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radio 4 how folk songs should be sung

The Sandman 25 Nov 14 - 03:25 PM
GUEST 25 Nov 14 - 03:55 PM
Bainbo 25 Nov 14 - 04:06 PM
The Sandman 25 Nov 14 - 04:12 PM
The Sandman 25 Nov 14 - 04:13 PM
Reinhard 25 Nov 14 - 04:14 PM
The Sandman 25 Nov 14 - 04:32 PM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 04:18 AM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 04:47 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 05:05 AM
Leadfingers 26 Nov 14 - 05:26 AM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 05:37 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 05:51 AM
GUEST,DTM 26 Nov 14 - 05:51 AM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 06:16 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 06:21 AM
Brian Peters 26 Nov 14 - 06:23 AM
Backwoodsman 26 Nov 14 - 06:37 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 07:17 AM
GUEST,Rahere 26 Nov 14 - 07:35 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 07:45 AM
bubblyrat 26 Nov 14 - 07:52 AM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 08:34 AM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 09:06 AM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 09:23 AM
GUEST,Rahere 26 Nov 14 - 09:54 AM
GUEST, topsie 26 Nov 14 - 10:01 AM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 10:27 AM
Backwoodsman 26 Nov 14 - 10:40 AM
Musket 26 Nov 14 - 11:06 AM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 11:07 AM
Backwoodsman 26 Nov 14 - 11:13 AM
Backwoodsman 26 Nov 14 - 11:15 AM
TheSnail 26 Nov 14 - 11:53 AM
GUEST,Desi C 26 Nov 14 - 12:20 PM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 12:58 PM
GUEST,LynnH 26 Nov 14 - 01:34 PM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 02:15 PM
Vic Smith 26 Nov 14 - 02:55 PM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 03:10 PM
Brian Peters 26 Nov 14 - 03:32 PM
Vic Smith 26 Nov 14 - 03:38 PM
The Sandman 26 Nov 14 - 04:20 PM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 04:46 PM
Jim Carroll 26 Nov 14 - 05:08 PM
GUEST,Bob Blair 26 Nov 14 - 07:23 PM
The Sandman 27 Nov 14 - 05:06 AM
Musket 27 Nov 14 - 05:16 AM
The Sandman 27 Nov 14 - 05:43 AM
Vic Smith 27 Nov 14 - 06:22 AM
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Subject: Radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 03:25 PM

I found this programme interesting, so thought I would draw peoples attention to this, if others were not aware of it.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 03:55 PM

And brilliantly, you neglect to provide any information concerning or even a title of the programme that you refer to.

A link? Nah, that's far too much to ask...


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Bainbo
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 04:06 PM

How Folk Songs Should Be Sung


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 04:12 PM

bbc radio 4 how folk songs should be sung, try googling.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 04:13 PM

thanks bainbo, cross posted


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Reinhard
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 04:14 PM

There was already a long discussion on this programme in 2011/12: M. Carthy on The Critics Group - Radio 4 where our poor soldier very pointedly had a lot to say.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 25 Nov 14 - 04:32 PM

Reinhard, 3 years ago, is there any problem with bringing it to peoples attention again?
I have just listened to it again, and thought Ewan made some good points about performing.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 04:18 AM

I found my opinion of the programme changed on listening to it again. In retrospectI think the programme might have been more interesting and more helpful if we had heard more of Ewans ideas about performing and less about personality clashes.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 04:47 AM

We are at present working on two - hour long radio programmes on Ewan which will be broadcast in January on Irish radio in time for the centenary of his birth; much of it will cover his work with the Critics Group
Hopefully, it will challenge some of the inaccuracies of this somewhat (well - inaccurate) and somewhat misleadingly named programme.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:05 AM

I sing them like Musket. I enjoy singing them like Musket.

If others enjoy it, brilliant. If they don't, you can't win 'em all.

Tell you what though. You can only criticise a style on your own personal liking. There is no such thing as wrong.

