mudcat.org: The current state of folk music in UK
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39]


The current state of folk music in UK

GUEST,kenny 19 Nov 19 - 06:06 PM
Raggytash 19 Nov 19 - 05:23 PM
Dave the Gnome 19 Nov 19 - 04:25 PM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 02:51 PM
Raggytash 19 Nov 19 - 02:51 PM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 02:21 PM
Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 19 - 01:45 PM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 12:10 PM
Jack Campin 19 Nov 19 - 12:07 PM
GUEST,HiLo 19 Nov 19 - 12:02 PM
Steve Gardham 19 Nov 19 - 12:02 PM
Vic Smith 19 Nov 19 - 12:00 PM
GUEST,Hi 19 Nov 19 - 11:57 AM
Joe G 19 Nov 19 - 11:43 AM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 19 Nov 19 - 11:38 AM
Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 19 - 10:53 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 10:47 AM
Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 19 - 10:37 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 09:35 AM
GUEST,HIlo 19 Nov 19 - 09:21 AM
Joe G 19 Nov 19 - 09:01 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 08:41 AM
Backwoodsman 19 Nov 19 - 07:53 AM
Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 19 - 07:48 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 07:13 AM
Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 19 - 06:38 AM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 19 Nov 19 - 05:58 AM
GUEST,Mike Yates 19 Nov 19 - 05:56 AM
Backwoodsman 19 Nov 19 - 05:55 AM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 19 Nov 19 - 05:54 AM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 19 Nov 19 - 05:52 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 04:22 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 03:59 AM
Jim Carroll 19 Nov 19 - 03:40 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 02:16 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 02:11 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 01:56 AM
The Sandman 19 Nov 19 - 01:54 AM
Joe G 18 Nov 19 - 07:27 PM
GUEST 18 Nov 19 - 07:20 PM
Joe G 18 Nov 19 - 06:37 PM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 18 Nov 19 - 06:36 PM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 18 Nov 19 - 06:33 PM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM
Joe G 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Nov 19 - 06:22 PM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 18 Nov 19 - 06:20 PM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 18 Nov 19 - 06:13 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Nov 19 - 05:39 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,kenny
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 06:06 PM

Jim hasn't been discussing "sessions" - he specifically has been talking about organisations which designate and publicise themselves as "Folk Clubs". How many "Folk Clubs" are there in your list ? It's certainly not 200.
I can only speak from my experiences in Scotland, but I would think there are fewer than half the "Folk Clubs" in Scotland at the moment than there was in the 1970s and 80s. I can also say from personal experience that when I was in a band playing clubs in the mid-1980s, the average audience would have between 40 and 60 in number. I played a lot of the Scottish clubs about 7-8 years ago as part of another group, the average number in the audience was 20 - 40. Average age would have been over 50.
These are my personal experiences of "the current [ or very recent ] state of folk music in Scotland" - which I accept does not necessarily extrapolate to the whole of the UK.
I have also returned tonight from a "singaround / session" at the Aberdeen branch of the TMSA. There were 25 people there. When we started the branch in the mid-1980s, we very rarely had less than 60 attending. Not a single soul there under the age of 40, maybe even 50. Figure it out for yourselves.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:23 PM

Well Dave, I had quick look earlier and there are over 50 clubs/sessions in Greater Manchester.

That added to 144 in West Yorkshire and surrounds add up to over 200 in a relatively small area of the UK.

Now either that area is over generously endowed with folk session, having more than the entire total given by Wiki or someone is talking their anal orifice.

I'll get you guess which I believe. Especially given their attendence at such places in the past 30 years.

