mudcat.org: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3]


popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad

The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 08:31 AM
GUEST,leeneia 17 Nov 11 - 08:37 AM
r.padgett 17 Nov 11 - 09:21 AM
Big Al Whittle 17 Nov 11 - 11:19 AM
johncharles 17 Nov 11 - 11:25 AM
dick greenhaus 17 Nov 11 - 11:33 AM
GUEST,Big Nige 17 Nov 11 - 11:36 AM
stallion 17 Nov 11 - 11:47 AM
Richard Bridge 17 Nov 11 - 11:56 AM
dick greenhaus 17 Nov 11 - 02:25 PM
Bert 17 Nov 11 - 03:16 PM
GUEST,Howard Jones 17 Nov 11 - 03:21 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 03:24 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 03:26 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 03:32 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 03:34 PM
Spleen Cringe 17 Nov 11 - 04:23 PM
Will Fly 17 Nov 11 - 04:41 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 04:46 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 04:48 PM
GUEST,SteveG 17 Nov 11 - 04:53 PM
Will Fly 17 Nov 11 - 04:54 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 04:54 PM
The Sandman 17 Nov 11 - 04:59 PM
GUEST,SteveG 17 Nov 11 - 05:02 PM
GUEST,josepp 17 Nov 11 - 05:06 PM
Will Fly 17 Nov 11 - 05:08 PM
GUEST,SteveG 17 Nov 11 - 05:10 PM
GUEST,SteveG 17 Nov 11 - 05:18 PM
Spleen Cringe 17 Nov 11 - 05:30 PM
dick greenhaus 17 Nov 11 - 05:59 PM
GUEST,999 17 Nov 11 - 06:51 PM
GUEST,999 17 Nov 11 - 07:06 PM
dick greenhaus 17 Nov 11 - 08:08 PM
GUEST,999 17 Nov 11 - 08:52 PM
The Sandman 18 Nov 11 - 06:30 AM
GUEST,999 18 Nov 11 - 06:52 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Nov 11 - 06:54 AM
Spleen Cringe 18 Nov 11 - 07:03 AM
GUEST,BIg Nige 18 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM
GUEST,Howard Jones 18 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM
The Sandman 18 Nov 11 - 07:44 AM
johncharles 18 Nov 11 - 07:51 AM
TheSnail 18 Nov 11 - 07:53 AM
The Sandman 18 Nov 11 - 07:58 AM
johncharles 18 Nov 11 - 07:59 AM
GUEST,Big Nige 18 Nov 11 - 07:59 AM
The Sandman 18 Nov 11 - 08:02 AM
GUEST,Big Nige 18 Nov 11 - 08:06 AM
TheSnail 18 Nov 11 - 08:18 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 08:31 AM

Is it inevitable that roots and trad music when it is popularised, becomes commercialised in the sense that its original form alters to cater for a popular taste, and thus metamorphises into something further from its roots?.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 08:37 AM

No.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: r.padgett
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 09:21 AM

Could be! I have a fb entry on this currently too!

New recording techniques, better mixing and quality could be making a product which is certainly more marketable to the public in general. This is great for those elite artists but what about "folk" music?

An interesting debate could ensue!

Ray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:19 AM

Well if its popular. it will have a commercial value - just given the laws of supply and demand.

I'm not really sure what you mean. Everything that enters the commerce chain is by definition commercialised.

My Joe Heaney cd cost me ten times as much as my Frank Sinatra one did. Twenty quid and two quid respectively. So you could say Joe was ten times more commercialised than Frank.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: johncharles
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:25 AM

Earwig O again.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:33 AM

yes. Not that it's necessarily bad, but it certainly drifts further from its roots.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: GUEST,Big Nige
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:36 AM

Trouble is these days anyone who can play three chords, writes a song, and then calls themself a folk singer. If you look up and down the Clubs and Festivals there are dozens of them, all claiming to represent the tradition, when all they are really doing is using Folk as a platform for their own dreary ramblings. Plastic Folkies!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: stallion
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:47 AM

Oh big Nige , has ever been thus! Someone wrote a parody of the "The Boxer", about learning two chords and becoming a folksinger, can't think for the life of me who it was. Someone will put us right, I know "Suicide" Bill used to sing it and, prodigious songwriter as he was, I don't think he wrote that one.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 11:56 AM

That's how folk music becomes altered in transmission and stays current in a community.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 02:25 PM

The point is that commercialization moves folk song out of its community.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: Bert
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:16 PM

GUEST,Big Nige, you are full of 'it'.

