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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Steve Shaw 16 Feb 19 - 03:58 PM
leeneia 16 Feb 19 - 11:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Feb 19 - 11:35 AM
leeneia 14 Feb 19 - 10:14 PM
Charmion 14 Feb 19 - 03:36 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Feb 19 - 11:01 PM
Charmion 12 Feb 19 - 10:19 AM
Mrrzy 12 Feb 19 - 09:51 AM
BobL 12 Feb 19 - 03:36 AM
Jos 12 Feb 19 - 03:31 AM
Jon Freeman 12 Feb 19 - 01:38 AM
Stilly River Sage 11 Feb 19 - 05:12 PM
Monique 11 Feb 19 - 05:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Feb 19 - 03:50 PM
leeneia 11 Feb 19 - 01:04 PM
Mrrzy 11 Feb 19 - 11:31 AM
Jon Freeman 11 Feb 19 - 07:19 AM
Thompson 11 Feb 19 - 04:38 AM
Jon Freeman 10 Feb 19 - 02:40 PM
Jos 10 Feb 19 - 02:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Feb 19 - 12:17 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Feb 19 - 02:30 PM
Thompson 09 Feb 19 - 09:58 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Feb 19 - 11:59 PM
Donuel 08 Feb 19 - 01:39 PM
Mrrzy 08 Feb 19 - 11:48 AM
Donuel 08 Feb 19 - 09:38 AM
Thompson 07 Feb 19 - 12:49 PM
Mrrzy 07 Feb 19 - 06:44 AM
Mrrzy 07 Feb 19 - 06:43 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Feb 19 - 06:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Feb 19 - 06:11 PM
Mrrzy 06 Feb 19 - 05:01 PM
Charmion 06 Feb 19 - 04:35 PM
Jos 06 Feb 19 - 06:25 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Feb 19 - 05:23 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Feb 19 - 05:15 AM
Thompson 06 Feb 19 - 02:43 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Feb 19 - 09:52 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Feb 19 - 08:52 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Feb 19 - 08:40 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Feb 19 - 08:28 PM
Thompson 05 Feb 19 - 03:53 PM
gillymor 05 Feb 19 - 01:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Feb 19 - 12:53 PM
gillymor 05 Feb 19 - 10:12 AM
leeneia 05 Feb 19 - 10:04 AM
gillymor 05 Feb 19 - 09:49 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Feb 19 - 09:46 AM
gillymor 05 Feb 19 - 09:28 AM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Feb 19 - 03:58 PM

The cognescenti in the UK seek out and stay loyal to the local butcher's sausage. I will not buy any branded or supermarket sausage, nor do I want a link that has had silly things added such as garlic, apple or leeks. Moore's butchers in Bude have been making sausages from pork shoulder for over a hundred years, and I will countenance no other sausage. I want a coarse, juicy meaty texture, a lovely salty spicy hit and no more than a hint of the rusk that makes supermarket bangers, with whatever meat they have in them minced to a sludge, seem like you're chewing a soggy dishcloth. His skins are just right, strong enough to hold the thing together but not so strong that only a hacksaw could cut through, the latter useless in a sausage casserole. Beautiful on the barbecue or in a bun as a hot dog with buttery fried onion and (if you really insist) ketchup, and peerless as bangers and mash with onion gravy. .


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 16 Feb 19 - 11:09 AM

I don't know what your sausage is like, Stilly, [whether it's raw or cooked, vacuum-packed or loose] but when I buy fresh, uncooked sausage, I cook it immediately. Then we either eat it right away or freeze it. I freeze it in Ziploc bags from which I suck out the air with a straw.

They keep well, but big batches go into the chest freezer, which is colder than a refrigerator freezer. I think it's -30 F.

A couple years ago I bought raw sausage from the German store in town. It came from their freezer and was professionally wrapped. I put it straight into the fridge freezer. It all spoiled. They refused to reimburse me. I was just supposed to know!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Feb 19 - 11:35 AM

As hot dogs go most of them are the lowest end of the production line, mechanically separated meat parts. If I have a hankering for hot dogs I used to get the Kosher ones, Nathans or Hebrew National. They're probably just as full of nitrates and such, but seem a little healthier. Most recently I bought several packages of an organically produced hot dogs produced by Applegate that were uncured. The grocery had them all in the freezer section (most meats there were bought near the sell-by date so all goes in the freezer to preserve it). They were very good. But probably not as good as the Milwaukee frankfurters. :)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 14 Feb 19 - 10:14 PM

So, Charmion, your ugly duckling neck of lamb turned into a beautiful swan of a pasta dish. A rich, flavorful dish like that is greatly enhanced by a sleet storm.