My apologies to all you good people to sing, play, promote and enjoy folk music but this has to be pointed out and if I ruffle a lot of feathers personally I don't give a f.............. flying flamingo.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 04:25 PM

Hi Raggy. I have already pointed out that the numbers quoted are irrelevant. They are obviously wrong but someone keeps quoting one of them, incorrectly, without the other. As I said a few posts back the main point of the Wiki article was that the number declined in the 80s but by the mid 90s the decline stopped. It also states that the decrease was due to changing musical and social trends. Which makes sense to me. Unlike the other explanation!. I have no idea where they got the figures from. EFDSS registered maybe? I dunno. But presuming they use the same source for both 1965 (over 300) and now (over 160) it shows that their source shows that the number of clubs had almost halved. No surprise to me as the number of pubs has reduced by a similar amount. Hope this helps and puts the 186, 136 or whatever figure is next quoted to bed once and for all.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 02:51 PM

"But honestly Jim, you have to understand that WE all accept that not everybody is going to like us if we become a professional artist."
THere's that in it Al, but with Ewan it lasted a lifetime and thirty years after he died
Bit much, doncha think
Like they say about the Irish - the plumber may forget to turn up but they'll never forgive Britain for the siege of Waterford
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 02:51 PM

For the sake of accuracy I will say again that the are more sessions listed in filofolk in West Yorkshire than are listed on wiki for the whole of the country.

There are not as some would claim a little over a hundred in the whole country. Can you HEAR THIS!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 02:21 PM

Interesting story Vic. one thing i think Ewan and Martin had in common was a love of life and of music and enthusisam for what they were doing


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 01:45 PM

No I'd never heard that story. But honestly Jim, you have to understand that WE all accept that not everybody is going to like us if we become a professional artist. It goes with the territory we occupy.

In one of Dirk Bogarde's books, he tells the story of a director who was always horrible to him, and just as Dirk was retiring said - I TOLD YOU'D never be any good!

Its just the bravery of the ordinary performer footsoldier. If you haven't got it, you can't do the job.

Some of your friends get very hurt when they see the way people treat you and the things they say. But the bottom line is that you don't let these assholes stop you from doing what you want to do ...i promise you, Ewan would have understood this.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 12:10 PM

"What stories about Ewan?"
Where have you been for the last thirty years since Ewan's death - and the thrity years before that Al ?

Here's one you might like
The Travelling People Radio Ballad was considered one of the most influential broadcasts in presenting the voice of Travellers to the general public and was reckoned to have helped Travellers improve their conditions enormously
When it was being finalised before broadcasting in 1964 the team put out an appeal for Traveller songs and recieved a tape of three from a 'Travelling woman'
They programmed it into the script and gave it to Sheila Stewart to sing as the recording was too poor
They later received a phone call revealing that the songs were not by Travellers but made up by folkie, John Brune putting on a phony voice
Sheila was dropped from the programme which was nearly abandoned because of the nearness o its going out - if it had gone out the anti- Traveller lynch-mob would have leapt on it as a fake
Frigging hilarious

And then there's the story told on Mudcat of Ewan and Peggy being booked at a folk club - as you probbly know, Ewan's relaxation technique was to turn it back-to-front and straddle the back
The Muddcatter who told the story baosed how he pinned a piece of paper to the chair back reading "WE ARE A PAIR OF CUNTS" facin the audience
Luckily one of them had the deceny to remove it before they started
Doncha just love the professional courtesy towards fellow artists shown by that sort of behavior ?
Want any more - there are a few ?
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 12:07 PM

Meet the Earl S. Landgrebe of music history:

I can't be arsed about how 100% accurate an insignificant story about somebody as predatory as Dylin is


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 12:02 PM

The post from Hi was me, sorry


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 12:02 PM

You've got to admire Jim's ability to fight on half a dozen or more fronts at once. I couldn't do it at my age.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Vic Smith
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 12:00 PM

Al wrote: -
There is actually a lot to be learned from everybody you meet on the folkscene and every audience has something to teach you.

Breakfast with Martin Carthy one of the many times he stayed after performing at our club.

Vic: All the very many times that I have seen you booked in folk clubs, you are always in the room all evening, always listening intently. Don't you ever get fed up?

Martin: You can learn from anybody - even if you are learning what not to do. Sometimes a not very good singer can sing an interesting song in a different way or they can remind you of something in your repetoire that you are neglecting and shouldn't be.

