mudcat.org: Origin: Morning Has Broken
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2]


Origin: Morning Has Broken

DigiTrad:
MORNING HAS BROKEN


Related threads:
Morning Has Broken-Christmas variation (12)
Tune Req: pipe version of Morning has broken (12)
Simple Gifts, Riddle Song, Morning Has Broken (4) (closed)
(origins) Tune Add: Morning Has Broken (15)


In Mudcat MIDIs:
Morning Has Broken


Boston Bill 15 Dec 99 - 01:22 AM
Helen 15 Dec 99 - 01:28 AM
Joe Offer 15 Dec 99 - 01:35 AM
sophocleese 15 Dec 99 - 01:40 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 15 Dec 99 - 06:42 AM
T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird) 15 Dec 99 - 09:09 AM
Willie-O 15 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM
MaryLee 15 Dec 99 - 10:22 PM
Murray on Saltspring 15 Dec 99 - 10:39 PM
Boston Bill 16 Dec 99 - 12:13 AM
Okiemockbird 16 Dec 99 - 10:42 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 02 Jan 00 - 12:47 AM
Liz the Squeak 02 Jan 00 - 02:14 AM
Mbo 02 Jan 00 - 10:26 AM
Micca 02 Jan 00 - 10:57 AM
sophocleese 02 Jan 00 - 11:12 AM
Jack Hickman - Kingston, ON 03 Jan 00 - 12:34 AM
Liz the Squeak 03 Jan 00 - 04:04 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Sep 04 - 10:30 PM
Murray MacLeod 23 Sep 04 - 02:57 AM
The Fooles Troupe 23 Sep 04 - 03:04 AM
webfolk 23 Sep 04 - 03:09 AM
Micca 23 Sep 04 - 03:28 AM
GUEST 18 Jul 07 - 08:41 AM
GUEST,Lauriek722 16 Oct 07 - 02:56 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Oct 07 - 11:25 PM
open mike 17 Oct 07 - 02:37 AM
GUEST,Just asking 18 May 09 - 06:00 AM
Jack Campin 18 May 09 - 06:46 AM
Valmai Goodyear 19 May 09 - 02:56 AM
Micca 19 May 09 - 03:41 AM
Geoff the Duck 19 May 09 - 04:16 AM
GUEST,Penny S. (elsewhere) 19 May 09 - 08:05 AM
Jack Campin 19 May 09 - 08:32 AM
Kent Davis 19 May 09 - 09:52 PM
pavane 20 May 09 - 08:01 AM
Jack Campin 20 May 09 - 10:36 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 20 May 09 - 11:14 AM
Kent Davis 20 May 09 - 10:29 PM
GUEST,Jack Campin 21 May 09 - 08:54 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 May 09 - 11:09 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 21 May 09 - 11:25 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 21 May 09 - 11:41 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 May 09 - 12:05 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 21 May 09 - 12:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 21 May 09 - 12:11 PM
GUEST,Philip Bennett 12 Jan 10 - 02:12 PM
Edthefolkie 12 Jan 10 - 02:24 PM
Genie 12 Jan 10 - 03:26 PM
Genie 12 Jan 10 - 03:31 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Boston Bill
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 01:22 AM

A lady claims "for sure" that the religious song "Morning has broken" has Celtic origins. Help Irish historians! Boston Bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Helen
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 01:28 AM

Hi Bill,

The words were written by children's author, Eleanor Farjeon, as far as I know. I don't know about the tune.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Joe Offer
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 01:35 AM

Click here for a pretty good thread on the history of this song.
-Joe Offer-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: sophocleese
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 01:40 AM

I've read in a hymn book that it is an old Celtic tune, but I'm having difficulty at this late hour remembering where I saw it. There is another hymn put to the same tune.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 06:42 AM

That reminds me, I have to type in the three Gaelic versions of Morning has Broken. As the other thread explains, the song Morning Has Broken is a recently written song, but to the ancient tune, Bun Esan. There are a number of other songs written to the tune, but in Gaelic tradition, the Christmas tune Leanabh An Aigh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: T in Oklahoma (Okiemockbird)
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 09:09 AM

The earliest publication of the tune that I know of is in Songs and Hymns of the Scottish Highlands, published in 1888. T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Willie-O
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 09:42 PM

Celtic schmeltic, doesn't sound like it to me. Sorry.

