mudcat.org: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13]


'Occupy English Folk Music!'

dick greenhaus 15 Nov 11 - 12:19 PM
BTNG 15 Nov 11 - 10:08 AM
Will Fly 15 Nov 11 - 04:49 AM
MartinRyan 15 Nov 11 - 04:38 AM
Big Al Whittle 15 Nov 11 - 04:37 AM
Jim Carroll 15 Nov 11 - 04:05 AM
glueman 15 Nov 11 - 03:46 AM
GUEST,Ralphie 15 Nov 11 - 02:59 AM
Dave the Gnome 15 Nov 11 - 01:27 AM
johncharles 14 Nov 11 - 06:15 PM
BTNG 14 Nov 11 - 05:52 PM
The Sandman 14 Nov 11 - 04:45 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 04:27 PM
Jim Carroll 14 Nov 11 - 04:11 PM
johncharles 14 Nov 11 - 02:06 PM
johncharles 14 Nov 11 - 02:03 PM
BTNG 14 Nov 11 - 10:57 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 10:50 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 10:44 AM
Jim Carroll 14 Nov 11 - 10:40 AM
BTNG 14 Nov 11 - 10:32 AM
GUEST,Jon 14 Nov 11 - 10:22 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 10:13 AM
glueman 14 Nov 11 - 09:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 14 Nov 11 - 08:30 AM
Jack Blandiver 14 Nov 11 - 08:29 AM
johncharles 14 Nov 11 - 08:06 AM
Spleen Cringe 14 Nov 11 - 07:55 AM
Spleen Cringe 14 Nov 11 - 07:53 AM
Jack Blandiver 14 Nov 11 - 07:50 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 07:36 AM
Jim Carroll 14 Nov 11 - 07:19 AM
Big Al Whittle 14 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Nov 11 - 06:25 AM
TheSnail 14 Nov 11 - 06:03 AM
glueman 14 Nov 11 - 06:03 AM
Jim Carroll 14 Nov 11 - 05:52 AM
Spleen Cringe 14 Nov 11 - 04:49 AM
Big Al Whittle 14 Nov 11 - 04:08 AM
Jim Carroll 14 Nov 11 - 02:45 AM
Big Al Whittle 13 Nov 11 - 07:18 PM
Spleen Cringe 13 Nov 11 - 03:48 PM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 11 - 03:25 PM
The Sandman 13 Nov 11 - 02:46 PM
glueman 13 Nov 11 - 12:55 PM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 11 - 12:47 PM
glueman 13 Nov 11 - 11:47 AM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 11 - 11:35 AM
Jim Carroll 13 Nov 11 - 11:31 AM
johncharles 13 Nov 11 - 11:18 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 12:19 PM

US folk music got occupied back in the 60s.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: BTNG
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 10:08 AM

ITMA was originally a reference to Hitler by the press of the time, but you could apply it elsewhere if you want......

Go here if you want to hear ITMA


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Will Fly
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 04:49 AM

Can I do yer now sir?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: MartinRyan
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 04:38 AM

problem is there's only you and me old enough to remember "that man again"!


Not true, I'm afraid - it still makes me grin regularly!

Regards


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 04:37 AM

Thanks a lot for those Jim. I finally got it. I had to copy them all, paste them onto a word document and then look at them one by one.

I spent yesterday trying to access them from mudcat and of course given the ungainly size of this thread. My computer was going into the 'oh hell! whats this idiot doing now!' mode.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 04:05 AM