Another time he stayed with Dan Quinn, one of our resident singers. Dan told me that I would have blushed if I had heard Martin talking about how good he thought my singing of The Gypsy Laddies had been.

Not long after this I was reading one of the many magazine interviews with Martin and he said something like 'I was in the Lewes club not long ago and one of the floor singers was Marilyn Bennett. What a great voice and what a great way she has in putting over an unaccompanied song'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Hi
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 11:57 AM

I really don't give a toss what Ewan McColl called himself...I do care about your insistence on relaying stories that even you know to be false. Again Jim, it goes to you credibility. What is your opinion worth if you can't be "arsed" to tell the truth.
   And Dylan may have been a lot of things but Predatory was not one of them.And please don't respond with that old Jilted Joan story.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Joe G
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 11:43 AM

I posted the link to FiloFolk earlier Pseud - it might have been in your Rioja period ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 11:38 AM

Here's an example of online material. There is plenty like this.
I apologise for not providing blue clickies: I have tried, but in vain.

https://filofolk.tykesnews.org.uk/venues.php

And here is one person's work at listing folk magazines.

Plenty here to be positive about?

http://www.jacey-bedford.com/folkmags.htm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 10:53 AM

What stories about Ewan?

I'm always the last one to know.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 10:47 AM

"Jim, you have got to stop telling those ridiculous stories about Bob Dylan not wanting to go to the south .."
I know the story from an interview with Theodor Bikel, which I still have here
It is convincing enough for me to tell the story as I do, and frankly, in a world that still digs up MacCool thirty years after his death to give him a kicking with stories I know to be blatantly untrue, I can't be arsed about how 100% accurate an insignificant story about somebody as predatory as Dylin is
If you people were equally concerned about stories about MacColl, Lloyd, Sharp (and now Child) were I might think a litle differently
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 10:37 AM

'i know high quality performers who will not go to some singers clubs in the uk because the standard is variable and sometimes very poor'

WE all do and some won't go to a club, unless its to network and try for a gig. There was atime when a BBC folk programme refused to publicise clubs were the programme comperes didn't have a chance of a gig.

Its the trouble with the folk world - it riven with people with superiority complexes. There is actually a lot to be learned from everybody you meet on the folkscene and every audience has something to teach you.

When you ignore the lessons or close your ears to them, then your music gets smaller - as it gets further away from life as lived and jumps into the abyss of the museum and the internet.

This isn't just applying to traditional music. There are hundreds of prosaic contemporary songwriters - who songs need 32 tracks of special effects to 'work'.

The folk world is very specific. The folk club audiences are, or should a unifying discipline that we all work to. Try to respect the achievements of others.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 09:35 AM

yes, we did maypole dancing at primary school, it would be good if it was introduced again , if it has not been,it teaches the benefits of teamwork in a fun way
people go to folk events to socialise they also do not go if the performances are poor, so both jim and al are right,
i know high quality performers who will not go to some singers clubs in the uk because the standard is variable and sometimes very poor and because they have to listen to poorly performed pop songs, and poorly performed trad songs. nobody minds if the people gradually get better, but when there is no attempt to practise,as is the case with some performers, its only fun for masochists


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,HIlo
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 09:21 AM

Jim, you have got to stop telling those ridiculous stories about Bob Dylan not wanting to go to the south ..this has been refuted in two readily available interviews, one with Theo Bikel and another with Alan Grossman. I pointed these out to you on this forum about a month ago.
   You do seem to ignore all facts that prove that you are mistaken. You also seem to have a penchant for inventing facts that suit your view. This makes it difficult not to question your credibility.
I know you don't like Bob Dylan. fair enough..but that is no reason to make clearly dishonest statements about him.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Joe G
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 09:01 AM

