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Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'

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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:58 AM

130 - Roll And Go - Capstan Shanty


This is another shanty with "Roll and Go!". This song is another diamond found by Cecil Sharp, which has been sung by a very famous shantyman called Short of Watchet, Somerset, who said it was used at the capstan. This song is a combination of "Sally Brown" and "A Long Time Ago".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 167).



Roll And Go

Way-ay roll and go,

O Sally Brown she promised me,
   - A long time ago.
She promised for to mary me.
   - Way-ay roll and go,
O she promised for to mary me.
   - A long time ago!

                   *2*
O Sally Brown's the girl for me,
   - A long time ago.
O Sally Brown she slighted me,
   - Way-ay roll and go,
O Sally Brown she slighted me,
   - A long time ago!

                   *3*
As I walked out one morning fair,
   - A long time ago.
It's then I met her I do declare,
   - Way-ay roll and go,
It's then I met her I do declare,
   - A long time ago!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:57 AM

129 - What is in the Pot A-boiling - Halyard Shanty


This shanty in my opinion is definitely pulling shanty, the construction verses, and choruses clearly show it, however, Stan Hugill did not specify this clearly, but he left underscored words on choruses in music notation. According to this notation, we can be sure this song is a halyard shanty. Stan Hugill took this song from Cecil J. Sharp's "Folk Song Society Journal (England Folk Song and Dance Society)" 1916: Vol 5 Iss 20. From Cecil Sharp's description, this sung has been sung by Mr. H. C. Alison (Of Perth Scotland), at Stratford-On-Avon, Aug. 29th, 1914. In my reconstruction, I will sing this shanty as a halyard.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 166).



What is in the Pot A-boiling


What is in the pot a-boiling?
   - O row, HEAVE and go!
Two sheep's spunks and an apple dumpling,
   - O row, HEAVE and go!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:55 AM

128 - Tommy's On The Tops'l Yard - Halyard Shanty


Here is "Tommy's On The Tops'l Yard" a very unique variant of "Sally Brown", Has been picked up by Stan Hugill in the West Indies. This shanty was used on halyards, but only for quick light pulls on the royal halyard - one pull in each refrain. Stan Hugill also heard that it was also used for tack and sheets. On page 166, we can find an alternative final refrain, which I will try to utilize in this reconstruction.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 165).




Tommy's On The Tops'l Yard



There was a ship she sailed for Spain,
   - Oh-o-o! ROLL'n'go!
There was a ship she sailed for Spain
   - TOM-my's on the tops'l yard!

                  *2*
There wuz a ship came home again,
There wuz a ship came home again,

                  *3*
An' wha' d'yer think wuz in her hold?
An' wha' d'yer think wuz in her hold?

                  *4*
She had diamonds, she had gold.
She had diamonds, she had gold.

                  *5*
An, what wuz in her lazareet?
An, what wuz in her lazareet?

                  *6*
Good split peas an, bad bull meat.
Good split peas an, bad bull meat.

                  *7*
An' who d'yer-think wuz her Old Man?
An' who d'yer-think wuz her Old Man?

                  *8*
Why Slimy Joe, the squarehead Man.
Why Slimy Joe, the squarehead Man.

                  *9*
An' who d'yer think wuz her chief mate?
   - Oh-o-o! ROLL'n'go!
An' who d'yer think wuz her chief mate?
   - Oh-o-o! ROLL'n'go!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:51 AM

127 - Sally Brown C - Halyard Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This song is a halyard shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! Stan Hugill heard this version, very popular on halyards, from "Tobago" Smith, a great West Indian shantyman.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 165).


Sally Brown C

Oh! Sally Brown she's a bright mulato,
   - WAY-ay, ay, ay, YAH!
Oh, She drinks rum an' chaws terbacco,
   - Oh, WALK along you SALly Brown!

             *2*
Sally lives on the old plantation,
She is daughter of the Wild Goose Nation.

             *3*
Seven long years I courted Sally,
But all she did was dilly-dally,

             *4*
Sally Brown's a big buck creole,
Her bow is big, but her starn is bigger.

             *5*
I brought her growns an' I bought 'er laces,
Took her out to all the places.

             *6*
Sally's teeth are white an' pearly,
Her eyes are black an' her hair is curly.

             *7*
Sally lives in ol' Jamaica,
Sellin' rum an' grown' terbacker

             *8*
I call her my ol, Queen of Faces,
Bought her coral beads an' laces.

             *9*
The sweetest flower in the valley,
Is my own my pretty Sally.

             *10*
Sally Brown, what is the matter?
Pretty gal, but can't git at her.

             *11*
Sally Brown, I love ye dearly,
Ye had me heart, or very nearly.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:49 AM

126 - Sally Brown B (Robbins version) - Halyard Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This particular version from Cecil Sharp's "English Folk-Chanteys" is a halyard shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! Robbins, Cecil Sharp's shantyman, sang the following tune. He said he always used it at halyards.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 165).



Sally Brown A (Robbins version)

I shipped on board of a Liverpool liner,
   - WAY, ho, a ROLling go!
And I shipped on board of a Liverpool liner,
   - For I SPEND my money 'long with SALly Brown!

             *2*
O Sally Brown was a Creole Lady
O Sally Brown was a Creole Lady

             *3*
O Sally Brown was a bright mulatto
O Sally Brown was a bright mulatto

             *4*
O seven years I courted Sally.
O seven years I courted Sally.

             *5*
And now we're married and we're living nice and comfor'ble.
And now we're married and we're living nice and comfor'ble.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:43 AM

125 - Sally Brown A (Dick Maitland version) - Capstan Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This song is a capstan shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! This version was sung by Dick Maitland, a shantyman from who shanties were the core of the collection of William Main Doerflinger. Here is how this shanty was commented by Doerflinger: Favorite heroine of shanty lore was the beguiling, rum-drinking, fickle Sally Brown. "Some people might think Sally Brown was rather immoral," Dick Maitland philosophized, "but it was the way of the world in them days!"
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 163, 164).


Sally Brown A (Dick Maitland version)

Saly Brown was a gay old lady,
   - Way-ay, Roll and go!
Oh, Saly Brown was a Creole lady,
   - Spend my money on Sally Brown!

                            *2*
She had a farm in the isle of Jamaica,
Where she raised sugarcane, rum an, terbacker.

                           *3*
Also she had a fine young daughter,
And that's the gal that I was after,

                           *4*
Seven long years I courted the daughter,
And when I asked her if she'd marry,

                           *5*
She would not have a tarry sailor!
She would not have a tarry sailor!

                           *6*
"Those lily-white hands and slender waist?
A tarry sailor I'll ne'er embrace!"

                           *7*
But now my troubles they're almost over,
Sally got married to a creol solider.

                           *8*
He beat and abused her and stole her money,
And left her with creol baby.

                           *9*
One night she was taken with a pain in her belly,
And they sent for a doctor and his name was kelly.

                           *10*
He rode a horse with a ropeyarn bridle,
And he laid young Sally on the table

                           *11*
And from her took a little tar baby.
Oh, Sally dear, why didn't you have me?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:42 AM

124 - Sally Brown A (Stanley Slade version) - Capstan Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This song is a capstan shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! Stan Hugill mentions that, with this version of the melody, the word was always added to make the text match the notes. A very famous shantyman from Bristol, Sally Brown always sang in this fashion.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 163, 164).



Sally Brown A

Ooh! Sally Brown she's a bright mulatter,
   - Way-hay, Roll an' go!
She drinks rum and ALWAYS chaws terbacker,
   - Spend my money on Sally Brown!

                      *2*
Sally lives on the old plantation,
She is daughter of the ANCIENT Wild Goose Nation.

                      *3*
Seven long years I courted Sally,
But all she did was GREATLY dilly-dally,

                      *4*
Sally's teeth are white an' pearly,
Her eyes are black an' her LOVELY hair is curly.

                      *5*
Sally lives in ol' Jamaica,
Sellin' rum an' grown' STRONG terbacker

                      *6*
I call her my ol, Queen of Faces,
Bought her coral beads an' SEXY laces.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:39 AM

123 - Sally Brown A2 - Capstan Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This song is a capstan shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! Worth mention is the fact the most of the verses Stan Hugill has from my favored shantyman (due to his yelps), Harding Barabadaian the West Indian Seamen.
In this reconstruction, I will only sing two verses to show another version mentioned by Stan Hugill. The melody of this version differs from the previous ending.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 163).


Sally Brown A

Ooh! Saly Brown she's a bright mulatter,
   - Way-hay, Roll an' go!
She drinks rum an' chaws terbacker,
   - Spend my money on Sally Brown!

                      *2*
Sally lives on the old plantation,
She is daughter of the Wild Goose Nation.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:37 AM

122 - Sally Brown A - Capstan Shanty


This I another "roll" shanty, the most famous "Roll an' Go!", also known as "Sally Brown". This song is a capstan shanty, as Stan Hugill mention it is only one theme of this song, and it is - all about Sally and her daughter. As an author of "Shanties from The Seven Seas" mentioned - there existed many obscene verses, which accounts partly for the fact that popularity never waned! Worth mention is the fact the most of the verses Stan Hugill has from my favored shantyman (due to his yelps), Harding Barabadaian the West Indian Seamen.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 162).


Sally Brown A

Ooh! Sally Brown she's a bright mulatter,
   - Way-hay, Roll an' go!
She drinks rum an' chaws terbacker,
   - Spend my money on Sally Brown!