Unitarians like to take credit for this hymn but I don't know from when or where.

Bill C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: MaryLee
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 10:22 PM

Well, in the UU "Singing the Living Tradition", the credits for Morning are: Words: Eleanor Jarjcon, 1881-1965, used by permission of David Higham Assoc., Ltd. Mewsic: Gaelic melody, copyright(little c in circle)1931 Oxford University Press, harmony by david Evans, 1874-1948.

Whatever, whoever, whenever its origins, it's a good tune and song!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Murray on Saltspring
Date: 15 Dec 99 - 10:39 PM

"Morning has broken" words are by Farjeon as said above, fitted to an old Gaelic tune. In hymn books, it's called "Bunessan". The hymn sung to it [before EF's words] is a Christmas carol, "Child in the manger, / Infant of Mary,/ Outcast and stranger, / Lord of all; / Child who inherits / All our transgressions,/ All our demerits / On Him fall." In Lachlan MacBean's Songs & Hymns of the Scottish Highlands it's given with the original Gaelic words, "Leanabh an aigh", and the note says: "Gaelic words from the hymn by Mrs. M. MacDonald, Mull (Mairi Dhighallach, bean Neill Dhomhnullaich ann an Ard Tunna)." While there's no note about the translation, we can safely assume it's by MacBean, I think.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Boston Bill
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 12:13 AM

Thanx all, for a really overwhelming response. Boston Bill


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Okiemockbird
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 10:42 AM

Some information about the melody can be found here.

T.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 02 Jan 00 - 12:47 AM

Oh! Forgot to mention.. I finished setting up the three versions of Morning Has Broken in Gaelic on the Leanabh an Aigh page of mine.

Leanabh An Aigh


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 02 Jan 00 - 02:14 AM

Morning has broken
Too bloody early
Blackbird has spoken
Too bloody Loud

Too sober to remember the rest of it, but Micca knows it....

LTS, who is still suffering and sounds like one of Marge Simpsons sisters.....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Mbo
Date: 02 Jan 00 - 10:26 AM

I wrote new lyrics to the song, with a heavy Scottish spin on it--when played by a military pipe & brass band, there is no other version that can compare!

--Mbo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Micca
Date: 02 Jan 00 - 10:57 AM

It is actually probably very appropriate, the alternative as sung by Peter Buckley-Hill at Towersey a few years ago.
    Morning has broken
    Too bloody early
    I have awoken
    with pains in my head
    Bloody great lorries going to Finchley
    pull up the duvet pretend that your dead

    Quarter past seven,s too bloody early
    Half past elevens Just about right
    Praise for the Morning? not bloody likely
    pull up the duvet, pretend that its night

I will try and find the rest as I have it somewhere if anyone wants it, it makes a nice change. Micca


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: sophocleese
Date: 02 Jan 00 - 11:12 AM

Yes Micca I would like the rest of that song. I am NOT a morning person. I could put it next to Plumber is a coming in, bloody big to do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Jack Hickman - Kingston, ON
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 12:34 AM

This is one of several sets of lyrics to the same melody. In the Catholic Hymnal used in these parts, one can fine a hymn titled "This day God gives Me" using the exact tune as Morning Has Broken. I first heard Morning is broken when a recording was played during the Graduation of my young brother from Brother Rice High School near Detroit. Actually it sounded quite wierd in the middle of the mass, being rather contemporary in nature. I was told at that time that the performer was Cat Stevens, and I had always thought he had adapted the words we know as Morning Has Broken.

The Hymnal referred to above contains the notation "Attributed to St. Patrick, 5th Century." It might also be taken from an ancient hymn known as "St. Patrick's Breastplate."

Keep the Faith.

