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BS: Language Pet Peeves

Alvin-Songster 02 Oct 10 - 11:31 AM
GUEST,999 02 Oct 10 - 11:48 AM
MGM·Lion 02 Oct 10 - 12:09 PM
michaelr 02 Oct 10 - 12:12 PM
catspaw49 02 Oct 10 - 12:50 PM
akenaton 02 Oct 10 - 01:06 PM
catspaw49 02 Oct 10 - 01:25 PM
YorkshireYankee 02 Oct 10 - 03:38 PM
Wesley S 02 Oct 10 - 04:35 PM
MGM·Lion 02 Oct 10 - 04:44 PM
maple_leaf_boy 02 Oct 10 - 05:13 PM
Richard Bridge 02 Oct 10 - 05:51 PM
Richard Bridge 02 Oct 10 - 05:52 PM
Uncle_DaveO 02 Oct 10 - 06:15 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Oct 10 - 07:28 PM
Uncle_DaveO 02 Oct 10 - 09:01 PM
Phil Cooper 02 Oct 10 - 09:33 PM
michaelr 02 Oct 10 - 10:12 PM
Jim Dixon 02 Oct 10 - 11:01 PM
katlaughing 02 Oct 10 - 11:42 PM
GUEST,Bert 03 Oct 10 - 01:49 AM
The Fooles Troupe 03 Oct 10 - 01:55 AM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM
Dave Hanson 03 Oct 10 - 03:30 AM
Liz the Squeak 03 Oct 10 - 04:01 AM
GUEST,FloraG 03 Oct 10 - 04:01 AM
Abdul The Bul Bul 03 Oct 10 - 04:53 AM
Wyrd Sister 03 Oct 10 - 05:19 AM
Paul Burke 03 Oct 10 - 05:37 AM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 05:51 AM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 06:47 AM
Paul Burke 03 Oct 10 - 09:27 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Oct 10 - 10:00 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Oct 10 - 10:08 AM
GUEST,999 03 Oct 10 - 10:11 AM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 12:02 PM
Uncle_DaveO 03 Oct 10 - 12:48 PM
Ed T 03 Oct 10 - 01:13 PM
MGM·Lion 03 Oct 10 - 01:15 PM
YorkshireYankee 03 Oct 10 - 01:39 PM
Penny S. 03 Oct 10 - 03:35 PM
Penny S. 03 Oct 10 - 03:40 PM
katlaughing 03 Oct 10 - 03:57 PM
The Fooles Troupe 03 Oct 10 - 06:27 PM
maple_leaf_boy 03 Oct 10 - 06:41 PM
Richard Bridge 03 Oct 10 - 09:37 PM
GUEST,leeneia 03 Oct 10 - 09:39 PM
Slag 03 Oct 10 - 11:44 PM
Darowyn 04 Oct 10 - 03:52 AM
Wolfhound person 04 Oct 10 - 04:09 AM
GUEST,Patsy 04 Oct 10 - 05:23 AM
s&r 04 Oct 10 - 05:59 AM
s&r 04 Oct 10 - 06:08 AM
Wyrd Sister 04 Oct 10 - 06:24 AM
GUEST,Nigel 04 Oct 10 - 08:02 AM
Hrothgar 04 Oct 10 - 08:32 AM
GUEST,Patsy 04 Oct 10 - 08:59 AM
Jeanie 04 Oct 10 - 09:30 AM
Uncle_DaveO 04 Oct 10 - 10:19 AM
Penny S. 04 Oct 10 - 10:36 AM
s&r 04 Oct 10 - 10:45 AM
GUEST,CrazyEddie 04 Oct 10 - 10:51 AM
GUEST,leeneia 04 Oct 10 - 11:11 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:13 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:18 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:26 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:28 AM
Richard Bridge 04 Oct 10 - 11:29 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:29 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:35 AM
Manitas_at_home 04 Oct 10 - 11:39 AM
MGM·Lion 04 Oct 10 - 11:41 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:42 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:46 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 11:52 AM
McGrath of Harlow 04 Oct 10 - 01:28 PM
Penny S. 04 Oct 10 - 01:34 PM
s&r 04 Oct 10 - 01:38 PM
Howard Jones 04 Oct 10 - 01:43 PM
McGrath of Harlow 04 Oct 10 - 01:44 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 01:57 PM
Bill D 04 Oct 10 - 04:43 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 05:18 PM
Joe_F 04 Oct 10 - 05:40 PM
Liz the Squeak 04 Oct 10 - 05:58 PM
artbrooks 04 Oct 10 - 06:10 PM
GUEST,Bert 04 Oct 10 - 06:49 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 10 - 07:18 PM
Uncle_DaveO 04 Oct 10 - 07:59 PM
Sandy Mc Lean 04 Oct 10 - 11:26 PM
Ed T 05 Oct 10 - 12:30 AM
GUEST,Songbob 05 Oct 10 - 12:56 AM
MGM·Lion 05 Oct 10 - 04:04 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Oct 10 - 06:42 AM
MGM·Lion 05 Oct 10 - 07:50 AM
Steve Shaw 05 Oct 10 - 08:00 AM
GUEST,Patsy 05 Oct 10 - 08:10 AM
GUEST,Dáithí 05 Oct 10 - 09:19 AM
GUEST,Songbob 05 Oct 10 - 04:34 PM
John MacKenzie 05 Oct 10 - 04:53 PM
Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM
Anne Lister 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM
Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 05:19 PM
Steve Shaw 05 Oct 10 - 06:26 PM
Wesley S 05 Oct 10 - 06:48 PM
Bill D 05 Oct 10 - 06:53 PM
Ed T 05 Oct 10 - 08:07 PM
MGM·Lion 06 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM
John MacKenzie 06 Oct 10 - 04:18 AM
Anne Lister 06 Oct 10 - 04:19 AM
MGM·Lion 06 Oct 10 - 05:16 AM
Dave MacKenzie 06 Oct 10 - 06:35 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 06 Oct 10 - 07:32 AM
DMcG 06 Oct 10 - 08:43 AM
Sarah the flute 06 Oct 10 - 08:44 AM
GUEST,leeneia 06 Oct 10 - 10:44 AM
GUEST,Patsy 07 Oct 10 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,greymaus 07 Oct 10 - 09:45 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Oct 10 - 10:01 AM
GUEST,leeneia 07 Oct 10 - 04:26 PM
Steve Shaw 07 Oct 10 - 05:30 PM
Crowhugger 07 Oct 10 - 06:04 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 12:42 PM
Donuel 22 May 19 - 01:14 PM
Joe Offer 22 May 19 - 02:22 PM
Thompson 22 May 19 - 02:52 PM
Jos 22 May 19 - 03:01 PM
Jos 22 May 19 - 03:05 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 03:08 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 03:28 PM
Nigel Parsons 22 May 19 - 03:50 PM
Nigel Parsons 22 May 19 - 04:00 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 05:17 PM
Steve Shaw 22 May 19 - 08:02 PM
Mrrzy 22 May 19 - 09:26 PM
meself 22 May 19 - 09:36 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 02:34 AM
Backwoodsman 23 May 19 - 02:51 AM
DMcG 23 May 19 - 05:07 AM
Donuel 23 May 19 - 06:10 AM
G-Force 23 May 19 - 06:33 AM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 11:23 AM
Steve Shaw 23 May 19 - 11:45 AM
leeneia 23 May 19 - 12:11 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 May 19 - 01:23 PM
Jos 23 May 19 - 01:42 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 19 - 01:45 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 May 19 - 02:24 PM
saulgoldie 23 May 19 - 03:24 PM
Steve Shaw 23 May 19 - 04:04 PM
Doug Chadwick 23 May 19 - 05:08 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 06:28 PM
Bill D 23 May 19 - 07:57 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 09:52 PM
Mrrzy 23 May 19 - 09:57 PM
Bill D 23 May 19 - 10:25 PM
Joe Offer 23 May 19 - 10:42 PM
meself 24 May 19 - 01:09 AM
Joe Offer 24 May 19 - 01:57 AM
DMcG 24 May 19 - 02:36 AM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 03:14 AM
Doug Chadwick 24 May 19 - 03:41 AM
Jos 24 May 19 - 07:40 AM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 07:59 AM
DMcG 24 May 19 - 08:10 AM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 08:55 AM
Mrrzy 24 May 19 - 09:22 AM
Doug Chadwick 24 May 19 - 09:31 AM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 09:46 AM
Doug Chadwick 24 May 19 - 09:49 AM
Doug Chadwick 24 May 19 - 09:51 AM
Charmion 24 May 19 - 10:04 AM
Mrrzy 24 May 19 - 10:35 AM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 06:27 PM
Raedwulf 24 May 19 - 07:32 PM
Bill D 24 May 19 - 07:56 PM
Steve Shaw 24 May 19 - 08:03 PM
Donuel 24 May 19 - 08:17 PM
Jos 25 May 19 - 02:34 AM
Jos 25 May 19 - 02:45 AM
Steve Shaw 25 May 19 - 06:04 AM
DMcG 25 May 19 - 06:37 AM
Georgiansilver 27 May 19 - 07:17 AM
Charmion 27 May 19 - 08:44 AM
Steve Shaw 27 May 19 - 09:08 AM
Jos 27 May 19 - 10:09 AM
Jos 27 May 19 - 10:18 AM
Mrrzy 27 May 19 - 11:19 AM
Jos 27 May 19 - 12:01 PM
leeneia 27 May 19 - 01:48 PM
Jos 27 May 19 - 03:22 PM
Bill D 27 May 19 - 08:47 PM
Steve Shaw 28 May 19 - 08:46 AM
DMcG 28 May 19 - 08:53 AM
Mrrzy 28 May 19 - 10:30 AM
leeneia 28 May 19 - 01:51 PM
Steve Shaw 28 May 19 - 04:19 PM
leeneia 28 May 19 - 04:36 PM
Mrrzy 28 May 19 - 05:55 PM
Steve Shaw 28 May 19 - 06:07 PM
Nigel Parsons 29 May 19 - 09:38 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 29 May 19 - 05:08 PM
Steve Shaw 29 May 19 - 06:09 PM
Mrrzy 29 May 19 - 08:00 PM
Mrrzy 29 May 19 - 10:00 PM
leeneia 30 May 19 - 11:13 AM
Bee-dubya-ell 30 May 19 - 12:22 PM
meself 30 May 19 - 01:22 PM
Tattie Bogle 30 May 19 - 08:21 PM
Mrrzy 30 May 19 - 09:53 PM
meself 30 May 19 - 10:37 PM
michaelr 30 May 19 - 11:24 PM
Nigel Parsons 31 May 19 - 08:09 AM
Mrrzy 31 May 19 - 09:04 AM
leeneia 31 May 19 - 10:00 AM
beachcomber 31 May 19 - 10:02 AM
DMcG 31 May 19 - 10:25 AM
John P 31 May 19 - 12:15 PM
Mrrzy 31 May 19 - 02:30 PM
Steve Shaw 31 May 19 - 04:42 PM
Mrrzy 31 May 19 - 07:27 PM
Tattie Bogle 31 May 19 - 08:00 PM
michaelr 31 May 19 - 09:33 PM
Neil D 31 May 19 - 10:58 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 01 Jun 19 - 03:04 AM
DMcG 01 Jun 19 - 03:21 AM
Doug Chadwick 01 Jun 19 - 05:43 AM
Mrrzy 01 Jun 19 - 09:13 AM
Jon Freeman 01 Jun 19 - 09:24 AM
Mr Red 01 Jun 19 - 10:55 AM
Jos 01 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM
Nigel Parsons 01 Jun 19 - 04:58 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Jun 19 - 05:45 PM
Bill D 01 Jun 19 - 09:12 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Jun 19 - 02:12 AM
DMcG 02 Jun 19 - 02:20 AM
Doug Chadwick 02 Jun 19 - 03:10 AM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 19 - 08:15 AM
Mr Red 02 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM
Tattie Bogle 02 Jun 19 - 06:41 PM
Mrrzy 02 Jun 19 - 07:37 PM
JennieG 03 Jun 19 - 07:31 AM
Jos 03 Jun 19 - 07:41 AM
Mrrzy 03 Jun 19 - 08:58 AM
Tattie Bogle 03 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM
JennieG 03 Jun 19 - 04:56 PM
Nigel Parsons 03 Jun 19 - 07:23 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Jun 19 - 01:45 AM
Mrrzy 04 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM
Mrrzy 07 Jun 19 - 10:09 AM
meself 07 Jun 19 - 11:18 AM
Steve Shaw 07 Jun 19 - 07:19 PM
SamStone 07 Jun 19 - 10:48 PM
lefthanded guitar 08 Jun 19 - 02:11 AM
Nigel Parsons 08 Jun 19 - 06:04 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:23 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:24 AM
Steve Shaw 08 Jun 19 - 06:30 AM
Jos 08 Jun 19 - 06:45 AM
Mrrzy 08 Jun 19 - 03:03 PM
Tattie Bogle 08 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM
JennieG 10 Jun 19 - 02:28 AM
Mr Red 10 Jun 19 - 08:51 AM
DMcG 10 Jun 19 - 09:06 AM
weerover 10 Jun 19 - 10:17 AM
leeneia 10 Jun 19 - 06:01 PM
Mr Red 11 Jun 19 - 03:52 AM
leeneia 11 Jun 19 - 10:58 AM
Jos 11 Jun 19 - 12:25 PM
Tattie Bogle 13 Jun 19 - 03:53 AM
Mrrzy 13 Jun 19 - 12:51 PM
Tattie Bogle 13 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM
Mrrzy 14 Jun 19 - 11:01 AM
leeneia 15 Jun 19 - 10:17 PM
Gurney 16 Jun 19 - 12:49 AM
JennieG 16 Jun 19 - 02:04 AM
Mrrzy 16 Jun 19 - 09:02 AM
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Subject: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Alvin-Songster
Date: 02 Oct 10 - 11:31 AM