John Eliot Gardener arranges and conducts baroque classical music as he feels audiences would have heard at the time of composing them. They tend to be slightly different to what we are used to, slightly up tempo for instance.

But.

He isn't doing it right. Others aren't doing it wrong. He isn't doing it wrong. Others aren't doing it right.

I have had people say they don't like how I have arranged songs and criticism is helpful. Only once has someone said to my face that I sang a traditional song "wrong." my reply means they no longer talk to me...


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Leadfingers
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:26 AM

If Cecil Sharpe collected over a hundred versions of only one song , which version is 'Right' ??


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:37 AM

"I sing them like Musket. I enjoy singing them like Musket. "
You take he words right out of MacColl's mouth - that was his argument
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:51 AM

Does that surprise you? I criticise his hypocrisy in some matters, but not others.

he said everybody should sing songs indigenous to them. (Except him, because he was a performer. Yeah, a contrary old bugger.)


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,DTM
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:51 AM

"I sing them like Musket. I enjoy singing them like Musket.

If others enjoy it, brilliant. If they don't, you can't win 'em all."

100% agree. Songs are for singing, not analysing.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 06:16 AM

"he said everybody should sing songs indigenous to them"'
He didn't - he said people should sing songs in their own accents, Lomax and Lloyd argued the same.
The reason was to persuade people to direct their attention to opening up their own local and national repertoires instead of sounding 'oirish' or mid-Atlantic - it worked.
The argument was first put forward by Lomax at a time when Lloyd and MacColl were doing both - they succumbed to his reasoning many people stopped sounding like "Walthamstow cowboys galloping across the plains of Essex" - to quote Peggy, though sadly, many others didn't.
Peggy's letter on the subject is still on the 'Living Tradition' archive, but I'm happy to dig it out if anybody doubts it.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 06:21 AM

Huh, if you sing Ballad of Jamie Foyers in Derbyshire English, it doesn't bloody rhyme.

Rod Stewart would be living on the state pension if he hadn't gone transatlantic in the early '70s.

Err.. I repeat. MacColl used the word indigenous. (January 1985, the "snug" of The Lord Conyers pub in Kiveton prior to their concert at the folk club there, Musket interviewing him.)


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Brian Peters
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 06:23 AM

Here it is, Jim - and worth reading:
Peggy Seeger's letter

My guess is that a lot of the impetus for people like Harry Boardman to sing Lancashire songs, and others to take up their own local repertoire, came directly or indirectly from 'The Policy'.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 06:37 AM

So let me understand this........singing in an assumed accent is 'wrong', but singing under an assumed name is 'OK'?

What's the difference? Both are a deceit, surely?


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 07:17 AM

Not to mention the faux Scottish accent, form a Salford lad.

Although for Clapton's sake, don't get Jim started.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,Rahere
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 07:35 AM

Actually, back in the 1960s, there was a need for songs from your own background, because people with no background were cocking things up out of simple ignorance. That was then, though, and with the growth and rediscovery of local heritage it's less of a problem. Where I live is on the edge of an area where the heritage is has bottomed out and will either recover or die, and so I do have to add something to that, for all that my family's from elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 07:45 AM

People with no background?

Some peasants near us with no breeding I suppose... Apparently, they serve Earl Grey after afternoon tea. Uncouth proles.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: bubblyrat
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 07:52 AM

I like to sing "Drinkin's Ower Risky " ( Ricky-do-dum-day ) in my best possible imitation of a Glasgow accent as picked up from a Royal Navy colleague from Larkhall (Glasgow) .It just doesn't sound any good at all ,especially sung with an English , or even Kelvinside, accent , otherwise.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 08:34 AM

according to this article method acting is not the same as Stanislvskis method


Developed in the early 20th century at the Moscow Art Theater by Constantin Stanislavski, the Stanislavski method of acting is a set of techniques meant to create realistic portrayals of characters. The major goal of the Stanislavski method is to have a perfect understanding of the motivations, obstacles, and objectives of a character in each moment. Actors often use this technique for realistic plays, where they try to present an accurate portrayal of normal life. It is not the same as "Method Acting," which goes even further into becoming a character.
Three Core Elements