Jack Hickman


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 03 Jan 00 - 04:04 AM

'This day, God gives me', is indeed a paraphrase of the stupendous hymn attributed to St Patrick, which is known (in certain choral circles) as 'Paddy's Vest' and part of the tune makes a splendid triple jig. It has always been my favourite hymn, and I love all 6 verses of it!! What else could beat 'I bind unto myself today, the strong name of the Trinity!'? A great hymn for christenings and confirmations, it is perfect for ordinations too.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: SCHÖN IST DER MORGEN
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Sep 04 - 10:30 PM

Reading about Cat Stevens being barred from the USA today started this tune running through my head. He brought this hymn lyric by Eleanor Farjeon, with the 'Gaelic' tune "Bunesan," into the limelight.
It has been translated into several languages. The German version, prepared for Nana Mouskouri, often was sung by a co-worker who, along with me, collected all the Mouskouri albums that we could find.

Lyr. Add: Schön ist der Morgen

Schön ist der Morgen
Schau aus dem Fenster
Ganz neu geboren
Schenkt er den Tag
Nimm ihn und freu dich
Danke und denke
Wieder kommt für mich
Ein neuer Tag.

Schön ist der Morgen
Singen die Lerchen
Ganz ohne Sorgen
Freu'n sie sich nur
Nimm dir ein Beispiel
Sei mehr zufrieden
Oft willst du zuviel
Frag mal warum.

Schön ist der Morgen
Sonne und Regen
Du bist geborgen
Solang du glaubst
Kommen und gehen
können die Stunden
Alles verstehen
Kann der Mensch nie.

Schön ist der Morgen
Fang wieder neu an
Gestern und Sorgen
Alt und vorbei
Danke und denke
Das die Welt schön ist
Darum verschenke
Nie deinen Tag.

Arr: G. Zimber

Schön ist der Morgen

Perhaps the best arrangement is the one prepared by John Rutter, the English composer, who has made arrangements for a number of old English songs and carols.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 02:57 AM

So where are the rest of the lyrics, Micca?

You've had four years to get out from under the duvet ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 03:04 AM

Morning has broken...

Well, fix it Dear Henry, Dear Henry...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: webfolk
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 03:09 AM

The tune is presumably 'traditional' and named after the beautiful village Bunessan on the Isle of Mull, Scotland. [good chippy]. As previous contibuters have said, there are several hymns set to its tune, including a setting of the odd verse in 'St Patrick's Breastplate' which goes to a different tune to the rest of the hymn. James Quinn, Roman Catholic hymnwriter, took those words and made a new hymn of it.
So Paddy's vest, as mentioned above, more correctly known as St Patrick's Breastplate and starts with 'I bind unto myself today....'
the odd verse within it being 'Christ be with me, Christ within me..'
James Quin's version of the odd verse, set to Bunessan goes 'Christ be beside me,
full text below

Christ be beside me, Christ be before me,
Christ be behind me. King of my heart.
Christ be within me, Christ be below me,
Christ be above me, never to part.

Christ on my right hand, Christ on my left hand,
Christ all around me, shield in the strife.
Christ in my sleeping, Christ in my sitting,
Christ in my rising, light of my life.

Christ be in all hearts thinking about me,
Christ be in all tongues telling of me.
Christ be the vision in eyes that see me;
in ears that hear me, Christ ever be.

Words:        adapted from St. Patrick's Breastplate by James Quinn
Tune:        Bunessan [Morning has broken]

nice version I'm sure you'll agree.
Ask me about the day job.

Geoff


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MORNING HAS BROKEN (parody)
From: Micca
Date: 23 Sep 04 - 03:28 AM

Alright already, here it is

Morning has broken (parody)
Peter Buckley Hill (Copyrighted about 1986 probably)

Morning has broken -- too bloody early
I have awoken with pains in my head
Bloody birds singing louder than Concorde
Pull up your duvet, hide in your bed

Bloody great lorries going to Finchley
Bloody loud children playing outside
Bloody bright sunshine right in my eyeballs
Pull up your duvet and try to hide

Twenty past seven's too bloody early
Half past eleven's just about right
Praise for the morning -- not bloody likely
Pull up your duvet, pretend that its night.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Lyr Add: MORGENLICHT LEUCHTET / MORNING HAS BROKEN
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Jul 07 - 08:41 AM

Just wanted to share some much more beautiful German lyrics than the Nana M quoted above - this is a bril translation of the Eleanor Farjeon. Just in case anyone out there reads German or cares!