"Emma Thompson attacks poor language" inspired me to begin this thread. Jump in with your own PP's.

  • "Awesome" use to mean "inspiring awe," but currently it's beginning to mean "better than average." "Hey, look! The Grand Canyon. Isn't that better than your average hole in the ground?" Sometimes it's even used just to say something nice. "You know how to spell cat? That's awesome!" Huh?

  • Where did, "Here's the deal" come from, and what will make it go away?

  • The word is "information," NOT "info." Is four syllables really that much more difficult to say than two? Okay if you want to use it informally, or to show you're with it. But using it on radio or television, as in, "For more info..." makes me wonder who's in charge.

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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,999
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 11:48 AM

    People who use the word `fuck` on threads. Hear that Spaw?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 12:09 PM

    "One pence"

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: michaelr
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 12:12 PM

    "...one of the only..." Someone/thing is either the only, or one of the few. Drives me nuts!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: catspaw49
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 12:50 PM

    Awesome post 999 and here's the deal on that.......I'll tell myself to fuck off and that should handle it. If you need more info on my decision just lemmee know.

    Spaw


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: akenaton
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 01:06 PM

    "We shal re-double our efforts"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: catspaw49
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 01:25 PM

    You got it Ake,,,,one of the only things we can all do! Let's all give 200% 100% of the time!!!

    Spaw


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: YorkshireYankee
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 03:38 PM

    Then instead of than
    "PIN number" (the N already stands for number)
    X "a.m. in the morning" (similar issue)
    "baited breath" (unless you've been eating worms)
    "very unique" (see "one of the only", in a previous post)
    X "peaked my interest" (unless your interest began to decline after that)
    "forward" instead of "foreword"
    apostrophes -- some missing, others unnecessary

    These things don't bother me so much from everyday punters (we all have our strengths and weaknesses; just because spelling & grammar always seemed to come pretty easily to me (perhaps because I read a lot as a kid) doesn't mean everyone else finds them easy), but when I see them in books/magazines/newspapers or hear them on radio or TV, I really feel that someone should have caught it before it was published/aired -- aren't proofreaders/editors/subeditors supposed to notice such things?

    Although... it seems that businesses rarely think it worth the time to proofread things these days -- after all, "time is money"!
    I'm a graphic designer, and in more than one job I've had, it has not been appreciated when I've caught mistakes; I've been told it's not my job to worry about such things. One printer even said that mistakes were no bad thing (as long as the mistake was the client's rather than ours), since they generate more business when the job needs to be reprinted... [sigh] Let's not worry about the sheer waste of binning all that paper and ink from the first run...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Wesley S
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 04:35 PM

    The word "veggies". I guess "vegetables" takes to long to say.

    "Newbie" for newcomer. Same thing.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 04:44 PM

    12 am and 12 pm ~~ if you work it out, both can only mean mean midnight, which is both 12 hours before noon [=ante meridiem] & 12 hours after noon [=post meridiem]. 'Noon' & 'midnight' are the correct terms.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: maple_leaf_boy
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 05:13 PM

    I don't get "my bad" and "a$$hat".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Richard Bridge
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 05:51 PM

    I think "my bad" is a useful coinage.

    What is "a$$hat"?

    I think I am most annoyed by the following (partly because of their frequency, partly because of their egregious nature): -

    "For free" in stead of "free" or "for nothing"
    Split infinitives
    "Checkout" in stead of "till"
    "Janitor" (or, worse, "in-store janitor") for "cleaner"
    "Regular" for "ordinary". "Regular" means "recurring with a fixed periodicity".
    "Expiration" (which means "exhalation") in place of "expiry"
    "In the event that" in stead of "if".
    "Less" in place of "fewer" (the former applies to amorphous quantities, the latter to numbers of individuals or individual things).

    I am confident that more will occur to me as the evening wears on and the bottle empties.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Richard Bridge
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 05:52 PM

    Oh - how could I have overlooked "Off of"?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Uncle_DaveO
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 06:15 PM

    I would have sworn that I posted the following earlier in this thread:

    "Epicenter" as in a usage like "Hollywood is the epicenter of the film industry in the U.S."

    Oh, so the film industry in the U.S. is way down underground, and Hollywood is located on the surface above it?   Awww, c'mon!

    Dave Oesterreich


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jim Dixon
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 07:28 PM

    I'd say the repetition of the word "is" in sentences like, "The trouble is, is that nobody listens."

    Once you notice it, you keep hearing it everywhere (in the US).

    I have only heard it in speech, probably by people who don't even realize they're saying it. I have never seen it in print.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Uncle_DaveO
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 09:01 PM

    Right here, in our very own, Mudcat, a lot of posters, use way too many, commas, without any, justification or sense. Makes it, hard to, understand. Leaving ALL commas, out, would make it, more readable!

    Dave Oesterreich


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Phil Cooper
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 09:33 PM

    Misuse of quotation marks and apostrophes. Also confusing compose and comprise.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: michaelr
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 10:12 PM

    People who don't know the difference between palette, palate, and pallet.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jim Dixon
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 11:01 PM

    Oops! How could I forget "copywrite" (for "copyright") "copywright" and even "copywritten"?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: katlaughing
    Date: 02 Oct 10 - 11:42 PM

    I've been having a little to-do with a newperson at the station where my Rog is chief engineer. They posted a story with the headline approximately as follows:

    "Humane Society Looking to Get New Diggs"

    Found out said reporter teaches at the local college and readily admitted to mistakes, which were corrected. We exchanged a couple of more comments in which she agreed using such slang as "diggs" should be guarded against, as she tells her students, but that sometimes it is "just fun."

    The new headline reads as follows:

    "Lots of tail wagging over proposed Roice-Hurst move"

    A definite improvement, though I suppose it would be better if "tail" were plural.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Bert
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 01:49 AM

    Second of all

    Surely it should be 'second of all but one' seeing as 'first of all' has already dealt with the first one?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: The Fooles Troupe
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 01:55 AM

    People who use 'gibberish-logic' ...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM

    Uncle DaveO: for some reason you posted your 'epicenter' comment on the Emma Thompson thread ~~ I wondered at the time if you had meant it for this one, or were making some recondite point about luvviedom!

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Dave Hanson
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 03:30 AM

    Go figure, which is usually written as ' go figger, ' it really means " If you don't know that, I think you are stupid "

    Dave H


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Liz the Squeak
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 04:01 AM

    People who say 'two things, a) blah de blah and secondly....' It's A and B or First and Second!!!

    Less instead of Fewer gets me every time and I shout at the TV when an advert that uses it is shown.

    'Compares to' instead of' compares with'.

    I can accept that we are ruled by Microsoft's version of spelling (even when the thing is set to English rather than American English) but am driven completely spare by books and publications that have both UK and US spellings used with gay abandon, often ON THE SAME PAGE! I dearly wish to go through certain books with a red pen, correcting every mistake and send it back to the author with the exhortation to employ a proofreader or at least a bloody spell checker! The worst offender was a 'vanity printing' tome that professed to be 'one of the best guides' to its subject matter... Opened at random, I gave up counting after the spelling mistakes, grammatical and typesetting errors got to 2 dozen on one double page. Obviously the subject matter was not 'how to write correct English'.