My dear husband and I had a new meal the other night - true frankfurters and cabbage steaks. The DH absolutely loved it. You can find out how to bake cabbage steaks on Youtube.

The frankfurters were shipped in from Milwaukee and were not cheap, everyday hot dogs. They had a mysterious sweet spice to them - not coriander. I couldn't identify it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 14 Feb 19 - 03:36 PM

The lamb neck did not end up in a ragu, as even Marcella Hazan says to use mince for that. And I failed to disjoint and cut it up, lacking a meat saw, thus blowing a plan to make a hotpot with it. In the end, I pressure-cooked it in the Instant Pot, shredded the meat and dressed it with vinegar and pepper, and served it on rotini with a robust tomato sauce — olive oil infused with chilies, anchovies, garlic, onion, carrot and celery, glug of red wine, defatted dripping from our latest roast chicken, tin of plum tomatoes.

It was really good, with a bottle of Pinot Noir and a sleet storm blowing a gale outside.

I may never buy ready-made tomato sauce again ...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Feb 19 - 11:01 PM

Still clearing leftovers out of my fridge, but today I made a batch of broccoli cornbread to warm up to go with meals. Can't eat much at a time, it's very rich. It's a box of cornbread mix, like Jiffy (this one happens to be a different gluten-free brand), 1 stick of butter (in the US this is a 1/2 cup - I used half butter and half olive oil), half a medium onion chopped and browned in the butter (careful not to burn it). Two eggs, 1 cup of cottage cheese (I used ricotta because that's what I had here), and a small package of frozen broccoli, thawed. Mix everything and put in a greased pan.

The recipe gave amounts on everything except the package of broccoli - who knows what size they had in mind - so I imagine you'd want to thaw enough that looks good when you submerge it in the mix. I submerged steamed fresh broccoli in the batter.

This goes in an 8" square pan.

Bake in 350o oven for 35-40 minutes, though I left it about 45 minutes to get a hint of brown on the top.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 12 Feb 19 - 10:19 AM

My grandmother, and my father who learned from her, also measured salt in the palm of her hand or between her fingers and thumb.

I much prefer to weigh ingredients, especially for bread. I get a much more consistent result, which pleases my neat-seeking soul.

Today, the plan is to deal with a hunk of lamb neck that looks good for nothing much but stewing, but isn't big enough to make a proper stew. I have never made a ragu, or at least not a proper one, so I think I shall start at the deep end, with this hunk of bony muscles.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Feb 19 - 09:51 AM

I am afraid to try souffles, too, mom made them with a high degree of anxiety.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 12 Feb 19 - 03:36 AM

Postal scales or jewellery scales are the things to use, or so I've heard. Otherwise use volume measurements: some of my breadmaker recipes specify 15g butter, for which I use a 15ml measuring spoon. Butter, like a surprising number of other foods, has a density close to 1gm/ml.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 12 Feb 19 - 03:31 AM

I use an old set of balance scales - a dish on one side and a set of weights on the other. There is a little movable metal weight on the arm of the balance which can be adjusted for complete accuracy. It never goes wrong.
My grandmother had her own measure for a teaspoon of sugar or salt when making bread - the hollow of the palm of her hand.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 12 Feb 19 - 01:38 AM

I think the only “proper” measuring spoon we have is the one for the breadmaker. Its tsp (graduated to its ½ tsp) works well with the machine.

Rambling on… One place I’d doubt digital kitchen scales as recommend in the blog is for measurements of only a few grams as can be found in bread recipes. Or at least I don’t think our own Salter set would give repeatable results better than within a couple of grams. In a moment of keenness, I did buy a pocket balance that would be better for that sort of task but in practice, they’ve had very little use.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 05:12 PM

Funny - I have that exact same set of measuring spoons, including the scratched up paint showing the amounts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Monique
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 05:06 PM

Ingredient Conversions Page on "Chocolate and Zucchini" blog to convert American measures into metric. My favorite recipe from this blog is "Very Ginger Cookies".


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 03:50 PM

There is no yeast in a Dutch Baby, it's a large popover, a very simple concept that perhaps Alton Brown has described on one of his kitchen chemistry programs. And it doesn't grow so large it's a problem unless perhaps you try to do it in a toaster oven.

