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The current state of folk music in UK

Steve Gardham 10 Nov 19 - 06:53 AM
r.padgett 10 Nov 19 - 06:42 AM
r.padgett 10 Nov 19 - 06:02 AM
Big Al Whittle 10 Nov 19 - 05:45 AM
Steve Gardham 10 Nov 19 - 05:33 AM
The Sandman 10 Nov 19 - 04:25 AM
Backwoodsman 10 Nov 19 - 03:51 AM
Big Al Whittle 10 Nov 19 - 03:38 AM
r.padgett 10 Nov 19 - 03:37 AM
Dave the Gnome 09 Nov 19 - 02:58 PM
Nick 09 Nov 19 - 02:18 PM
The Sandman 09 Nov 19 - 01:58 PM
The Sandman 09 Nov 19 - 01:55 PM
peteaberdeen 09 Nov 19 - 01:24 PM
punkfolkrocker 09 Nov 19 - 01:01 PM
Backwoodsman 09 Nov 19 - 12:51 PM
Nick 09 Nov 19 - 12:34 PM
GUEST 09 Nov 19 - 12:31 PM
Jack Campin 09 Nov 19 - 11:45 AM
Backwoodsman 09 Nov 19 - 11:08 AM
punkfolkrocker 09 Nov 19 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,Brian Peters 09 Nov 19 - 09:22 AM
punkfolkrocker 09 Nov 19 - 09:19 AM
peteaberdeen 09 Nov 19 - 08:54 AM
Big Al Whittle 09 Nov 19 - 08:39 AM
GUEST,8 Nov guest 09 Nov 19 - 06:09 AM
peteaberdeen 09 Nov 19 - 05:17 AM
The Sandman 09 Nov 19 - 04:03 AM
r.padgett 09 Nov 19 - 02:22 AM
GUEST,Pseudonymous 09 Nov 19 - 12:50 AM
Backwoodsman 08 Nov 19 - 10:25 PM
Big Al Whittle 08 Nov 19 - 08:19 PM
The Sandman 08 Nov 19 - 07:51 PM
Backwoodsman 08 Nov 19 - 04:19 PM
Raggytash 08 Nov 19 - 03:14 PM
GUEST 08 Nov 19 - 02:14 PM
Dave the Gnome 08 Nov 19 - 02:11 PM
GUEST,Brian Peters 08 Nov 19 - 02:05 PM
GUEST,Joe G 08 Nov 19 - 12:51 PM
Backwoodsman 08 Nov 19 - 12:42 PM
Raggytash 08 Nov 19 - 12:12 PM
Raggytash 08 Nov 19 - 12:11 PM
r.padgett 08 Nov 19 - 12:10 PM
Backwoodsman 08 Nov 19 - 11:22 AM
punkfolkrocker 08 Nov 19 - 10:57 AM
punkfolkrocker 08 Nov 19 - 10:52 AM
r.padgett 08 Nov 19 - 09:58 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Nov 19 - 09:42 AM
punkfolkrocker 08 Nov 19 - 09:39 AM
Vic Smith 08 Nov 19 - 07:06 AM
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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 06:53 AM

Hi Ray
Yes, the majority of the audience were definitely over 50. Some were over 90 (my mother 96, a source singer). I would say more than half were fairly new to folk music. There were significant numbers of younger people 20s 30s both in the audience and performing and this is very important. Considering the nature of the music, mostly unaccompanied, no PA, I'd say the numbers of younger people there was encouraging.

As for 'they came because it was free' all I can say is that when we run paid ticketed gigs with the same performers we get good audiences, mostly the same people as well. Also don't forget some of the performers and audience had travelled more than 30 miles to be there and we didn't pay for their travel.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 06:42 AM

To maybe partly address The Sandman's comment re people not attending paid guests at folk clubs and concerts ~ from my own point of view I do go to sessions and folk festivals, these are to some extent confined to time and money and travel ~I have sessions such as straight instrumental ones a month, mixed song and music twice a month, unaccompanied song once a month, occasional guests ~ last one Pitmen Poets (£20)concert

Limited time and fitness requirements does limit the time spent on folk activities!