To begin employing the Stanislavski method, actors generally go over the script very carefully, looking for key identifying factors. A performer discovers what a character wants, what prevents the character from getting it, and what means the character will use to achieve this goal. These concepts are frequently referred to as "objective," "obstacle," and "method." Actors must also determine the given circumstances of every scene, such as where the scene takes place, what is in the room, and what is going on in the outside world.
Beginning with Objectives

To identify the objective clearly, an actor breaks down a scene into "beats" or "bits," which are short sections that end with each change of objective. In a basic example, if a character pours a cup of coffee, answers the phone, and then runs screaming out of the house, the scene has at least three separate beats. At the bare minimum, the objective changes from pouring coffee, to answering the phone, to getting out of the building. Beats are not determined on action alone, however, and may be based on a change of argument or emotion.

Actors can define objectives even within individual lines of dialogue, based on a concept called "objective words." It is the actor's job to understand and play the character's objective not only in the entire play or film, each scene, and each beat, but also in each line. Determining what the key motivation is behind each line is a basic practice in the Stanislavski method.
The "Magic If"

In order to help actors portray the honest objective of the character, Stanislavski pioneered a concept called the "magic if." To help connect the character to the actor, performers must ask themselves "What if this situation happened to me?" Through this activity, actors identify with characters as possible aspects of themselves, allowing them to think like the characters, rather than just impersonate them.
Obstacles and Methods Within a Scene

Obstacles are things preventing a character from achieving his or her objective. In the previous scene, if the character trips while trying to run, it would present an obstacle to the objective of getting out of the house. Obstacles are dealt with through one of three methods: the character gives up the objective because of it, finds a way to go around it, or plunges along regardless. The method a character chooses in dealing with obstacles gives great insight into that character; the basis for much of the Stanislavski method lies in defining how and why a character chooses a particular response.
The Internal Monologue

Understanding the objectives and methods of a character allows a performer to create an internal monologue for that character. Real people typically have a semi-constant flow of thoughts going on in their minds, and the Stanislavski method attempts to create a similar internal monologue for a character. This technique helps each action feel as if it comes spontaneously, rather than simply because the script says it should happen. Actors also use this monologue to help them prevent a scene from becoming repetitious or dull even after many performances.
Differences from "Method Acting"

Due of its emphasis on realism, the Stanislavski method is often used in modern plays, film, and television. It should not be confused with Lee Strasberg's "Method Acting," however, which involves an actor attempting to completely become a character. The Stanislavski method maintains that a performer must remain somewhat separate from the character, in order to properly understand his or her motivations and goals.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 09:06 AM

"Not to mention the faux Scottish accent, form a Salford lad.
Maccoll grew up in a Scots household, learned his songs from Scots lodgers and neighbors and his Scots parents.
I know from personal experience that when he was in conversation with his mother he lapsed into broad Scots pretty well as I end to lapse into broad Scouse when I talk to by sisters.- not "faux" - but then again, don't let these facts interfere with your grave dancing.
Whatever words MacColl chose to frame his beliefs in, his intentions were as I stated - happy to pass on Peggy's address so you can put her right Muskie (thanks Brian).
Staninslavski's method was not the same as Strasberg's adaptation - I worked at the headquarters of the London branch of the Strasburg Studio in Red Lion Square and had a chance to discuss it with some of the people there - different beast altogether
MacColl adapted Stanislavski for singing, just as he adapted Laben's movement technique for the voice - it was a technique of relating to and identifying with a song - worked like a charm and still does for me.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 09:23 AM

There are a number of performers in THE UK FOLK REVIVAL who sing under an assumed name.
I am of the opinion that its not important and not as important as trying to get a song right,I judge performers on their performances not their names.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,Rahere
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 09:54 AM

