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BS: Recipes - what are we eating?

Mrrzy 17 Jan 21 - 01:22 PM
Charmion 17 Jan 21 - 10:19 AM
Mrrzy 17 Jan 21 - 10:03 AM
Raggytash 16 Jan 21 - 11:06 AM
Steve Shaw 16 Jan 21 - 10:48 AM
Stilly River Sage 16 Jan 21 - 10:20 AM
Raggytash 16 Jan 21 - 09:50 AM
Jos 16 Jan 21 - 09:40 AM
Mrrzy 15 Jan 21 - 09:40 AM
Jos 15 Jan 21 - 05:14 AM
Steve Shaw 14 Jan 21 - 08:06 PM
Steve Shaw 14 Jan 21 - 05:24 PM
Jos 14 Jan 21 - 04:21 PM
Mrrzy 14 Jan 21 - 03:46 PM
Steve Shaw 14 Jan 21 - 11:19 AM
Mrrzy 14 Jan 21 - 10:10 AM
Steve Shaw 13 Jan 21 - 08:21 PM
leeneia 13 Jan 21 - 04:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jan 21 - 03:29 PM
Mrrzy 12 Jan 21 - 10:12 AM
Steve Shaw 11 Jan 21 - 01:50 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Jan 21 - 01:05 PM
Mrrzy 11 Jan 21 - 11:48 AM
Charmion 11 Jan 21 - 11:10 AM
Steve Shaw 11 Jan 21 - 10:05 AM
Charmion 11 Jan 21 - 09:14 AM
Mrrzy 10 Jan 21 - 05:31 PM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 21 - 01:27 PM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 21 - 12:29 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jan 21 - 10:35 AM
Jos 10 Jan 21 - 08:38 AM
Charmion 10 Jan 21 - 08:27 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 21 - 07:23 AM
Jos 10 Jan 21 - 07:16 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 21 - 06:05 AM
Steve Shaw 10 Jan 21 - 05:54 AM
Jos 10 Jan 21 - 03:29 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jan 21 - 12:07 AM
Thompson 07 Jan 21 - 06:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jan 21 - 11:44 AM
Charmion's brother Andrew 05 Jan 21 - 11:37 AM
BobL 05 Jan 21 - 03:24 AM
Charmion 04 Jan 21 - 04:52 PM
Raggytash 03 Jan 21 - 06:07 PM
Charmion's brother Andrew 03 Jan 21 - 05:40 PM
leeneia 03 Jan 21 - 05:02 PM
Mrrzy 03 Jan 21 - 02:01 PM
Charmion 03 Jan 21 - 01:32 PM
Mrrzy 03 Jan 21 - 01:29 PM
keberoxu 03 Jan 21 - 12:55 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 Jan 21 - 01:22 PM

Mwah! They are in their salt bath now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 17 Jan 21 - 10:19 AM

Yes, Mrrzy, you’re right.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 Jan 21 - 10:03 AM

I was thinking of making my duck legs confit as I have all that goose fat but it seems more a method of *preserving* duck than cooking it, and since I plan to eat my duck legs, I think I'll go back to my usual recipe. Am I right about confit?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Jan 21 - 11:06 AM

If I'm going to eat pasta I prefer to make my own fresh, using egg and egg yolks with a little olive oil in it.

Aside from that the machine was gift from a friend!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Jan 21 - 10:48 AM

You don't care much for pasta, yet you have a pasta machine...?

I never buy jars of pesto. I always make my own. We have a little mini-chopper electric gizmo that's great for blitzing the garlic, basil* and pine nuts, then it's a matter of mixing in the Parmesan and extra virgin olive oil. I like to be in control of ingredient quality and freshness. It's somewhat distressing to see how a great big bunch of basil turns into a teaspoonful!