Sean
"Dancing at the Crossroads" was a phrase coined by DeValera back in the 30s - a romantic image of Ireland that he himself helped to shatter by allowing the church to outlaw the crossroads dances and drive the dancers and musicians into the newly constructed 'Ballrooms of Romance' (using the excuse of the protection of the chastity of the "maidens") It has nothing to do with Irish music today, if it ever had.
"Tommy Handley"
It's been commented on before Ralphie - problem is there's only you and me old enough to remember "that man again"!
John
Don't want to start a pissing English/Irish contest, but private collections such as ours are a minute part of the work of ITMA; it also houses (or aims to) every commercial recording of Irish (and related) traditional music ever made, and comes with a studio to interview, record and film visiting singers, musicians and researchers.
It co-operates in the issuing of new albums and published works and Nicholas Carolan, the director is now into the 14th series - (it began in 1994) - archive film of traditional music presented on national television in both English and Irish language versions.
It records many of the weekend festivals here, so it is not just an archive for past material - it is a living, working organisation which has been vital to the success of the Irish music scene here.
We went to the opening (it was opened by the President of Ireland, Mary Robinson) in 1987 with Malcom Taylor and were all gobsmacked when it only shared a couple of floors with the Irish Society of Antiquaries; they moved to new premises, an entire five storey Georgean house in the centre of Dublin.
It is one of two national archives of folk/traditional material in Dublin; the other is housed at University College Dublin and covers a wider range of material - tales, folkore, customs, etc.
Hate to hark back to the original argument, but this has not been achieved by flapping arms about and claiming "we don't know what "folk music" is any more" - if we don't, nobody is going to shell out taxpayers money for a non defined and diverse unknown entity.
There is room for all kinds of music in the set-up here, but the fact that all the work is rooted more-or-less in what is covered by that somewhat inconvenient '1954' definition means that Irish traditional music has a clear identity - and strangely enough, it is that identity that has attracted the youngsters to the music in droves, without them ever being aware of 1954, but simply by recognising it when they hear it.
Is the identity of our folk music really so complicated that we have to get involved in crassly titled arguments such as "Occupy English Folk Music" as if we're in some sort of a ******* war?
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: glueman
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 03:46 AM

What is the topic in question here? Do you stay on topic when you chat in the pub? This thread is a bunch of opinions, not a PhD proposal. The democratic nature of the internet means there is no hierarchy, just people chipping in their two penn'orth, like it or lump it.

The pleasure of a forum is down to people being able to say their bit, exercise their hobby horses, disagree, kiss each other's a***s confident in the knowledge the topic will re-emerge somewhere down the line. There's too much pedantry as it is without putting meaning in harness to a subjective, intuitive riff of a thread title.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Ralphie
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 02:59 AM

Just noticed the acronym "ITMA"....Not quite sure how Tommy Handley (It's that man again) is relevant....OK. Back to your discussion.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 15 Nov 11 - 01:27 AM

600!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: johncharles
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 06:15 PM

some one should start a thread/campaign to open the digital archives so we can all share the music,after all our taxes pay for it.
I am not the best person to do this as I am not very good at organising but I would definitely suppport it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: BTNG
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 05:52 PM

It appears to have become yet another forum for what is and what is not folk, whatever folk means....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: The Sandman
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 04:45 PM

to quote Fred Trueman, i dont know what the bloody hell is going on out there, can we get back to.. occupy english folk music


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 04:27 PM

The one you enigmatcally titled "Maidens dancing at the Crossroads"

That was a link to a picture based on something Big Al said; no point other than a visual take on the romance of it all, assuming that's what he was getting at. Clicking on the link now, it doesn't work. Here it is again:

Maidens dancing at the Crossroads

Looking for the image, I came across this poem in connection with it with I find deeply affecting...

She was a summer dance at the crossroads.
She was a card game where a nose was broken.
She was a song that nobody sings.
She was a house ransacked by soldiers.
She was a language seldom spoken.
She was a child's purse, full of useless things.


[Michael Hartnett (1941-1999), "Death of an Irishwoman," in Staying Alive: Real Poems for Unreal Times, ed. Neil Astley]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 04:11 PM

John,
Thanks for that - I am delightd it has happened at last.
Still doesn't solve the problem of acquiring privately held collections (we listed around 50 twenty years ago), but at least it seems to be a worthwhile collection.
Can't really say how it compares with ITMA; they only started putting material up on the web a year or so ago, but I know their in-house collection is enormous.
One of the developments here is the setting up of local archives (usually county-based); the Clare one has some way to go before we start making our recordings available but we've bought a house in the town which has been renovated as a musical visitors centre.
Sean
The one you enigmatcally titled "Maidens dancing at the Crossroads"
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: johncharles
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 02:06 PM