    Another pet peeve is the continued publication of historical "facts" that have been proven to be otherwise. The accusations of murder levied against Richard III is a prime example. The account of these murders were written on the orders of the man who had just usurped Richard and wanted to dispose of any potential threats. Tudor 'historians' state that Richard III had his 2 nephews murdered in the Tower of London when in fact, there is no contemporary evidence that this happened. When the Tudor dynasty was exhausted, a retraction was broadcast and Richard exhonorated. However, if you open any school history book published in the last 200 years, you'll see that Richard murdered the Princes in the Tower and that is it.

    LTS


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,FloraG
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 04:01 AM

    The last line is repeated ( singers)

    - if so - its not the last line.

    A right and left hand star - callers call. Try putting both hands in!

    This door is alarmed ( poor door )

    Turn into a bowl ( cooks ). How?
    FloraG


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Abdul The Bul Bul
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 04:53 AM

    "tiny little" and pronouncing 'aitch' with an h.
    Al


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Wyrd Sister
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 05:19 AM

    "Should of" as the expansion of "should've", a contraction of "should have". Same for could/would


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Paul Burke
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 05:37 AM

    It's been going on a long time, and I doubt if it will stop in our species' lifetime. A hundred years ago, Disgusted of Tonbridge Wells might have written to "The Times"(*):

    The word "terrific" used to mean "inspiring terror," but currently it usually means "very good."

    Where did the phrase "Hello" come from, and what will make it go away?

    The word is "omnibus," NOT "bus." Are three syllables really so much more difficult to utter than one? It is permissible if you want to use it informally, or to show you are "up to date". But to use it in the newspapers, as in "to catch the bus..." makes me wonder who is in charge.


    Note that I've partially corrected a few solecisms ("use to", a certain laxness of punctuation), and excised contractions like "isn't" that would not have been printed in the better newspapers, but wouldn't be blinked at today.

    (*) That's how he would have put it then. No one with any education wrote to the Times.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 05:51 AM

    "Didn't used to" ~ horribly widespread ~ should of course be "Didn't use to": think about it. But this one a losing battle, I fear.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 06:47 AM

    The American usage [following on from a post above] 'The London Times'. There is no such newspaper. It is called simply 'The Times'. A friend from US once tried to defend this, as necessary to distinguish from 'The New York Times', &c; but climbed down and admitted I was right when I pointed out that the masthead of 'The New York Times' reads 'The New York Times'; while the masthead of 'The Times' simply reads 'The Times'.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Paul Burke
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 09:27 AM

    And haitch with an haitch his has hold has the 'ills.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jim Dixon
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 10:00 AM

    I once bought a guidebook to the northwest United States (principally Washington and Oregon) that consistently and repeatedly referred to the "Williamette River." The correct spelling is Willamette.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 10:08 AM

    "The American usage [following on from a post above] 'The London Times'. There is no such newspaper. It is called simply 'The Times'."

    That's true MtheGM, and I understand that both are proper names so the insertion of a place name (as in London) isn't grammatical, but for US readers the default cultural assumption would (probably?) naturally be that if someone refers to 'The Times' they will be using shorthand for "The NY Times"?

    Personally I'm inclined to think "The London Times" is sloppy journalism because you'd never get that kind of fudge used as a reference in academic literature. But is there a preferable way to disambiguate, that is both uncomplicated and concise for more general use?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,999
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 10:11 AM

    Expressions such as `Are you joking me?`


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 12:02 PM

    >But is there a preferable way to disambiguate, that is both uncomplicated and concise for more general use? <

    CS ~ I think 'The [London] Times', or '"The Times" of London' would both be acceptable.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Uncle_DaveO
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 12:48 PM

    I think it was GUEST,Bert who asked us:

    Second of all

    Surely it should be 'second of all but one' seeing as 'first of all' has already dealt with the first one?


    "Of them all, the first is" blah-blah = "First of all"

    "Of them all, the second is" whatever = "Second of all"

    So "second of all" is perfectly logical, Bert.   I wouldn't use it myself, because the unadorned "second" is quite sufficient in that context and "second of all" is kind of cumbersome, but it's not logically or grammatically wrong.

    Dave Oesterreich


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Ed T
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 01:13 PM

    in order to,....why not just to?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 01:15 PM

    There seems to be a belief among tv football commentators and commenters that "Goal" is an indelicate word in some way, and the euphemism "It's in the back of the net" is somehow more seemly. I don't think I have ever heard the word "Goal" on Alan Hanson's lips, for example.

    Now, why do I find this so profoundly irritating?

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: YorkshireYankee
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 01:39 PM

    "Here, here!" instead of "Hear, hear!"
    "It's a mute point" instead of "moot point"

    I think the reason "Here, here!", "mute point", "peaked", "baited breath" and "forward" bug me so much is that by using homonyms, people are losing the original sense(s) of the word(s), along with a certain richness of expression (and even understanding) which accompany the "proper" spelling(s), and I regret that loss -- even while knowing it's inevitable.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Penny S.
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 03:35 PM

    "Fascia" instead of "facia". Lost cause already. It's a bundle of things, such as ligaments in the foot, not a facing board.

    And there's something else, but fortunately I have forgotten it.

    Penny


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Penny S.
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 03:40 PM

    "Comprises of".

    Penny


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: katlaughing
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 03:57 PM

    "Go figure" in my neck of the woods usually means "Who would have thought it?"

    We've always referred to it as the NYTimes and the Times of London as just the Times.

    I can still hear Mrs. Worcester, my old English/Latin teacher, scolding any of us who used "like" when we meant "such as." It's a lost cause, it's even been deemed "acceptable," but it still bugs me, greatly! The best example of incorrect usage she used with us was the old "Winston tastes good like a cigarette should!" My, how times have changed.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: The Fooles Troupe
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 06:27 PM

    "There seems to be a belief among tv football commentators and commenters that "Goal" is an indelicate word in some wa"

    ... because they associate it with the 'goal' spelling of 'jail'.... and don't want to upset the supporters?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: maple_leaf_boy
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 06:41 PM

    "a$$hat" or "asshat" is a term I've heard used. An "ass" is a donkey,
    so a donkey hat doesn't make sense to me.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Richard Bridge
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 09:37 PM

    How could I have forgotten?

    "try and".

    In the vast preponderance of circumstances "try to" is correct.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,leeneia
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 09:39 PM

    I agree my peeve doesn't make much sense, but I'm peeved by people who introduce themselves by simply walking up to another person and saying their own name. As in:

    "Leeneia? Jonathan Bimblethwaite."

    Apparently I am so unimportant that it's too much effort to say, "Hello, I'm Jonathan Bimblethwaite and..."

    When someone does that, I stare at them and say "What about him?"

    When I worked at the fabric store, pushy women would sometimes barge into somebody else's transaction with "Scissors?" or "Velcro?"

    I didn't let them get away with it. The person I was helping deserved my full concentration.
    =============
    This isn't a peeve, but it gave us a good laugh. A novel involving concert violinists said that when premier violinist So-and-so performed, "there wasn't a dry seat in the house."

    Obviously got 'wasn't a dry eye' mixed up with 'wasn't an empty seat.'


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Slag
    Date: 03 Oct 10 - 11:44 PM

    "The END of the DAY"! How about "after all is said and done" or "The bottom line is" or "To sum up" or " the net effect is" or "with the results being" or and the conclusion is" or "in the final analysis" or just about anything except "at the end of the day" Please!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Darowyn
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 03:52 AM

    "Attendees"!
    Someone who attends an event is an attender.
    Someone who is 'attended to' is an attendee.
    So at a gig the audience are the attenders, and the artists are the attendees.
    The "..er" suffix is active. The "...ee" suffix is passive.
    A referee is someone who is referred to. A referrer is someone who refers.
    I saw a notice on a bus recently. It said "Seating capacity 56. Standees 12"
    Standees must be people who have been stood up. How sad for them!
    Cheers
    Dave


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Wolfhound person
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 04:09 AM

    nucular

    Suggestions for use of this term welcome - it looks like a good word in its own right, but what does it mean?

    Nuclear I understand already, thank you (when pronounced correctly)

    Paws


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Patsy
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 05:23 AM

    Whether it is X Factor, or an obesity fitness programme or anything people are lumped together to train and go through their paces 'boot camp' I hate that.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: s&r
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 05:59 AM

    Dissect and cervical with long 'i'sounds. Questionnaire and quarter with no 'w' sound (eg courter). Don't like the affectation of an otel, but like even less an hotel with the'h' aspirated.

    Stu


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: s&r
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 06:08 AM

    And 'he gave it to John and I'

    Stu


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Wyrd Sister
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 06:24 AM

    'ahead of' meaning 'before'!!!!!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Nigel
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 08:02 AM

    "You know" and "know what I mean" make me cringe. If I know, why tell me, and if I don't know what you mean then I'll tell you.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Hrothgar
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 08:32 AM

    Surplus prepositions (if anybody needs to know what a preposition is, PM me and I'll explain without telling anybody) as in "signed off on". What's wrong with "signed"?

    Nigel, I am of the opinion that anybody who is being interviewed should be cut off after ten "y'know" (or "y'knows?") in the interview, or possibly after five in the one sentence.

    I have counted up to ten in one long, rambling sentence, Usually they seem to be preceded by "um". It appears to be a disease amongst those of the football persuasions, especially soccer and rugby league.

    Yes, I'm a snob.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Patsy
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 08:59 AM

    Can I be frank? (meaning they can justify how rude they are going to be).


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jeanie
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 09:30 AM

    I find this very irritating in TV and Radio interviews with members of the public:

    "I'm married to Mary" - or "This is Bert Johnson, and you're married to Mary, is that right, Bert ?"

    as if there is only ONE person called Mary in the whole world ! It should be: "My wife's name is Mary" or "...and your wife's name is Mary...."

    Another pet peeve of mine is a pronunciation issue: the use of an open "ay" sound for the rounded "o" sound. I actually stopped listening to my local radio station because the travel reporter annoyed me so much with his pronunciation: "All clear on the M25 say far" (instead of "so far"). The presenter of a recent archaeology programme on TV did the same, and kept talking about "stanes" and "banes". This would be fine if the rest of the pronunciation was "heightened RP" (i.e. Noel Coward-type English), but these random rogue vowel sounds amongst otherwise standard RP really irritate.

    Another annoying pronunication issue amongst broadcasters in particular: the use of "-in" as the ending of a word, instead of "-ing" when this is not part of their native dialect - i.e. the rest of their pronunciation is standard RP. Do they think it makes them sound relaxed and cool ?

    - jeanie


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Uncle_DaveO
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 10:19 AM

    I think it was S&R who declared:

    Don't like the affectation of an otel, but like even less an hotel with the'h' aspirated.

    So is "a hostelry" or maybe "an 'ostelry" better than those?