There's a Gino d'Acampo variant that adds sundried tomatoes in oil to the above ingredients. I like to leave that one a bit knobbly. It makes a superb bruschetta topping, sprinkled with a few baby basil leaves and Parmesan shavings. The best bruschetta bread I've found in this country is the Crosta & Mollica pane Pugliese, imported from southern Italy. Another pesto version by Jamie Oliver isn't really like the usual idea of a pesto at all, though he calls it one. He uses olive oil, basil, Parmesan, blitzed almonds (you can use skin-on ones) and halved cherry tomatoes. He puts everything in a big bowl and scrunches it all up like mad with his hands. It's fantastic with spaghetti, beautiful and rubbly. My ordinary green pesto goes really well on top of a simple risotto bianco. Keeping it simple cuts down the chance of mistakes. That's my kind of cookery!

*Absolutely the only time I ever blitz garlic, and I use just half a clove!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Jan 21 - 10:20 AM

The last time I had a container of cream that was past it's sell-by date (that isn't the same as "toss it date") I mixed it with milk and used it in a quiche.

I buy organic milk because it seems to last a lot longer in the unopened container if I don't get to it right away. We're talking weeks, not days.

Last night I chopped onions that I sautéed in the chicken fat from the bird I roasted this week, then let diced carrots and potatoes simmer in it, added a little water with the drippings, a little bouillon and some turmeric before adding some frozen green peas, followed by large dice chicken breast and thickening it with a water flour mix. Instead of eating this chicken pot pie mix in a crust (a lot of work and way more calories than I need) I simply break some good whole wheat crackers over the top of the bowl.

Yesterday was such a windy day that when you stepped out into it the wind pulled the warmth from your body. The chicken stew was the perfect remedy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Jan 21 - 09:50 AM

I have to admit to not being a great lover of pasta in any form. It is not my go-to food ............. however.

Earlier this year I had a basil plant that went rampant so I made a jar of pesto. That now needed using so I made some pasta (Tagliatelle) but added a generous amount of the pesto to the dough.

Even if I say it myself it was sublime.

Incidentally in the past when rolling out my pasta (with a pasta machine) I have added basil leaves, folded the dough over them and rolled again and again until the required thinness has been achieved. That dough when cut into Tagliatelle or spaghetti is rather good too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 16 Jan 21 - 09:40 AM

Mrrzy, you will just have to decide that for yourself. I can neither see nor smell your cream.
The cream I used a few days ago that was three months out of date just smelled like cream, though it was so thick you could have spread it on bread. When I added it to my simmering sauce it melted like butter.

One food that I would never ever take chances with is cooked rice. The result of eating it can be very unpleasant - even deadly.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Jan 21 - 09:40 AM

If it smells like stinky cheese, is it cheese? I am still wondering about my cream bottle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 15 Jan 21 - 05:14 AM

Your English didn't look mangled to me, Steve.
If I am going to eat out-of-date food I do usually use it in a cooked dish so that possible harmful organisms that wouldn't survive heating are dealt with. One can also try a small amount of the food and then wait a while in case anything nasty happens, but if I thought that might be a good plan it would be a sign that the food should be thrown out anyway.
I am happier to throw away salads as they go into the compost, and are thus not wasted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 08:06 PM

Slightly mangled English there. I got distracted.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 05:24 PM

Spoilage organisms usually make food smell (and look) off, whereas harmful organisms rarely do. Manufacturers are super-cautious about use-by dates, and they'll tell you that they have your safety at heart. What they really want is for you to throw perfectly good food away and buy more. It's fine to use your nose and eyes but you need to use your intelligence as well. Dairy products and leafy salads are among the worst offenders when it comes to giving you a dodgy tum. It's also worth remembering that products such as soured cream, yoghurt and creme fraiche are produced using carefully-nurtured cultures. They're not just fresh stuff that's gone a bit off. and that pasteurising milk is a compromise to avoid changing the taste of the milk by too much.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 04:21 PM

Mrrzy, open it and smell it. If it smells OK and there is no sign of mould or - very important - anything turning pink, it will probably be fine.
I also had some rather solid cream, use-by date mid-October. I added it to a pasta sauce along with some white wine and herbs, plus leeks and mushrooms. It was delicious and there have been no ill effects.
Trust your nose.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 03:46 PM

Really? It isn't a usable dairy product that just isn't cream any more? Aw.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 11:19 AM

Use-by dates? I'm using a chorizo ring tonight that expired in September. Looks good, smells good - but I am cooking it. Sliced ham: always seems ok two weeks out of date. Unopened milk, fine for two or three days past. Sniff. Out of date eggs, crack 'n sniff. Best for omelettes or scrambled. Hard cheese, ignore date. Soft or blue, not quite so forgiving but generally good for at least a few days past. Throw that cream away.