                     *2*
Sally lives on the old plantation,
She is daughter of the Wild Goose Nation.

                     *3*
Seven long years I courted Sally,
But all she did was dilly-dally,

                     *4*
Sally Brown's a big buck creole,
Her bow is big, but her starn is bigger.

                     *5*
I brought her growns an' I bought 'er laces,
Took her out to all the places.

                     *6*
Sally's teeth are white an' pearly,
Her eyes are black an' her hair is curly.

                     *7*
Sally lives in ol' Jamaica,
Sellin' rum an' grown' terbacker

                     *8*
I call her my ol, Queen of Faces,
Bought her coral beads an' laces.

                     *9*
The sweetest flower in the valley,
Is my own my pretty Sally.

                   *10*
Sally Brown, what is the matter?
Pretty gal, but can't git at her.

                     *11*
Sally Brown, I love ye dearly,
Ye had me heart, or very nearly.

                     *12*
Sally Brown's a wild ol' lady,
Sally's got a creole baby

                     *13*
Sally Brown she wouldn't marry,
An' I no longer cared to tarry.

                     *14*
Sally Brown, I love yer daughter,
I love Yer farm beside the water.

                     *15*
Sally Brown, I kissed yer daughter,
Stopped her rum an' gave her water.

                     *16*
She wouldn't have a tarry sailor,
So I shipped away in a New Bedford whaler.

                     *17*
Sally Brown, I took a notion,
To sail across the flamin' ocean.

                     *18*
I shipped away in a New Bedford whaler,
When I got back she wuz courtin' a tailor.

                     *19*
Now me troubles they are over,
Sally's married to a creol solider.

                     *20*
He beat her up an' stole her money,
Then left her with a creol baby.

                     *21*
Sally Brown, I'm bound ter leave yer,
Sally Brown, I'll not deceive yer.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:35 AM

121 - Roll The Woodpile Down - Capstan Shanty


"Roll The Woodpile Down" is another shanty partially related to "Roll The Cotton Down". This particular version mentioned by Stan Hugill belonging to S. Taylor Harris, and as a chorus instead of "Rollin', Rollin" is used "Trav'ling, Treav'ling", and this is all we can get about Harris version. The whole version we can find in S. Taylor Harris's "Six Sea Shanties"(1925), fortunately for me I owned this super unique book, so I will be really pleased to reconstruct this beautiful version. This song I will sing as a capstan shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 160).


Roll The Woodpile Down


The white folk larfed as the coon pass'd by,
   - 'Way down in Florida.
The white folk larfed as the coon pass'd by,
   - An' we'll roll the woodpile down!
   - Trav'ling, Trav'ling! as long as the worl' goes roun'
   - That brown gal of mine on the Georgia Line,
   - An' we'll roll the woodpile down.

*2*
The roof do leak and the rain come froo,
The roof do leak and the rain come froo,

*3*
Old Runkelkeit was a dam good cook,
Old Runkelkeit was a dam good cook,

*4*
Oh! the work is hard and the biscuits too,
Oh! the work is hard and the biscuits too,


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:33 AM

120 - Roll The Woodpile Down - Shore Song


This version of the "Roll The Woodpile Down" is the shore Negro version, sailors sometimes sang the chorus from this version: "haul the woodpile down". This song will be sung in halyard shanty tempo, but of course, it is a shore song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 161).


Roll The Woodpile Down


Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
   - Way down in Florida
Old Aunt Dinah had a farm
   - Haul the woodpile down


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:31 AM

119 - Roll The Woodpile Down - Pump Shanty


"Roll The Woodpile Down" is another shanty partially related to "Roll The Cotton Down". This shanty is sea version of Negro song "Haul The Woodpile Down". Stan Hugill's version comes from West Indian seamen and is fairly obvious it originated in either the West Indies or the Southern States of America, most probably in the latter, being, perhaps, one of the many rivermen songs that reached deep-water. No specified type of this shanty in Stan Hugill's book, the grand chorus gives us two options, I decided this time to recreate this song as pump shanty. To be more precise, the tempo is adjusted to the "Downton" pump.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 160).



Roll The Woodpile Down


'Way down south where the socks do crow,
   - 'Way down in Florida!
The gals they all dance to the ol banjo,
   - An' we'll roll the woodpile down!
   - Rollin'! Rollin'! oh, Rollin' the whole worl' round,
   - That brown gal o' mine's down the Georgia Line,
   - An' we'll roll the woodpile down!

                  *2*
When I was a young man in me prime,
I chased them yaller gals two at a time,

                  *3*
We'll roll him high an' we'll roll him low,
We'll heave him up and away we'll go,

                  *4*
O rouse an' bust 'er is the cry,
A black man's wage is never high.

                  *5*
O Curly goes on the ol' ran-tan,
O Curly's jist a Down-East Man.

                  *6*
O one more heave an' that'll do,
We're the bullies for to kick 'er through.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:28 AM

118 - Alabama II - Pump Shanty


This version of the "Roll, Alabama, Roll", Stan Hugill mention, is the version from William Main Doerflinger's "Shantymen And Shantyboys"(1951), and instead of the halyard shanty this time is sang as pump shanty. Here full version of this song from Doerflinger's book, indexed as The "Alabama (II)", in his book.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 160).



Alabama II

Oh, in eighteen hundread an' sixty-one,
   - Roll, alabama, roll!
The Alabama's keel was laid,
   - And roll, Alabama, roll!

                *2*
'Twas laid in the yard of Jonathan Laird
At the town of Birkenhead.

                *3*
At first she was called the "Two-Ninety-Two,"
For the merchants of the city of Liverpool

                *4*
Put up the money to build the ship,
In the hopes of driving the commerce from the sea.

                *5*
Down the Mersey she sailed one day
To the port of Fayal in the Western Isles.

                *6*
There she refitted with men and guns,
And sailed across the Western Sea,

                *7*
With orders to sink, burn and destroy
All ships belonging to the North.

                *8*
Till one day in the harbor of Cherbourgh she laid,
And the little Kearsage was waiting there.

                *9*
And the Kersage with Winslow was waiting there,
And Winslow challenged them to fight at sea.

                *10*
Outside the three-mile limit they fought,
Outside the three-mile limit they fought

                *11*
Till a shot from the forward pivot that day
Took the Alabama's steering gear away,

                *12*
And at the kearsage's mercy she lay,
And Semms escaped on a British yacht.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:25 AM

117 - Roll, Alabama, Roll! - Halyard Shanty


This halyard shanty has a very similar tune to "Roll The Cotton Down". Stan Hugill has this version of the "Roll, Alabama, Roll" from New Zeland Lady which he met, in New Zeland in 1925, whose husband had been a seaman in "Alabama".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 159).



Roll, Alabama, Roll!

Oh, in eighteen hundread an' sixty one,
   - ROLL, alabama, ROLL!
This ship her building wuz begun.
   - Oh ROLL, alabama, ROLL!

                *2*
When the Alabama's keel was laid,
This ship her building was begun.

               *3*
Oh, she was build in Birkenhead,
Built in the yard of Jonathan Laird

               *4*
And down the Mersey she rolled one day,
An' across the western she ploughed her way

               *5*
With British guns, oh, she was stocked,
She sail from Fayal - in Cherbourg she docked.

               *6*
To fight the North, Semmes did employ,
Any method to kill an' destroy.

               *7*
But off Cherbourg, the Kearsage lay tight,
Awaiting was Winslow to start a good fight.

               *8*
Outside the three-mile limit they fought,
An' Semmes escaped on a fine British yacht.

               *9*
The Kersarge won - Alabama so brave,
Sank to the bottom to a watery grave.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:23 AM

116 - Lower The Boat Down - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down", described by Joanna C. Colcord in her "Roll And Go - Songs Of The American Sailormen" (1924). Joanna Colcord claims this song has Negro origin, is almost the same as a version (C) from Stan Hugill's book, without a grand chorus. Miss Colcord claims the words being very likely borrowed from shanty "Rolling King", However Stan Hugill is closer to the theory that words are from "South Australia". To take the case even more complicated, Cecil Sharp gives similar words in his version of "One More Day". About reconstruction, I will perform the first stanza that comes from "Shanties From The Seven Seas", second from Cecil Sharp's "English Folk-Chanteys". (1914).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 159).



Lower The Boat Down


There's only one thing grives me,
   - Oh, lower the boat down!
It's my poor wife and bayby,
   - Oh, lower the boat down!

                     *2*
I'm bound away to leave you
Don't let my parting grieve you


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:21 AM

115 - Oh Köm Un Beer For Mi - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down". This version is sung aboard German ships. This one as a halyard, and "Sacramento" as capstan were the two most popular shanties aboard German ships. Stan Hugill heard and taken part in the singing of this hauling song many times and participated in singing this song on board a German barque. Here is version from "Knurrhahn: Seemannslieder und Shanties" (1936).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 157).



Oh Köm un Beer for mi


No den Suden to, dor foort een Shipp,
   - Oh, KöM un Beer for ME!
Verprovianteert mit schlauem Kniff,
   - Oh, KöM un Beer for ME!

                  *2*
Wat harr dat schipp for'n proviant,
Dre Arften, dre Bonen, tein Foten vull Sand.

                  *3*
Doch ut de slappkist dor kunnst all'ns hemm,
De Ool dat wor een bussiness-man.