Folk clubs presuppose that people are happy to spend time developing folk song and music band of people who are dedicated to the promotion of the aims of the club and pay good money to see professional guest

These to my mind are the heroes and should be applauded for their work

Concerts are a different matter and tend to be more in the realms of entertainment

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 06:02 AM

If I might ask Steve, the audience what proportion do you reckon were new or fairly new to folk song and music? What proportion do you think were under 50

Basically do think Hull's Maritime Concert were attracted to the Free side of things and were simply if I might use the phrase "punters" of the wider variety?

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 05:45 AM

I love gadgets. When they go out of fashion after a few years, you can get them cheap.

got a great yamaha keyboard for forty quid plus stand, and a yamaha drum machine on ebay.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 05:33 AM

Our latest concert in Hull Maritime yesterday. The Museum Curator decided that for safety reasons the room had to be limited to 100 capacity. As it was he relented and allowed in 120. Many many were turned away disappointed. I'd say less than half of the audience were aware of the folk scene. Comments from audience afterwards were as the previous 2, 'This has been the best one so far'.

Many many thanks to the following performers who gave their services free.
Spare Hands (6-piece group)
The Smugglers (4-piece group)
Paul and Liz Davenport
Sam Martyn
Linda Kelly
Shanty Jack
Hull Chanty Crew (varies between 8 and 12 singers)
Maggie Graham
Ralph and Helene Marks

IMO all of the songs were either traditional or in traditional style with local heritage as the subject.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 04:25 AM

Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett - PM
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 03:37 AM

So is the scene becoming more isolated and entrenched by professionals V sessions? That is the need to make a living for the "true" professionals against the for fun people and where does "audience" come into it?

Just asking! er um

Ray"
some professionals also go to sessions, howeer lots of singers who attend singarounds and could do with improvement do not go to guest booking clubs because it appears they are not interested in listening to anyone else but themselves, then you have the people who attend irish music sessions who never go to anything else, make of thatwhatever you will people are perfectly entitled to attend ITM SESSIONS ONLY , IT IS MEANT TO BE MORE OF A STAEMERNT OF FACT


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 03:51 AM

Al, I don’t need an Airturn pedal - I make each song fit on one page and, if it’s too long to fit in the standard screen, I tap the scroll arrow on the screen to make it scroll up slowly. That way, I have less gear to lug, go wrong, lose, or have nicked!


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 03:38 AM

those electronic ringbinders with a pedal to turn the page are pretty cool.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 10 Nov 19 - 03:37 AM

So is the scene becoming more isolated and entrenched by professionals V sessions? That is the need to make a living for the "true" professionals against the for fun people and where does "audience" come into it?

Just asking! er um

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 02:58 PM

Bernard Cromarty at Lymm, Nick.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Nick
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 02:18 PM

A friend of mine (who is coming to hear us play in a few weeks) was very involved in traditional music in York at the Lowther I think. Long time ago.

We come from different places and traditions but we don't fall out.

He will champion unaccompanied song - and I enjoy much of what he does - AND I always encouraged his wife to sing when I ran the little local thing I did each week

But as I'm broader church I would be happy when we played some tunes and all sorts of stuff. But - and I know a friend in New Zealand who has the same battle - you have to decide what you are.

I have been into a totally trad thing - in Lymm. When I walked with a guitar the immediate comment "well you are not playing that here". I said 'it's a walking stick in case I fall over". Which is fine and I didn't. I have had this conversation on mudcat donkeys years ago with the person who has a different recollection. (Bernard something?)

It was very reverential if I remember

Same week way back when I went to Wigan folk club/gathering (Tues and Thurs) run by Joan with the wonderful red hair. What a wonderful all encompassing brilliant place to go. Where everyone was encouraged and everyone smiled.