MORGENLICHT LEUCHTET

Morgenlicht leuchtet
rein wie am Anfang
Frühlied der Amsel
Schöpferlob klingt
Dank für die Lieder
Dank für den Morgen
Dank für das Wort
Dem beides entspringt.

Sanft fallen Tropfen
Sonnendurchleuchtet
So lag auf erstem
Gras erster Tau
Dank für die Spuren
Gottes im Garten
Grünende Frische
Vollkommenes Blau.

Mein ist die Sonne
Mein ist der Morgen
Glanz der zu mir aus
Eden aufbricht (1 Mose 2,15)
Dank überschwänglich
Dank Gott am Morgen
Wiedererschaffen
Grüßt uns sein Licht.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: Origin? Morning has broken--FACT!!
From: GUEST,Lauriek722
Date: 16 Oct 07 - 02:56 PM

Better late than never. Hi, I'm a PK (Preacher's Kid) so I MAY have a little edge. As far as I know, "Morning Has Broken" (text) was published in 1931 by Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965.) It is indeed a Scots Gaelic melody, originating in Bunnessan (Isle of Mull), but its meaning from the Bible, Psalms 30:5 ("weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning".) It was adopted by mainstream Protestants early on, but even Roman Catholics sing it now. However, it's my opinion that the earlier version is a much prettier and more lyrical hymn.

Of course, I could be wrong. This is just what I learned. It's one of my favorite tradional hymns.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Oct 07 - 11:25 PM

Guest posted German lyrics "Morgenlicht leuchtet" 18 Jul 07; the lyrics are a translation by Jürgen Henkrys 1987, a translation of the Eleanor Farjeon song. Evangelisches Gesangbuch no, 455.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: open mike
Date: 17 Oct 07 - 02:37 AM

what's a duvet? is it like a couch cushion or pillow?

oh, this says it is like a down comforter..
http://www.plumeriabay.com/Main/Info/What-Is-A-Duvet.aspx

30 years ago when i was married, we had a dawn ceremony
and this song was one of the ones on the program.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: GUEST,Just asking
Date: 18 May 09 - 06:00 AM

If this is a religious song then what's with the "black bird" who supposedly spoke just like the first bird? And springing fresh from the world??? We are not supposed to be FROM the world but just IN it???


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 May 09 - 06:46 AM

The naming of hymn tunes is arbitrary. Just because it's called "Bunessan" doesn't mean it has any connection with the place at all.

There is no such thing as an ancient Gaelic hymn tune. The Catholic church didn't use hymns in vernacular languages and the Protestant church in Scotland didn't use hymns at all until the 18th century - just psalms, to a very small number of tunes.

The Handbook to the Church Hymnary has this, for the hymn "Child in the Manger":

Mr Lachlan Macbean of Kirkcaldy has kindly supplied the following information andout this hymn and its tune: 'The verses have been chosen from a longer, beautiful hymn by Mary Macdougall, who in the earlier decades of the nineteenth century was a widely recognized poetess in the island of Mull. This hymn she named "The Child of Agh", i.e. of Happiness, Good Fortune, Power, or Wonder.

The tune BUNESSAN was noted down by Alexander Fraser from the singing of a wandering Highland singer. Its bold movements are in keeping with the freedom shown in Gaelic song'. It is printed from Songs and Hymns of the Gael (ed. L. Macbean, 1888).


They don't say that what the wandering singer was singing was a hymn, or that he had any connection with Mull.

Nor do they say what tune Mary Macdougall had in mind, if any.

The words for "Child in the Manger" are unrelated to those of "Morning has Broken", so no link with Mull there either.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 19 May 09 - 02:56 AM

This is fascinating. I'd long thought that Battle of the Somme had a strong similarity to Morning Has Broken; it's interesting to know that they come from the same musical tradition.