I rarely use more than three chords for a song and here is a few of my titles. Some of which are quite folky.

Plastic Flower Seeds
The Espresso Machine (Tune - The Spinning Wheel)
Silicone Cindy (Tune - Cindy)
Size Doesn't Matter
My Cart has a Mind of its Own (Parody of My Heart has a Mind of its Own)
Exponential Blarney (Tune - Five Nights Drunk)
Mid-Life Crisis
Phallic Fencepost
The Car Behind (Tune - Five Nights Drunk)

Anyway, I'd rather be a Plastic Folkie producing songs than a Plastic Critic.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:21 PM

When roots and folk music ever does become popularised, we'll let you know the answer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:24 PM

correct, and can sometimes alter the nature of the music, for example a record producer could say play it this way or that way, or we will add strings to this bit to make it a hit.
there was a lot of difference between let us say frank profitts tom dooley and peter paul and marys


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:26 PM

Howard, it has already happened, cast your mind back to all around my hat, tom dooley.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:32 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqInvZ9hY9Y all around my hat, words deliberately altered, in fact two songs were combined, the original all around my hat has nothing to do with the song farewell she.
what is the purpose of the rock percussion, other than to make it palatable to young consumers.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 03:34 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqInvZ9hY9Y


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:23 PM

I'm all for it. We have this great repository of songs and I reckon anyone can do them anyway they like. I might not always like the results, but that's okay, too.

Check this out: Richard Hawley sings Ellan Vannin. Lovely.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:41 PM

Play what you like - how you like. If you do something different with the music and thereby create something new and different, what does it matter? The listening public will be the arbiter, whatever you do.

I can happily sit down and listen to Lead Belly singing "Grasshoppers In My Pillow" - and then enjoy Davy Graham's take on it in his "Leaving Blues" with percussion and double bass added. Totally different - equally great. The existence of DG's version doesn't negate LBs or make it disappear.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:46 PM

but my point is not whether i am for it or against it, that is irrelevant it is whether in the process of getting altered it is taken away from its roots, if by popularising roots music we take it way fron its roots have we done a disservice to the music by altering, or by inciting musicians to alter it to make it a hi and make themselves lots of money.
Ellen vannin was written by hughie jones ,so it is not relevant it is a modern composed song


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:48 PM

furthermore richard hawley is breaching copyright, by offering ellen vannin for sale ,has he asked hughie jones?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:53 PM

There you go, and here's me thinking the 'popular taste' was the 'root'! Dick, I think if you look close enough you'll find in most cases the 'original form' WAS intended to cater for 'popular taste'.

Now where do the 'English and Scottish POPULAR Ballads' fit into your theory?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:54 PM

Dick, the answer to your question is in my reply: The existence of DG's version doesn't negate LBs or make it disappear. - i.e. the existence of modern or even 'commercialised' versions of traditional music doesn't make the original (if there is such a thing) disappear. It still exists - and, actually, it might get brought more to people's attention by the newer version.

You can't do a disservice to music, no matter what you do. It exists. It is. It may get obscured sometimes by history or by temporary lack of interest, but it's still there. And all taste is totally personal - you can't legislate for it, except in totalitarian states.

Why worry about it? You asked the question. That's my answer - for what it's worth!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:54 PM

The Ellan Vannin Tragedy
Music and Text by Hugh E. Jones (Wee Huge Publications)
        

Listen to the Song - MP3 or Watch the Video

(If you enjoy this short low bitrate MP3 sample, take a look at our CD. The FULL song is featured in high quality stereo together with 19 other tracks.)

On the morning of 3rd December 1909 the SS Ellan Vannin of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Co. left the Island at 01.13 bound for Liverpool. She was carrying 15 passengers, 21 crew plus mail and 60 tons of cargo. In command was Captain James Teare of Douglas with 18 years of experience. At departure the weather was not particularly rough, and though the barometric pressure was falling, the captain did not expect any trouble. As the passage progressed the weather rapidly deteriorated and by 06.35 when she arrived at the Mersey Bar the wind had increased to storm force 11 with 20 foot waves. She foundered between the Mersey Bar and the Q1 buoy on the Mersey approach channel. She filled with water and sank by the stern. All passengers and crew were lost.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 04:59 PM

richard hawley cannot even be bothers to check properly, it took me 5 minutes of my time to confirm it was written by hughie jones.
will, you dont get my point it is no longer roots music if its nature/style gets changed to pander to popular/hit parade/tin pan alley taste, by having to hange to be commercially succesful its nature changes it is no longer what it was.
it has absolutely nothing to do with what i like or dont like