I went to Swinton and met Dave the Gnome and people like Pete Ryder (I still sing that song...)

Is it folk. Who knows?

I sympathise with people who want it all to be one thing but - for my sins - I like many things. And don't see them as different.

I have a friend in Belfast who is a million miles better than me played for years in the US professionally. And we still love music. He came from a strict proper irish traditional music world (champion player and all that) and he sees the similarities between jazz and Irish Traditional music. Because they are tension and resolution.

It is the world of I have a better lawnmower.

Whereas they are all just lawnmowers


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 01:58 PM

heres another example walter pardon aparantly did not like the farmers boy but like old browns daughter, to me they are both sentimental squit,. but i would nt call walter thick because he like one but not theother


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 01:55 PM

Iagree with jacks taste, but it has nothing to do with being thick, just different people like different stuff , bit like food ,i dont likecockles but i would not call anyone thick who did


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: peteaberdeen
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 01:24 PM

i saw neil young on a bbc arena programme early '70s it was important to me - and i've liked him since. from joni to to the clash i always thought '70s music was the best and listen to it more and more as i get older (63). some days van morrison is all i can deal with. of course, i am very stupid, jack. whose music would you recommend to make me a bit brighter?

jeez louise, i have seen some offensive comments on mudcat = but being thick for enjoying some music?


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 01:01 PM

"Could you give us the name and address of the charm-school you attended please, Jack?"

who put the "offensive" in charm offensive...???

Who put the ram in the rama lama ding dong...


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 12:51 PM

”What does Americana mean- or is it a vague term just like 'folk'- as in daft statements like 'I don't like folk music'

Nostalgia trips for people thick enough that they thought the Eagles, Neil Young and James Taylor were worth listening to 40 years ago and want to hear that stuff one more time before they get shuffled off to the eventide home.”


Could you give us the name and address of the charm-school you attended please, Jack? It’s obviously a failing school, and I want to warn my kids not to send my grand-kids there.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Nick
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 12:34 PM

I blame the Scots myself... https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/12283961.balladeer-taylor-returns-to-his-roots/


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 12:31 PM

Must be great to be such a superior being.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Jack Campin
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 11:45 AM

What does Americana mean- or is it a vague term just like 'folk'- as in daft statements like 'I don't like folk music'

Nostalgia trips for people thick enough that they thought the Eagles, Neil Young and James Taylor were worth listening to 40 years ago and want to hear that stuff one more time before they get shuffled off to the eventide home.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 11:08 AM

”back woody, i wouldnt mind portfolio practioners so much if they practised and tried to improve their presentation”

I do, and I always have for the past 58 years of performing.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 09:36 AM

it's the weekend.. enjoy...??? BLANCHE- Red Head


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Brian Peters
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 09:22 AM

I'm one of the people who used 'Americana' loosely, many posts further back. I tend to use it to describe the whole gamut of US folk, including old-time, bluegrass, country and blues, all of which I love with a passion. However, it's also a genre in its own right - with dedicated festivals to prove it - and seems in this context to be a pretty slick kind of country-pop.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 09:19 AM

To that I'll add the gothic alt country of the late 1990s onwards..
probably developing from earlier country punk
with added touches of eastern european 19th century immigrants to america minor key music..

It's doomy and depressing.. the kind of Americana I like...

Blanche & 16 Horsepower were a good exampless...


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: peteaberdeen
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 08:54 AM

like most forms of contempary music americana was invented by neil young. his song 'borrowed tune' and much of the rest of his 'tonight's the night' album being a good example - though all of his accoustic, shambling stuff from the early days would do. then add a bit of blue grass, a bit of acquired honest authenticity, modern day low-fi hippyness, gillian welch and dave rawlings. then finish off with the latest 'sitting in a lonely shack watching geese fly by and worrying about my woman and the environment' style. this may sound like i don't like it but i do - it's great.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 08:39 AM

Very sorry to hear about your athiritis BWM. I always think of you as a talented singer/guitarist/songwriter and conscientious performer.