BLUE CLICKY

national sound archive
JOHN


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: johncharles
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 02:03 PM

Dear Jim
I have just had a look at the National Sound Archive web site
http://sounds.bl.uk/Browse.aspx?collection=Traditional-music-in-England&browseby=Browse+by+performer&choice=P-R
I clicked on walter Pardon and had a quick listen, was suprised how much is available. Going to Folk club now but will check more later. It certainly seems to compare well with the Irish equivalent.
John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: BTNG
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:57 AM

"Folk Against Absolutism"

Now that I like


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:50 AM

I seem to remember my comment (before the hissy-fit) was that they had become non-narrative

No hissy-fit, Jim - and neither have they become non-narrative, only in your opinion.

Sorry Sean - don't get the point of your link

What link?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:44 AM

In 1984 - 1998?

I was thinking of how the CD-Rs could be backed up and even improved upon from the original analogue tape-stock with excellent results for not much outlay other than precious time. And DAT would have been a far better option than CD-R. According to WIKI the CD-R / WO was introduced in 1988, a year after DAT. I'd be very surprised if any of them still work, unlike DAT. Time was, owing to the failure rate of CD-Rs I used to back up my digital archives on cassette; these days SD cards suffice - as well as the ubiquitous H4 (retired from field work, we now use it exclusively for mastering) we run a Zoom R24 for all our main recording work. Not a moving part in the entire operation until it makes it onto the lap-top...

That's a point - has anyone released an album on SD card yet?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:40 AM

"Saying he's singing ballads the wrong way is not criticism"
Did I say he was singing them "the wrong way"? I seem to remember my comment (before the hissy-fit) was that they had become non-narrative and therefore something else - right and wrong didn't come into it. I went on to express the opinion that ballads, by definition, are narrative songs.
There followed a long and incresingly bitter tooing-and-froeing where I feel my argument was totally and rather spitefully misrepresented - prepared to pull out the relevent bits, but would rather not open old woundds.
Sean has contiued to distort my attitude - each time I have asked him to clarify his distortions I have been met with silence.
Sorry John - don't get the irony - our depositing our collecton at NSA was one of the instigations to developing the archive from non-British (largely African and Asian) to include British traditional material (Lucy Duran was in charge at the time and a massive instigator of this).
While we were happy that our recordings were to be held there we have always thought the whole archive could have been more usable - which is why we pushed for the development of a fully accessible archive - there or somewhere else. What I do find ironic is that the NSA houses the earliest and one of the most important set of recordings of folk songs ever made, the Grainger Collection, which, as far as I am aware, remains virtually inaccessible.
Personally, I still find the British Library, where the collection is housed, a fairly forbidding experience to visit and while we were happy to see the 'Bright Golden Store' project embarked on, its limited resources meant it could not even begin to tackle the recordings of traditional material existing unarchived in the UK, let alone make them generally available, which was the point of our depositing our recordings there in the first place - it still seems very much hand-to-mouth and inaccessible.
The Irish Traditional Music Archive, on the other hand, has taken full advantage of the change of heart of the Irish establishment and is putting up new material on a monthly basis - suggest you ask Malcolm Taylor or Derek Schofied how it has progressed
Sorry Sean - don't get the point of your link - we tend not to have competing threads entitled "Occupy Irish Folk Music" and fight for the scraps fallen from the establishment's table - Irish music caters for a broad church with a wide ranging congregation.
Explain please!!
What do you think of my "crossroads" examples?
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: BTNG
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:32 AM

"I foresee a real cultural disaster to make this board's spats insignificant when our last century of sound and vision go 'pfutt'."

Then what do you suggest?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:22 AM

All you need is a basic audio interface for your computer / laptop (try the Behringer UCA202 - £30 top

In 1984 - 1998?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 10:13 AM

OTOH - who needs a permanent record anyway? All culture is flux & flow; things come, things go & we could do without the accumulated clutter and people getting too much bogged down in the past. I believe, with good reason, that Popular Musical Culture is an Unbroken Tradition of some 50,000 summers duration, and counting. For sure, there will be cherished residue, but let's keep it in perspective. All things have their time; all things must pass; but the Tradition of Living Human Music will endure as long as there are Living Humans to do it (and others to sneer at the for not doing it right).

