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British Folk Art

GUEST,Mike Yatres. 23 May 11 - 05:50 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 23 May 11 - 05:09 AM
GUEST,Mike Yates 23 May 11 - 04:23 AM
JohnInKansas 22 May 11 - 09:36 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 22 May 11 - 04:37 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 03:51 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 22 May 11 - 03:39 PM
Dave the Gnome 22 May 11 - 03:39 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 22 May 11 - 03:36 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 03:34 PM
Dave the Gnome 22 May 11 - 03:24 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 22 May 11 - 03:19 PM
glueman 22 May 11 - 02:17 PM
catspaw49 22 May 11 - 01:47 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 01:33 PM
GUEST,Eliza 22 May 11 - 01:23 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 01:20 PM
glueman 22 May 11 - 01:06 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 12:17 PM
glueman 22 May 11 - 12:06 PM
GUEST,lively 22 May 11 - 11:38 AM
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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Mike Yatres.
Date: 23 May 11 - 05:50 AM

I didn't know that there were still so many copies available! By the way, if you are looking for a book on French folk art, then I like Jean Cuisenier's "French Folk Art",published by Kodansha International, Ltd., Tokyo, New York & San Francisco. 1976. I got my copy a few years back from Barter Books in Alnwick, Northumberland. There are probably other copies still available.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 23 May 11 - 05:09 AM

A search on Abebooks reveals a few:

North Country Folk Art


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Mike Yates
Date: 23 May 11 - 04:23 AM

One of the best books on the subject is Peter Brears' "North Country Folk Art", published by John Donald of Edinburgh, in 1989. Although published in Scotland it deals with English folk art and covers all aspects of popular art. It is also full of excellent illustrations. It may be hard to find these day, but it is worth the effort!


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 22 May 11 - 09:36 PM

Although the term "Folk Art" works pretty well for the US, it's likely that what you're looking for is categorized differently for other cultures. In the US, there were (and are) settlements of immigrants who came together, stayed - for a time - together, and thereby "segregated" styles that, while they existed in the "homelands," were merged sufficiently there to be less noted. "British" also has a longer "industrial" tradition that probably buries the sort of "primitive" stuff you want amongst the "commercially manufactured collectibles."

While it's likely not the sort of thing you're looking for, I've noted that British artists (or Frenchmen painting to order for British clients) prior to the mid 20th century had a very distinctive (and IMO "peculiar") way of drawing/painting horses, with scrawny long necks and pointy noses so that they looked like long-legged wolverines.

For "primitive paintings," and especially for symbols/signs, perhaps a search for architectural styles from a particular time and place might be a way of finding how houses and barns etc. were decorated in distinctive sytles. I would suspect that "British" is too broad a category to be too revealing, but a more specific district/region within the British realms might get more helpful results.

Symbolisms often are revealed in "advertising" if you can pin down a place and time, or a style of ads like patent medicines or farm implements that provide a few hits. Cigar boxes often had rich symbolisms in the US, although I don't know how common that was elsewhere.

In the US, there are a few - but pretty good - resources that crop up in a search for "Erotic Folk Art," (tame by current standards, but some of it is pretty cute).

If the first search term you think of doesn't work, you'll need to come up with a different set of terms that's in better agreement with what the thing is called by the people who own the secrets you want. Finding collectors of what you want would likely be most fruitful, especially if they've got an "organization."

John


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 22 May 11 - 04:37 PM

Quite perfect for tattoos too

Tattoos are certainly Folk Art - and I have a Crawhall motif on my bum. Too much information, as usual...

What's your medium anyway? I'm currently repruducing medieval vernacular chuch carving (green men / triple hares / Hereford romanesque) in polished painted plaster using latex moulds from my own clay sculptures. Looking good...


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:51 PM

"Check that Crawhall link"

Ah, Wickerman central! Quite perfect for tattoos too.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:39 PM

I'm looking for olden days stuff by ignorant rural retards that I can steal and wreak irreverent havoc with

Check that Crawhall link; he was hardly a retard, but an educated gentleman who drew on the old traditions of vernacular woodcutting so well beloved of us Broadside browsers!