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:02 PM

Dick,
You gave 'All Round my hat' as an example. This is a popular song from the early nineteenth century. I can show you the sheet music! By popularising it once again it is going back to its roots!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,josepp
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:06 PM

Yes, I think commercializing takes it further from its roots. Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" was based on a Willie Dixon tune and it certainly went on to become a foundation stone of hard rock and metal. T.Rex's "Jeepster" is a reworking of Howlin' Wolf's "You'll Be Mine." "Jeepster" was certainly a foundation stone for glitter rock and punk.

So, yeah, commercializing takes it out of the realm of roots music. Whether or not it does a disservice to roots is up to the listener. Personally, I say no. I've also written songs that sound rootsy but actually swiped riffs and melodies from modern rock songs. Works both ways.

Often, someone who is a big fan of a certain rock band read about this roots influence on them and starts to listen to that influence and becomes a fan of that too. So, I see nothing wrong with commercializing the stuff as long as you tip your cap to the giant shoulders upon which you stood.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:08 PM

Dick - I most certainly get the point you're making - and I repeat mine, which you don't seem to see:

It doesn't matter what you do to any music by way of style or interpretation. Everything exists side by side. If I rock up a traditional ballad with drums, bass, electric guitars and a reggae rhythm, it doesn't alter the fact that the original exists. You're not moving the music away from its roots so that it becomes obscured - you're adding another dimension to it. You're implying that a "commercial" version somehow changes the nature of the original - which, of course, it can't do. If you then want to call the commercial version of the tune "reggae" (for example), then do so.

Is "Whisky In The Jar" somehow not what it was because Thin Lizzie gave it a kick up the arse? Of course it is - it's "Whisky In The Jar".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:10 PM

The song (or theme) Farewell she/he has been traced back to a 17th century pop song which over the centuries has ben twisted and turned by many broadside hacks for commercial gain. Another one going back to its roots.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,SteveG
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:18 PM

Whiskey in the Jar in its well-known form owes its great popularity and longevity to having been printed endlessly by just about every 19thc printer in every town. Even the likely original 'Patrick Flemming' is only known from an 18thc broadside.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:30 PM

GSS, obviously Richard Hawley credits Hughie Jones as the songwriter of Ellan Vannin on his False Lights From the Land e.p. where he featured this song along with a version of Shallow Brown. All the necessary clearances and so on will have been sorted out prior to release via MCPS, and to suggest otherwise is just silly. And I know it's not a traditional song! I just used it as a recent example of a song that's become part of the folk 'canon' being reinterpreted in a different style...

I could equally have pointed towards Nick Cave singing the Lichtboy's Lassie. Or Shelagh McDonald's wonderfully funky Dowie Dens of Yarrow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 05:59 PM

Steve-
Folk music can be (and has been) defined as the musical expression of a cultural group or society.The "original form" catered to the popular taste of that particular society. Commercialization generally involves changing it to cater to the taste of a more general population, outside of that society. If it's your culture's music, you don't think of it as folk music, it's just music.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 06:51 PM

When any music stops 'speaking' to people it loses its currency and begins to disappear. ANY music, not just folk or roots music. I know people who are still in love with AC/DC, Cream, etc. But on a greater scale, while some of their stuff is still great, we can see that much of it was and is basically shite. People could sit around and make lists about the 100 greatest songs of the 20th Century. I've seen some of those lists and I like maybe 10% of the stuff that's listed, whether that be in the area of folk or rock or hard rock or bebop or big band or blues or, or, or.

Thin Lizzy's WitJ was pretty good, but my hearing of it was informed by the versions I listened to or played in the 1960's, and while it's certainly different, it is as Will Fly said still WitJ.

Electric instruments are not going to be uninvented. I'm happy that the songs themselves are still being sung/done, and even if the arrangements break with tradition, well, that's just the way it is. Sometimes commercialism results in people being exposed to music they would never have heard in any other way.

PP and M were responsible for many traditional songs being kept alive, as were the Kingston Trio, Limeliters and some others. Judy Collins and Joan Baez have both done trad songs in 'updated' forms. They made the songs accessible to people and for some that resulted in them delving into song origins and history.

