and UK - "Station Wagons", "Utes", "Semis" (also used occasional in the USA I think), "Pavlovas" (a confection made with baked egg whites and filled with cream and fruit), of course "Vegemite" (a local version of Marmite), "Stubbies" (applied both to small bottles of beer and to brief shorts), "thongs" (the most casual footware around, called "flip flops" in NZ), "parkas" (a cheap weatherproof top - called "anorak" in the UK I think), "cossies" (swimming shorts), etc etc

Australian colloquialisms are legendary and too numerous to talk about, just as they are elsewhere.

Funny, though, I could not think of any significant musical differences, although some Aussie folk songs have odd names in them, but in all other respects are similar. Does this mean music is a universal language??

Regards
Chris


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: The Shambles
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 07:58 AM

Hookers are big chaps that play rugby.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GeorgeH
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:06 AM

I thought the only difference that matters is that we have one and you just like to pretend you do . .

[ducks and runs]

G. (who considers Arthur Miller to be the finest English Language playwright of the 20th and 21st centuries, in case anyone took that seriously)


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,James
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:07 AM

Wax jackets or "waxies" are very common in maritime Canada. I find this thread interesting because I think that Canadians, particularly east coasters ,are fairly familiar with a lot of British terms. The American thing that drives me round the bend is the reference to the main course of a meal as the "entre" . I think this is common in other parts opf Canada as well.


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Mbo
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:18 AM

Ddw, when the floods caused by Hurricane Floyd came rolling through this part of the state--the folks on the news must used the word "inundate" a billion times. Is there such a thing as a "state word"? BTW anyone guess what "heifer-dust" is yet?

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Fortunato
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:40 AM

Is it just his personality, or is my friend for 19 years, an expatriated Brighton boy, typical of Englishmen in his reluctance to express personal feelings? After 19 years I don't think he's ever verbalized any feelings of friendship to me, though we've hefted 1,000 pints together and sung 2,000 songs. "Men don't talk of such things," he'd say. Whereas and nevertheless, I've tried to say what a good friend he's been to me only to be met with chagrin.

Just curious, Fortunato


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: Fortunato
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 08:40 AM

Is it just his personality, or is my friend for 19 years, an expatriated Brighton boy, typical of Englishmen in his reluctance to express personal feelings? After 19 years I don't think he's ever verbalized any feelings of friendship to me, though we've hefted 1,000 pints together and sung 2,000 songs. "Men don't talk of such things," he'd say. Whereas and nevertheless, I've tried to say what a good friend he's been to me only to be met with chagrin.

Just curious, Fortunato


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Subject: RE: BS: British/American cultural differences.
From: GUEST,BV
Date: 10 Feb 00 - 10:01 AM

As a Brit raised in America from the age of 4, but in a vary British household and with frequent trips "accross the pond", it does my heart good to hear all these comments! I often used to think I was being raised somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, I was so torn. I was often acting as translator in my home, since my Mum refused to change her speech/habits regardless of the fact that she lived in America (for over 25 years now), and I would frequestly have to explain things she said/did to guests.

One thing I was always struck by though, there are as many or more regional variations to speech/culture in England as there are in America, and a lot less area for them to occur in!

-Blackvelvet


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