                  *4*
Un morgens Klock soss koom de Ool an Deck,
Un spee denn eerst mol ober dat Heck.

                  *5*
Oh, Stuurmann, wat sund de Luud for ne Blaas,
Laat se eerst mol hentrummen de Raas.

                  *6*
De Stuurmann de gung in vuller Wut,
Nat dat Logis un haalt de Luud herut.

                  *7*
'Turn to' wi wullt hentrummen de Raas,
Doch Janmoot denkt, du kannst uns mol.

                  *8*
Un sund wi in Hamborg man eerst vermoort,
Gaat wi von Bord un geevt 'three boos'.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:20 AM

114 - De Runer Von Hamborg - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down". This version is sung aboard German ships. This one as a halyard, and "Sacramento" as capstan were the two most popular shanties aboard German ships. Stan Hugill heard and taken part in the singing of this hauling song many times and participated in singing this song on board a German barque.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 156).



De Runer Von Hamborg


De see geiht hoch, de Wind de blast,
   - Oh, KOHM un Beer for MI!
Janmaat, de fleit, is nie verbaast,
   - Oh, KOHM un Beer for MI!

               *2*
Reise aus Quartier un all' an Deck,
De Ool de fiert de Marssails weg.

               *3*
Un wenn wi nu na Hamborg kaamt,
Denn suut man all' de Sneiders staan.

               *4*
Elias roppt, dor bust du ja,
Ik see di nich tom eersten Mal.

               *5*
Du bruukst gewiss een' neen Hoot,
Ik heff weck von de neeste Mood.

               *6*
Un ok gewiss een Taschendook,
Un'n neen Slips, den bruukst du ok.

               *7*
Un ook een beeten Seep un Twern,
Un denn one pound to'n Amuseern.

               *8*
Wi is dat een lutjen Koom,
Un een Zigarr, dat smeckt doch schoon.

               *9*
Afmusert ward, dat is mol klor,
Wie gaat von Bord un schreet Hurroh.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:18 AM

113 - Roll The Cotton Down ( F ) - Halyard Shanty


Roll The Cotton Down ( F ) - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This version is an "A Long Time Ago" version theme version. The book example suggests use more verses from "Blow the Man Down" shanty, I add additional five verses which gives us a reasonable length of the song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 155 ).


Roll The Cotton Down ( F )


Oh, a long, long time an' a very long time,
   - Roll the cotton down!
Oh, a long, long time an' a very long time,
   - We'll roll the cotton down!

                      *2*
Oh, there ships they lay in Frisco Bay,
There ships they lay in Frisco Bay,

                      *3*
An' the smartest o' these was an ol' Yankie,
An' the smartest o' these was an ol' Yankie,

                      *4*
These smart Yankee packets lay out in the Bay,
All a-waiting a fair wind to get under way,   

                      *5*
With all their poor sailors so weak an' so sad,
They'd drunk all their limejuice, no more could be had.

                      *6*
With all their poor sailors so sick an' so sore,
They'd scoffed all their whack an' they couldn't get more.

                      *7*
Oh, I sailed out of 'Frisco in a full rigged ship,
I sailed out o' 'Frisco in a full-rigged ship.

                      *8*
Her masts wuz of silver an' her yards wuz of gold,
Her masts wuz of silver an' her yards wuz of gold.

                      *9*
We wuz bound for New York with a cargo o' gold,
Bound south 'round the Horn through the ice an' the cold.

                      *10*
In eighteen hundred and ninety-four,
We shipped in a drogher bound for Singapore.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:16 AM

112 - Roll The Cotton Down ( E ) - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This version is a "Paddy and the railway" version theme version. The book example suggests use more verses from "Blow the Man Down" shanty, I add additional five verses which gives us a reasonable length of the song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 155 ).



Roll The Cotton Down ( E )


Oh! in eighteen hundred an' seventy-one,
   - Roll the cotton down!
I did what many other have done.
   - We'll roll the cotton down!

                      *2*
I shipped away across the sea,
I shipped away to Amerikee.

                      *3*
In eighteen hundred and seventy-two,
I shipped away with an Irish crew.

                      *4*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-three,
I sailed away across the sea

                      *5*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-four,
I landed on Columbia's shore

                      *6*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-five,
Still Dan O'Connel he wuz alive

                      *7*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-six,
Me drink no longer I could mix

                      *8*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-seven,
Me children number jist eleven

                      *9*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-eight,
I made a fortune, not to late

                      *10*
In eighteen hundred an' seventy-nine,
I for a sight of Home did pine


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:14 AM

111 - Roll The Cotton Down ( D ) - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This vesion is a "Blackball" version theme version. The book example suggests use more verses from "Blow the Man Down" shanty, I add additional five verses which gives us a reasonable length of the song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 155 ).



Roll The Cotton Down ( D )


Oh! when I was a young man in me prime,
   - Roll the cotton down!
I thought I'd ship in the Blackball Line.
   - We'll roll the cotton down!

                      *2*
In the Blackball Line, oh, ye kin shine,
For the ye'll wake at any old time.

                      *3*
It's when a Blackballer is bound for sea,
'Tis then ye'll see such a hell o' spree.

                      *4*
There's tinkers an' wharf rats, shoemakers an' all,
All shipped as prime sailorman aboard the Blackball,

                      *5*
Oh, muster ye sojers an' fakirs an'sich,
An' hear yer name called by a son-o'-a'bitch.

                      *6*
An' when the Blackballer hauls out o' the dock,
To see these poor bastards, how on deck they flock.

                      *7*
'Lay aft here ye, lubbers! Lay aft one an' all,
I'll have none o' yer dodgers aboard Blackball!"

                      *8*
Now see these poor bastards how aloft they will scoot,
Assisted along by the toe o' boot.

                      *9*
THe seceond mate stands 'em all up in a row,
A seam in the deck he sure makes 'em all toe.

                      *10*
It's 'Fore tawps'l halyards!' the mate he will roar,
'Oh, lay along smatly, ye son-o'-a-whore!'


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:12 AM

110 - Roll The Cotton Down ( C ) - Halyard Shanty


Here halyard version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down C", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This version is a "Deep-sea" version theme version. Because Stan Hugill gives us on page 155 the beautiful set of "Halyard only" stanzas, I also think is necessary to sing them, so here is the halyard variation of "Roll the cotton down C".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 154, 155 ).



Roll The Cotton Down ( C )


Oh! away down south where I wuz born,
   - Roll the cotton down!
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn
   - We'll roll the cotton down!

                            *2*
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn
Oh, we wisht to Christ we'd niver bin born!

                           *3*
Oh! away down south one winter's morn,
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn.

                           *4*
We're bound away to Mobile Bay,
We're bound away at the break o' day.

                           *5*
Oh, around Cape Horn we're bound to go,
Around Cape Stiff midst the ice an' snow.

                           *6*
Oh, 'Frisco town is far behind,
An' the gals down south are free an' kind.

                           *7*
Oh, fare-ye-well we're bound to go,
Never let it be said we'll forget you.


"From here onward the verses are halyard ones only"


                           *8*
So stretch it aft an' start a song,
A bloody fine song and it won't take long.

                           *9*
Oh, stretch yer backs an' haul away,
An' make yer port an' take yer pay.

                           *10*
I'll sing ye a song if ye'll git me some gin,
That'll bouse this block right down to the pin.

                           *11*
Oh, rock 'n' shake 'er is the cry,
The bloody topm'st sheave is dry.

                           *12*
Oh, haul away when she takes the next roll,
Why don't the Mate shake 'er, oh, Gawd blast his soul.

                           *13*
Oh, I wist Jonny Slite would keep his luff,
The bastard thinks we've hauled enough.

                           *14*
Oh, sweat that yard the Mate do say.
Give one more pull, lads, then belay!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 17 Oct 21 - 05:09 AM

109 - Roll The Cotton Down ( C ) - Capstan Shanty


Here capstan version of the shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This version is a "Deep-sea" version theme version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 154, 155 ).



Roll The Cotton Down ( C )


Oh! away down south where I wuz born,
   - Roll the cotton down!
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn
   - We'll roll the cotton down!

   - Roll the cotton,
   - Roll the cotton, Moses!
   - Roll the cotton,
   - Oh! roll the cotton down!

            *2*
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn
Oh, we wisht to Christ we'd niver bin born!

          *3*
Oh! away down south one winter's morn,
Oh! away down south around Cape Horn.

          *4*
We're bound away to Mobile Bay,
We're bound away at the break o' day.

          *5*
Oh, around Cape Horn we're bound to go,
Around Cape Stiff midst the ice an' snow.

          *6*
Oh, 'Frisco town is far behind,
An' the gals down south are free an' kind.

          *7*
Oh, fare-ye-well we're bound to go,
Never let it be said we'll forget you.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 08 Oct 21 - 01:12 AM

108 - Roll The Cotton Down ( B ) - Halyard Shanty


A very popular halyard shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song.
The versions of this great shanty are:
(a) Negro Version
(b) Cotton-Stowers' version
(c) Deep-sea version.
(d) Blackball version.
(e) Paddy and the railway.
(f) "A Long Time Ago"
This version is a "Cotton-Stowers' version" theme version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 153 ).



Roll The Cotton Down ( B )


Come rock an' roll me over,
   - Oh, ROLL the cotton DOWN!
Let,s get this damned job over,
   - Oh, ROLL the cotton DOWN!