Valmai (Lewes)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Micca
Date: 19 May 09 - 03:41 AM

If I might add 2 cents of help here in clarification, with reference to the passage above
"In Lachlan MacBean's Songs & Hymns of the Scottish Highlands it's given with the original Gaelic words, "Leanabh an aigh", and the note says: "Gaelic words from the hymn by Mrs. M. MacDonald, Mull (Mairi Dhighallach, bean Neill Dhomhnullaich ann an Ard Tunna)." While there's no note about the translation, we can safely assume it's by MacBean, I think." Ard Tunna (or Ardtun as it is given on maps) is a sort of suburb of Bunessan (how anywhere that small could have suburbs beats me) on the Isle of Mull and is a very beautiful place there are some views Here, scroll down it sorta sums up the tune in some ways.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 19 May 09 - 04:16 AM

GUEST,Just asking - As for the blackbird, it is just part of the imagery. This morning has broken and is just as beautiful as the first ever morning (actually, probably nicer, as there isn't as much ammmonia, sulphur dioxide and volcanic gases as at the start of the planet). (A) blackbird has spoken (sung), and the sound is as uplifting a sound as the first ever bird song...
A blackbird does not have the sinister significance of a carrion crow crow.
I expect that it was chosen because it scans as a lyric (sparrow or pigeon would just about fit) in the way that Albatross or Duck would not...
Quack!
Geoff the Duck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: GUEST,Penny S. (elsewhere)
Date: 19 May 09 - 08:05 AM

Try this for not doom ridden.

Blackbird has spoken

Penny


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 May 09 - 08:32 AM

it sorta sums up the tune in some ways

Except that nobody said the tune originally had anything to do with Bunessan. The connection is with the words to an entirely different hymn that uses the same tune as "Morning has Broken".

I've been to Bunessan several times. Not a hugely exciting place, though the local pub used to have very good ceilidhs - I'm not sure if they still happen. Facing north with the hills behind it, it can be bleak and gloomy in winter.

There are quite a few American sites that claim some of Eleanor Farjeon's work as out of copyright (one of her children's books, republished by Project Gutenberg). Since she only died in 1965, that is certainly not the case in many other countries. If US law classifies "Morning has Broken" as public domain in the same way, Americans are getting something for free that would otherwise be earning very substantial sums for Farjeon's estate in the UK. American copyright law can be as sleazy as the US's idea of "free trade".

The tune seems more similar to "Air Fa-La-La-Lo" than anything else to me, though I can sort of see a very distant similarity to "The Battle of the Somme".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Kent Davis
Date: 19 May 09 - 09:52 PM

Jack Campin,

One of my hymnals indicates that the copyright dates from 1957. Our sleazy laws extend copyright protection back 30 years before that. We Americans, in our sleazy free-trade sort of way, still provide copyright protection even to "Happy Birthday"!

Sleazily yours,

Kent


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: pavane
Date: 20 May 09 - 08:01 AM

Happy Birthday was written as recently as 1932, I understand


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 May 09 - 10:36 AM

The 1957 copyright date makes no sense, given when the hymn was written and when Farjeon died. Maybe that was the copyright date for the hymnal?

I tried the Harry Fox Agency site and got nothing, but maybe I was doing it wrong.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Rifleman (inactive)
Date: 20 May 09 - 11:14 AM

The tune for Morning Has Broken is named Bunessan. The tune had been found in L. McBean's Songs and Hymns of the Gael, published in 1900. Before Eleanor Farjeon's words, the tune was used as a Christmas carol, which began Child in the manger, Infant of Mary, translated from the Gaelic lyrics written by Mary MacDonald. The English-language Roman Catholic hymnal also uses the tune for the hymn, This Day God Gives Me.

Writing credit for Morning Has Broken has occasionally been erroneously attributed to Cat Stevens, who popularized the song. The familiar piano arrangement on Stevens' album, Teaser and the Firecat (1971) was performed by Rick Wakeman, the classically trained keyboardist with Yes


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Kent Davis
Date: 20 May 09 - 10:29 PM

I agree the copyright date seems odd, but that is the date in the hymnal (not the date of the hymnal itself) and it is also the date given in the DT. I'm guessing Ms. Farjeon renewed the copyright then. The copyright for "Happy Birthday" is 1935 but the song is considerably older: http://www.snopes.com/music/songs/birthday.asp

Kent


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 21 May 09 - 08:54 AM

Dead helpful to copy and paste a chunk of Wikipedia, I don't think. Particularly when it gets somebody's name wrong.