    Dave Oesterreich


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Penny S.
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 10:36 AM

    Putting "Without Prejudice" at the head of an offensive document intended to damage someone else. Only known one usage of it, and I don't know the correct meaning of the phrase.

    Using the term "goodwill payment" of a payment from a debtor designed to cover a portion of expenditure by the group he was in debt to.

    Same misuser of language in each case, and one who wouldn't, indeed didn't, recognise real goodwill when it was offered.

    Penny


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: s&r
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 10:45 AM

    A Hostelry every time. The omission of the 'h' sound is a bizarre hangover from court pronunciation when French was the language of the court. Kestionnaire and onvelope are similar.

    Stu


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,CrazyEddie
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 10:51 AM

    Patsy's "Can I be frank?" brings to mind a Goons' sequence

    Gridpype Thynne: "I'll I be Frank?"

    Moriarty: "Yes, I'll be Gladys"

    (Sound of Thynne slapping Moriaty across the face)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,leeneia
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:11 AM

    Here are four expressions which deserve pet-peevehood. They are from a recent thread, but bear repeating.
    ========
    picking his brains (what an ugly image)

    diddley or diddley squat (Just act yourself what it really means.)

    verbal diarrhea (I'm eating!)

    anal, or anal retentive (meaning merely "More particular than I")


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:13 AM

    I have to say that, at this particular moment in time, I can't think of any particular peeve's.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:18 AM

    I lied. Do not say "albeit" within my earshot. And, yanks, there is no need whatever to say "London, England."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:26 AM

    One of the commonest modern horrors is saying "prior to" when you simply mean "before."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:28 AM

    liase


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Richard Bridge
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:29 AM

    I'm sure there's a London in Canada. And "albeit" is a perfectly proper word.

    But people who say "Can I" when they mean "May I" are bad for my blood pressure.

    And so are people who say "literally" when they mean the opposite.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:29 AM

    pre-order


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:35 AM

    "I'm sure there's a London in Canada."

    Without wishing to sound imperialist, "London" on its own, to all sane people (except perhaps for those living in the vicinity of London, Canada), means London on the banks of the Thames. A qualifier would be needed for the Canadian one for most people who don't live in Canada, and even for some who do. Let common sense prevail.

    "And "albeit" is a perfectly proper word."

    In every circumstance it can be replaced by although, though or but. It is just pretentious. Literate people avoid it like the plague, as with clichés.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Manitas_at_home
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:39 AM

    Unfortunately, Steve Wikipedia has:

    London is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City – Windsor Corridor with a metropolitan area population of 457,720; the city proper had a population of 352,395 in the 2006 Canadian census. The estimated metro population in 2009 was 489,274.[2] It was named after the city of London in England.[3] London is the seat of Middlesex County, at the forks of the non-navigable Thames River, approximately halfway between Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan. The City of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the official county seat.


    Confused? You will be!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:41 AM

    "Avoid like the plague"? perhaps...

    ~M~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:42 AM

    I was only going from what Richard said. Do they burn hospitals in London, Canada?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:46 AM

    "Burn?" I meant "blow up."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:52 AM

    "One pence"

    ~Michael~

    "One pee."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: McGrath of Harlow
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:28 PM

    "...'goal' spelling of 'jail' " (Foolestroupe - 03 Oct 10 - 06:27).

    - the word is gaol. Pronounced the way it is spelled.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Penny S.
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:34 PM

    "With respect", "With all due respect," "With the greatest respect," etc. You know that what follows is totally without it.

    Penny


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: s&r
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:38 PM

    Pronounced as jail in my dictionary Kevin

    Stu


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Howard Jones
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:43 PM

    I am prepared to defend the use of "pee" for pence. It evolved quite spontaneously on decimalisation, when it became necessary to distinguish between "New Pence" (as they were then known) and the old penny, not just on paper but in speech. "One penny" was ambiguous, "one New Penny" a bit of a mouthful, so it became "one pee".

    If "pence" was said in full, it was emphasised to make it clear it meant New Pence, whereas pre-decimal the emphasis was on the amount. So we lost the old contractions: "tuppence" (emphasis on the first syllable) signified 2d whereas "two pence" (with either equal emphasis or slightly more on "pence") meant 2p. Same with "thruppence". The "ha'penny" (1/2d) became "half-p"

    Of course, in time people became used to the new coinage and there was less chance of confusion, but by then these usages had become established.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: McGrath of Harlow
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:44 PM

    Pronounced the same way whichever spelling you prefer.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 01:57 PM

    Half a pee


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 04:43 PM

    'cop-speak'..."At this point in time the inebriated individual exited the vehicle"
    I wonder if that is taught in police training?

    (And I HEARD an announcer say on the radio, "This program was pre-recorded earlier.")


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 05:18 PM

    A few years ago I heard a Beeb weathher forecaster on the telly say that at least the overnight rain had washed the humidity out of the air.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Joe_F
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 05:40 PM

    All the following, not in themselves, but in their currently fashionable senses, which perhaps need not be specified: abuse, agenda, contradiction, define, denial, disorder, dysfunctional, excellence, existential, featured, feel, foundation, genocide, icon, identity, impact, incredible, international, issue, legacy, legendary, multicultural, narcissism, personality, potential, price tag, quality, reinvent, relatively, resolve, showcase, signature, total, who.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Liz the Squeak
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 05:58 PM

    Hiccups rather than hiccoughs.

    People who say 'I don't want to be rude/offend you/single you out but... because it always means they are about to be very rude, or offensive or pick on you for something. If you don't want to do it, don't do it!

    LTS


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: artbrooks
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 06:10 PM

    'Decimate'. It means "reduce by ten percent". It is not a synonym for devastate. An army that has 10 soldiers in every hundred killed has been decimated. A city destroyed by an earthquake is devastated.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Bert
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 06:49 PM

    'Decimalization' when they really mean centigesamalization (or however you spell it).

    There IS no unit between the pound and the new penny. The term florin is obsolete.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 07:18 PM

    Yeah Joe. "Existential": is it the most pretentious word of all? Or should we vote instead for "paradigm shift?"

    "A city destroyed by an earthquake is devastated."

    Indeed. But it is certainly not "razed to the ground" (or, even worse, "raised to the ground").


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Uncle_DaveO
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 07:59 PM

    "Half a pee"???

    Man, you gotta see a doctor about that prostate!

    Dave Oesterreich


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Sandy Mc Lean
    Date: 04 Oct 10 - 11:26 PM

    As my frequent posts will show spelling is not a strong point of mine. That being said in the USA they intentionally spell words such as labour, harbour, honour, etc. incorrectly by dropping the silent "U". That is their right, I suppose, and I have no objection to that. What does piss me off though is when computer spell-checkers keep underlining these words when I spell them correctly! That's my rant on this! :-}


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Ed T
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 12:30 AM

    asHphalt, pronounced that way.
    Presently, when currently is meant.
    I should have went,when gone is meant.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Songbob
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 12:56 AM

    To illustrate a few of my pet peeves in spelling, may I say:

    I would of told you that some folks are just loosers,
    And the Internets filled with poor English users,
    But noone ever said its easy
    To express yourself as non-cheesy,
    Without you become a language abuser.

    Yeah, I know it's not much, but it's off the top of my head, so I couldn't be exhaustive in the listing.

    Bob


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 04:04 AM

    "....in the USA they intentionally spell words such as labour, harbour, honour, etc. incorrectly by dropping the silent "U". That is their right, I suppose, and I have no objection to that. What does piss me off though is when computer spell-checkers keep underlining these words when I spell them correctly!...."

    Agreed, Sandy ~ tho your 'incorrectly' might be queried as a bit if a relativist term here?. And WHY does it do so when one has opted for the UK setting in the computer toolbar-menu? I mean, what is the use of having this option if it doesn't recognise this distinction?

    This refers to the  system; is it the same with other computers? And, for info, the word 'recognise' in the last line of previous para has acquired a red line because I didn't type 'recognize' ~~ which I categorically decline to do, Mr Macintosh!}

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:42 AM

    I tend not to defend many things American, but I have to speak up for American spelling. English may well have started here in England but many more non-English than English people speak English these days and a big majority use American-English spellings. It's typically quirky (and very honourable) of the Brits to hang on for dear life to their own way of spelling, but it's a bit Canute-like to berate the Yanks for their system, which (I hate to say) is often more logical than ours. But who wants logic to enter into it!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 07:50 AM

    Steve ~~ If that was addressed to me or Sandy McLean, one of whose points I was developing, I would point out that neither of us was in any way 'berating' the American system; merely querying the logic of spellchecks which mark our own spelling [which I am sure you will agree at least remains a viable option] as incorrectly spelt when we have opted for the UnionJack rather than the OldGlory logo in the computer toolbar. That seems to be a piece of poor programing at  HQ to me! And an implied beratement on THEIR part of OUR perfectly acceptable system.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 08:00 AM

    It wasn't directed at anyone. Just something I've occasionally mused over for some time.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Patsy
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 08:10 AM

    Any automated telephone message especially the 'your call is important to us' aaaah!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Dáithí
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 09:19 AM

    My current pet hate...

    refute when they mean deny... and from journalists, usually1
    D


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Songbob
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 04:34 PM

    If I'm not mistaken, some software packages allow the user to choose 'British English' vs. 'American English' for their documents. But what I haven't seen so far is an Operating System with the same choices. Perhaps those choices are there when you install the damned thing, I don't know. In any case, you could type 'colour' in Word and have it right, but in a chat room (or on the Mudcat, for that matter) it gets flagged as incorrect.

    Someone needs to invent a universal "universe setting," that applies language rules to all the content, no matter the source. Now that would be handy!

    Bob


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: John MacKenzie
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 04:53 PM

    I hate the phrase
    ONE HUNDRED!"!!!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM

    Both my 'on-the-fly' spell checker and the one in my Opera browser allow ME to add words to their list, so I don't get 'beeped' at when I decide to type thru instead of through.

    As to UK spelling vs. American...we in the colonies are fairly thrifty, and so many of our spellings are shorter....(leaving out that 'u' must save...oh...tons (not tonnes)..of printing ink and megabytes of HD space every year...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Anne Lister
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:04 PM

    I'm another wincer every time someone confuses few and less ... but the other irritant, which has me reaching for something to throw at the radio (which tends to be where I hear it most) is the phrase "mitigate against". Must be confusion with "militate against" but it makes no sense at all.
    Oh, and the almost universal misuse of the phrase "beg the question".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 05:19 PM

    and.... it's **wreak havoc, not 'wreck' havoc.......arrrggghhhhh

    (you want fun? Ask folks to provide the present tense of 'wrought'.
    The are 2, depending on whether it's about God or material ...(wrought iron)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:26 PM

    Gosh yes, beg the question. Awful. Unfortunately, the sense in which it is now commonly used, to raise the question (why can't people just say that!), is so prevalent that it is now recognised as acceptable by certain authorities. Degradation rules OK...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Wesley S
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:48 PM

    Any establishment that offers "homemade" food. Unless the person who made the apple pie lives there it's not "homemade".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 06:53 PM

    affect & effect....if you do not know the difference, please look it up. Like insure & ensure,it is NOT irrelevant.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Ed T
    Date: 05 Oct 10 - 08:07 PM

    Stores that advertise fresh products....only to find they were "previously frozen", or "freshened", whatever that means. Fresh does not mean anything anymore?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 02:50 AM

    The use of "anyone?" ~~ as in, "Let's have a thread about language. Pet-peeves, anyone?"