             *2*
Was ye ever down in Mobile Bay,
Screwin' cotton by the day?

            *3*
Oh, a black man's pay is rather low,
To stow the cotton we must go.

            *4*
Oh, a white man's pay is rather high,
Rock an' shake 'er is the cry.

            *5*
Oh, so early in the mornin', boys,
Oh, afore the day is dawnin', boys.

            *6*
Five dollars a day is a white man's pay,
So bring yer screws an' hooks this way.

            *7*
And bring yer sampson posts likewise,
Oh, bear a hand, get a curve on, boys.

            *8*
We'll floor her off from fore to aft,
There five thousand bales for this 'ere ceraft.

            *9*
Lift her up an' carry her along,
Screw her down where she belongs.

            *10*
Oh, tier by tier we'll stow 'em neat,
Until the job is made complete.

            *11*
Oh, Mobile Bay's no place for me,
I'll pack me bags an' go to sea

            *12*
We'll screw him up so handsomely,
And roll him over cheerily.

            *13*
A white man's pay is rather high,
An' a black man's pay is rather low.

            *14*
Oh, come hither, all you slaver boys,
An' come hither, all you bigger boys.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jul 21 - 01:04 AM

107 - Roll The Cotton Down ( A ) - Halyard Shanty


A very popular halyard shanty "Roll the cotton down", opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song. At Tops'l halyard it was a hardy perennial, although it suited t'gallant halyards it was a hardy perennial, although it suited t'gallant halyards even more so, being of a fairly lively march time.
This version is a "Negro" theme version.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 152 ).


Roll The Cotton Down ( A )


Oooh, roll the cotton down, me boys,
   - ROLL the cotton DOWN!
Oh, roll the cotton down, me boys,
   - Oh, ROLL the cotton DOWN!

             *2*
I,m goin' down to Alabam,
To roll the cotton down, me boys,

             *3*
When I lived down south in Tennessee,
My old Massa, oh, he said to me.

                     *4*
Oh, the slaver works for the white man boss,
He's the one who rides on the big white hoss.

             *5*
If the sun don' shine, then the hens don'lay,
If the slaver won't work, then the boss won't pay.

             *6*
Away down south where I was born,
I worked in the cotton and the corn.

             *7*
Oh the slaver works the whole day long,
The Camptown ladies sing this song.

             *8*
When I was young before the war,
Times were gay on the Mississippi shore.

             *9*
When work was over at the close of day,
'Tis then you'd hear the banjo play.

             *10*
While the darkies would sit around the door,
And the piccanninies played upon the floor.

             *11*
But since the war there's been a change,
To the darkey everything seems strange.

             *12*
No more you'll hear the banjo play,
For the good ol' times have passed away.

             *13*
And now we're off to New Orleans,
To that land of Slaver Queens

             *14*
Oh, in Alabama where I was born
A-screwin cotton of a summer's morn.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jul 21 - 01:02 AM

106 - Roll The Old Chariot - Stamp And Go Shanty


This song is one of the most popular "stamp-n-go" shanties. William Main Doerflinger in his "Shantymen and Shantyboys" (1951), says that it is based on the words of Salvation Army revivalist hymn and that the tune is a Scottish reel. It seems without any doubt that the shanty is of Negro origin.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 151 ).



Roll The Old Chariot


Oh, a drop of Nelson's blood wouldn't do us any harm,
Oh, a drop of Nelson's blood wouldn't do us any harm,
Oh, a drop of Nelson's blood wouldn't do us any harm,
And we'll all hang on behind!
   - So we'll ... ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
   - And we'll roll the golden chariot along!
   - Oh, we'll ro-o-oll the old chariot along!
   - An' we'll all hang on behind!

                      *2*
Oh, a plate of Irish stew wouldn't do us any harm,
Oh, a plate of Irish stew wouldn't do us any harm,
Oh, a plate of Irish stew wouldn't do us any harm,
And we'll all...

                     *3*
Oh, a nice fat cook wouldn't do us any harm.

                     *4*
Oh, roll in the clover wouldn't do us any harm.

                     *5*
Oh, a long spell in goal wouldn't do us any harm.

                     *6*
Oh, a nice watch below wouldn't do us any harm.

                     *7*
Oh, a night with the gals wouldn't do us any harm.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Jul 21 - 01:01 AM

105 - Timber Drogher's Shanty



This was one of the most unclear case to me to investigate, about this piece of musical notation and text Stan Hugill give to us this description: "Whall gives a short variant of this shanty with a different tune. He calls his version a "timber drogher's shanty" (by "this shanty" Stan Hugill means "Highland Laddie" or "Donkey Riding").
So I did go to my shelf where I have a copy of W. B. Whall's "Ships. Sea Songs and Shanties, unfortunately, searched page by page and did not found this song, my copy is a 3-rd edition from 1913. What's going on then? Maybe Stan Hugill gives the wrong reference? Doing research I found in the description only one existing record of this song by Gibb Sheffler, who wrote in the description of his performance, he saw this song in 4 th edition of Walls book, so my track directs me to buy a higher edition than mine. Fortunately, I have been lucky to buy the 6-st edition of Walls book from 1927, and eventually, I Found It! On page 115 I found this:

"Timber droghers would sing--

Was you ever in Quebec,
a launchin' timber on the deck?
Because she was a young thing,
lately left her mammy O!

...end of the story.
To be honest, I didn't found what I hope, means the whole song two or three full stanzas, I found the same piece that prints Stan Hugill. Of course, now I know for sure there is not more than we can find in "Shanties from the Seven Seas", in fact, W. B. Whall's 6 th edition really contains more content, so is a win-win anyway.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 150).




Timber Drogher's Shanty


Was you ever in Quebec,
a launchin' timber on the deck?
Because she was a young thing,
lately left her mammy O!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 16 Jul 21 - 01:21 AM

104 - My Bonnie Highland Lassie-O - Capstan Shanty


The capstan shanty which is related to "The Powder Monkey" shore sea-song, and "Donkey Riding" is this one. "My Bonnie Highland Lassie-O" is a song used both for anchor work and for hauling logs through the timber ports of the droghers. This version Stan Hugill learned from his friend Seamus Ennis of the B.B.C. Folk-Song team. Seamus Ennis collected it in Ireland, from the McDonagh family, Feanish Island, Carna, Country Galway.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 149).


My Bonnie Highland Lassie-O


Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
   - Bonnie lassie, highland lassie!
Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
   - My bonnie highland lassie-O?
I was often in Roundstone Town,
Drinking milk and eating flour,
   - Altough I am a young maid,
   - That lately left my mammy-O!

            *2*
Were you ever in Galway Bay?
   - Bonnie lassie, highland lassie!
Were you ever in Galway Bay,
   - My bonnie highland lassie-O?
I was often in Galway Bay,
Drinking coffe and bohay,
   - Altough I am a young maid,
   - That lately left my mammy-O!

            *3*
Were you ever in Quebec?
   - Bonnie lassie, highland lassie!
Were you ever in Quebec?
   - My bonnie highland lassie-O?
I was often in Quebec,
Throwing timber up on deck,
   - Altough I am a young maid,
   - That lately left my mammy-O!

            *4*
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
   - Bonnie lassie, highland lassie!
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
   - My bonnie highland lassie-O?
I am fit to sweep the floor,
As the lock is for the door,
   - Altough I am a young maid,
   - That lately left my mammy-O!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 16 Jul 21 - 01:18 AM

103 - The Powder Monkey - Shore Sea-Song


Stan Hugill in his book gives us only a chorus of this song, it seems to be based on "Donkey Ridding" shanty, he didn't remember the source or composer, of this ditty, the song according to the description from Stan Hugill point this song in time around the 50s of nineteen century. Unfortunately in "Shanties from the Seven Seas" we can find the only chorus, so I did took the first stanza from this beautiful shore song from Michael Watson, The Powder-Monkey (An Old Salt's Story) - 50th edition (London: Patey & Willis, [n.d.]), and I add to this first verse-chorus from Stan Hugill. It was also done a bit of musical work because in the book the song was in G note, so I had to transpose it down to F note, to match the chorus from Stan Hugill. Also worth noting the stanza 2 and 3 are not confirmed. This is the first song from "Shanties from the Seven Seas" which is not shanty or forebitter, as Stan Hugill mentions itself it is a "shore sea-song", and as a "shore sea-song" will be reconstructed.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 148).




The Powder Monkey

A yarn I've got to spin as how Ive heard my old dad tell,
Of a gallant little hero who aboard the vict' ry fell,
He was brimming full o' courage, an' was just the sort of lad,
To make the sort o' sailor that our Navy's always had.
As powder monkey, little Jim was pet o' all the crew,
with his flaxen hair so curly, an' his pretty eyes o' blue;
An' the bo's'un always said as how that what got over him,
Was the chorus of a sailor's song as sung by little Jim.

   - Soon we'll be in London Town, sing, my lad, yo ho o!
   - and see the king in a golden crown, sing, my lads, yo, ho!
   - Heave ho! on we go, sing, my lads, yo, ho!
   - And Who's a-feared to meet the foe? sing, my lads, yo, ho!

                                  *2*
In ninety-eight we chased the foe right into " Bourky Bay,"
And we fought away like slavers's, all the night till break of day,
The foeman's flag ship "Orient," was blowed away sky-high,
With the Admiral an' all his crew an sare em right says I.
Now little Jim was in the thick of fall the fire and smoke
And he seemed to think that fighting hard was nothing but a joke,
For he handed up the powder from the maghzines below,
And all the while a singing, as if his pluck to show.