Thanks for clarifying Al. I thought that was the case but wasn't sure


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 08:41 AM

"I don't think people go to folk clubs for critical analysis"
Of course they do to an extent Al
Try to get someone who has been forced to sit through an evening of crap singing back to that club and you'll see what I mean
Nobody switches off their critical faculties in order to enjoy singing - the two go together like a horse and whatsit
It has bencome too easy to argue that working on singing spoils enjoyment and has become an excuse for sloppy singing and not being arsed to learn words
Apart from anything else a singer has to enjoy his or her own singing and they are not going to do that by forgetting words, o over-pitching or singing out of tune
Singing wall enough to please yourself takes work and that work has to be based on self criticism, if people are going to refuse to listen to the opinions of others, as most folkies do, in my experience
Personally, I regard criticism of my singing a compliment paid by someone who cares enough to help
I find often that those in the most need of help are the ones who refuse to accept it
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 07:53 AM

Spot-on Al.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 07:48 AM

I don't think people go to folk clubs for critical analysis. I never did. I think it takes a lot of bottle, these days to get up and sing.

Most of the population are locked into a cycle between their phones and the wide screen TV. God alone knows how they get time to breed.

We who break out of the cycle are a persecuted minority. New recuits are welcomed - not criticised.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 07:13 AM

"Jim making snotty remarks about folk clubs like that."
Not the clubs Al, just the severe shortage of them and what is passed off as 'folk' in far too many of them
I think clubs are essential
I see no critical analysis here - any bugger can pat his and his mate's back
If I can put up with the snide that has gone on here without returning it in kind, isn't it about time you faced what is being said head on rather than back-heeling it into the gutter
Just a though ("for time is short dear")
Jim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 06:38 AM

Joe, I was looking forward to going to my favourite folk club. The Oddfellows Arms in Wimborne.
I was looking forward to seeing all my friends and hearing them sing. Ididn't care what they sang. I didn't care how badly or well they sang. By eight o'clock the tiny room would be full and you'd have to stand.

But you have to park a way away. it was a cold night and I didn't want to get breathless with the cold. And I didn't want to carry a heavy guitar. I had to stay in.

I sit down at the computer and here's Jim making snotty remarks about folk clubs like that.

Like Voltaire says, I would fight for his right to say these things. My father in the much despised British army did fight. However sometimes it gets right on my tits.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:58 AM

I do thank Mike for his correctione. :)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Mike Yates
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:56 AM

Dear Pseud, for somebody who knows so much about folk music, Cecil Sharp's name is spelt without a final 'e'. Thought you'd know that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:55 AM

” pseuds writing style reminds me of guest some bloke”

Not that Some Bloke needs any assistance from me - he’s a very big bloke, and he’s eminently capable of looking out for himself - but I know him well in the real world, sold him a Lowden a few weeks ago, and I’m almost certain ‘pseudonymous’ isn’t him. Almost.

Having said that, it’s of no consequence who he is, just as long as he sticks to a consistent ID on this thread.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:54 AM

I also remember at primary school they tried to get us to do maypole dancing, but probably not in a very inspiring way as we didn't make any pretty patterns with the ropes and didn't enjoy it much.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 05:52 AM

I think it is accepted that Sharpe's work was used in education, both here and in the US. That was one of his aims, as I understand it. We did country dancing in school (I was born in the 50s) and I now suppose that Sharpe and then Revivalists may have been among the causes of this.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 04:22 AM

My interpretation of jims posts and his point is that there is not great interest in the roots of the music, eg pseudonymous does not care for walter pardon, so what?in fact pseud seems intent on attacking Walter and attacking Jims scholarship.psued seems to have an agenda
if in fact it is true that there is not much interest in the roots of tradtional music, this is not imo healthy.
irish trad musicians seem interested in the roots of their music, and in some cases eg john and katie howson[ english people connected to the folk revival] seem interested in the roots of sliabh luchra music.
pseuds writing style reminds me of guest some bloke


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 03:59 AM

"incestuous"
Incestuous my arse Steve

We took our songs to the people face to face in open to the public clubs, schools Trades Unions and even theatres like the national
We also invited and helped those who wished sing themselves
Pat and I did over fifty public talks inside and ouside the folk scene - libraries colleges and local history groups mainly