I have no idea where my mother found this Raisin Bonanza recipe, I copied it onto an index card when I was probably 10 or 12 years old, as I created my own little wooden recipe box. That box is still the heart of a lot of things I make (that I loved and that my kids are particularly fond of.) In our family panoply of recipes it's up there with baking powder biscuits, pancakes, grilled cheese sandwiches, chicken pot pie . . . a classic comfort food that sometimes one is forgiven for making a meal of.

Raisin Bonanzas
Preheat oven to 400; baking time 15 to 20 minutes
Yield 12 to 16, depending on how much you roll out your dough.

Biscuit Dough:
2 cups sifted flour
1 T sugar
3 ½ tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/3 cup shortening (or butter)
¾ cup milk (or water, for lighter biscuits)

Optional:
Melted butter
Granulated sugar

Sift flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in shortening. Add milk/water and mix to moderately stiff dough.
Roll out on lightly floured surface, creating a rectangle so you can cut it into 4" squares. (At this point, if you wish, you can use the melted butter to brush over the flat dough and sprinkle granulated sugar over it. I never bother.) If you roll the dough out thinner and cut the squares slightly smaller you can make 16 biscuits, but you might want to increase the amount of filling for them.)

Place raisin filling on each square, then when it is divided equally, proceed to lift the corners together and lightly pinch. Place each biscuit in an ungreased muffin pan cup.

Filling:
1 cup light or dark raisins
¼ cup brown sugar (packed)
1 tsp cinnamon
2 T melted butter
Walnuts (I use at least 3/4 cup)
Mix all ingredients until blended.

I fed this recipe into My Fitness Pal, yield 12, without the extra butter and granulated sugar, and it comes out at 188 calories per biscuit. Sorry no weights on the ingredients for all of you UK folks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 01:04 PM

Hi, Mrrzy. I used to be afraid of yeast cookery too. I got started with Rhodes' frozen bread dough from the freezer case at the supermarket. Their directions are very good. Then somebody gave me a bread machine, and I haven't looked back.

I quit watching Lucy at the age of 9 or 10. Her stupidity was cringe-making.

How about making meat loaf with the ground bison. Mix in some sausage to add flavor and a little fat. Despite all the old jokes about it, meatloaf is good, and it freezes well.
==============
Question for everybody:
I investigated a funny-looking box in my fridge. It's Camembert that we got at Christmas-time. Is it safe to eat, do you think?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 11:31 AM

I have never made a Dutch baby, I am afraid of things that are supposed to grow in the oven. Shades of I Love Lucy when I was young and fearful. Are they really good?

Meanwhile I have some ground bison. Ideas? I usually make spags...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 07:19 AM

Maybe my post was misleading but I'm pretty sure I've never had Eccles or Chorley cakes that were not shop bought, Thompson.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 11 Feb 19 - 04:38 AM

Waiting eagerly for recipes for Chorley Cake and Raisin Bonanza.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 10 Feb 19 - 02:40 PM

Then there's Chorley cakes... I don't know the American version but would happily eat either of the UK different versions.

And I'm pretty sure that in the past, mum has used up scrap pastry with the dried fruit type fillings.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 10 Feb 19 - 02:26 PM

If you were to put the 'Raisin Bonanzas' in the tin the other way up and flatten them a bit, you would have something very similar to Eccles cakes - except Eccles cakes have more currants than raisins.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Feb 19 - 12:17 PM

It's another cold humid rainy day, so I'm going to bake a couple of things. Starting with a "Dutch Baby" popover for brunch, and then some baking powder biscuits that are rolled out to about 1/4 inch thin, scored into a dozen squares, and each one filled with a raisin/walnut/brown sugar/butter/cinnamon mix. Pinch four corners together, place corners up in the ungreased muffin tin, bake, and they are so good! (I'll come back with specifics after I make them. I'm just dreaming of them now - and they're called "Raisin Bonanzas." It's a recipe from my childhood, no idea where Mom got it. And my kids also love it.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Feb 19 - 02:30 PM

Yes! And difficult to repeat completely from one time to the next. In season the zucchini, onions, peppers, garlic, tomatoes, and herbs are all likely to have come out of my garden. It is an "organically" developed dish based upon what was picked in the last couple of days.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 09 Feb 19 - 09:58 AM