                                  *3*
But little Jim was booked as the fight was just on won,
A musket bullet pick'd him off, afore his song was done,
They took him to the cock-pit, where a smiling he did lie,
And the sailors—Well, there warn't a man but somehow piped his eye,
Says Jim, "my lad, don't fret for me, but if the shore ye see,
Give a kiss to dear old mother, and say it comes from me,
And there never was a braver heart, that served our gracious Queen.
When the little powder monkey, who so gallantly used to sing


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Jul 21 - 01:22 PM

102 - Donkey Riding - Stamp And Go Shanty


A shanty similar to "Highland Laddie" and the almost identical tune is that known as "Donkey Riding". This song was also very popular among the timber droghers both in Liverpool and Canadian ports, and by sailors was used as a capstan or "stamp-n-go" shanty when working with cargo. This version Stan Hugill took from his old shipmate called Spike Sennit, who said it was just as popular at sea as in port. My reconstruction will imitate the "stamp-n-go" shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 147,148).


Donkey Riding

Wuz ye ever in Quebec,
Launchin' timber on the deck,
Where ye'd break yer bleed-in neck,
   - Riding on a donkey?

   - Way, hay an' away we go!
   - Donkey riding, donkey riding!
   - Way, hay an' away we go!
   - Oh riding on a donkey?

                *2*
Wuz ye ever in Timbucktoo,
Where the gals are black an' blue,
An' they waggle their bustles too,
   - Riding...

                *3*
Wuz ye ever in Vallipo,
Where the gals put on a show,
Waggle an' dance with a roll 'n' go?
   - Riding...

                *4*
Wuz ye ever down Mobile Bay,
Screwin' cotton all the day,
A dollar a day is a white man's pay?
   - Riding...

                *5*
Wuz ye ever in Canton,
Where the men wear pigtails long,
And the gals play hong-ki-kong?
   - Riding...

                *6*
Wuz you ever in London town,
Where the gals they do come down,
See the king in a golden crown?
   - Riding...

                *7*
Wuz ye ever in Miramashee,
Where ye tie up to a tree,
An' the skeeters do bite we?
   - Riding...

                *8*
Wuz ye ever on the Broomielaw,
Where the Yanks are all the go,
An' the boys dance hell an' toe?

                *9*
Wuz ye ever down 'Frisco Bay,
Where the gals all shoun, hooray,
Here comes Johnny with his three years' pay!
   - Riding...

                *10*
Wuz ye ever off Cape Horn,
Where the weather's niver warm,
When ye wish to hell ye'd niver bin born?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Jul 21 - 01:19 PM

101 - Hieland Laddie (B)


Here one of the most famous "stamp-'n'-go shanties. The "Hieland Laddie" comes from the old Scottish march and dance tune.
This song, with these particular lyrics, was sung in two versions, first, is the version sung with the full chorus that was used by timber drogher's crews at the capstan when loading cargo, heaving in and out, in the timber ports of Canada, and nor'- east America. The second version without grand chorus was used in halyards or, at the 'screws' used to roam tight bales of cotton down the holds of the Cotton Traders. the 'screwing' the cotton job was extensively described by Nordhoff, and He was actually the oldest source who given this text, to us.
The Version of my reconstruction will be 'screw' the cotton song, which is actually not 'Shanty' only 'chant' - this how has Nordhoff described songs of cotton stevedores. This is one of the great examples, why not every 'work song' called 'shanty'.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141,142).


Hieland Laddie ( B )

Wuz ye ever in Quebec,
   - Hieland laddie! Bonnie laddie!
Launching timber on the deck?,
   - Me Bonnie Hieland laddie O!

   - Way, hay an' away we go!
   - Hieland laddie, bonnie ladie!
   - Way, hay, heels an' toes, me bonnie Hieland laddie O!

         *2*
Wuz ye ever in Mobile Bay,
Screwin' cotton on a summer's day?

         *3*
Wuz ye ever off Cape Horn,
Where the weather's niver warm?

         *4*
Wuz ye ever in Mirramashee,
Where ye tie up to a tree?

         *5*
Wuz ye ever in London town,
Where them gals they do come down?

         *6*
Wuz ye ever in Bombay,
Drinkin' coffe an' bohay?

         *7*
Wuz ye ever in Vallipo,
Where the gals put up a show?

         *8*
Wuz ye ever in 'Frisco Bay,
Where the gals all shout 'Hooray'?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 09 Jul 21 - 01:18 PM

100 - Hieland Laddie (A)


Here the one of the most famous "stamp-'n'-go shanty. The "Hieland Laddie" comes from the old Scottish march and dance tune, very popular as walkaway and capstan shanty in old Dundee whalers. In Ferris & Tozer collection appears as a halyard shanty (in this case of course without grand chorus). Stan Hugill learned this version from Bosun Chenoworth who had sailed for years in the hard-bitten whaling ships of Dundee. Song with this amount of verses is obvious capstan shanty, to use as walkaway it sings at the unison, and used about half of the
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141,142).



Hieland Laddie ( A )

There wuz a laddie came from Scotland,
   - Hieland laddie! Bonnie laddie!
Bonnie ladie from far Scotland,
   - Me Bonnie Hieland laddie O!

   - Way, hay an' away we go!
   - Hieland laddie, bonnie ladie!
   - Way, hay, an' away we go!
   - Me bonnie Hieland laddie O!

         *2*
Where have ye been all the day?
Where have ye been all the day?

         *3*
I did not see ye doon the glen,
I did not see ye near the burn,

         *4*
'Nay, I wuz no doon the glen,
Nay I wuz no near the burn.

         *5*
But I went to seek a road to fortune,
Thought I'd find a road to fortune.

         *6*
I joined a ship an' went a-sailin',
Sailed far north an' went a-whalin'.

         *7*
Shipped far north on a Dundee whaler,
Shipped far north as a whalin' sailor.

         *8*
Bound away to Iceland cold,
Found much ice but not much gold.

         *9*
Greenland is a cold country,
Not the place for you and me.

         *10*
Thought it was a way to fortune,
But whalin's not the road to fortune.

         *11*
Wist meself in Bonnie Scotland,
Back agen in Bonnie Scotland.

         *12*
We caught some whales an' boiled their blubber,
Oil an' fat chocked every scupper,

         *13*
We'll soon be homeward bound to Scotland,
Homeward bound to Bonnie Scotland.

         *14*
I'll be glad when I get hame,
I'll give up this whalin' game.

         *15*
Oh, Hieland Laddie went a-sailin',
Oh, Hieland Laddie went a-whalin',


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Jul 21 - 12:36 PM

From Here I will continue:
Stan Hugill's "Shanties From the Seven Seas"

Chapter Two: "Runaway Choruses; Young Things and their Mammies; the Roll Family; Rolling Rivers and Rolling Homes and Rolling Kings; Fishes; the Blow Family; Pigs--Human and Otherwise; the Ranzo Group"


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Jul 21 - 12:34 PM

"Shanties From Seven Seas - Part One" - Reconstruction Completed


This is the end of the fantastic chapter of my research on shanties and the beautiful maritime tradition, from the time when sails reigned supreme on the seas. It is a part of the, project that coincides with the most famous work in the subject of shanties, I mean Stan Hugill's "Shanties From the Seven Seas". This book is the most important source of basic and expert knowledge on the subject of shanties. Why I wrote that the basic and expert, well, certain information that Stan Hugill gives us seems to be basic information, however, more than sixty years after the first edition of this book (1961), observing discussions about shanties and listening to music that without blinking an eye is called shanties, gives me the reflection, is that book should definitely be rediscovered. When it comes to expert knowledge, I can only write that, in the first chapter of this work, I found information that I have not found anywhere else.
   What is my method of research on shanties?
   Namely, I try to reconstruct every single song from the book "Shanties From the Seven Seas", that is, every song is read, rewritten, I also try to reach sources for every single song, that is cited by the author, which made me the owner of one of the largest in the world of a private library containing shanties (the collection includes over 40 songbooks and other sources from the 19th and 20th centuries, most of them are first editions). These volumes allow me to find information about the original shanties, often simple descriptions that allow me to spot tiny, almost elusive pieces of the puzzle. The next stage is the musical one, I do manually transcribes the score presented by Stan Hugill in his book, and insert into a computer generator, in addition, I have almost all the official albums of The Last Shantymen, where I first look for the song understudy, the original singing always takes precedence before the score from the book (taking into account, of course, a lowering of the speed and tempo, which is naturally accelerated to the requirements of the stage). After getting acquainted with the music and the text, I start rehearsals that consist of learning roughly the text and rhythm, then I add hand and body movements imitating work to better understand the dynamics. After a few days, I'm ready to record. Worth noting, is that in the first edition of "Shanties From the Seven Seas", Stan Hugill gives us shanties in various different languages, so I reconstructed the shanties and forebitters in French, Swedish, Norwegian, Two dialects of German, English, and I know that the next parts will add their international brick to this list.
Because of these reconstructions, I also became interested in other forms of exploring knowledge about shanties, so I use the help of my mentors, who thank you very much for helping me in my research, Gibb Sheffler - who was the first, who recorded all the songs from Stan Hugill's book, and is an undoubted authority for me in the field of shanties, Jim Mageean - whose three books along with music, advice, and answers explain important things to me in the field of shanties. Another person is Caitlín Nic Gabhann, who is my concertina teacher (playing at the concertina allows me to get closer to the original sound of the forebitters). Finally, I would like to mention the two most important people, and at the same time the most important people helping me in my research, both of them are equally milestones of my shanties knowledge, so it will be alphabetical: Simon Spalding - expert in the field of shanties, shantymen, experienced sailor, (he sailed on so many tall ships which, due to the number, it is impossible to name) , also a musicologist and multi-instrumentalist who gifted me by his friendship, his expert knowledge of all kinds of shanty and more onboard work really helps to understand the intricacies of the rhythm of the sea work songs; the second person is the Polish National Shantymen Marek Szurawski, his long, personal friendship with Stan Hugill, and several decades of work on shanties, gives him undeniable knowledge in the field of shanties, recognized all over the world, I have the privilege of participating in two parts of the Maritime Workshops under his leadership, the value of which is cannot be overestimated. The scope of knowledge and materials in the field of Maritime and Shanties, as well as the personal friendship I received from Marek Szurawski, is an irreplaceable source of practical and theoretical knowledge.
The reconstruction of the first part of Stan Hugill's "Shanties From The Seven Seas" was successful for me, I reconstructed ninety-nine songs, not missing a single one, in the, as most as possible close to the origin. The second part of the book is in front of me, and my next achievement. If anyone likes what I do and wants to support me, please subscribe to and like my YouTube channel where you can find all 99 shanties and songs from Stan Hugill's book and more. Also, if any of the readers, have any materials related to the original shanties and would like them to donate to my library, I would be grateful. Below is the link to the playlist with the first, complete part of "Shanties From The Seven Seas".