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:39 PM

Should have said before (I'll probably be in trouble whether I post it or not!) How about folk-based art

Cheers

DtG


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:36 PM

PS - Folk Art, like Folk Music & Folklore, is more often than not a matter of perception than intention. Below the line is a thread about a 10,000 y.o. megalithic site which is somehow Folklore. Go figure...


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:34 PM

"none of which might be the sort of thing lively is looking for"

Indeed Suibhne, I'm looking for olden days stuff by ignorant rural retards that I can steal and wreak irreverent havoc with.
Hope that helps... :)


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:24 PM

If Folk Roots has become F Roots can Folk Art become F Ar...

Oh, I guess not.

:D tG


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 22 May 11 - 03:19 PM

I'm sure Wallis would turn in his grave if you called his work Folk Art, glueman. Just seems kind of wrong somehow, like calling Ivor Cutler Folk Music. But then again, when you consider the amount of art being done by British Outsiders, then one night ponder the nature of Folk (What is Folk Art anyone? What's that? Never seen a horse make a picture?). Otherwise, anything in the traditional & generally anonymous vernacular - from medieval misericords to modern hip-hop grafitti tags would suffice, none of which might be the sort of thing lively is looking for (as we've seen again & again on Mudcat, Folk is very often a matter of what isn't rather than what is - & I'm still frankly mystified as to what is meant by the term Folk Arts).

Joseph Crawhall II wasn't Folk either, though his quaint woodcuts & decorative motifs certainly have an abiding Folk feel & will be familiar to many Folkies - see Here for a fine selection of his amazing work.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: glueman
Date: 22 May 11 - 02:17 PM

Have a look at the work of Alfred Wallis and similar British naive/folk artists.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: catspaw49
Date: 22 May 11 - 01:47 PM

I would think a beautiful British Folk Art painting would depiict a ship loaded with every Concertina in the world sinking 75 miles west of Fastnet Rock..................


Spaw


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 01:33 PM

Good point Eliza, I have just ordered a title from Amazon called 'Castles and Roses'.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 22 May 11 - 01:23 PM

There's canal boat art, 'Castles and Roses'. And pub signs!


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 01:20 PM

OK, well we can ditch the "motif" term then. What I'm after is resources for British folk art, preferably in the painted medium. Information on resources for regionally specific folk art, preferably in the painted medium, would be best of all.

As said there seems to be a huge amount of folk art (in various mediums) from the US out there, but I don't know where to look for sources closer to home.

It's a good point about 70's album covers, but I really don't want to imbibe the period aesthetic overlay. Had enough of that as a kid.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: glueman
Date: 22 May 11 - 01:06 PM

Not sure what you mean by motifs in the context of folk art. There are recurring symbols each with their own heritage. I'm not trying to be obtuse but it's not simply a case of saying people in Sussex liked painting egg and dart patterns or fleurs de lys and those in Durham painted trefoils and ducks. There will be a historical reasons and probably a technical one too depending on the medium.

You could look through some old folk rock covers from the 1970s but they'll tell you about 70s culture, not ideograms and cyphers of the native culture.


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 12:17 PM

Painting folk art motifs is what I'm after. And I'd like to learn about different regional styles within the UK.

I think covered that in the OP, tho' I could possibly have been clearer in the thread title :)


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Subject: RE: British Folk Art
From: glueman
Date: 22 May 11 - 12:06 PM

It might be useful to narrow it down. Bodging, embroidery, scrimshaw, painting, plus a few dozen others.


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Subject: British Folk Art
From: GUEST,lively
Date: 22 May 11 - 11:38 AM

Dear Mudcatters, can anyone direct me to useful resources for British (and also European) folk art?

My interest is primarily practical, as I wish to explore painting traditional folk motifs for myself.

I have found a lot on the internet on American folk art, but far less for folk art from the UK.

In particular I would like to learn more about specific regional styles and techniques.


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