Ah, that most delicious of all dishes, ad hoc leftovers jazzing up fresh vegetables!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 08 Feb 19 - 11:59 PM

This evening I made a batch of my own invention, chunks of zucchini in a casserole with onion, green pepper, Italian sausage, pasta sauce, Parmesan cheese, some wine, egg noodles, and I cleared out some partial things in the fridge and freezer. A couple of peppers I needed to dice and freeze, some went in the skillet, a small container of frozen diced tomato, the rest of a jar of fancy roasted red peppers and feta cheese (by Peloponnese) from lunch a couple of weeks ago. That last ingredient made this dish amazing.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Feb 19 - 01:39 PM

I never eat tiger
But I do eat meat
As a good driver
the drive throughs are sweet

Food is violence
No matter your mood
You will break silence
When you are the food

Tigers get hungry
In the wild or Zoo
When not caged but free
the new food is you


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 08 Feb 19 - 11:48 AM

Heh heh you are *already* food, Donuel!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Donuel
Date: 08 Feb 19 - 09:38 AM

food is violent

Vegans won't eat meat
Living things with eyes
will not be their treat
Pigs feet make them cry

Food is violent
Organic or not
Screams are silent
What ever you got

I've beaten some eggs
Not a sound was made
I've fried chicken legs
There was no first aid

I've peeled bananas
Potatoes I've mashed
It sounds like torture
the food that I've thrashed

Make a melon ball
slice a tomato
Your food has been mauled
As if torpedoed

I've whipped cream, crushed nuts
burned red onions
vegetables cut
all by the dozen

Food is violent
no matter your mood
After an ambulence
You'll one day be food


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 07 Feb 19 - 12:49 PM

The only alcohol I've ever found had a slightly bitter taste was the Guinness in Guinness stew, but I don't mind it there. Maybe my tastebuds are lacking (quite possible as many years of sinus infections have played merry hell with my sense of smell), but I don't get any bitter undertaste from the slosh of red wine I'll put into a stew or the slosh of vermouth I'll often put in when cooking fish.

Steve, how do you get your sirloin flat? I went to the butcher's today and got him to flatten it, which he did, saying any further flattening would wreck the fibres of the meat. But do you flatten it yourself, for instance by beating the tripes out of it with a rolling pin while invoking the name of your favourite government minister?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Feb 19 - 06:44 AM

Was negligible, sorry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 07 Feb 19 - 06:43 AM

Right, cook with the wine you're drinking, that's what I learned. Also there was a lot of liver damage in my family... Mom could not eat one chocolate with cordial in it... But we were never triggered by food with wine, or flambeeing, so I am pretty sure the alcohol left in, say, mom's coq au vin or beef bourguinion was anything other than negligeable.

Also my sheperd's pie failed: too much liquid, it got above the mashed and created an awful texture.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Feb 19 - 06:33 PM

Well you know me - I have nothing whatsoever against booze, and there's nowt nicer than a boozy trifle or a big glug of Baileys poured over ice cream. But I don't want that boozy edge in a slow-cooked dish, for example. All I can say is try it and see. Burn it off!   

There are some booze additions I dislike. For me, using cider to boil a ham is a no-no. Not keen on beef in beer/Guinness either. In Italian cooking, my speciality, if you're going to use wine, you should use the same wine that you're going to drink with the dish. Using a cheap wine that you wouldn't drink, or worse, "cooking wine," will always give you poor results


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Feb 19 - 06:11 PM

This discussion got me thinking about all of the okra I have in the freezer, so I pulled out a gallon ziplock bag (about 5 pounds?) and took it next door. Her husband isn't allowed okra now (he loves it fried) due to kidney stones, but she can eat it. She really likes it boiled and he can easily resist the boiled version—you had to grow up with it fixed that way.

Alcohol in wine used for cooking adds a harsh edge to the dish.

I don't cook often with anything other than regular table wines, but I've had a bottle of Marsala unopened forever because I hadn't thought about how long it would last once opened. There aren't that many things I would make to use the rest of it in a week. But this is what I learned:


What’s the difference and similarities among Marsala, Sherry and Port? They all are fortified wines, but differ in origin, flavor, alcohol by volume levels, and ways of usage.

These are among the best wines to use for cooking. They pack the most intense flavors and—because they’re fortified with a little more alcohol than table wine—have the longest life on the pantry shelf.