Part One Playlist


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 Jun 21 - 03:00 PM

099 - The Gals O' Dublin Town ( B )

Old Capstan song with other titles: "Harp without the Crown" or "The Shenandoah". Miss Joanna Colcord gives it as a forebitter, and she says it was sung to a tune almost the same as that of "The Banks of Newf'n'land".
The "Harp without the Crown" is a phrase hearkening back to rebellious times in Ould Ireland. According to Miss Colcord, Captain Jim Murphy of the "Shenandoah", in actual fact, flew the Irish flag beneath the American one aboard his ship.
Stan Hugill gives us as a capstan shanty, but because they are two versions, one I will do recreate as forebitter another as capstan shanty. Both versions come from Stan Hugill's shipmate Paddy Delaney (ex-blackball line sailor). So this version will be reconstructed as a capstan shanty. I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992).
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141,142).


The Gals O' Dublin Town ( B )


Sometimes we're bound for Liverpool, sometimes we're bound for France,
But now we're bound to Dublin Town to give the gals a chance.
   - Hurrah! Hurrah! for the gals o' Dub-a-lin Town,
   - Hurrah for the bonnie green flag an' the Harp without the Crown!

                      *2*
Sometimes we're bound for furrin' parts, sometimes we're bound for home,
A Johnny's always at his best whenever he may roam.

                     *3*
Sometimes the weather's fine an' fair, sometimes it's darn well foul,
Sometimes it blows a Cape 'Orn gale that freezes up yer soul.

                     *4*
Sometimes we work as hard as hell, sometimes our grub it stinks,
Enough to make a sojer curse, or make a bishop blink.

                     *5*
Sometimes we wisht we'd niver jined, sometimes we'd like to be
A-drinkin' in a pub, me bhoys, a gal sat on each knee.

                     *6*
Sometimes we are a happy crowd, sometimes we'll sing a song,
Sometimes we wish we'd niver bin born, but we do not grouse for long.

                     *7*
An' when the voyage is all done, an' we go away on shore,
We'll spend our money on the gals, 'n' go to sea for more!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 Jun 21 - 02:59 PM

098 - The Gals O' Dublin Town ( A )


Old Capstan song with other titles: "Harp without the Crown" or "The Shenandoah". Miss Joanna Colcord gives it as a forebitter, and she says it was sung to a tune almost the same as that of "The Banks of Newf'n'land".
The "Harp without the Crown" is a phrase hearkening back to rebellious times in Ould Ireland. According to Miss Colcord, Captain Jim Murphy of the "Shenandoah", in actual fact, flew the Irish flag beneath the American one aboard his ship.

Stan Hugill gives us as a capstan shanty, but because they are two versions, one I will do recreate as forebitter another as capstan shanty. Both versions come from Stan Hugill's shipmate Paddy Delaney (ex-blackball line sailor). So this version will be reconstructed as a forebitter. I try to recreate this song from hearted Stan Hugill's version from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992).

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 141).




The Gals O' Dublin Town ( A )


Naow, 'tis of a famous Yankee ship, to New York we wuz bound,
An'our cap'-n be-in' an Oirish man, belongin' to Dubalin Town,
   - Hurrah! Hurrah! for the gals o' Dub-a-lin Town,
   - Hurrah for the bonnie green flag an' the Harp without the Crown!

                                          *2*
An' when he gazes on that land, that town of high renown,
Oh, it's away the green burgee and the Harp without the Crown.

                                          *3*
'Twas on the seventeenth o' March, we arrived in New York Bay,
Our Capen bein' an Irishman must celebrate the day.

                                          *4*
With the Stars an' Stripes 'way high aloft, an' flutterin' all around,
But underneath his monkey-gaff flew the Harp without the Crown.

                                          *5*
Now we're bound for 'Frisco, boys, an' things is runnin' wild,
The officers an' men dead drunk, around the decks they pile.

                                          *6*
But by termorrer mornin', boys, we'll work without a frown,
For on board the saucy 'Shenandoah' flies the Harp without the Crown!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 15 Jun 21 - 04:49 AM

097 - Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah! (Wat we doht)


Here is the "Gangspill" or capstan shanty, very popular on german crew ships. A couple of words worth describe from the text: David Straat was well known in Hamburg "Sailortown", where seamen used to congregate at the end of the voyage; The Groote Freiheit is an adjacent street off the Ripabahn.
Stan Hugill took text from "Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag" Hans Sikorski (1936). After review of text i found couple spelling diferences, for reconstruction i used text from "Knurrahan,Seemanslieder und Shanties Musikverlag".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 138).




Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!


Un wenn wi nu na Hamborg Kamt, Denn went wi, wat wi doht,
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn an'ne, Eck von'ne David-Straat,
   - Hurrah! Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Pennan'ne, Eck von'ne Davidstraat.

               *2*
Un ok de luttje Mary, dat is ne fixe Deern,
Kriegst du de mol det Obends fot, denn kannst di nich besweern.
   - Hurrah! Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah, Hurrah!
denn kopt wi een for fiv Penn An'ne, Eck von'ne David Straat.

               *3*
Un ok de dicke Anna, dat is ne feine Popp,
Kummt Janmaat von lang' Reis' torug, denn passt se em gliks op.
   - Hurrah! Hurrah...


               *4*
Denn goht wi no St. Pauli rop, dor geiht dat lusting her.
Wenn se di seet, denn schreet se all: Du, Fitje, kumm mol her!

               *5*
Un op de Groote Freiheit, wat is di dor en Larm,
Ear du di dat versehn deist, hest gliks ne Deern in'n Arm.

               *6*
Un wenn de Huer verjuchheit is, denn weet ik wat ik do,
Ji kont mi alltosom mol fix, ik go no See hento.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Jun 21 - 06:01 AM

096 - Hourra, Mes Boués, Hourra!



Two french "Hourra" shanty gives us Stan Hugill, this one "Hourra, Mes Boues, Hurra!", can be found in several french collections, Hayet, Bernard Roy, etc..., but Stan Hugill seems to favored Captain Hayet, and decided to give credit of saving this fantastic shanty from oblivion. Jean Loro, one of the friends of Stan Hugill teaches him to sing the second refrain often sung as: "Hourra, mes boues, hourra!". This is a hauling shanty (chanson a hisser).
In comparing to the original text from Captain Hayet "Chansons De Bord"(1934), Stan Hugill gives nine verses instead of the original eleven, also the melody is a little bit different, but keeps the same dynamics of course. Due to the involvement of Jean Loro, I decided to reconstruct Stan Hugill's melody and version, to keep the uniqueness of the song which seems to be known from the personal experience of Stan Hugill.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 137).


Hourra, Mes Boués, Hourra!


Derrière chez nous y'a un petit bois
   - HourRA, mes boues, hourRA!
Cueillis deux fraises, en mangis trois
   - TRA la, la la, la la LA, la la!

                  *2*
Avec une fillett' de quinze ans.
Sa mere arrive au meme instant,

                  *3*
Que faites-vous a mon enfant?
J'suis en train d' lui compter les dents.

                  *4*
Il lui en manqu' une sur le d'vant
Il lui en manqu' une sur le d'vant

                  *5*
Que je lui pose bellement.
Que je lui pose bellement

                  *6*
Il m'en manqu'une egalement!
Il m'en manqu'une egalement!

                  *7*
Donnez-moi z'en, marin galant.
Donnez-moi z'en, marin galant

                  *8*
J'les pose qu'a cells de quinze ans.
J'les pose qu'a cells de quinze ans

                  *9*
Le vieilles pour le commandant!
Le vieilles pour le commandant!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 08 Jun 21 - 09:05 AM

095 - Drunken Sailor (B)


This shanty is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-'n'-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work-song allowed in the King's Navee.
In latter days, in bigger ships with smaller crews, it was mainly used at braces when 'going about' or to hand aloft a light sail such as stays'l - in this latter case it would then be used as a hand-over-hand song.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 135).