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: John MacKenzie
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 04:18 AM

    The café across the way from me, has paninis on the menu !!!!

    Man went to see his doctor. He said, "Doctor, I've got a 'orrible 'eadache"
    The doctor said, "I suggest you take a couple of aspirates"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Anne Lister
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 04:19 AM

    Now you've got me started ... "Sea change"/ "Step change".
    Sea change must have started with Ariel's song in The Tempest but what it has to do with change generally I don't know, but now we also have "step change". Surely it's all just changes? Permanent changes, transient changes, small changes ...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: MGM·Lion
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 05:16 AM

    Indeed, Ariel's 'sea change' in The Tempest has been greatly misunderstood and over-interpreted to mean 'a profound change'.

    No such thing. In its context in the play, it simply means 'a change into something connected with the sea': as Ferdinand's father lies "full fathom five", Ariel sings, his bones are turned to coral, his eyes to pearls, and everything else about him suffers a similar 'sea change'. But the phrase sounds sorta romantic, don't it eh?; so has been over-defined to death.

    ~Michael~


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Dave MacKenzie
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 06:35 AM

    I get annoyed by "fresh" milk, that's been pasteurised and homogenised. If had fresh milk and it's had nothing done to it, and probably still warm.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 07:32 AM

    People who say "decayed"(sic) when they mean "decade".

    It's a noun so the stress is on the first syllable (very few exceptions in English). Other words that get mangled in the same way include "project" which often gets incorrectly pronounced the same way as the verb "to project" with the stress on the second syllable.

    Rule of thumb: noun - stress first syllable, verb stress second syllable.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 08:43 AM

    Two of my favourites: "a quantum leap" - you mean we have made the smallest possible leap?

    And an apostrophe one, such as I saw at the weekend "Coffee's and Teas"
    If you can't decide whether there should be an apostrophe or not, at least have the courage to go one way or the other.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Sarah the flute
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 08:44 AM

    My pet hates are....

    Use of the word "There" by broadcasters. Why do they have to say at the end of the reporters piece ..."Fred Bloggs there" why not "Thankyou Fred Bloggs in Afghanistan" or wherever.

    Use of the phrase "Give it up for....." Give what up ? Why not just say a round of applause for.

    Weather forecasters using the phrase "as the day goes along" where is it going and along which route!!!

    Sarah


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,leeneia
    Date: 06 Oct 10 - 10:44 AM

    Something else about 'decade.' It's fuzzy and pretentious.

    Why are journalists so in love with the word? They are supposed to get the facts.

    So why do they write "Almost three decades have passed since Joe Blow was tried for the murder of Jim Dokes?" Why not say "Joe Blow was tried 28 years ago?" Even better, "in 1982."

    That way, we know the reporter has checked the facts.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,Patsy
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 09:36 AM

    Adverts for special collections of CD'S in particular for a certain Rock compilation set and I wouldn't be surprised if the classic ones were similar. They insist that you can ONLY BUY IT HERE! surely that must be untrue when I know that I've had nearly every track on so many other compliations that I have either bought or have ever had bought for me. I think I must have about 5 or 6 albums with Boston's More than a Feeling and Free's Alright Now.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,greymaus
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 09:45 AM

    MY pet peeve? Everyone's apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 10:01 AM

    "People who say "decayed"(sic) when they mean "decade"."

    Misuse of Latin words or phrases, particularly where their use is superfluous. Omission of italics and square brackets where required.


    Heheh. That's the beauty of threads like this. You gotta be so careful...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: GUEST,leeneia
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:26 PM

    "apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're..."

    I think most people understand these forms. Mistakes happen because people are typing fast.

    John MacKenzie: I just got your joke about the aspirates.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 05:30 PM

    "Adverts for special collections of CD'S"

    Tee hee. Watch those damned apostrophe's now!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Crowhugger
    Date: 07 Oct 10 - 06:04 PM

    Yes, Songbob, and there's even Canadian English option sometimes. It accepts labour and neighbour as correct, but also realize, digitize etc. And it won't object to the nouns pretence, defence and practice.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM

    Ok:

    There is no such thing as a stray bullet. It's not as if you left the door open and it got out.

    NPR has started saying "in about 10 mn from now" -- pick one, people.

    Merde alord I had several more in mind when I refreshed this thread.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 22 May 19 - 12:06 PM

    (alors)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 22 May 19 - 12:42 PM

    One that always irks me is the way the news media, at least in North America, use the noun 'suspect'. It originally meant, 'a person suspected of having committed a certain crime'; now it would seem to mean, 'a person who has definitely committed a certain crime but who has not yet been convicted in a court of law' - so you get reports such as, 'The suspect broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect, John Smith, yesterday." Kinda defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect', doesn't it?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Donuel
    Date: 22 May 19 - 01:14 PM

    For a dyslexic there are no pet peeves with language. It is more like a painful aneurism. We have to give 400% effort 25% of the time just to be average.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Joe Offer
    Date: 22 May 19 - 02:22 PM

    What word would you suggest instead of "suspect," meself? Seems to me, that until a person is proved guilty, he/she is still a suspect and should not be assumed to be the perpetrator. That's why we have courts.
    -Joe-


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Thompson
    Date: 22 May 19 - 02:52 PM

    Is there a rule that all American films (and it's beginning to infest others) must have the line "Listen up"?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 22 May 19 - 03:01 PM

    So the report should say "The perpetrator broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect ..."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 22 May 19 - 03:05 PM

    ... and as a contribution:

    I am getting increasingly fed up with the use, in plays, soaps, and such like, of "Well good luck with that ...".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 22 May 19 - 03:08 PM

    Exactly, Jos. (Did you read what I wrote, Joe?). The 'unknown' (or at least, unconvicted) perpetrator is the - wait for it - 'perpetrator' (or 'offender' or 'criminal'). The 'suspect' is the person suspected of having been the perp. As I say, if you are saying that the suspect committed the crime, you are saying that the suspect committed the crime - so it defeats the purpose of calling them the 'suspect', which would be presumably to allow for the presumption of innocence.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 22 May 19 - 03:28 PM

    Law and Order does not punish the offenders, as they claim, boom boom, but the suspects.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 22 May 19 - 03:50 PM

    Exactly, Jos. (Did you read what I wrote, Joe?). The 'unknown' (or at least, unconvicted) perpetrator is the - wait for it - 'perpetrator' (or 'offender' or 'criminal'). The 'suspect' is the person suspected of having been the perp. As I say, if you are saying that the suspect committed the crime, you are saying that the suspect committed the crime - so it defeats the purpose of calling them the 'suspect', which would be presumably to allow for the presumption of innocence.

    If the 'suspect' is unconvicted, then it isn't reasonable to describe them as the 'perpetrator', as that has yet to be confirmed.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 22 May 19 - 04:00 PM

    Going back even further:
    "apparent confusion when dealing with their/they're/there or whose/who's or your/you're..."
    I think most people understand these forms. Mistakes happen because people are typing fast.

    NO! people don't type 'fast', they type quickly.
    'Fast' is an adjective (he was a fast runner) not an adverb (he ran fast).
    It may only be used as an adverb when given the meaning "firm" or "solid", as in to "stand fast" or to "hold fast". Biblically "He hath made the round world so fast that it cannot be moved"

    Yes, I know the language moves on, but changing the meaning of words dilutes the ability to make clear, unambiguous comments.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 22 May 19 - 05:17 PM

    "If the 'suspect' is unconvicted, then it isn't reasonable to describe them as the 'perpetrator', as that has yet to be confirmed."


    You're missing the point - which I realize I muddied with my parenthetical "(or at least, unconvicted)", but we don't have an 'edit' feature. The point is, if you say that a suspect broke in and killed somebody, and that John Smith is the suspect in question, you are saying that John Smith broke in and killed somebody. So much for 'presumption of innocence". It completely defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect'. At the same time, you're saying, nonsensically, that whoever may have committed the murder is merely a 'suspect'. If, however, you say that a perpetrator/offender/assailant/criminal broke in and killed someone, and John Smith is the suspect, there is no confusion.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 22 May 19 - 08:02 PM

    "Is there a rule that all American films (and it's beginning to infest others) must have the line "Listen up"?"

    Dunno, but there does seem to be a rule that any rudely interrupted steamy sex scene in an American film betrays the fact that the woman is still wearing bra and knickers and the man is still wearing underpants...

    Back to the topic...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 22 May 19 - 09:26 PM

    There is a lot of overuse of "alleged" too. If you're caught doing it you are no longer the alleged doer.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 22 May 19 - 09:36 PM

    Re: "Listen up!". These are among the first words spoken in The Revanant - set in the later 1700s. In fact, the expression has not been traced back to any earlier than 1930s, as far as I know.

    Of course, the same movie gave us a fiddler playing Ragtime Annie - which has been traced all the way back to 1923, according to The Fiddler's Companion.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 23 May 19 - 02:34 AM

    Oh, let's not start with movie anachronisms. In Amadeus, Mozart had an American accent that wouldn't develop for a century. (I didn't say let's not *continue* with the anachronisms...)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Backwoodsman
    Date: 23 May 19 - 02:51 AM

    There seems to be a growing practice, among BBC presenters, to pronounce a leading ‘s’ as though it was followed by ‘h’ - so, ‘shtrong’, ‘shtudent’, ‘shchool’, etc.