One of the most ground breaking projects was when Argo Records co-operated with MacColl Seeger, The Critics, Lloyd, Tom Paley and other singers, along with some of Britain's finest actors like Michael Horden, and Timothy West to produce two magnificent series of Poetry and Folksong for schoolchildren, "Poetry and Song" (14 LPs) and Voices (8 LPs)
Somewhat different from the 'Vanity Publishing' approach of having to pay too let people know how talented you are or (in many cases) aren't

Putting your songs on little screens rather than facing your listeners (as folk song was always about) don't come more incestuous
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 03:40 AM

"Or just maybe he was pissed off with all the hypocrisy."
You need to read Dylan's biographies - or maybe Joanie Baezs's - the lady he ruthlessly used as a stairway to stardom and threw away when he got their
Dylan was a careerist user as distinct from the people who dedicated their lives to folk music - he couldn't even be arsed to go to The South to support the Freedom Riders he built his career singing about - how's that for hypocrisy
The stench of hypocrisy rises every time Bobby Believers make an issue of MacColl's name change (adopted to avoid prison) while totally ignoring that their own flavour of the month did exactly the same to boost his career

I'm going to avoid the "aren't we doing well" nonsense - everything I have to say has been said, as has these fallacious claims
The numbers in their low hundred of clubs says how well they are doing and the rush for the internet and fame and fortune is only proof that the scene has been ripped from its roots and that a scramble for stardom has replaced a love of folk song proper
Neil Young - for crying out loud, and this from self styled folk academics as well as supposed lovers of folk music!!!

Dave's sneering reference to 'the good old days' coupled with a suggestion taht they be "ignored" really does make me howl, given the situation
One of the unsung heroes on this forum (CJB - Chris) has given more than enough proof of how good those days where with the many hundreds of radio programmes he has dug up and made available, from Bert Lloyd's classics to the hundred or so 'Folkweave' or 'Folk on Two' and many many more, all catering for every taste and description of folk song and beyond, that were common way back then   
All gone, and if Dave gets his way, safely forgotten

I watched with stunned pleasure last night, an hour long programme on Irish Television covering the importance of folk song in Irish 20th century history - it was the first of four
The subject was basically about the songs but was treated as a serious historical documentary - one traditional music expert (Terry Moylan, the compiler of the magnificent 'The Indignant Muse'
The rest were major journalists, historians, a National Librarian and several politicians
The historical footage was beyond description in its importance
Ireland seems to be embracing it's traditional song and music while England is rejecting it as fast as possible to make room for pop stars and schmaltz

On MacColl's 100th anniversary, Pat and I tentatively approached an Irish radio station, via a friend and asked would they be prepared to do perhaps a half hour dedication
Our producer friend was dragged in with both hands and given two, hour long programmes, complete with expenses for us to visit and interview Peggy Seeger for three days in Oxford

Pat and I have now done around a dozen radio Preogrammes on folk song on Irish radio nd two television features
I am rapidly coming to the conclusion that they might be interested in doing ono on Walter Pardon -
The chances of England doing one are minimal at present and, if he continues to be treated with the disregard he has been on this forum, they will never find a spot for him on English radio unless we can produce him singing soft rock and Country and Western

If folkies don't cherish their cultural folk wealth, I can't see how anybody else will
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 02:16 AM

correction travelling folk was started in 1983[that was back[in jims day]36 fecking years ago steve, and you claim to be doing something new. please stop trying to troll jim carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 02:11 AM