"Out-of-date wine?" Huh? I don't understand...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Jan 21 - 10:10 AM

The Google has failed me again.

I bought too much fresh-ish-by-American-standards cream for my solstice bûche. Now, a month later, I have an unopened glass container of something fairly solid that has been in the fridge the whole time.

What do I have? Is it something like crème fraîche? Ricotta? Still cream, just solidified? Cream cheese? Cheese? My assumption is that it is still edible...

Thank you!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Jan 21 - 08:21 PM

My 10.05am recipe from the 11th should have also included two roughly chopped red onions. Dammit! Anyway, I have the ingredients and we are having it tomorrow!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Jan 21 - 04:54 PM

I've started baking cauliflower, too. I cut it into slices of even thickness so it bakes more evenly.

Advice for people who dislike broccoli and brussels sprouts - try putting lime juice on them. It's delicious.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jan 21 - 03:29 PM

On Twitter I follow mystery novelist Laura Lippman, who does a lot of cooking also. And today she posted photos of a pizza they made, with big chunks of fresh mozzarella, sausage, tomato sauce, etc. But the feature that was one of the "slaps forehead!" moments for me was that it was on a paddle to slide onto a stone in the oven, sitting on a piece of parchment for the easy sliding. Something to try the next time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Jan 21 - 10:12 AM

Hmmm... Cauliflower is one of the few veg I really like overcooked. Mush that woman's cauli my way!

Made what I thought was a tactical blunder: had leftover pork loin that had been marinated in an Oriental style, sesame oil, soy sauce, ginger. Totally forgot how I'd cooked it, so just thought of it as leftover pork, and decided to make sauerkraut soup with it, Eastern European style, rosemary, celery seed, some leeks. Adding the meat after chopping it, ate the last sesame-y piece and thought Uh oh, this will not work.

But it did. It was absolutely de-yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 01:50 PM

Small amounts of pickled raw cauliflower can be good, otherwise it needs to be al dente. Cauliflower, like sprouts, is very unforgiving if even slightly overcooked. I had an aunt who I dreaded going to visit if she was cooking Sunday lunch. To save time she pre-cooked the cauliflower early in the morning then reheated it for the lunch. The merest touch with your fork and it totally disintegrated. Vegetable abuse writ large.

Adding the chorizo turns it into a proper full meal. Yotam suggests it as a side dish if you leave out the sausage, and suggests that you up the amount of paprika. Unless you're a veggie I'd include it. You'd be pleasantly surprised: the little rings of chorizo turn agreeably crunchy around the edges. I like my black pudding done like that too, but that's another story. Not sure about adding Parmesan. I might try it next time, but the sausage stays. It's a one-tray meal and we can scoff it out of a pasta bowl in front of the telly. Sorry about the parsley, Maggie. I'm sure a bit of coriander would be a good sub.

We're very fortunate in Cornwall as we live in one of our major cauliflower-growing areas. All the supermarkets sell Cornish cauliflower and it's very fresh. Cheap too. I won't buy cauliflower that isn't tight and firm in the curd, or discoloured in any way, and I always give it a good sniff before purchase. Limp outer leaves are a no-no too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 01:05 PM

I concur - I don't care for raw cauliflower or broccoli. They're much better cooked.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 11:48 AM

If you make an oil- or butter-based sauce with your spices, paint the outside of the whole cauliflower with some of it, then turn the veg upside down and introduce the rest of the sauce into the cauliflower's insides, between the stalks, and bake whole at slightly lower temp, say 400F, for a slightly longer time, maybe up to 45mn. Cut into halves if small, quarters for large, to serve. A total fave.