  • Marsala has a medium-rich body that is great for sauces, marinades, meats and seafoods
  • Port has a rich sweetness and depth that’s especially good in meat-based casseroles
  • Sherry’s complex roasted nutty flavors can enhance just about any soup, stew, or sautéed dish

  • From here.

    And from another site, the Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services in New York State, this one with clinical studies into the question:
    Alcohol can be found as an ingredient in many recipes. It can be added as an ingredient to add specific flavors or it can be part of an ingredient, such as extracts. Many cookbooks and cooks tell the consumer that the “alcohol will have burned off," however the process is more complicated than this simple statement implies. Alcohol does boil at a lower temperature than water - 86 degrees centigrade vs. 100 degrees C. for water, though one may have to boil a beer for 30 minutes to get it down to the NA or nonalcoholic category, which by law means it contains less than .5 percent alcohol.

    Nutritionists from Washington State University, the University of Idaho and U.S. Department of Agriculture experimented with cooking with alcohol, though not with beer, but with wine and sherry. They cooked two Burgundy-laden dishes similar to boeuf bourguignon and coq au vin, plus scalloped oysters with sherry. Depending on the method (simmering or baking), the temperature, the time and even on the size of the pan anywhere from 4 percent to 49 percent of the original alcohol remained in the dish. Long simmering in a wide pan was the most effective way to remove alcohol; baking appeared to be the least.

    I am happy with the way food tastes with no extra effort to remove alcohol beyond the natural cooking time and low boiling point of alcohol. I do use it to deglase, so there it has been happening unconsciously. But last night's delicious teriyaki simmered for 30 minutes so no doubt still contained some alcohol. I'll pass on the boiled beer.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 05:01 PM

    You guys have Better Than Bouillon?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Charmion
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 04:35 PM

    The Instant Pot multi-cooker does boffo beans. I made a beans-and-ham-hock stew for the ages yesterday, and it took only an hour, plus time to bone the hock and cut up the meat. Perfect texture, great flavour.

    Further to the discussion of stock, above: I'm with Steve Shaw on bouillon cubes. I read the labels on the packets at the supermarket, including the ones that say Organic and whatever, and always end up putting them back on the shelf in favour of the cut-up veg and chicken wreckage that I have used for some fifty years.

    It isn't just that I don't know what the finished article will taste like, it's also that properly made stock behaves in a particular way when you boil it down, and I have no idea whether the bouillon cube will produce a similar result.

    I'm not so sure of Steve's analysis of the effect of wine, but then every cook has his/her own special understanding of "harsh". Come to think of it, everything I put wine in gets flambéed or cooked for ages, and sometimes both.

    As for okra, I have no idea. The only place to buy okra around here is more than half an hour away in Kitchener, and I don't consider it worth the trip.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Jos
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 06:25 AM

    On the sliminess of okra, which always puts me off, I saw a television programme in which they said you could cure it by soaking the okra in salt and vinegar.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 05:23 AM

    Alcohol in wine used for cooking adds a harsh edge to the dish. Unless you're heating the booze very fast, when deglazing for example, it takes hours to evaporate away and there will be some left if the cooking temperature is kept low, even for hours. In a slow cooker the alcohol will hardly evaporate at all even if you leave it cooking all day. It's the fruit and acid elements in the wine that you want, not the alcohol. And burning it off is fun!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 05:15 AM

    Delia Smith always recommended Marigold bouillon powder for veg stock. I found it disgusting and threw it away. I won't use veg stock cubes or powder. If I can't use chicken stock I'll boil up a carrot, onion, celery stick and herbs for half an hour to make my own.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson
    Date: 06 Feb 19 - 02:43 AM

    Ooooh, will try that beef stock base, Steve. Will try that next time.

    As for the strips, ahhh. Like what my father used to do with veal scallopini for a toast treat - mushrooms simmered in butter, Marsala...

    Of course nothing cabbagey in stock, who would DO that!

    I’ve just got a tub of bouillon powder - re-familiarising myself with cheap old hippie recipes in case Brexit gets as terrifyingly economy-destroying as looks likely. Do he use it?

    We make a cold spinach salad from Japan here that would go nicely as a side dish with your teriyaki chicken, Stilly. Blanch the washed spinach quickly in boiling water, drain it and rinse it off in cold water (this removes any chalkiness) and squash out the water; mix in ground-up sesame seeds, a little sugar and soya sauce (we use Kikkoman). It’s also lovely hot. Here’s a proper recipe https://www.justonecookbook.com/spinach-with-sesame-sauce


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 09:52 PM

    Yes, the gel and everything that roasted with the chicken goes into the stock. If I don't have any homemade I use bouillon cubes (I found a robust variety a while back and bought a lifetime supply). I have some beef bouillon in the fridge also. That can help boost the cooking liquid when starting out to braise a pot roast or make stew.