There are few of us unmauled by the ravages of time. I can't bring myself to think of the loss of my guitar playing. I know its coming - I've seen all my mates lose either the love of the music or the capacity to play.

I used to guitar teach this follower of the Divine Light. Followers of a little Chinese kid guru.

He assuired me all that I had would be taken away. My reaction at the time was - lets get on with you acquiring C, F and G7.

At the moment - I'm learning to play the ukelele. I'm no George Formby - but I'm getting there.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,8 Nov guest
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 06:09 AM

What does Americana mean- or is it a vague term just like 'folk'- as in daft statements like 'I don't like folk music'


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: peteaberdeen
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 05:17 AM

for me , the problem with most folk/roots/americana type music is it is performed sometimes hundreds of miles from west cumbria - don't these performers know it is difficult to get to - though i love live music. very inconsiderate of them


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 04:03 AM

back woody, i wouldnt mind portfolio practioners so much if they practised and tried to improve their presentation


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 02:22 AM

Yes nothing wrong with American folk and of course Americana all in their respective place and certainly makes fine concert style entertainment ~ also fine for musicians and people joining in

Simply I prefer club singarounds where ppl get a chance to sing and play largely British songs and music in turn

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Pseudonymous
Date: 09 Nov 19 - 12:50 AM

I get where Backwoodsman is coming from. I'm thinking this is about context, a sense of what people expect where. In a context where the emphasis was perhaps on camaraderie, welcoming offerings from all, perhaps a private social oriented get-together, no money charged on entry, free butties for all, I could put and do up with performer shyness. In a more public 'performance' focussed context, one might expect a little more.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 10:25 PM

”What I am trying to say is - that probably to guys like me and BWM, who take playing very seriously, the blokes (and women) with ringbinders and and still struggling with the three chord trick and coming out to play in public - probably jar more on us that than they do on you.”

Well, as the Basal Joint Thumb Osteoarthritis gets worse and worse (in both hands, due to manny years of finger-picking), my playing is going backwards I’m afraid. I can’t take anti-inflammatories due to my other, more important, medication fighting with them, but I rub the Voltarol 2.32% on, grit my teeth, keep playing, and try to ignore the pain!

Y’know, it’s not the ring-binders I object to per se - I have my electronic version of the ring-binder, with my set-lists set up in OnSong on my iPad, the lyrics are there for quick reference should I forget a line, and I regard a quick glance down to get my equilibrium restored and the song flowing is far preferable to the all-round embarrassment of cue-dropping, freezing, and having to abandon a performance mid-song when my brain-fade kicks in. I mount my iPad about waist-height - on my mic-stand if I’m playing plugged, or on its own stand or side-table with my picks, capos and tuner if unplugged - so there’s no barrier preventing contact with my audience.

So, whilst I prefer well-rehearsed performers and dislike ‘habitual readers’ - those who rely on reading entire songs despite having sung them many, many times, and who hide their faces behind their binders instead of looking out at their audience - I don’t have a problem with singers for whom an occasionally-referred-to aide memoire provides comfort and confidence, and helps them make a better fist of their performance.

And, as I get into my eighth decade, I find that, whilst my playing and vocal skills remain plenty good enough for playing-out, where my memory is concerned “Fings ain’t wot they used to be” and discreet electronic assistance is something I appreciate.

As always with this kind of thing, the usual disclaimers apply - IMHO, YMMV, etc.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 08:19 PM

We were quite a poor family, and I didn't own a really playable guitar til i was 23 - although I had learned to play on five quid Rosettis and the like.

Still since i owned that first good guitar -(a Jedson, my wife got me one Christmas from Kays Catalogue) - probably the most important thing in my life has been trying to play the instrument better than I could the day before.