I use crumpled tin foil, or a couple of toothpicks, to keep the cauliflower nicely upside-down.

I strongly prefer cooked to raw cauliflower, but I think that is a minority view...


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 11:10 AM

That's interesting, Steve.

Now, do you think some grated parmesan would work in place of the chorizo?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 10:05 AM

We bake cauliflower that way too. I find that a large cauliflower does two of us. I got my idea from Yotam. I put the florets into a big bowl. Then I add a sliced-up chorizo (mild or hot 'n' spicy, either is good, but skin it first), a small handful of pumpkin seeds, about two ounces of chopped-up green olives (no stones), salt and freshly-ground black pepper, a generous dose of paprika (smoked is good) and several glugs of extra virgin olive oil. Get your hands in there and mix thoroughly, then spread it all out, as you say, on a tray lined with greaseproof paper. Half an hour in a fairly hot oven, stirred half way through. When it's done, I sprinkle the whole lot generously with freshly-chopped parsley. It's one of our favourites is that, and it works every time.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 11 Jan 21 - 09:14 AM

I had the rellies (BIL and family) in for a steak dinner last night, as we’re all desperate for conversation and I have a freezer full of meat that otherwise won’t get eaten. Not to speak of rather a lot of wine that otherwise won’t get drunk.

Roasted cauliflower seems to be our new favourite veg dish. Recipe:

- A cauliflower, small or large, depending on the size of dining party
- Olive oil
- Salt, pepper, and herb & spice mix of your choice

Heat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit (400 with fan). Line a large sheet pan with parchment paper.

Break the cauliflower into florets and cut the florets to more or less consistent size, about an inch and a half in diameter. Put the pieces in a large bowl, anoint with oil, and sprinkle flavourings with abandon. Toss.

Spread the cauliflower pieces on the sheet pan in a single layer and put the sheet pan on the middle rack of the oven. Roast until generally browned and tender to a fork, which usually takes about half an hour.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 05:31 PM

Duck eggs. Soooo much better than chicken eggs I find. Scrambled in butter mmmmm.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 01:27 PM

Well I just googled "perfect omelette" and flashed through the first two pages of results (I may have missed something). Only one website, the American (I think) Epicurious, suggested adding water or milk. At least two big names said don't do it (including Jamie Oliver). Felicity Cloake, who is a food writer in the Guardian who tests recipes, made omelettes with milk, with water and with neither. She found that both the milk and water robbed the omelette of richness and gave unsatisfying results.

My mum used to add milk to scrambled eggs, then overcook them. I've tried with and without, and I found that milk just made the eggs less rich. I've never heard of adding extra liquid to omelettes. A good thing to do with scrambled eggs is to melt the butter in the pan then pour half of it into the egg mixture, mixing quickly, then putting the eggs in the pan. Plenty of butter is the key. It's crucial to get the eggs off the heat while they're still at least half-runny.

Chachun à son goût!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 12:29 PM

Well all I can say is that I've been making omelettes and scrambled eggs for over half a century and they always turn out well - without water (or milk). In fact, I've never heard of the addition of water before the mention in this thread. Blimey, the albumen is 99% water anyway!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 10:35 AM

My omelet method is pretty much like Steve and Charmion concur is a good one. 1-2 teaspoons of water, two eggs, etc. But yes, in this instance I didn't want to stop and wash and reheat the pan so I added the egg to the browned chopped peppers and onions (there wasn't much of all of that, maybe 1/4 cup, and it was a half-ounce of the sausage) and moved the pan around to spread out the egg. Add the lid for about 30 seconds to help it set up, then cheese and struggled with this one to get it out of the pan because some of the fried bits stuck. It wasn't as pretty as usual.

Hot sauce I use a lot these days is a Mexican pepper sauce brand called Tapatio. It won't send steam out of your ears but you can feel the heat and (most importantly) it adds a complementary flavor to the eggs. And this is a sauce, not a salsa.