    Drives me nuts. Anyone else noticing it?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 23 May 19 - 05:07 AM

    A growing one for me is statement as an adjective, as in a recent John Lewis advertisement for 'a statement sofa'. My sofa can keep its statements to itself, thank you. The only statement I am happy for it to make is that I like to sit down occasionally.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Donuel
    Date: 23 May 19 - 06:10 AM

    Mrzzy is not a suspect. He is a person of interest, in a good way.
    bearded bruce is a 'person of interest' in a bad way.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: G-Force
    Date: 23 May 19 - 06:33 AM

    One that gets me here in the UK is the pronunciation of the 'oo' vowel sound. When I was growing up (in the South East anyway) it was like 'oooh', whereas now it is commonly like the French 'y' or the German 'u-umlaut' sound. So for example 'food' sounds more like 'feud'.
    This seemed to start about 20 years ago with young females - perhaps they thought they were sounding sexy, I don't know. But now it has spread - you hear it all the time on TV.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 23 May 19 - 11:23 AM

    Misuse of "after" as in They died after being hit by a train. No, they were killed by a train. If you survive for a while you can die after. If you die right then, it isn't after.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 23 May 19 - 11:45 AM

    What about the tendency for young people to fail to open their mouths properly when enunciating a word such as "book," thereby rendering it "berk"...and altering the short "i" sound at the end of words to "ee" as in "monee" and "societee" and industree"... And politicians who say "...going forward" deserve to be twatted right on the nose!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 23 May 19 - 12:11 PM

    Using definitive when definite is meant.
    Unravel when untangle is meant.
    "The next level" What is that supposed to be?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 23 May 19 - 01:23 PM

    ...and altering the short "i" sound at the end of words to "ee" as in "monee" and "societee" and industree

    But it IS "monee", "societee" and "industree", at least where I come from. I can't recall anyone saying "moni".

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 23 May 19 - 01:42 PM

    'Misuse of "after" as in They died after being hit by a train'

    The version of this (often heard in regional television news bulletins) thst worries me is: "They were killed after being hit by a car" - as if they were lying in the road in pain and somebody came along and finished them off.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 23 May 19 - 01:45 PM

    I'm a northerner, Doug. We talk proper up yon.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 23 May 19 - 02:24 PM

    I'm a northerner, Doug.

    So am I.

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: saulgoldie
    Date: 23 May 19 - 03:24 PM

    Well, for better or for worse (or worser) language is dynamic. Sometimes the new usages can be interesting and enriching. Others, they just represent devolution. We all have our favorites on either side.

    A couple of my own "faves" are--
    Raising one's pitch toward the end of a statement as if it is were question.
    Inserting a letter "h" where it does not belong (mentioned earlier).
    Dropping a "d" or a "t" Where it DOES belong.
    These two seem to be some sort of affectation more prevalent among young women.
    Extraneous or missing apostrophes, check.
    Extraneous or missing commas, check.

    Now, this is my YUGE big cahuna of all word misuses. It is YUGE not because it sounds stupid/lazy/whatever. But because Its misuse f-u-n-d-a-m-e-n-t-a-l-l-y changes the meaning. That is the use of "can't." Look, if you "can't" do something, it is something that you are INCAPABLE of doing. You do not have the physical strength or coordination to do whatever it is. It does NOT mean that you do not have PERMISSION.

    If you are physically CAPABLE of doing something but there are consequences that you do not like, then you must acknowledge that you CHOOSE to not do it, rather than that you "can't" do it. People say "can't" so they can avoid taking responsibility for the CHOICE that they make to avoid the consequences.

    This misuse is an example of devolution. This misuse does not clarify anything, and does not provide some new and novel way of illuminating a point.

    Saul


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 23 May 19 - 04:04 PM

    You could be Yorkshire, though, Doug. It's not proper north tha knows...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 23 May 19 - 05:08 PM

    No, never Yorkshire but I have moved across the country from the Mersey to the Humber, via Manchester.

    On reflection, my grandson, who was brought up in South Yorkshire, calls my wife "Granneh" and would probably say "moneh". I've never stopped to think about it - it's just the way he talks.

    There was one TV advert, for gas central heating I think, that used the Carol King song "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow" which opened with the line "Tonight you're mine completeleh" ARRRRG!

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 23 May 19 - 06:28 PM

    Jos... Exactly.

    People are hanged. Pictures are hung.

    In that vein (sorry) the widow, not the wife, files for death benefits or whatever.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 23 May 19 - 07:57 PM

    "vocal fry"

    I was aware of it before I ever heard it explained. People make excuses for it and justify it in various ways, but it really wears on me.

    As to usage: Certain military usages..like using 'contingency' when they mean 'contingent'... "To put down the uprising, we sent in a contingency of peace keepers." arrrgghh...

    And media people who will NOT learn how celebrities pronounce their names.. It's Michael COHEN.. not 'Cone' or 'Cohn'. They are studying how to say 'Buttigieg', but can't say Cohen?

    Also, media people who refuse to pronounce, as closely as possible, the names of foreign cities & countries. Some are very difficult, but Nicaragua has 4 syllables, not 5. The 'u' and 'a' are not separate syllables. Simply stating "that's how we've always said it." is not much of a defense. Yes, I'm aware my opinion is not likely to alter anyone's habits.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 23 May 19 - 09:52 PM

    Well, when I am speaking English I pronounce things, like foreign things, in English. When I speak French it's PaREE, in English PAriss.
    People's names are another thing.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 23 May 19 - 09:57 PM

    Also pronouncing cache like cachet, as in, there was a cachet of arms. No, there wasn't.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 23 May 19 - 10:25 PM

    No.. a cachet of arms would mean something like "my bomb is bigger than your bomb"...not something we want to test..


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Joe Offer
    Date: 23 May 19 - 10:42 PM

    Meself, I'll stick with "suspect." After all, the crime itself has not been proved until the trial. So, it is a "suspected" or "alleged" crime until the court has proved it.
    But I'll still respect you in the morning....

    -Joe-

    And yes, I did read what you wrote. I just disagreed.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 24 May 19 - 01:09 AM

    Do you really not see a significant difference between:

    1) The suspect killed Bill Jones. The suspect is John Smith.

    and

    2) The assailant killed Bill Jones. The suspect is John Smith.

    ?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Joe Offer
    Date: 24 May 19 - 01:57 AM

    Hi, Meself - I will agree that assailant is a better term, but I think that "suspect" works reasonably well.
    I'm a member of the "whatever works as long as it doesn't sound stupid" school. "Suspect" is common usage, and it doesn't sound particularly stupid. I'm not bound to pedantry, but I have to admit that your choice of the word "assailant" is damn good.
    -Joe-


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 24 May 19 - 02:36 AM

    media people who will NOT learn how celebrities pronounce their names

    Not always as easy as it seems. My daughter was at school with Gemma Arterton, who pronounced her name A - er - t'n at the time.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 03:14 AM

    "She married her husband in 2017." Considering how expensive weddings are, what a waste of money doing it twice...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 24 May 19 - 03:41 AM

    "She married her husband in 2017."

    Unless she was a vicar, registrar or other such appointed official, she got married to someone in 2017.

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 24 May 19 - 07:40 AM

    Doug, doesn't that make a nonsense of the well known question:

    "Will you marry me?"

    Somehow, "Will you get married to me?" doesn't have that special something ...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 07:59 AM

    "Romeo, Romeo, where art thou Romeo?"

    "Money is the root of all evil."

    "Theirs but to do or die!"

    "Beam me up, Scotty!"

    "Elementary, my dear Watson."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 24 May 19 - 08:10 AM

    Quoting Shakespeare can be tricky:

    "Uncle me no uncle" -- Richard II, Act 2 Scene 3.

    I an not quite sure what part of speech that first 'uncle' is...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 08:55 AM

    "Crisis? What crisis?"

    "Let them eat cake."

    "Not tonight, Josephine."

    "It's life, Jim, but not as we know it."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 24 May 19 - 09:22 AM

    Not as we know it, not as we know it. Great video, that.

    I saw a headline (clickbait) that said Groom cries as bride reveals love for his spouse. What? Bigamy?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 24 May 19 - 09:31 AM

    "Romeo, Romeo, where art thou Romeo?"

    I'm not picking on you, Steve. It's just by chance that you are the one I keep disagreeing with - nothing personal - but the quote is:-
    "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?"

    Wherefore, in this case, means "why". Why did you have to be a Montague?

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 09:46 AM

    Er, I did know that, Doug. Are you sure you're getting me drift?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 24 May 19 - 09:49 AM

    Doug, doesn't that make a nonsense of the well known question:

    "Will you marry me?"

    Somehow, "Will you get married to me?" doesn't have that special something ...


    Of course, in every day usage, only a pedant would make the difference between the passive form of being married and the active form of officiating at the ceremony. However, we are in a thread called "Language Pet Peeves" where the distinction is being made between the status of the groom before and after the nuptials.

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 24 May 19 - 09:51 AM

    OK Steve! I'm easily confused.

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Charmion
    Date: 24 May 19 - 10:04 AM

    Tautologies.

    Today's irritant: "fellow classmates".

    Aaaaargh!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 24 May 19 - 10:35 AM

    Ooh yeah!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 06:27 PM

    Me too, Doug. I'm thinking of getting meself analysed some time in the next thirty or forty years... :-)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Raedwulf
    Date: 24 May 19 - 07:32 PM

    "Step foot". With apologies to the American contingent here, stupid Americanism!! Because it has been creeping into British English these last several years, I believe, from American English.

    Step doesn't work like that. You can step up, step out, step back, step on; you step in a direction. You can take a step, and a foot is also a measure of length. But you don't "step inch / metre / whatever". You can set foot; you are putting your foot somewhere (in it, possibly...). But you don't "step foot". Stupid, meaningless, idiotic misuse of the English language, whether it's the American or British version!!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 24 May 19 - 07:56 PM

    Interesting... I've been an adult American for 60 years, and I have never heard "step foot". I suppose it occurs when someone just doesn't hear 'set foot', but it's a new one to me. Next time, ask them where they got it.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 24 May 19 - 08:03 PM

    Don't worry, Bill. Raedwulf will quite likely elucidate once he's had a good night's kip...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Donuel
    Date: 24 May 19 - 08:17 PM

    There are mornings I step foot
    first in fresh cat puke stink
    My tell tale foot steps lead to the sink
    But I've never heard of step foot.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 25 May 19 - 02:34 AM

    Reminds me of Teresa May at (I think) the last general election, who had been 'knocking on doorsteps'.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 25 May 19 - 02:45 AM

    I have been increasingly annoyed by politicians going on about Brexit and what they think is the need to "get it over the line". Are they playing rugby, or American football, or shove ha'penny - who knows?
    You would think the future of the country is too important to be reduced to a game.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 25 May 19 - 06:04 AM

    "Delivering brexit" is almost as bad.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 25 May 19 - 06:37 AM

    Heard on Radio 4 this morning that some sportsperson's hand is "slightly fractured". A small fracture I understand...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Georgiansilver
    Date: 27 May 19 - 07:17 AM

    In the last 60 years.... What used to be 'Would have.....could have.... and.... should have which when shortened became would've, could've and should've...........have become would of... could of and should of in the UK..... How on earth did we get there??? Poor teaching in schools to put it bluntly.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Charmion
    Date: 27 May 19 - 08:44 AM

    Georgiansilver, you have a good one there. This form of words is also dealing the last blow to the subjunctive of "have": "If she would of gone home on time ..."