There is an important loose end here. Who was the Alexander Fraser who collected the tune? When and where? What else did he collect? Where are his manuscripts? Were any of them published? Did Macdougall ever hear the tune? How did Macbean get hold of it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 09 - 11:09 AM

Eleanor Farjeon published her "The Old Nurse's Stocking Basket" in 1931.
If the verse appeared in her books, it would have been copyright as of the date of the first publication of the poem in her books.
Several of her books were reprinted, possibly with additions, in the 1930s.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Rifleman (inactive)
Date: 21 May 09 - 11:25 AM

I found, experienced in these threads, that nothing is helpful unless you suggest it Campin, AND I got the text from Here
Not Wikipedia, so keep it to yourself!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 21 May 09 - 11:41 AM

The page you linked to says they got it from Wikipedia themselves.

If you're going to cite Wikipedia, it's usually better to link rather than copy - articles get revised (which this one doubtless will be) and most the time you want the current version.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:05 PM

First published in Percy Dearmer, Vaughan Williams and Martin Shaw, 1931, "Songs of Praise," 2nd edition. Shaw provided the music, "an old Gaelic ..."
This book was copyright. Published by Oxford University Press.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Rifleman (inactive)
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:08 PM

I'm not THAT interested in the song ( I'll leave that to archivists and other interested parties), I don't even perform said song (too over done.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin? Morning has broken
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:11 PM

Eleanor Farjeon was credited as lyricist for the song in Dearmer et al.
Reprints are available very reasonably.

Vaughan Williams used her lyrics in one or two of his "Carols."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Morning Has Broken
From: GUEST,Philip Bennett
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 02:12 PM

Hi. Does anyone know when the Bunessan tune first appeared, I mean the first historical reference to it? I'm writing a novel set in 1574 in which my main character sings it. But if the song didn't exist in 1574 that'll be a little tricky.
Thanks.
Philip Bennett
fillmoreavebklynny3905@netzero.net


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Morning Has Broken
From: Edthefolkie
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 02:24 PM

When I was at primary school we used to sing "fresh from the WORD" not "world". Ms Farjeon meant God's word presumably. Can't check it as I lost my copy of "Songs of Praise" about 40 years ago.

So Yusuf aka Cat aka Steve or his producer must have changed it to "World" on the record. Obviously didn't want to get too, ahem, religious.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Morning Has Broken
From: Genie
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 03:26 PM

Ed, Farjeon's lyrics do say "fresh from the Word" (as in, "In the beginning was The Word ... ".
BTW, I just listened to Cat Stevens singing "Morning Has Broken" and it sounds like he sings "the word." I don't hear any "l" there at all.
Anyway, Cat wasn't "Yusuf" until many years after he recorded MHB.

I suspect it was them there Unitarians (contemporary type) who changed it from "The Word" to "the world," to purge the song of strong Christian theological language. (Though that reference to God as "The Word" is as much Judaic as it is Christian.) Unitarians are well known for often avoiding "the G word" or its variants (Lord, Father, Master).

I think this is an example of where the attempt to rewrite old or classic hymns ends up with something either nonsensical or oxymoronic or perhaps worse. (Especially since the UU Hymnal still contains the line "God's re-creation of the new day.)

I'm not sure what "Praise for (the morning, the singing) springing fresh from the world" is supposed to mean.    Anyway, I don't see the need to change the original lyrics.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origin: Morning Has Broken
From: Genie
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 03:31 PM

The DT: Morning Has Broken lyrics have a bunch of periods thrown in in the middle of sentences (where there should be commas or no punctuation) but aside from that, they are correct.

The DT does say the tune is "traditional," but perhaps it should be more specific and identify the tune as "Bunessan" or at least as "Gaelic" or something of that sort.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 25 January 2:52 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.