The answer to digital corruption is simple though: if you treasure it, back it up!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: glueman
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 09:08 AM

Speaking as a recorder of traditions, I'm seriously concerned about the reliability of current methods of data archiving. One chap I spoke to says half of his older memory sticks were corrupt and his CDs were degrading rapidly, even in optimised conditions. Hard drives are notoriously prone to letting go.
I foresee a real cultural disaster to make this board's spats insignificant when our last century of sound and vision go 'pfutt'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 08:30 AM

Whoops SOP. Cross posted.

Great minds, Mr Spleen...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 08:29 AM

581 open reel tapes dubbed to recordable compact disc

OMG! I hope they've kept the original reel tapes to go back to when the CD-Rs go on the fritz. All you need is a basic audio interface for your computer / laptop (try the Behringer UCA202 - £30 top) and you'd be able to do the job yourself on £30 software (I mastered our last album using Soundforge and we've had no complaints) & saving as WAVs / FLACs / even MP3s & backing up to far more reliable media than CD-Rs. Give me an earwax-cylinder any day - at least then you'd have something to listen to 100 years hence....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: johncharles
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 08:06 AM

it seems somewhat ironic given how great Ireland is in terms of funding and preserving traditions that:- "In 1984 the National Sound Archive began to acquire, preserve and catalogue the collection of field recordings made by Jim Carroll and Pat Mackenzie. The end of 1998 saw the completion of the project with the acquisition of the remainder of the collection and a total of 581 open reel tapes dubbed to recordable compact disc and fully catalogued on the NSA automated system." john


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:55 AM

Whoops SOP. Cross posted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:53 AM

I looked at that Robin Hood thread you directed me to, Jim. I don't see any evidence that Sean can't take criticism. Saying he's singing ballads the wrong way is not criticism, it's simply an assertion that there is an strictly defined right way of going about things that Sean (or Steeleye Span or the Young Tradition or Folk Choirs or anyone else who you assert doesn't measure up) falls short of. You are quite within your rights to say you don't like Sean's approach to ballad singing, even that you detest it if you want to: you don't even need to justify your stance - personal taste is all horses for courses. To say it's wrong, though, is elevating critical opinion to some sort of objective absolute.

If there is one true and correct way of doing it, what is it? And what is it measured against? And who is empowered to wield the yardstick? And who measures them? And where does it leave those of us whose tastes in ballad singing are different to or more liberal than that?

On the other thread you approvingly quote Ewan McColl as saying the greatest threat to folk music is that it should fall into the hands of people who neither like nor understand it. That's the sort of soul crushing statement that has the power to drain folk music of every last drop of humanity and joy. I much prefer what Martin Carthy said: words to the effect of: The worst thing you can do to folk music is ignore it...

Folk Against Absolutism. That's an organisation I'd join...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:50 AM

PS

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music_of_Ireland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Traditional_Music_Archive

http://www.oac.ie/site/content/willie-clancy-summer-school-2011

http://www.pipers.ie/

http://www.artscouncil.ie/Publications/traditional_arts_eng.pdf

Maidens Dancing at the Crossroads


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:36 AM

I suggest that if you are really interested in what this is all about you look up the recent 'Robin Hood Ballads'thread

In which my only crime was to suggest (as the thread requested) a Robin Hood ballad to listen to. That my suggestion was our setting of Child #102, Jim responded with his customary stream of infantile bilious put-downs because it didn't fit in with his elitist state-funded scheme of how such material really ought to be sung - despite the fact that I've never heard any Traditional Singer sing Child #102, and only Revival singers I've heard were Spiers and Boden who did a version few years back, but many years after our recording was featured on the first volume of John Barleycorn Reborn (not that I'm suggesting their version was in anyway inspired or influenced by ours). Since Jim seemed so convinced that we were so off the mark in our interpretation, I suggested that he was privy to some darker secret lore on ballad singing; some heremetic tradition which qualified his absolutist hysteria, and his willingness to stamp out the efforts of infidels such as ourselves - and The Watersons, Mr Fox, The Young Tradition and Steeleye Span if I remember rightly.