    While we're here, let's all yell Boo and Sucks to people who insist on using phrases from foreign languages without knowing how to pronounce them. Every time I hear "coo de grah" where "coup de grace" is meant, I wince rather too visibly and hiss rather too loudly.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 27 May 19 - 09:08 AM

    Yes, the correct usage of foreign phrases is, for me, a sine qua non.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 27 May 19 - 10:09 AM

    Three annoying/confusing ways in which people begin the answer to a question:

    So ...

    Yes no ...

    The point is is ... (heard on Radio 4 only this morning)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 27 May 19 - 10:18 AM

    People who say "If I would have ..." when they mean "If I had ...".


    And in describing amounts:

    "the most number of" instead of "most of"

    and, for example:

    "half of all the people in the country ..." instead of "half the people in the country ..."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 27 May 19 - 11:19 AM

    Coo de gras, ew. Also bon appetiT.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 27 May 19 - 12:01 PM

    'bonn zhaw'

    'merci bokew'


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 27 May 19 - 01:48 PM

    "Gunman." Just because some brute shoots somebody doesn't make him a gunman.

    If I use a pair of scissors, do I become a scissorwoman? No, I'm still just a woman.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 27 May 19 - 03:22 PM

    Not really a peeve, but interesting regarding guns, was an occasion some years ago when I heard a news report of the same incident on three BBC radio stations. On Radio 3 (mainly classical music), listeners were told that a man had been 'shot and killed'. On Radio 4 (news, documentaries, plays), the man had been 'shot dead'. On Radio 1 (pop music aimed at younger listeners), he had been 'gunned down'.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 27 May 19 - 08:47 PM

    I lived in St. Louis for 6 months. There were several streets I was familiar with that had interesting names I'd never have encountered in Kansas: It took awhile for me to connect the spelling on maps & signs with how the locals referred to them.

    Cabanne Place where I lived was 'Cabbany'

    DeBaliviere was 'De Boliver'

    Gravois was 'Gra-voys' (as near as I could tell)

    There were others, all sounding as if they were being pronounced by someone from The Bronx. I...umm.. adapted


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 28 May 19 - 08:46 AM

    Well near me there's a village called Wolfardisworthy. It's pronounced "Wolsery." The ancient capital of Cornwall, Launceston, is "Lanson" unless you're an emmet. Half a mile from my house there's Widemouth Bay. Say "Wide Mouth" if you want to provoke a splutter. It's "Widmuth."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 28 May 19 - 08:53 AM

    The comedian Dave Gorman in one of his shows says there is a sign on his station for "Loughborough University." He claims he is often asked how is is pronounced and says "Low-brow University" which he finds pleasing because "it is true and false are the same time.'


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 28 May 19 - 10:30 AM

    New UVa grad students in psych had a whole orientation on pronunciation and language... Rio Rd is Rye-oh, not Ree-oh. Monticello is chello, not sello. Grounds, not campus; first second etc -years, not freshmen sophomores. The Corner is a neighborhood. I got used to the pronunciation, but still thought of my students as juniors. There was more...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 28 May 19 - 01:51 PM

    That's a good observation about the shooting, Jos.
    ===========
    There's a pompous habit that gets on my nerves. Example:

    phone rings

    Leeneia: Hello
    Pompous twit: Leeneia? Arthur Fotheringay.

    Not "This is Arthur Fotheringay." or "My name is Arthur Fotheringay, and I'm calling about..."

    Apparently I am supposed to be so focused on the incredible Arthur Fotheringay that all he has to do is utter the two words, and I'm completely absorbed in his personality. Also, I am so unimportant that he cannot waste a few polite syllables on me.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 28 May 19 - 04:19 PM

    Tommy Cooper:

    The phone rang so I picked it up and said "Who's speaking, please?"

    A voice said "You are."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 28 May 19 - 04:36 PM

    Here's another language peeve of mine: people who put others down using the lingo of psychiatry or psychology when the situation doesn't merit it and they lack the qualifications to assess others.

    In a thread about chords, somebody started a post with "The fixation on chord names..." Now a fixation is a serious problem in a damaged mind. Telling the world that So-And-So has a fixation is arrogant and uncalled for. Naturally the post was not well-received.

    We hear other examples often. Calling somebody paranoid because they're more fearful than most. Calling somebody a nympho when she's sexier than most. It's dishonest, and I dislike it.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 28 May 19 - 05:55 PM

    Yeah, as a psychologist I find the misuse of my jargon annoying.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 28 May 19 - 06:07 PM

    Psychiatrist to neurotic patient "You have acute paranoia"

    Neurotic Patient "I came here to be treated, not admired"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 29 May 19 - 09:38 AM

    Tommy Cooper:
    The phone rang so I picked it up and said "Who's speaking, please?"
    A voice said "You are."


    So, in effect they were both wrong.
    At the time Tommy asked "Who's speaking", he was speaking.
    At the time the caller said "you are" the caller was also incorrect.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
    Date: 29 May 19 - 05:08 PM

    "Would of" and "Could of" and of course "Off of" were the common usage in Somerset schools in the 1960s despite constant corrections from the teachers.

    Robin


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 29 May 19 - 06:09 PM

    You really do have a problem, don't you, Nigel? :-) :-) :-)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 29 May 19 - 08:00 PM

    Strangled means dead, also.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 29 May 19 - 10:00 PM

    And if your spouse is dead you're the widow(er), not the wife/husband.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 30 May 19 - 11:13 AM

    Hello, Mrrzy. I'm glad to hear that someone else gives thought to the bullying power of psych terms used carelessly.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bee-dubya-ell
    Date: 30 May 19 - 12:22 PM

    Language is about communicating ideas. If someone pays too much attention to how "correctly" a communication is worded, then he/she is probably paying too little attention to the thought being communicated. It's analogous to valuing the packaging more than what's in the box.

    Having said that, it still grates when my step-son tells a waiter he's going to "do" whatever dish he's ordering. I'm not sure if he's going to eat it, shoot it dead, or fuck it.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 30 May 19 - 01:22 PM

    Don't blame the younger generation - AFAIK, that use of "do" emerged from hippy culture in the '60s, when people started to "do" rather than "take" drugs. That's when I first encountered that word-use; I remember the time and place ....


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 30 May 19 - 08:21 PM

    Mis-placed/unnecessary apostrophes are top of my list, or not using them when they should be there.
    Dey-ja voo (already you) instead of dey-ja vyu (already seen) for the other language ones. (phonetic spelling there!)
    Complimentary and complementary: so often confused/used incorrectly.
    Your and you're.
    There, they're and their.
    And, of course, could of, would of, should of.

    There are a few Scots peculiarities too, such as people saying, and spelling the following word as definATEly. And it's quite commonplace to hear "he has went" instead of "he has gone".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 30 May 19 - 09:53 PM

    Voo, not vyu, is how I have always heard it...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 30 May 19 - 10:37 PM

    Tattie, you must have learned your French in a different ecole from moi ... !


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: michaelr
    Date: 30 May 19 - 11:24 PM

    One that always gets to me is "one of the only..." No, it's either one of the few, or it is The Only.

    Another is the misplacement of the word just, as in "You just can't come barging in here" when what's meant is "You can't just come barging in here".


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 31 May 19 - 08:09 AM

    One that always gets to me is "one of the only..." No, it's either one of the few, or it is The Only.

    It depends on the missing part of the sentence. e.g. "This is one of the only seven known to exist." would appear to be a correct use of the words.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 31 May 19 - 09:04 AM

    One of the 7, I would think. I just am lovin' this thread.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 31 May 19 - 10:00 AM

    It's not a peeve, but I'm amused by the word "ones." Example: He's one of the ones who trampled Mrs. Hardwick's petunias.

    How can there be more than one one?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: beachcomber
    Date: 31 May 19 - 10:02 AM

    Politicians, in particular, but many other people use "grow" incorrectly, eg Some say "We will grow our economy...!"

    I would like to ask the opinions of Mudcatters on the use of an "R" sound between a word that ends in a vowel and one that commences with a vowel, such as "Aston Villa (r) are the new Champions. Is this a correct figure of speech ?? I've even heard "I saw (r) him do it" ???


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 31 May 19 - 10:25 AM

    Just read on a tour guide leaflet :
    "Here they stage traditional dance shows, local handicraft workshops and mythical ceremonies"

    I might be interested in seeing a mythological ceremony. I think I would feel conned to pay to see a mythical one.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: John P
    Date: 31 May 19 - 12:15 PM

    I'm tired of being asked for detes.

    Light isn't spelled "Lite". I even had a gas stove with "Lite" on the dial.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 31 May 19 - 02:30 PM

    I am reminded of a friend who had a sign over his sink that said THINK! There was also a sign above the stairs that said THTAIRS!...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 31 May 19 - 04:42 PM

    Well I'm a stickler for the use of good English, but I must say that many of the complaints here remind me of King Canute. Language is wot people speak, not wot professors of language profess. Whether we like it or not, what we often regard as linguistic outrages generally end up as standard English. "Begging the question," for example, which started out as one thing has become entirely another, and, as such, will be regarded even by naysayers as standard English in its new meaning. If we don't accept the changes we become as the dinosaurs did....


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 31 May 19 - 07:27 PM

    What, birds? Ahahahaha sorry.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 31 May 19 - 08:00 PM

    @mrzzy and meself: it is déjà vu, not déjà vous. Malheureusement, too many people pronounce the "vu" wrongly. The French pronunciation is definitely not "voo" as in "vous". There is not an exact English equivalent, but it is closer to "view" than "voo".
    I learned my French at school, yes, but also by staying with a French family for several months; they would not have said "déjà vous"!!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: michaelr
    Date: 31 May 19 - 09:33 PM

    Nigel Parsons -- in that case it should be "one of only seven" - "the" is superfluous.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Neil D
    Date: 31 May 19 - 10:58 PM

    Mrrzy said: "People are hanged. Pictures are hung."
    Reminds me of the scene from "Blazing Saddles" when Bart, who had recently been spared hanging and appointed sheriff, runs into an old acquaintance who says : "Bart, they told me you was hung". Bart responds "and they was right".

    My pet peeve is intentionally misspelled word in products or company names. When I used to make meat deliveries in Cleveland, the two big grocery chains on the East Side were Bi-Rite and Sav-Mor. It drove me to distraction.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 03:04 AM

    And what about "very unique". How can you have degrees of uniqueness?