    More than once I've seen people mentioning burning off the alcohol in wine. Why? It adds more flavor to whatever you're cooking and is gone by the time cooking is finished.

    This evening I made teriyaki chicken, that I haven't made in probably years. Here in the states one of the earlier cooking programs on Public Broadcasting was with Jeff Smith, who was The Frugal Gourmet. Alas, his program disappeared from sight when he was charged with abusing the young man who was his assistant, but his teaching of how to make dishes was top-rate and I have a number of his recipes I still use. And his cookbooks are out there in the used book stores. I gave one to my son, and explained that while the man himself was in disgrace, his cookbook was helpful in teaching how to do the things needed for various recipes.

    1/2 cup of sherry (though I didn't have any so used Marsala)
    1/4 cup of soy sauce
    2 tablespoons sugar
    grated ginger (as much as seems right)

    Pour the marinade over the chicken and let it sit for at least a few minutes; I turned it every so often and left it in the fridge for a couple of hours.

    I usually use cut up whole chicken parts in the past, but on this occasion I had a deeply-discounted package of organic chicken thighs that had been deboned and no skin. I buy it frozen. Normally skin and bones go in the dish, but when the thighs were half-price to start with and if you bought two you got the second package for 1 cent, I got them. And thighs have so much more flavor. Anyway, use peanut oil if you have it and put enough in a deep skillet or a other lidded pan to brown the chicken. Do it in a couple of batches if needed (I had about 3.5 pounds of meat, so it took two batches). Once it is browned, return all meat to the pot, pour the marinade over the meat, cover it and let it cook for 30 minutes. Serve over rice.

    Because I had as much chicken as I did I made half-again as much marinade to work with. And I'll have some wonderful leftovers for the rest of the week!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 08:52 PM

    For a glorious lamb stew, watch Gennaro Contaldo on YouTube making one in Malta (it Googles). It works a treat. If you're making it for the next day hold back the peas until then, then they won't lose their colour. Frozen peas work a treat and don't need long. I used diced shoulder for this. My butcher dices it for me but I found with him that I needed to do a bit of trimming on some of the pieces, but the connective tissue does cook nicely. Not so much dried skin. A great one-pot dish. It may need bit longer to go tender enough than Gennaro says.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 08:40 PM

    I like the organic Kallo stock cubes too, Thompson, if I need a lighter stock. And your stock recipe is right up my alley. Here's a cheat's secret: add a Kallo cube to your stock pot. The stock comes out even richer! I never add brassica trimmings to stock.

    If I want stock for something like a slow-cooked pot roast, I'll use one Kallo beef cube to 500ml water, I'll soak a handful of dried porcini in 300ml boiled water for 20 minutes and use the liquor from that (look out for the last drop which can be gritty), and I'll boil a glass of red wine in a small saucepan and set fire to it to burn off the alcohol. Mix that lot together and you have a super stock. You can chop up the porcini and chuck that in the pot too. Why not.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 08:28 PM

    I said thin slices, Thompson, not strips. In effect they are just very thin-cut sirloin steaks. The butcher I get them from calls them flash-fry steaks. Best not to have that edge of fat, then they won't curl up. Bash them even thinner if you like. The other night mine got thirty seconds each side in a very hot pan of the garlicky oil.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Thompson
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 03:53 PM

    Made Steve's sirloin-tomatoes-capers-garlic-pepper casserole tonight. It was good, but I was a little stymied by the instructions to cut 300g of sirloin into 6 thin strips. Making thin strips, I had about 15. I'd be inclined to put on some more tomatoes, maybe…?

    As for what to do with lamb, Irish stew is nice - traditionally it's a white stew, with just lamb and onions and potatoes and herbs and stock, and sometimes barley; however, I happily add carrots.

    There are lots of Arab lamb dishes which are very nice - try Yotam Ottolenghi as a source. And the Caribbean curried goat is nowadays mostly made with lamb or mutton rather than goat.

    Artificial stocks: I use those gloops of chicken gel by Knorr often, and if a bit more stocky strength is needed without more salt, one of the Kallo very low salt cubes.