Well, Musket, if you were one of the tea-dance crowd who'd taken over the EFDSS at the time...
What they were really having a go at is the crew who'd not settled to who they were, singing in a cod mid-Atlantic accent one moment and an equally inaccurate Irish or Scottish one the next. And that was only part of the list of pains we faced. Who were not grown up enough to tell the BBC crew who thought English folk had to include Dylan (a point Martin Carthy makes, referring to Ewan MacColl's opinions) and thought Simon and Garfunkel's version of Scarborough Fair was both uthentic and the last word in the subject, not realising thaat what we really needed was to get back to the first word. This is why Jeremy Barlowe's work on the English Dancing Master in the late 1970s was so important, work which hasn't really been taken on yet, and the follow-up work done by Joel Cohen in Boston in the States.
I'm not saying there is no such thing as modern folk, or American folk, or trad, or whatever. What I am saying is that the journey by which we got to these was somewhat distorted between the 1930s and the 1950s, and we have the resource and knowledge to undo that and pick up again where we should be. Most of what we're doing's clearly right in any case, but it would be as well to be able to claim all our heritage. It's what the Early Music crowd call historically-informed performance, not performance identical to what the original would have been, in whatever century the song comes from, but a performance which can justify where we are now in a line of thinking and feeling descended from where it started.
It's kind of where Ewan McColl was coming from back then, just he didn't have the tools we have now nor the experience of the mistakes his followers and others made along the way. Now it's time to make our own mistakes, whether through failing to take uup the siren call of commmercial music a couple of years bak, or going that way, we are as blind now as they were then and as anyone evermore will be. All we have is the path by which we got to where we are, and to carry that on. In this, we held part of a heritage the commercial music tried to kill in the 1980s, and it's our choice whether to follow the siren song of dosh and try a professional career in the face of the opposition of those already starving in the sector, or whether we do it as excellent amateurs, which is, after all, the real nature of folk music down the ages. And so on and so forth.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST, topsie
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 10:01 AM

"performers in THE UK FOLK REVIVAL who sing under an assumed name"

I believe that, because of the rules of - I think - Equity, some have had to change their names because they happened to have the same name as someone already registered.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 10:27 AM

not always to do with equity, some changed it for other reasons, why shouldnt they?does it matter, in my opinion it is more important to practise and try and perform without words, but that is just my opinion, the opinion of a talentless moron.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 10:40 AM

So why is it 'wrong', according to someone whose opinions I don't give a FF about and who isn't around to debate the point any more, to sing songs that aren't from one's own region/area/district/country/whatever, and to attempt to sing them in the accent appropriate to the song's provenance?


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 11:06 AM

I don't get into arguments about people with opinions on my hobby and (semi) artistic output either. Neither MacColl, EFDSS, 1954 or any of the other terms that get some people animated actually mean Fuck all.

People sing, people listen. It either makes you feel horny, makes you want to throw up or any and all points in between.

MacColl only heard my singing twice, so hardly enough to tell me what my folk music is considering that is what I sing.

I don't pretend accent it either. I'm a northern Lad and you either get that or something fairly neutral if it is American. I don't sing with an American, Scottish or Australian accent, I don't black up to sing Swanee River, I don't sing Diddy songs from a church roof whilst borrowing lead and I don't nick a car before singing a scouse song.

(there. That should just don't the trick. It was getting a bit boring.)


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 11:07 AM

"to sing songs that aren't from one's own region/area/district/country/whatever"
Nobody said it was "wrong" - that's one of the urban legends.
People running clubs can adopt any policy they wish to present any kind of music they wish - MacColl's clubs chose to promote traditional and traditionally based clubs in order to open up the British repertoire - those who didn't agree with that policy were free to go somewhere else.
As Peggy said - it was a club plicy adopted by Ewan's clubs.
The end result was that the British repertoire became the norm (more or less) - I'll drink to that.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 11:13 AM

Correct. I don't do any of those things either - as you know, I sing in the regional accent in which I speak - but I don't censure those who do sing in an assumed accent, neither do I censure Mancunians who changed their name in order to try to fool people into believing they were a Jock. Which was the point I was originally trying to make!