as he refuses to qualify what he says I am left with "I can't get a grant so the system must be crap"

Like I say, I've rejected a lot of Arts Council money in my time & regard arts funding as fundamentally immoral when it could be better spent elsewhere. As of the present moment I neither want nor need Arts Council funding. This isn't an absolute rule, for there are many exceptions, and many deserving causes where I feel arts council money would come in very handy indeed, but, for the most part, the best of it happens because of the passion and hard work of those involved & pays for itself as a result. That's generally the way things happen over here anyway, for those who work very hard at the Folkface however thin the seam might be, and however small the reward.

*

I'm convinced that it won't happen until some sort of consensus is reached on what folk music is about

Well, you'd know all about consensus, Jim - meanwhile, Folk just does what it likes without worrying what it's about. Maybe we should start a What is Folk About? thread to address that very issue and see how many answers we come up with...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:19 AM

"have you got a blue clicky for that Jim?"
Sorry - never got my head around the blue clickie - about 2/3 weeks ago in the archive.
I'm sorry nobody in the UK gets the grants they deserve for their endevours - god knows, we tried hard enough when we were trying to launch a national archive.
I'm convinced that it won't happen until some sort of consensus is reached on what folk music is about
In the meantime - this gives an example of your 'maidens dancing at the crossroads'"
Jim Carroll

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folk_music_of_Ireland
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Traditional_Music_Archive
http://www.oac.ie/site/content/willie-clancy-summer-school-2011
http://www.pipers.ie/
http://www.artscouncil.ie/Publications/traditional_arts_eng.pdf


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 07:04 AM

have you got a blue clicky for that Jim?

Personally I'm sorry Sweeney can't get a grant for his endeavours. Sometimes its not the financial thing - its just recognition you need. I'm in no position to comment on his work - I don't know it, or him. However judging from all his contributions to mudcat - it must be something he cares deeply about.

I made an enquiry about a grant one time.   It was after I'd seen this really crap performance poet, who'd got World Council tours, his cd financed, and all sorts of subsidy - and I figured I could use some of that.

However you've got to face facts, some of us are just common as muck and whatever class system is in operation - we're at the bottom.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 06:25 AM

think you'll find that it is the opposite way around Spleen - Sean as been maikg sweeping dismissals of folksong, researchers, academics..... and refusing to qualify, them

Jim, if you actually bothered to read my posts you'd find that rather than making sweeping dismissals, I'm pointing out basic problems of folkloric approach & methodology which in no way interferes with my overall relationship to the subject itself, in which I take a keen interest. You react against everything I say with a barrage of bluster, name dropping, put downs & personal insults. It's an irksome trend for sure, but all along I've striven to be civil, only to met with the irrationality and hysteria that typify your response to pretty much anything I say. Remember this is a discussion forum, not an academic peer-review; we're just talking about stuff, knocking ideas around. I really don't have the time nor the inclination (in this context) to reference and footnote everything I say, which is pretty much self-evident anyway.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: TheSnail
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 06:03 AM

Jim Carroll

A classic example has been is attacks on Irish music's success and the backing it has received from the Arts Council.

You, of course Jim, never make any sweeping dismissals of UK folk clubs or the people that run them.