What I am trying to say is - that probably to guys like me and BWM, who take playing very seriously, the blokes (and women) with ringbinders and and still struggling with the three chord trick and coming out to play in public - probably jar more on us that than they do on you.

However that's only half the story Guys like Roger Quigley who has run the The Sailors Return in Weymouth every Wednesday provides a place where people can get started and more experienced singers can perform as well. Roger also runs the Wessex Folk Festival which is a terrific festival for traditional dance.

in a typical sailors evening you will hear every aberration and variety of folk music imaginable, and it is welcoming and inclusive. And that is a damn sight more healthy than the scene I grew up with where either you were trying for a career in showbiz, or you were looking for a neurotic alternative to being an ordinary human being. Either way, you had a licence to look down on others.

The scene isn't a comfortable place for those of us who remember evenings of great entertainment, and rubbing shoulders with the great professional performers of our generation. but it has its merits. and its not our go.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: The Sandman
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 07:51 PM

correct Dave, but dont expect me to turn up for andy caven, even though he does what he does well, and certainly dont expect me to turn up to see unpractised singers practising with portfolios. andy may not be my taste but he does what he does well


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 04:19 PM

It’s some people’s insistence on everyone else sticking to their outdated, outmoded ‘definitions’ that have caused the problems.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 03:14 PM

Guest ............ I think we perhaps have enough problems on this thread with 'definitions' without adding to them !!!!!!


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 02:14 PM

what's wrong with 'Americana'? Only the name, maybe, and quite possibly the way it's promoted, but if it means dismissing American music entirely, that's nonsense- a definition maybe needed here?


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 02:11 PM

if someone volunteers to put the work in to run a regular venue, they're entitled to put on whatever kind of music they want

Thank you, thank you and thank you again, Brian. That is what I have been trying to say for ages. You just summed it up so simply :-)


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Brian Peters
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 02:05 PM

I've never come across a 'strictly traditional' folk club in over 40 years as punter and performer, though I don't deny they may have existed back in the mists of time. What I have come across are folk clubs in which traditional or traditional-style songs are favoured by the organisers who make their preferences known through the performers they book, or by assembling a like-minded group of friends who like the same kind of thing. If the 'wrong' kind of singer turns up to do a spot then I hope they'd be treated with generosity. However I was told many times in my days of cold-calling organisers that such-and-such a club didn't like'that finger in the ear stuff' at my first mention of traditional songs, so prejudice clearly works both ways. I don't have a problem with that - if someone volunteers to put the work in to run a regular venue, they're entitled to put on whatever kind of music they want, as far as I'm concerned.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: GUEST,Joe G
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 12:51 PM

Yes that's the song Nick - I couldn't recall the name after a few pints! It must have been you and Christine I remember singing it at new year. When they were singing it I was thinking ' I know this song but not from them singing it!' so when they said it was popular in Whitby the penny dropped!


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 12:42 PM

Raggy, it’s Kip, not Kit.

You’re right, Dave and Kip are friends of mine, and they’re a grand couple - funny, musically very talented, and very generous with their material to other performers. I’ll be doing a floor-spot with my band at WW’s Boston gig on Monday evening - I’ll give them your regards!


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 12:12 PM

Joe I should have said Thank you for passing on our regards, so Thank you.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Raggytash
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 12:11 PM

That would be Metagamma Joe. Dave and Kit sang it one night in the Tap & Spile. At the end of the night I asked if they had it on CD and secondly could we use it.

The answer was no they hadn't as yet recorded it, but they would put in on their website for 24 hours so I could download it, which they duly did.

Christine and I started using the song, which is truly superb, a proper folk song. It became our 'stadium' song, one that we could rely on to bring the house down.

On roll a few years and Kit and Dave where again playing in Whitby, when they came to that song I think they were amazed at how the audience took up the chorus !!

Someone said to Christine 'they're singing your song!' No said Christine we were singing their song!!