Drunken Sailor B


What shall we do with'a drunken sailor?   x3
   - Earleye in the mornin!
   - Way, hay 'n' up she rises!                   x3
   - Earlye in the mornin!

                *2*
Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

               *3*
Keep him there an' make him bale her.

               *4*
Trice him up in a runnin' bowline.

               *5*
Tie him to the taffrail when she's yard-arm under.

               *6*
Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

               *7*
Take him an' shake 'im, an' try an' wake 'im.

               *8*
Give him a dose o' salt an' water.

               *9*
Give him a taste o' the bosun's rope-end.

               *10*
Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

               *11*
What'll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

               *12*
Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

               *13*
Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

               *14*
What shall we do with a drunken solider?

               *15*
Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

               *16*
What shall we do with the Queen o' Sheba?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 Jun 21 - 07:50 AM

094 - Drunken Sailor (A)

This shanty is a very well-known shanty, a typical example of the stamp-'n'-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work song allowed in the King's Navee. This shanty was very popular in ships with big crews when at halyards; the crowd would seize the fall and stamp the sail up.
It is a very old shanty, having been sung in the Indiamen of the John Company. Olmstead gives a version with its tune in his book "Incidents of a Whaling Voyage"(1839) differing very little from the modern accepted one.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 134, 135).



Drunken Sailor (A)

   - Way, hay an' up she rises!
   - Patent blocks o' diff'rent sizes,
   - Way, hay 'n' up she rises!
   - Earlye in the mornin!

What shall we do wi'a drunken sailor? x3
   - Earlye in the mornin!

                *2*
Put him in the long-boat till he gets sober.

                *3*
Keep him there an' make him bale her.

                *4*
Trice him up in a runnin' bowline.

                *5*
Tie him to the taffrail when she's yard-arm under.

                *6*
Put him in the scuppers with a hose-pipe on him.

                *7*
Take him an' shake 'im, an' try an' wake 'im.

                *8*
Give him a dose o' salt an' water.

                *9*
Give him a taste o' the bosun's rope-end.

                *10*
Stick on his back a mustard plaster.

                *11*
What'll we do with a Limejuice Skipper?

                *12*
Soak him in oil till he sprouts a flipper.

                *13*
Scrape the hair off his chest with a hoop-iron razor.

                *14*
What shall we do with a drunken solider?

                *15*
Put him in the guard room till he gets sober.

                *16*
What shall we do with the Queen o' Sheba?


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 01 Jun 21 - 03:19 AM

093 - Horraw For The Blackball Line (solo variations)


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. Stan Hugill in his book apart of the two versions of this spectacular song gives us also additional, three variations of the first solo and refrains. Here they are.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation A)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - To me way - ay - ay - hay - ho!



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation B)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - A.. ah - way - ay - ay, hoo - ray - ya!



Horraw For The Blackball Line (variation C)

In the Black-ball Line I served me time,
    - To me way - ay - ay, hoo, ro, ya!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 28 May 21 - 04:46 AM

092 - Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. The Blackball Line of packet ships started in 1816, an American line running between New York and Liverpool. The ships were small roughly 300 to 400 tons. After 1850 was added ships over a thousand tonnes. Here version with the melody a very popular tune with Liverpool Jacks. For this version, I will utilize the first verse from music notation, and verses from page 132 of the first edition from "Shanties From The Seven Seas".
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 133).


Horraw For The Blackball Line (Liverpool Jacks Tune)


I served me time in the Blackball Line,
   - Timme way, hay, a-way, yah!
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - Hurraw for the Blackball Line!

                      *2*
Oh, around Cape Horn with a mainskys'l set,
Around Cape Stiff an' we're all wringing wet.

                      *3*
Oh, around Cape Stiff in the month o' May,
Oh, around Cape Horn is a very long way.

                      *4*
It's when the Blackballer is ready for sea,
The sights in the fo'c'sle is funny to see.

                      *5*
There's tinkers and sogers an' fakirs an' all
All ship for prime sailors aboard the Blackball.

                      *6*
Now the packet ship she is crowdin' on sail,
The wind from the south'ard is blowin' a gale.

                      *7*
An' when we git to ol' New York Town,
We'll meet ol' Patrick an' drink till we drown.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 25 May 21 - 02:44 AM

091 - Horraw For The Blackball Line


This shanty was sung at the capstan or windlass. All those shanties with words "Hurrah", "Horray", or "Horraw" in the refrain or chorus were known by sailors as "horraw choruses" and very often was said that "our wild horraw chorus soon raised the mud hook (or hoisted the tops'l)". Here one of the best "horraw horuses" shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 131).


Horraw For The Blackball Line


In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - To me way, hay, hoo, ro, yah
In the Blackball Line I served me time,
   - Hooraw for the Blackball Line!

             *2*
Blackball ships are good an' true
They are the ships for me an' you

             *3*
That's the Line where ye can shine
That's the Line where I wasted me prime.

             *4*
If yer wish to find a real goldmine,
Just take a trip on a Blackball ship

             *5*
Just take a trip to Liverpool,
To Liverpool that Yankee school

             *6*
Yankee sailors ye'll see there,
With red-topped boots an' short-cut hair.

             *7*
There's Liverpool Pat with his tarpaulin hat,
An' Paddy Magee the Packet Rat

             *8*
There was once a Blackball ship,
That fourteen knots an hour could slip.

             *9*
They'll carry ye along through the ice an' snow,
They'll thake ye where the winds don't blow.

             *10*
I've seen the Line both rise an' shine,
An' crossed the line in 'em many a time.

             *11*
Oh, drink a health to the Blackball Line,
Their ships are stout an' their men are fine.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 22 May 21 - 04:25 AM

090 - Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso


Here another French hauling shanty originally comes from Captain A. Hayet's version (Chansons de Board; 1927). Fortunately, I found the book by A. Hayet mentioned by Stan Hugill. This song is the combination of "Goodbye, Fare-ye-well" and "Blow The Man Down". Unusually consist of four solos and for refrains. H. Jacques says that this shanty was a traditional one among the seamen of the sailing ships which loaded saltpeter in Chilean ports, but the song is much older, potentially beginning of the nineteenth century, sang by whalers of the south seas.
In the comparison process, I did discover some of the musical notations were different than in Stan Hugill's book, so I took precedence of older sources, and for reconstruction used original notes from "Chansons de Board". This shanty I will try to reconstruct in the original version from Captain A. Hayet's "Chansons de Board".

"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 129).




Et Nous Irons a Valparaiso

Hardi! les gars, vire au guindeau
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
Hardi! les gars, adieu Bordeaux!
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Au Cap Horn il ne fera pas chaud
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
A faire la peche au cachalot
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!

       *2*
Plus d'un y laissere sa peau
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
Adieu misere, adieu bateau!
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Et nous irons a Valparaiso
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
Ou d'autres laisseront leurs os
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!

       *3*
Ceux qui r'viendront pavillon haut
   - Good bye, farewell!
   - Good bye, farewell!
C'est premier brin de matelot
   - Hourra! oh! Mexico!
   - Oh! oh! oh!
Pour la bordee ils seront a flot
   - Haul away, he!
   - Oula tchalez!
Bons pour le rack, la fille, le couteau
   - Hal' matelot
   - He! ho! hisse he! ho!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 18 May 21 - 09:04 AM

089 - As-Tu-Connu Le Per' Lanc'lot


A French version, Stan Hugill learned from Jean Loro, a fine French "matelot" who had sailed in many of the "Borde" Vessels. Mentioned French matelot, Johan Halvorsen sang this shanty at halyards. Stan Hugill added to his version several verses from Captain A. Hayet's version (Chansons de Board; 1927). Fortunately, I found the book by A. Hayet mentioned by Stan Hugill, so I can inform you, that, verses: 1, 4, 6, 7, and 8 come from "Chansons de Board". What is really interesting to many people is why in French shanties (taking into account French cultural independence ), is the English refrain sung? This was because, during the American War of Independence (1775), many of New England's whale ports were blocked by English ships. As a result, many New Bedford whaling families have asked to be moved to Milford Haven and Dunkirk, where they have formed the nucleus of the whaling industry of England and France. This was the reason why many French shanties, especially those sung on whalers, have English choruses.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 127).




As-Tu-Connu Le Per' Lanc'lot


As tu conu le Pere Lancelot?
   - GoodBYE, fa-re-well! goodBYE, fa-re-well!
Qui fail la peche aux cachalots,
   - HourRA! oh, MexiCO-o-o-o!

                      *2*
Il a trois filles qui font la peau,
Il a trois filles qui font la peau,

                      *3*
L'une a Lorient, l'autre a Bordeaux,
La troisieme est a Colombo,

                      *4*
Il donne la goutte a ses mat'lots,
A coups de barre et de guindeau.

                      *5*
Il mange la viande, nous laiss' les os,
Il boit du vin et toi de l'eau.

                      *6*
A la manoeuvre le bosco
Te dresse a coups de cabillot.

                      *7*
Le lieutnant t'envoie la-haut.
A coups de bottes dans le dos.