Years ago, probably in my teens, I was watching an American television game show called What's My Line, and after identifying whoever the guest was, for some reason he cooked an omelet on stage. As he was setting up, regular panelist Arlene Francis said something about starting with milk and he was all over her - "NEVER use milk, always use water, just a tiny amount" (that's actually paraphrased - mostly I remember being impressed by his passion on the topic). I resolved at that time to use only water. I think it was confirmed by Julia Child at a later date, only use water.

When I make scrambled eggs I also only use a little water, same exact method, except the eggs are stirred around once they're in the pan.

There's a little OCD in play when I cook fried eggs for myself, and the dogs have caught onto it. When I crack the egg and carefully apply to the hot pan, if at the first the yoke breaks, it bugs me, so it gets a quick stir in the pan and is cooked just long enough to be solid for easy distribution to the three waiting dogs. (Sometimes it breaks when flipping, and if it isn't too bad, I live with it if I can corral the liquid yoke.) So when I make fried eggs for myself they're sitting there hoping I break all of the yokes. If I'm going to eat scrambled eggs, they're beaten briefly with a fork in a bowl with the aforementioned water the same as for omelets. I don't care for pan scrambled. My

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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 08:38 AM

A French Canadian in Montreal told me she always use a drop of water, rather than milk, so that the steam will help the omelette rise.
But I reckon the eggs make it rise anyway, without extra steam.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 08:27 AM

My omelette method is just like yours, Steve. It’s how they do it in France.

Milk in the beaten egg softens the curd, which some people like. I do it when scrambling, but not for omelette.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 07:23 AM

That's what I do too. A very small non-stick frying pan is the ideal thing for that. I bought just the thing in Lidl for £3.99. No more gouging of burnt egg off the bottom of the pan for me! And still a bit sloppy for me, please! I can't quite remember how Dave and Si managed to produce an omelette rather than scrambled.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 07:16 AM

Sometimes if I have an onion that has started growing long green sprouts, I chop the green part and add it to the cheese in a cheese omelette. The combination of onion and cheese seems to magically create a third flavour that wasn't there before (a bit like the way mixing blue and yellow paint produces green paint, which wasn't there before).

That Hairy Bikers' method, without the addition of bits of egg shell, is the way I make scrambled eggs - leaving some recognisable yolk and white in the result.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 06:05 AM

I seem to recall seeing the Hairy Bikers making an omelette from scratch in under a minute by just cracking the eggs into the hot pan with seasoning, then beating the mix all around until it was set just so. It was some kind of contest to see who could make the fastest omelette. I think the verdict was that it turned out quite well but would have been even better without the bits of shell. :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 05:54 AM

I take it that the sausage and green peppers were on the side and not in the omelette...?

A cheese omelette is a thing of beauty, and it's done in a trice. I'm not a big fan of non-stick, but for omelettes I have a pair of not-too-big non-stick frying pans, which are ideal. The cheese should be something like a strong cheddar and you don't need too much.

I'm not saying my way is the best or only way, but here's how I do an omelette:

Turn the heat up to very hot. Beat three eggs, not too much (very important), with some salt and pepper. Absolutely no milk. I can never understand why anyone puts milk in eggs for omelettes or scrambling. Get the frying pan very hot and drop in a knob of butter, at least an ounce. Only butter, no oil. When the butter sizzles like mad and looks like it's going to go brown, pour in the eggs and swirl to cover the pan. Leave alone for 20 seconds. Then tilt the pan and get the runny middle to come to the edge all round. There should still be some runny middle left when you add the cheese and/or flip the omelette in half. You are not making something to sole your shoes. As soon as you've flipped, turn off the heat under the pan. The hot pan will do the rest. After a few seconds turn the omelette over and leave for a few more seconds. Scoop your chips or whatever on to a warm plate and put the omelette next to them. Something green will make you feel like it's doing you at least some good. Manna from heaven in m'humble. If I have a spare bread roll kicking around, I'll have an omelette, without the cheese, for my breakfast, half of it inside the buttered roll and the other half just for greedy devouring. Keep your face over the plate and avoid company as you feast. Large mug of builder's tea essential.