However, that said, I was shocked and somewhat horrified to hear/see Barbara Ann being used in a barbeque sauce TV commercial.

Bar bar bar bar barbeque
Bar bar bar bar barbeque
etc

My remark at the time was "Is nothing sacred anymore?"

IMO


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 07:06 PM

Listen to this. More people know the words than ya can shake a stick at.

And that's what I mean. These kids/young adults in the audience are singing their music, our music. Ain't that a good thing?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 08:08 PM

Wotthehell does "good" have to do with it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,999
Date: 17 Nov 11 - 08:52 PM

Isn't it a good thing that younger people are singing a trad type song?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 06:30 AM

we are not talking about good or bad , but whether when something is taken away from its roots via commercialisation or treatment it is no longer roots music.
peter pears singing waly waly, yes its still waly waly but it aint roots music, because its treatment has turned it away from its roots.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gHTw9XjKMc


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,999
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 06:52 AM

Good Jesus!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 06:54 AM

Define "roots."

Define "golden age."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:03 AM

A folk song is a folk song. It doesn't stop being one when played on unexpected instruments, given a different arrangement or sung in a non-approved non-folk voice. For that matter, I'm not convinced that most of the stuff that passes for authentic and rootsy on the folk scene is anything of the sort - we're just conditioned by familiarity to make that assumption.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,BIg Nige
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM

Stallion, I think it was written by the late Fred Wedlock, not 100% about that but he certainly used to sing it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM

The way folk songs and tunes are treated by folk revival musicians is in most cases very different from the way they were originally performed in their "roots" environment. Do you object to this as well, or is it just "tin pan alley" versions?

Is this any more "authentic" than Steeleye Span, or Peter Pears for that matter?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:44 AM

who is talking about objecting?
here is another example, this version was a mega seller.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5SyTVrxFjc&feature=related
very differnt from frank proffits version, very different from its roots


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: johncharles
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:51 AM

There have been a number of these folk preservation threads recently.
The extreme defensiveness of some of the purists does nothing to serve their cause, rather it emphasises their insularity, and causes friction with the more liberal approach to music most people seem to have.
I have listened to a lot of "traditional" music recently and you know what; some of it is really not very good and could only benefit from a new interpretation by someone who could actually play and sing well.
Controversial I know, but go and listen to some of the archived material. As has been said earlier the original will always be there.
john


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: TheSnail
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:53 AM

I've heard tha when Frank Proffitt heard The Kingston Trio's version of Tom Dooley, he went outside and cried. He thought they were taking the piss out of him.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:58 AM

Howard,
I do not claim that my music is authentic, and I am sure steeleye span were not claiming their music was authentic, I am talking about the transformation of music FROM ITS ROOTS, in order for it to be commercial.
please do not personalise the issue,[my version of burlingtin fair is not relevant] you made an inaccurate claim earlier in the discussion about trad and roots music never being popularised, now you have put one of my videos up, in an attempt to personalise the discussion.
my recording of burlinton fair has not been a commercial hit unlike the versions i put up of allaround my hat[uk top ten] and tom dooley a hit version recorded in 1958 by The Kingston Trio. This version was a multi-format hit, reaching #1 in Billboard, the Billboard R&B listing, and appearing in the Cashbox country music top 20.
I do not consider my version of burlington fair to be either authentic or commercial.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: johncharles
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:59 AM

Dear Snail
Just listened to Tom Dooley by the Kingston trio on you tube. I can see why Mr Proffitt might want to cry.
john


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,Big Nige
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:59 AM

Why would he think that? and Bert (above) I think you've proved my point.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 08:02 AM

john charles, this is not a folk preservation thread it is this:
Is it inevitable that roots and trad music when it is popularised, becomes commercialised in the sense that its original form alters to cater for a popular taste, and thus metamorphises into something further from its roots?
the above is not a folk preservation thread, in fact it is the opposite a discussion about change.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: GUEST,Big Nige
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 08:06 AM

If it were not for the Kingston Trio's version of Tom Dooley, we probably not be talikng about it today. They could sing and play well, as you say, so why the jibe about crying? don't get it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: popularisation and commercialisation of roots/trad
From: TheSnail
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 08:18 AM

Not a jibe, Big Nige, I have every reason to believe it is a true story.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 14 November 3:51 PM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.