We had a great evening with Chris Coe and John Adams. Lots of excellent traditional and "in the tradition" music and song from them and floorsingers alike. Next Saturday we have Carole Etherton and Andrew McKay (who is very Welsh). As well as their own songs, strongly influenced by traditional music, they are sure to sing a few from Phil Tanner since they live in Llangenith.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: glueman
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 06:03 AM

An internet forum requires three things, first a willingness to engage with others, second, a commitment to logic, third, a sense of goodwill. If posters lack those it needs firm moderation to impose them. I see neither in evidence on this thread.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 05:52 AM

"I think what Sweeney is trying to say is that the Irish state sponsored folk scheme seems a bit 'maidens dancing at the crossroads'"
Which is crass enough in itself but as he refuses to qualify what he says I am left with "I can't get a grant so the system must be crap"
The support for traditional music - after many years of it being marginalised has put Irish music, in all forms, on the map - especially with young people, and Sean's contempt is an example of one of the reasons that this has not happened in the UK - which was my reasong for bringing it up here.
I suggest that if you are really interested in what this is all about you look up the recent 'Robin Hood Ballads'thread
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 04:49 AM

Jim... can you not see the difference between challenging an opinion and attacking the individual who holds that opinion?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 04:08 AM

I dunno Jim. To be honest, we've got our share of swotty kids in this country - to be found at every folk festival in the land as they empty every performance space available, smirking their way through three slip jigs and a hornpipe.

I think what Sweeney is trying to say is that the Irish state sponsored folk scheme seems a bit 'maidens dancing at the crossroads' sort of thing. More Irish Post than Hot Press.

And the Irish Post has closed down.

I don't think he means any harm. He's just got reservations.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Nov 11 - 02:45 AM

"And your repeated attacks on Sean for holding views contrary to your own do you no favours"
I think you'll find that it is the opposite way around Spleen - Sean as been maikg sweeping dismissals of folksong, researchers, academics..... and refusing to qualify, them on this forum for a very long time
A classic example has been is attacks on Irish music's success and the backing it has received from the Arts Council.
You might like to qualify your statement - he refuses to qualify his.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 07:18 PM

yes its a bit of a dirty scrap.

There really is so much that unites us. Its a pity we can't isolate that, and just stick to it.

I suppose the thread title with its military ring is a bit of a rallying call for us to fall out. I don't want to occupy any space where I'm not welcome, and I suspect that's true of all of us.

In the seventies in Brum, when we organised a folk festival - every club in the city was invited to participate. We need a bit of that spirit of cooperation, if we are to advance our separate causes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 03:48 PM

It's, out of the blue, one of the best, most intriguing, simultaneously fascinating and entertaining debuts out of the UK folk scene in a long time. Ian A Anderson, fRoots, on Sean and Rachel's Sons From The Barley Temple.

Luckily not everyone shares your views, Jim. And your repeated attacks on Sean for holding views contrary to your own do you no favours. Let's keep to debating ideas rather than getting personnal.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 03:25 PM

"What about Peter Kennedy, you never mentioned him, the only man to collect neilidh boyle"
We tend to not talk about Peter Kennedy - whatever 'good' he did was balanced out by his damage - still being repaired.
And for the record - Peter Kennedy recorded Neilidh Boyle along with Sean O'Boyle; it's fairly common that the people who introduced Kennedy to his informants don't get mentioned) and Alan Lomax beat them both to it by about two years (January 1951)
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: The Sandman
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 02:46 PM

Over this side of the Irish Sea Tom Munnelly would be a main influence - knitting machinist, singer turned collector - awarded a doctorate by Galway University a month or so before his death. Even the early collectors - the hangovers from the Victorian era, actually got their hands dirty at the 'folkface'. Sharp and Karpeles - the favourite target of knockers like Sean, traipsed around the Somerset and into the Appalachians (and in Karpeles case, into Newfoundland) and brought back a goldmine of songs which they attempted to make sense of.
What about Peter Kennedy, you never mentioned him, the only man to collect neilidh boyle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: glueman
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 12:55 PM

My brother, twenty years my senior, had an undiagnosed mental condition (as many were in that era) that made him subject to wild mood swings, paranoia and precipitate violent outbursts, much of it based on flimsy or non-existent pretexts. I doubt whether anything you throw my way, will be unprecedented Jim. Enjoy your beliefs, whatever they may be but most of all be happy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 12:47 PM

"Thanks for the heads up Jim"
Oooo! its the little grass who wuns to sir when he can't hack an argument - and who encourages his kids to deal in "STOLEN GOODS" in the shape of "thieved" folk songs
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: glueman
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 11:47 AM