    Real stock: any roast chicken that passes through our house, the bones and skin go into the pressure cooker, and also the jelly part of the juice of chicken and vegetables and lemon and vermouth that's strained off from the roasting dish. I'll add a couple of stalks of celery, two big carrots, two bay leaves, a whole onion with the skin on, and the green of any leeks hanging around, plus a few herbs - a bit of thyme, mostly. That's pressure cooked for about an hour or an hour and a half, then the dog gets the carrots and celery and the rest of the solids go in the compost bin; the liquid is cooled, poured into plastic boxes and kept in the fridge.

    Anyone got a nice recipe for fish stock?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: gillymor
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 01:13 PM

    I have fond memories of okra fried much like that by a friend from Valdosta, GA, along with farm-raised catfish. The boiled stuff can just too slimy.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 12:53 PM

    The okra I eat has usually been picked that day or very recently; I started growing it because my next door neighbor was having trouble growing it. I thought "how difficult can it be?" and put in four plants - and as a result sometimes had to pick twice a day to keep up with it. I gave her most of it, and suggested that she should show me how she cooks it (not boiled!) because I hadn't eaten it that I could remember. Her fried okra was an instant hit. Cut into about 1/2 inch pieces on a bit of a diagonal, moist pieces rolled in seasoned cornmeal (fish fry is good) with a little white flour for sticking purposes. Place in a skillet in shallow hot corn oil, and don't crowd the pieces. They cool on a plate with paper towels and many of them are eaten at the stove by the cook. If I'm here by myself they sometimes never reach the table.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: gillymor
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 10:12 AM

    Cornmeal thickening works well in Chili too, leenia.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: leeneia
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 10:04 AM

    Thanks for that nice recipe, gillymor.

    I'll have to try thickening with cornmeal, as you say.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: gillymor
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 09:49 AM

    I love it in black-eyed peas but the "fresh" stuff we get around here is usually dried out and flavorless.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: Stilly River Sage
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 09:46 AM

    I have a lot of frozen organic okra that came out of my yard last fall. I mostly eat it fried (when fresh) and my daughter swoops in periodically for a bag when her household decides it's time to make gumbo. I've used it in stir-fry a few times.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
    From: gillymor
    Date: 05 Feb 19 - 09:28 AM

    Bean and Bean Gumbo

    READY IN: 50mins
    YIELD: 8-9 cups         

        2 teaspoons olive oil
        1 large onion, chopped (about 2 1/2 cups)
        4 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
        1 -2 fresh green chili, minced
        1 tablespoon paprika
        1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
        1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
        3 stalks celery, diced
        1 large bell pepper, seeded and diced
        3 cups water or 3 cups vegetable stock, plus
        3 tablespoons water or 3 tablespoons vegetable stock
        2 cups fresh sliced okra or 2 cups frozen sliced okra
        1 1/2 cups cooked black-eyed peas (15-oz. can)
        1 1/2 cups cooked white beans (15-oz. can)
        1 tablespoon brown sugar
        2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
        3 tablespoons cornmeal
        1 cup minced fresh parsley
        1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
        salt & fresh ground pepper

    Directions (In spite of the all the ingredients it's pretty easy to make, mostly chopping)

        In a saucepan, warm the oil.
        Stir in the onions, garlic, and chiles.
        Cover and cook on low heat, stirring frequently, until the onions         are tender, about 8 minutes.
        Add the paprika, cumin, thyme, celery, bell peppers, and 3 cups of the water or stock.
        Bring to a simmer, cover,and cook for about 5 minutes.
        Add the okra, black-eyed peas, white beans, brown sugar, and tomatoes and simmer for another 5 minutes, or until the    vegetables are tender.
        In a small bowl, whisk together the cornmeal and the remaining 3 tbls.
        of water or stock and stir into the gumbo.
        Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, until the cornmeal is cooked and the gumbo thickens slightly.
        Add the parsley, lemon juice, and salt and pepper.

    I made this for a Super Bowl gathering the other day with cornbread and brought along some McIlheny's hot sauce. I got it out of the Moosewood Low Fat Favorites cook book and it turned out well, it got all ate up by a bunch of skeptical carnivores. I used frozen okra because we just don't seem to get the good kind here in S.W. FL, canned diced tomatoes because the fresh ones are out of season right now and used half smoked paprika and half sweet paprika otherwise I followed the recipe.


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