Have a good 'un tonight, sing a couple for me (North Lincs accent, please!). 😃


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 11:15 AM

Cross-posted with Jim - mine of 11:13 am was a response to Musket.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: TheSnail
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 11:53 AM

There are a number of performers in THE UK FOLK REVIVAL who sing under an assumed name.
Back in the nineteenth century the Scottish fiddler Archibald Milligan changed his name to Carl Volti.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 12:20 PM

The very fact that there is a radio prog titld 'how Folk songs SHOULD be sun, is reason enough to give it a very wide berth surely!


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 12:58 PM

MacColl's clubs chose to promote traditional and traditionally based clubs in order to open up the British repertoire - those who didn't agree with that policy were free to go somewhere else."
The Singers Club had a policy[ as I understand it] that American singers could sing American songs, English singers should sing English songs etc, this policy only applied to singing in the singers club, so this meant that Peggy Seeger and Tom Paley were able to singsongs from the Appalachian mountains though they were not from this part of America?
Was it ok for an English singer to sing an Irish or Welsh song?
I am merely curious as the exact rule, no intended criticism, just asking for clarification, Thanks.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,LynnH
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 01:34 PM

@GSS- I'm not sure how Charles Parker singing "The Strawberry Roan" squares with Singers Club/Critics group policy.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 02:15 PM

Lynn H,I am afraid I cannot answer that one. oh hang on, maybe he didnt sing it at the club but at a crtics group meeting somewhere else. Someone on the programme said ewan lived in the stockbroker belt thats not correct, he lived in Beckenham, Which joined on to london and was at that time a mix of working class and middle class, but not stockbroker belt, i went to school there for a couple of years, stocxkbroker belt way wide of the mark.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Vic Smith
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 02:55 PM

Funnily enough, I lived within a few doors of the MacColl residence in Beckenham for a couple of years when I was at college so this was 1964-1966. They were pretty huge houses and even in those days many were divided into flats. Somehow I was the leaseholder for two of the three flats and had the (difficult) job of collecting the rent from all the students who had a room there to pay to the letting agency. It has seven bedrooms in total but even what intended as living room and lounge etc. were occupied as single student rooms.
Ours had been rented to students for some years and was the only run-down house in the area. I think that most of them have now been converted into flats, but a quick check on house prices for those that remain as single occupancy in the roads in that area and that reveals that their current prices seem to be in the range of £1 to 2 million, so you can imagine the sort of house that is being discussed here.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 03:10 PM

this is exactly what was wrong with the programme, nonsense about houses, instead of more detail about how to perform songs.if he had a big house he did not inherit it, it was as a result of his song writing skill.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Brian Peters
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 03:32 PM

The comment about the house was a throwaway remark addressing the more general point about how MacColl gradually became estranged from the group. The programme was actually about the Critics Group, rather than about singing technique, whatever the title may have suggested.

What baffles me about this thread is that people are getting so hot under the collar about this 40-50 year-old slice of history. The kind of ideas discussed by MacColl and his acolytes / collaborators had a profound and often beneficial influence on the folk world we've all grown up with. On the other hand, there was much else going on at the time, independent of CG, that also fed into it. I see nothing wrong per se with enthusiasts getting together in an attempt to improve their performance and understanding of songs, however quaint some of their ideas seem now, and however divorced they might be from the way Sam Larner etc did it. The idea that there is one particular way in which folk songs SHOULD be sung is not something I hear getting preached from many pulpits these days, so why not listen with interest to these voices from the past, rather than dismissing out of hand the whole notion of trying to get better at singing?