Thanks for the heads up Jim, devoid of context as usual. Personally I think you're courting the martyrdom of being banned for antisocial behaviour, the final act of betrayal by an uncaring folk world. Anything collected without pay is a kind of theft I suppose, though I was making a different point entirely. As for 'boasting' of teaching kids shanties, I'm not into folk Legolands or Disneyworlds, state sponsored or otherwise. If the children know shanties, which they do, it won't be through my social engineering.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 11:35 AM

Sorry cross-posted -
"Dr Desi Wilkinson"
Very fine flute player and singer.
Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 11:31 AM

John - you are of course right - there are a handful of academics in the UK. I was reacting to your - them-and-us description, which I feel presents a totally false picture. My own experience began where research and performance fed into one another - singer/academics like Bert Lloyd, Vic Gammon, George Deacon, David Atkinson, Bob Thomson - typified by the only one I recognise on your list, Ian Russell - singer, morris-dancer, musician, collector - eventually professor. The rest of your list could be quantum phyicists as far as they have influenced what I understand as "folk". Over this side of the Irish Sea Tom Munnelly would be a main influence - knitting machinist, singer turned collector - awarded a doctorate by Galway University a month or so before his death. Even the early collectors - the hangovers from the Victorian era, actually got their hands dirty at the 'folkface'. Sharp and Karpeles - the favourite target of knockers like Sean, traipsed around the Somerset and into the Appalachians (and in Karpeles case, into Newfoundland) and brought back a goldmine of songs which they attempted to make sense of. Given their pioneering status, they didn't make too bad a job of it, though I would be the first to agree that it could do with updating. All of these have in some way contributed to my understanding of folk from the body of material we had in the early sixties. The much reviled 1954 definition worked for me as a singer seeking a deeper understanding of the songs I sang and it worked for me as a collector trying to find out how the singers we were recording understood and related to their songs - much of which we managed to record. I resent being told by armchair critics like Sean that I and people like me in any way attempted to tamper with what we found - one rather unpleasant piece of work described all collectors as "thieves" (though he boasted teaching his children sea shanties - making him a latter day Fagin, I suppose) The problem isn't that "folk" has come to mean something else, (to the vast majority of people it doesn't mean anything) but that it has lost any meaning whatever, in the revival, that is. We no longer have a consensus as to what we mean - that can't be good for either singers or researchers. Lloyd put it best in Folk Song in England; "If 'Little Boxes' and 'The Red Flag' are folks songs, we need a new term to describe 'The Outlandish Knight', 'Searching Fror Lambs' and 'The Coalowner and the Pitman's Wife' - to which I can only add "or vise versa'.

Jim Carroll


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: 'Occupy English Folk Music!'
From: johncharles
Date: 13 Nov 11 - 11:18 AM

An interesting case it put here by an academic for some of the "Traditional "   Irish ballads originating in England. I suppose the 1954 definiton of folk would cover this. However, it does show the folk process and there is every reason to suspect this continues today.
Around the Hills of Clare: Songs and a Recitation from the Jim Carroll and Pat Mackenzie Collection.
The songs are a mix of the very local, notably the bucolic title-track, 'Around the Hills of Clare', the grand pan-Irish, and a smattering of the general inheritance of balladry and narrative song in the English language. The latter suggests that broadsheet ballads, sometimes originating in England, were disseminated far and wide. In some cases, they doubtless found their way to the south-west of Ireland and were passed on from generation to generation long enough for them to mutate seamlessly into the local accent, to become part of the local tradition. Tom Lenihan's beautiful rendition of 'The Constant Farmer's Son' is an example of this, as is 'The Old Armchair' ('Fair Margaret and Sweet William').
(http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Around+the+Hills+of+Clare%3A+Songs+and+a+Recitation+from+the+Jim...-a0156004573)
DESI WILKINSON University of Newcastle

Dr Desi Wilkinson, has research interests in Celtic and Breton folk musics.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 22 October 2:41 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.