I can also remember music sessions held in pubs, that were not in seperate rooms plus folk clubs held in pubs [the capital in london] was one that comes to mind, plus some in sussex.. the laughing fish at isfield? that was the eighties or nineties, vic and tina smith ran that to suggest it is something new is just a joke,Ican remember both irish tune sessions english tune sessions, english song sessions in pubs[ withh john and katie howson that were not in seperate rooms.
all back in the 1980s and 1990s] then there was travelling folk starte in 1989
The Travelling Folk (TTF) is a travelling folk club for West Kent and East Sussex. We don't meet regularly in one venue but gather in pre-selected pubs around the area on the first and third Thursdays of each month to enjoy ourselves and to bring folk music to those who may not have had the opportunity of experiencing a live folk session before. Steve Gardham is giving a wrong impression


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 01:56 AM

Further more i also did musaic in schools on occasions in the 80s, you are not doing anything that has not been done 30 years ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Nov 19 - 01:54 AM

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham - PM
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:22 PM

Yes, Sue, that's another aspect of the modern folk scene that gets little mention. Back in Jim's day the majority of the folk scene was quite incestuous in that it took place in private pub room with little contact with the general public. Nowadays we try to take music into all sorts of institutions and out onto the streets to engage the general public, and not just passively. We have been into schools, taught them folk songs and had the kids perform at our festival, and many other similar events. I know Whitby Festival puts on all sorts of events like this and it's still going strong."
this comment is not entirely accurate, folk song was being sung and folk dance in primary schools at th4e beginning of the folk revival, right in to the middle sixties. folk festivals have been engaging the public with folk dance[morris dance sword dance since the sixties and in the case of sidmouth folk festival even earlier,so you are painting a false picture, Steve?
what is the point of a trolling comment like back in jims day?
anyway Iwas busking and putiing folk music on the streets during lancaster maritime festival in 1992, that was over26 years ago, so to give this impression you are doing something new is just squit


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Joe G
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 07:27 PM

Thanks - looks reasonably healthy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 07:20 PM

This is what goes on in my neck of the woods

http://www.pyramidfolk.info/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Joe G
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:37 PM

Step Back From The Computer (and the Rioja ;-) )


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:36 PM

and don't get me started on A L Lloyd's racist/racialist comments on why the Maid of Australia wan't heard much is Australia! "Miscegenation".What sort of language is that from a Pommie who went over there to work on a ranch?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:33 PM

and I still don't rate Walter Pardon much.
So there!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM

FOr 'rumours' read ' suggestions'/'hints' whatever.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Joe G
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM

Glad to hear it re campaigning against TR

I'm having a few days break from the beer and wine as had a heavy couple of weeks and diabetes check due soon. Though got friends coming at the weekend so........


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:23 PM

Come on, let's cover the wall!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:22 PM

Yes, Sue, that's another aspect of the modern folk scene that gets little mention. Back in Jim's day the majority of the folk scene was quite incestuous in that it took place in private pub room with little contact with the general public. Nowadays we try to take music into all sorts of institutions and out onto the streets to engage the general public, and not just passively. We have been into schools, taught them folk songs and had the kids perform at our festival, and many other similar events. I know Whitby Festival puts on all sorts of events like this and it's still going strong.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:20 PM

ANd I will also say, in view of some of the more scurrilous rumours spread about me on Mudcat, that I was out on the streets campaigning against Tommy Robinson and his ilk, and so far from being as has been suggested is possible a BNP member, I have had hate stickers from them posted all over my house. I do hope Joe Offer leaves this up, as there are one or two people who I really believe might benefit from considering how I have contributed to 'folk music' in this country.
Anonymously or not.
Must kick this Rioja habit.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 06:13 PM

We have done various 'benefit' gigs too. Local community stuff and in support of coaches to national demos.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Nov 19 - 05:39 PM

I know several of us have already put up on this thread plenty of evidence to the health of the scene in our own areas, but it has been ignored by the naysayer, so nothing wrong with repeating it. Just keep cutting and pasting. It might eventually cover the wall.

With all due respect, Dick, you are performing in folk clubs and similar. You are very likely missing all the sessions, singarounds events just for local artists like our free concerts etc. You don't mention the festivals either. Yes some are closing due to the economic situation but that says nothing about the type of music or what is being performed. (Surely this doesn't need explanation!)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 7 December 11:40 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.