Lovely, lovely people.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 12:10 PM

With respect I have never been to a traditional only folk club as far as I know

The scene 50 years on in sessions and clubs I visit have encompassed the revivalist, traditionalist and contemporary singer songwriters that call themselves (rightly) folk singers and new singers and others love to be part of the scene ~ joining in is to my mind part of the enjoyment in both music and chorus songs ~ though not necessarily always a good idea at concerts and clubs where there is paying audience!

I am not keen on Americana ~ simply it is not what I like for a number of reasons, and feel I am wasting my time ~ alright for concert goers ~ not me sorry

Newcomers to the scene are and should be encouraged to seek out the traditional and all the other music in the folk genre and sing unaccompanied or with accompaniment which is "appropriate" and they are ~good luck to them

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 11:22 AM

“It gives me no pleasure to say so, but from my own observations I believe that the vast majority of people who enjoy folk music and who go to folk clubs, festivals, sessions and other events, have no interest in true traditional singing. Their points of reference are exclusively folk revival performers. The folk revival has its own aesthetic values - largely accompanied, and a lot of outside influences from America, Europe and elsewhere. It is a modern interpretation of folk music, it is not re-enactment. I love it (well, most of it), but it is a different animal from traditional singing.”

Pretty much sums it up for me too, Howard.

I’d go further, and say that it was the traddy-rule-makers who set themselves up as arbiters of what may, and may not, be sung in folk clubs who drove me out back in the mid-70s. I recall all-too-clearly my final attendance at a local club, when the MC ran down to the stage shouting, “No, no, no - this isn’t what we want, get off!” at two young men who had just begun a self-written, highly political song. I don’t know who was more embarrassed, the would-be singers or those in the audience who, like me, had been drawn to the clubs by the American and British revival singers and writers.

It was fifteen years before I set foot in a folk club again, by which time the overwhelming control of the “Strictly Trad//That’s not Folk” brigade had waned considerably.


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 10:57 AM

.. and why I don't enjoy a lot of current corporate music industry folk singers...

However, I liked Kate Rusby's voice, but found her band arragements too distracting.
I'd have prefered it if she'd just had simple droning reed instruments backing her,
not that show off strummer who tended to over indulge himself..


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 10:52 AM

Coming from a punk rock and indy 'outsider music' background,
I've kind of grown up accepting rough unpolished untutored singers, with more individual personality than skill,
as my norm.
It's the technically proficient slick over polished MOR singers,
the vocal acrobatic skills show offs,
that fail to engage my interest and emotions...
I tend to prefer self-taught naturalistic singers.
That's why Walter Pardon immediately sounds ok to me...


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: r.padgett
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 09:58 AM

I do think it is important to say that true traditional singers are diminishing by the hour!

Revival singers and enthusiasts tend to seek earlier revivalist singers for material and even re arrange heir arrangements ~ as well as writing contemporary sing in the traditional style

I for one always advise singers to seek out the true source of songs ~ largely from the traditional singers and to listen to a range of these old singers

Ray


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 09:42 AM

"...but in the last 10 years it gave me an increasingly severe pain in the arse,"

Have you tried riding it with a saddle on? :-)


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: punkfolkrocker
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 09:39 AM

I've loved cycling all my life,
but in the last 10 years it gave me an increasingly severe pain in the arse,
so I've now reluctantly left my much loved bike in the hall gathering dust...

Vic - errrmmm.. dunno how that fits with your bike/trad metaphor...???


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Subject: RE: The current state of folk music in UK
From: Vic Smith
Date: 08 Nov 19 - 07:06 AM

Howard wrote: -
At first hearing many of the old singers and musicians can sound a bit rough-and-ready to modern ears. Like any art form, traditional singing takes time and understanding in order to learn how to appreciate it.
It is bit like riding a bike. Difficult for some people to master, quite easy for others, but once you have learned, it can give you pleasure for the rest of your life.


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