My dad always overcooked everything. His idea of an omelette was to not flip it but to fry it on both sides until it was so rubbery that you could have slapped someone's face with it for sixty seconds and it still wouldn't have dropped to bits. In my teen years, when I'd copy his method, I found it to be surprisingly edible, but in no sense whatsoever do I now look back and think to myself "Now that's what I CALL an omelette..."


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Jos
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 03:29 AM

"Hot sauce" isn't very specific. What kind of sauce? And does "hot" mean it contained chilli, or that you heated it up first? Or maybe both?


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jan 21 - 12:07 AM

Lately I'm poking around the fridge and thinking about different combinations of the usual ingredients. Just for a change. If I land on something that is particularly successful, I'll share it.

I made an omelet the other days with some leftover chopped green bell pepper and onion, sautéed with some breakfast sausage. Cheese added before flipping it in half, and adding hot sauce on top. Not bad, but next time I'd use a different kind of sausage. I prefer it to be savory, but that sausage was too salty.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Thompson
Date: 07 Jan 21 - 06:41 PM

Yotam Ottolenghi is the guest on the latest episode of The Food Chain (BBC World Service), which should be available in podcast soon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 11:44 AM

I have a 1 quart low-power crock pot from the 1970s that is at its best when used for making oatmeal overnight, started right before bedtime. I have a glass electric kettle for boiling water, so while it heats I plug in the crock pot, add a little salt, cut up a few dates, add either old fashioned oats or steel-cut oats, then pour the boiling water over the oats and the pot is hot enough to cook them. Starting with cold water results in a mess by morning that would take a lot longer to finish.

I alternate the dried fruit; sometimes I cut up dates, other times I add raisins.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 11:37 AM

I have long enjoyed cocoa with a shot of blended or vatted malt whisky in it. If the game of "Dead Ants" had instead involved "Død tante/Tote Tante," I might have got into the game.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: BobL
Date: 05 Jan 21 - 03:24 AM

a.k.a. a Lumumba. Used to live on them, holidaying in Majorca half a lifetime ago.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 04 Jan 21 - 04:52 PM

Why has it taken me so damned long to discover cocoa with rum in it?

Delicious, nutritious (sorta) and relaxing! Can’t say better than that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Raggytash
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 06:07 PM

Thank you Leeneia, we are very proud Grandparents of a beautiful baby boy and loving every second of it!!

I should have expanded of Pomme Lyonnaise.

Cut potatoes into 1 inch cubes and par boil. Cool under a running cold water tap and then drain. Ideally they are then baked until golden brown, although I cheated and deep fried them, then mix with onions that have been browned in a frying pan.

One of a thousand or more ways of preparing potatoes!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 05:40 PM

Mrrzy, on a tous lu /La Zizanie/ il y a 50 ans, à peu près. Our parents bought Astérix books to encourage us to read French. They rather enjoyed the books themselves, too.

For the last nearly 20 years, I was a procedural clerk--greffier à la procédure--at the House of Commons of Canada, and the ability to function at a professional level in English and French (both written and spoken) was a prerequisite for the job. Before that, I was a soldier and served in French-language and bilingual units.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: leeneia
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 05:02 PM

Raggytash, your family dinner sounds wonderful. Congratulations on the new baby.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 02:01 PM

Si une des langues est le Français...


Made my sore-throat-cure soup- chicken broth, hot pepper, lemon juice. Drink from mug as hot as you can.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Charmion
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 01:32 PM

Pas francophone, mais bilingue.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: Mrrzy
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 01:29 PM

Qui a lu La zizanie, album d'Astérix?

Je ne savais pas que t'étais francophone. Ô frère de Charmion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Recipes - what are we eating?
From: keberoxu
Date: 03 Jan 21 - 12:55 PM

What next, Charmion?
I'll tell you what next, in the state of New Mexico
(just north of El Paso, Texas):
the local politicos passed an act in 1989
which made New Mexico the first state in the union to have
an official cookie, the Bizcochito.


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