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Vic Smith
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 03:38 PM

My link reminds us that A Very Sensible Well-Informed Person argued with Ed Milliband on television last week that £2,000,000 will only buy you a garage in London at current property prices - never mind a big house.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 04:20 PM

"The idea that there is one particular way in which folk songs SHOULD be sung is not something I hear getting preached from many pulpits these days, so why not listen with interest to these voices from the past, rather than dismissing out of hand the whole notion of trying to get better at singing?"
has anyone dismissed the idea of getting better at singing, I certainly have not, in fact I h ave suggested that the programme would have been better if we could have heard more of Ewans ideas about how songs should be sung and less irrelevant throwaway remarks.
I agree there is no one particular style folk songs should be sung, however, Brian I know you are a skilled performer and that you value committment and practice and basic performance skills[ like singing without notes]


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 04:46 PM

Quickie - back later
The MacColl household occupied a smallish 3 bedroom maisonette in Beckenham
When I visited and throughout the period I stayed with them young Neill was evicted from his bedroom to make room for me and the tape recorders (see below)
Jim Carroll

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLjS3gzHetA


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 05:08 PM

It was once my ambition to live long enough to see the folk song reval reach adulthood - an ambition long abandoned
Back to Denzil Washington
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: GUEST,Bob Blair
Date: 26 Nov 14 - 07:23 PM

Brian Peters. " however quaint some of their ideas seem now"

Perhaps you can give some examples of these quaint ideas so that we can have some idea on what you're talking about.?

Bob Blair


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 27 Nov 14 - 05:06 AM

I think that many of the suggestions from Jim Carroll[ which I assume came from Ewan and his mates] about breath control and diction and singing technique are very good.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Musket
Date: 27 Nov 14 - 05:16 AM

Agreed. You never do badly from listening to how others do what you do.

Aping them in order to somehow seem "authentic" is another cesspit of geraniums entirely...


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: The Sandman
Date: 27 Nov 14 - 05:43 AM

Ewans ideas re Stanislavski,and how folk song should be sung, do not appear to have any continuity with traditional singers, but is that a reason to not consider them? I suppose not, as long as the singer is not giving the impression to others that this is how traditional singers sang.In the edited excerpts we heard and for all i know they may not be truly representative of everything that happened at critics group meetings, Ewan was portrayed as being a person who was in charge, as someone in that position he had a responsiblity[ to explain that these ideas had no connection with tradtional singing styles], for all i know he may have done that.
In Ewans favour, he was giving up his time to try and help others he was also trying to get singers to analyse and think about interpretation, all of which are positives., some singers like Luke Kelly moved on, but still owed a huge debt to Ewan and Peggy as regards repertoire.


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Subject: RE: radio 4 how folk songs should be sung
From: Vic Smith
Date: 27 Nov 14 - 06:22 AM

Brian Peters -
"What baffles me about this thread is that people are getting so hot under the collar about this 40-50 year-old slice of history."


I realise that you probably know this, Brian, but what the obsessive nature of Mudcat with Ewan and The Critics reflects is the average age of the British contributors here. They came into this music when they were young and when MacColl was a hugely important and divisive character on the folk scene. He remains so for those people. Amongst regulars on this forum are those who have gained an enormous benefit from what Ewan did and said. Those from the Critics Group with the other opinion are not represented here. Recently, I was digitising old radio interviews and came to one with someone who had been a prominent member of The Critics Group. In the interview I mentioned Ewan's name but before I could frame the question about his influence on the interviewee, I was interrupted with "Aaaaargh! No more gurus! We each have to work out own direction... our own salvation."

One of your recent albums * sees you working with artists that are young enough to be your children (ahem, grandchildren?) and I think that this typifies what I think of as your approach. Of course, you recognise the importance of knowing where the scene has come from as it is a guide to where it is going but you refuse to be bogged down in the past. I hope that I feel that I also can learn from the different attitudes of younger performers in my contact with them in conversations and in interviews for radio and magazine articles.

* The Liberty to Choose
A Selection of Songs from The New Penguin Book of English Folk Songs
James Findlay, Bella Hardy, Brian Peters, Lucy Ward.

Fellside Recordings FECD257 (CD, UK, June 10, 2013)


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