                      *8*
Et son second qu'est le plus beau,
Si tu groumes te fout a l'eau!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 14 May 21 - 09:43 AM

088 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)



This shanty it was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. A Norwegian version from Henrik Wergeland "Opsang". This shanty Stan Hugill learned from seamen Johan Halvorsen in port Bergen.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Norwegian)


Maria vet du nu hvorden?
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
Du nu skal vende din stavn igjen?
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

               *2*
Naar Kanalen vi passet har,
Og Goodvin Sand vi da blir klar.

               *3*
Nu skal vi gaa mot kolde nord,
Og hlem til vores gamle mor.

               *4*
Hun sitter bak de norske fjeld,
Og venter der den lange kveld.

               *5*
Hun venter paa den elskte søn,
Som kommer hjem saa traet av sjøn.

               *6*
Med frisk sydvest det gar galant,
Naar alle seil er sat i kant.

               *7*
Med godt humør og med stor lyst,
Snart ser vi gamle Norgest kyst.

               *8*
Vor Kaptein han befaler saa;
En mand paa utkik straks at gaa.

               *9*
Han alt fra merset roper ned:
'Vi har en lods forut i lae!

               *10*
'Bras forre mersseil bak med hast!
Staa klar, et taug til lodsen kast!'

               *11*
Saa gjør vi godt fast lodsbaaten
'Nu lods, tag I kommandoen!'

               *12*
Nu har vi faat vor lods, vor ven,
Hal forre mersseil fuldt igjen!

               *13*
Nu har vi ombord vor lods
Nu kan vi seile glad vor ko's.

               *14*
Saa seiler vi langs laden frem,
Til Bergen der er vores hjem.

               *15*
Og naar vi er av sjøen kjed,
Vi anker glad paa Bergens red.

               *16*
Lad styrbords anker gaa med hast,
Og gjør saa vores seil godt fast.

               *17*
Den sjette mai vi kom derind,
Vi kom for en sydvestlig vind.

               *18*
Vi haler ind i nummer tre,
Saa faar vi se, hvor det staar te.

               *19*
Paa Tolboden stod piger fem,
De hilste os velkommen hjem.

               *20*
Vor styrmand han befaler saa:
'Vor kjetting agter bringes maa!"

               *21*
I havnen vi nu tørnet er,
Og snart vi hjem til pigerne ser.

               *22*
Men først vi lens i pumpen slaar,
Og dertil vi en shanti faar.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 11 May 21 - 04:07 AM

087 - Ved Ankerhioning

This version of the "Goodbye Fare-ye-well" is mentioned by Stan Hugill on page 124, he says, is this is version which Laura Alexandrine Smith gives us in her "The Music of The Waters" (1888). Usual it is sang as a capstan anchor shanty. L. A. Smith gives also an English translation:

Solo.--" And the kaiser he sat in his castle so high.
Chorus.--Good-bye, fare you well; good-bye, fare you well.
Solo.--His crimson, my boys! we are homeward bound.
Chorus.--Hurra, my boys, We are homeward bound."

I want to make a special thanks to Pawel Paco Kalicinski, who helped me with pronunciation to make it possible to sing this beautiful shanty in the Norwegian language.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Ved Ankerhioning

Og Keiseren sad paasit Noje Stot.
   - Goodbye, fare you well, goodbye, fare you well.
Hans hoirode Kjole den klarham saa goot.
   - Hurra, my boys, we are homeward bound!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 07 May 21 - 03:36 PM

086 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Singurd Sternvall version)


This version of the "Goodbye Fare-ye-well" is mentioned by Stan Hugill on page 124, he says is this is a Swedish version in "Sang under Segel", and gives us one verse without chorus lines. In big effort and great luck I found this original mentioned book: Singuard Sternvall's "Sang under Segel" (1935), so now I can sing this mentioned shanty in full 5 verses length. Also, I will use the original music took from this beautiful book. The original comment to this song in "Sang under Segel" says:

"A very old gang song: sing in my time mostly as a halyard shanty".

So here we go, this version different from than previous five versions from Stan Hugill's book will be not a capstan shanty only a halyard shanty.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (Singurd Sternvall version)



Oh, fare you well, I wish you well.
   - Good-BYE, fare you well, good-BYE, fare you well.
Oh, fare you well, my bonny young lass.
   - HooRAY, my boys, we are HOMEward bound!

                *2*
Oh, don't you hear the Old Man say:
"We are homeward bound this very day".

                *3*
We are homeward bound and I hear the sound.
So have on the windlass and make it come round.

                *4*
Our anchors aweigh and our sails they are set,
and the girls we are leaving, we leave with regret.

                *5*
She is a flash clipper packet and bound for to go,
with all boys on the towrope she cannot say no.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 04 May 21 - 05:42 AM

085 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (odd verses collection)

This shanty it was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Collection of the culled odd verses to this version are from other shantymen - mainly German and Scandinavian. I think their enough verses to sing them together as a separate version. I used a slightly different melody mentioned by Stan Hugill, after version D.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 123, 124).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (odd verses collection)


At home there waits mother, an' Susie an' Flo,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
With all o' them pulling she's sure to go.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                  *2*
We're loaded down with sugar and rum,
The sails they are set and the wind she has come.

                  *3*
Our ropes are now taut and our sails they are full,
She spreads out her wings like a herring-back gull.

                  *4*
We're homeward bound with a roaring breeze,
We're homeward bound, so the Old Man says.


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 30 Apr 21 - 03:15 AM

084 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (D)


This shanty was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Verses to this version are the version from "The Dreadnought". I used a slightly different melody mentioned by Stan Hugill, after this version (version D), in the text, he mentioned, is that some of the seamen sang the first few bars this way.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 122, 123).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well (D)

'Tis of a flash packet - a packet o' fame,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
She's a rorty flash packet an' the "Dreadnought's" her name.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                  *2*
She's bound to the west'ard where the salty winds blow,
Bound away in the "Dreadnought" to the Pierhead do flock.

                  *3*
It's now we are leavin' the sweet salthouse Dock,
Where the boys an' the girls on the Pierhead do flock.

                  *4*
They give three loud cheers while the tears freely flow,
Bound away in the Dreadnought to the west'ard we'll go.

                  *5*
It's now we are sailin' on the wild Irish shore,
Our passangers all sick, and our new mates all sore.

                  *6*
Oh, it's now we've arrived on the Banks o' Newf'n'land,
Where the bottom's all fishes an' fine yeller sand.

                  *7*
Where the fishes they sing as they swim to an' fro,
She's a Liverpool packet--O Lord let 'er go!

                  *8*
Now we're a-runnin' down the Long Island shore,
Where the Pilot will board us as he's done oft before.

                  *9*
Then back yer main tops'l raise yer main tack also,
Bound away to the west'ard in the Dreadnought we go.

                  *10*
It's now we've arrived in ol' New York once more,
Where I'll see my dear Sal, oh, the gal I adore.

                  *11*
I'll call for strong liquors an' married we'll be,
Here's a health to the Dreadnought where'er she may be.

                  *12*
Here's a health to her Ol' Man an' officers too,
Here's a health to the Dreadnought, to the west'ard we'll go!

                  *13*
This song was composed when the watch went below,
Bound away in the Dreadnought, to the west'ard we'll go!


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Subject: RE: Discovering world legacy of shanties by 'Shogun'
From: Shogun
Date: 27 Apr 21 - 03:45 AM

083 - Goodbye Fare-ye-well (C)


This shanty was sung at the windlass or capstan when raising the anchor. Verses to this version are the 'Milkmaid' theme (see 'Blow the Man Down' page 210, first edition, of the "Shanties from the Seven Seas"). Is worth mentioning, that Stan Hugill disagreed with collectors and writers who hold a theory that homeward-bound songs were never debased by sailors. This version is an example of excerption from this theory (the "Milkmaid" version was entirely obscene). To recreate this song, I will use melody, heard on Stan Hugill's record, from the album "Chants des Marins Anglais" (1992), with Stormalong John.
"Shanties from the Seven Seas" by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 122).



Goodbye Fare-ye-well   (C)


Oh, as I wuz a-rollin' down Ratcliffe Highway,
   - Goodbye, fare-ye-well! goodbye, fare-ye-well!
A pretty young maiden I chanct for to see.
   - Horraw, me boys, we're homeward bound!

                *2*
Oh, where are ye goin' to, my pretty maid?
I'm going a milkin', kind sir, she said.

                *3*
Oh, have ye a sweatheart, my pretty maid?
'I'm lookin' for one, kind sir,' she said.

                *4*
Then may I come wid ye, my pretty maid?
'Well, yes, since ye axed me, sir,' she said.

                *5*
'But I guess yer a bad one, kind sir,' she said.
'Ye want for to love me, but yer don't want ter wed,'

                *6*
Jack took her in tow, an' away they did go,
The bulls did a grunt, an' the cows did a low.

                *7*
They came to a haystack but the maid she wuz shy,
They backed and they filled an' heaved many a sigh.

                *8*
The haystack capsized an' Jack got all bent,
With hay in his gaff-tops'l, his breeches all rent.

                *9*
So he left her a-sittin' a-lookin' forlorn,
An' shipped to the south'ard away round Cape Horn.

                *10*
Now, all ye young sailors that round the Horn sail,
Don't take a young milkmaid away from her pail.

                *11*
Or else ye'll regret it an' wish ye were dead,
So don't go a-courtin' in a haystack for a bed.


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