    Robin


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 03:21 AM

    Steve is right about how language evolves and changes, but it can be confusing. A moment ago I read Pixar has dropped a trailer for a new film. In 'old-think' that means the trailer has been cancelled, removed, has gone. In 'new-think' it means it is now available.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 05:43 AM

    "People are hanged. Pictures are hung."

    It is particularly grating in My Fair Lady, a film specifically about the correct use of English, when Rex Harrison sings (or, rather, says)

    By law she should be taken out and hung,
    For the cold-blooded murder of the English tongue.


    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:13 AM

    English-speakers can't pronounce the French "u" of vu, but nobody I've heard say it [Yogi Bera] pronounces it with a y (vyu). They [English speakers] do not differentiate vous (voo) and vu (voo).

    As a native French speaker I have no problem with that. See Paris, above.

    Maybe Higgins was singing tongue in cheek?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jon Freeman
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:24 AM

    As far as I can see from Chambers and the Oxford Dictionary Online, people may be “hung” or “hanged” but the latter is rather more common.

    The Oxford one goes on to explain:   
    The reason for this distinction is a complex historical one: hanged, the earlier form, was superseded by hung sometime after the 16th century; it is likely that the retention of hanged for the execution sense may have to do with the tendency of archaic forms to remain in the legal language of the courts


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mr Red
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 10:55 AM

    'The suspect broke into the house and killed two people. Police arrested the suspect, John Smith, yesterday." Kinda defeats the purpose of using the term 'suspect', doesn't it?

    Yes and No. Languge is fluid and meanings morph.

    Gay has meant, over a period of several hundred years, variously sexually active as in "brisk young widow" to happy about life with no sexual connotations, to the modern appropriation.

    As Nigel Rees was won't to say in his books: "bad meanings drive out good"

    Hung is ambiguous without context (sexual connotations rear up (sic) again), whereas hanged is more specific. And I am hanged if I know why!
    I know which I prefer to be!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM

    I don't usually take any notice of sports results, but I have noticed lately that instead of winning cups and trophies teams 'lift' them. It sounds as if they stole them.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 04:58 PM

    How can there be more than one one?
    In binary notation numbers are represented by a series of ones and zeros


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 05:45 PM

    You're all worrying far too much. What you should be worrying about is the fact that Nigel failed to insert a full stop in his last post.. Cheers! :-)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Bill D
    Date: 01 Jun 19 - 09:12 PM

    I despise the trend of *verbing* nouns... :"Our staff has surfaced some new data."


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 02:12 AM

    Like when an Olympic athlete fails to medal...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 02:20 AM

    Sort of, Bill. I would say it is one of the glories of the English language that we can use pretty much any word as a noun, verb, adjective, adverb ... and bring out a 'tone' that would otherwise go unnoticed. In the hands of a skilled poet or writer this can be wonderful.

    Most of us, though, are not skilled poets or writers...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Doug Chadwick
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 03:10 AM

    Maybe Higgins was singing tongue in cheek?

    I think you are being too generous, Mrrzy. In any other film, poetic licence would allow the rhyming of hung with tongue - but not this one. The lyricist simply got it wrong and the director didn't pick it up.

    DC


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 08:15 AM

    Well, for off rhymes, Tom Lehrer wins. Uncut, and unsubt [riff] tle.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mr Red
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM

    Mispronunciation and enjambed rhymes for comic effect are all the funnier. Mind you Cole Porter did it all the time to make the yric more fluid and flowing.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 06:41 PM

    OK, Mrzzy, I did qualify my last post by saying that the French 'Vu" is not the same as "view". How we were taught to say it requires considerable oral contortions: put your lips forward as if you were going to say a "oo" sound, but then say "ee" instead, and you'll get that odd cross between the 2 sounds, for which there is no English comparison!
    Parfait, ou non?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 02 Jun 19 - 07:37 PM

    Nice! Turlututu chapeau pointu! (That was the exercise for the English speakers)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: JennieG
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:31 AM

    Many newsreaders here add an extra syllable to words beginning with 'thr', perhaps for emphasis.....for example, "three" becomes "the-ree" and "threat" is now "the-reat", etc.

    It is annoying. I have become one of those Olde Phartes who yells at the TV because of things such as this.

    Also - when did a sporting match become a "clash"? Something else to yell about......


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:41 AM

    Another that has been really getting on my nerves is "from the get-go"

    (often pronounced "from the gecko").


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 08:58 AM

    That extra syllable is highly folksong-y (the t-uh-rain pulled away on that g-uh-lorious night)... I have not yet had to yell at my radio over it. Yet.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 01:39 PM

    @Jos: and if they don't win their match they "crash out"! (No, they just lost a game!!)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: JennieG
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 04:56 PM

    When the news is sung they can add as many extra syllables as they like.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 03 Jun 19 - 07:23 PM

    "Pet Peeves"?
    You can't, he's a poltergeist, so incorporeal. (at least according to J K Rowling)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 04 Jun 19 - 01:45 AM

    You may as well give up on things such as get-go. It's standard English now. As a matter of fact, though I'd never write it, I quite like it and I use it all the time.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 04 Jun 19 - 10:47 AM

    Yeah, I remember my dad saying get-go, and I'm old. Ish.

    This reminds me of my sisters quizzing mom on modern (in the 60's) slang, and after each phrase, mom said That's over my head. Then they said something (I forget what) and mom says wait, I don't understand that one. "Went over her head" went over her head! We died laughing.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 07 Jun 19 - 10:09 AM

    Also why does ouster mean ousting?


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: meself
    Date: 07 Jun 19 - 11:18 AM

    "From the get-go" does not appear in print until the 1960s, apparently. Some think it morphed from the expression, "From the word 'go'"; personally, I think the similarity is coincidental (due to the opposing rhythmical stresses in the two expressions; 'the GET-go' would not naturally emerge from 'the word GO').

    Another theory is that it is an abbreviated version of "Get ready, get set - GO!"

    Yet another theory has it as coming from the clunky formation "getting going" - I think "get going" more likely.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 07 Jun 19 - 07:19 PM

    Thing is, with us old fogies we'd tend to think that the old is better than the new. Therefore "from the word go" is better than "from the get-go." But I'm not so sure. Looked at utterly objectively, which is a very bad thing to do, both expressions are equally bad, or equally good. So I'm going with the flow. And you know me...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: SamStone
    Date: 07 Jun 19 - 10:48 PM

    luv it when the eastenders say "neiver" for neither


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: lefthanded guitar
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 02:11 AM

    Prefacing a sentence with the inane phrase "Not for nothing, but......" Whatever the f*** does that mean?! I've even asked people who say it, and they don't know.


    This is seconded in irritating language by the phrase " Not to talk about it... but...." And then, of course, they talk about it.

    Shaddup. ;)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Nigel Parsons
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:04 AM

    Similarly Whatever the f*** does that mean? is just a longer way to ask "What does that mean?"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:23 AM

    No it doesn't. At least in the written word, one is a neutral request for an explanation. The other is highly-nuanced, and, depending on context, might imply surprise, derision, shock or outrage. In the spoken word, much would depend on how you express either.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:24 AM

    I meant "No it isn't." Grr.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Steve Shaw
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:30 AM

    And if you want to know one of my pet peeves it's the use of asterisks in swear words. Even The Guardian doesn't permit them. I sometimes use them sarcastically, for example in the expression "Trump is a complete and utter b*ast*ard." That method also comes in handy on those websites that automatically replace your swear word with a different word.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 06:45 AM

    I do wish people would say 'inspiring' instead of 'inspirational'.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 03:03 PM

    There was a thing for awhile where one said So (something that can't be so), such (something that can't be such), wow. Took me forever to get it right. So effort, such wrong, wow. But now nobody uses it.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 08 Jun 19 - 07:58 PM

    Well where have I been hiding? I have NEVER EVER in ma puff heard ANYONE say "from the get-go"! And yet you say it's commonplace?
    Yes, I have heard, and would use myself "from the word go" or "from the off" but no, nay, never "from the get-go". Could be a song in that?.......

    And it's no, nay, never, - - -
    No, nay from the get-go
    Will I play the go-getter
    In your game of get-go


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: JennieG
    Date: 10 Jun 19 - 02:28 AM

    A turn of phrase which is cropping up more and more - here in Oz, at least - is "forced to do such and such". A news item yesterday about a boat sinking was "survivors forced to cling to wreckage". This morning's local rag has a front page story "police forced to taser man involved in brawl". That's just two instances of what are becoming more and more usages of "forced to".

    The stories would be more succinctly told "survivors cling to wreckage" and "police taser man" but perhaps they would then lack a little drama, and some folk like to milk all the drama they can from their stories.

    I know language is a living thing, constantly changing and evolving.....and while I do enjoy some current terms and words, I don't have to always like where it is going or some of the stops along the way.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mr Red
    Date: 10 Jun 19 - 08:51 AM

    And what about starting an answer with "So..........."

    I find it distracting, in a way that "Ah" or "Well",** and "yes" isn't off-putting. Yet they serve the same purpose, a delay while the answerer (sic) can collect their thoughts - usually on a subject they know well.

    So........... it is a modern affectation, and as Folkies, Traditionalists,** and old Fogies we find strange on our ears.

    Language morphs all the time. Consider words for being "in fashion/good", hip, hot, cool,** and wicked - all words with contra contexts.

    ** Pedants'*** corner - note use of the Oxford comma.

    *** note use of the Oxford Grocer's**** apostrophe.

    ****yes, yes. There are more than one Oxford Grocer, but only one who misspells "'" AFAIK.





    So.......... I'll get my côte


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: DMcG
    Date: 10 Jun 19 - 09:06 AM

    I don't worry at all about my spelling and grammar on Mudcat - I am not producing a work of literature, after all. But I do expect professional documents to be to higher standard. I got a bit of sales promotion that said this:

    "Cruises here bring to your holiday a balance of both nature and elegant grounds."

    There is *some* semblance to English...


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: weerover
    Date: 10 Jun 19 - 10:17 AM

    I agree with DMcG on mistakes in general, we all make them, but I frequently find basic errors in textbooks intended for the teaching of English in schools, which I consider unforgiveable.

    I am somewhat surprised that Tattie Bogle has never encountered "the get-go". I believe we are fairly close geographically, and I have heard it many times, though usually on TV.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 10 Jun 19 - 06:01 PM

    This is more than a peeve. i am dismayed at parents of young children who are so absorbed in their electronics or their own conversations that they completely ignore their young child.

    The process by which a little one (age one to five) acquires language is one of the most amazing things in all of nature. In addition it's interesting, gratifying or adorable to participate in.

    Two days ago I pre-boarding an airplane, and two parents with a little girl were getting aboard just ahead of me. Her parents allowed her to step on the jetway, with its slope and its sudden steep ramps while staring at a small electronic screen. Soon she stopped looking at held up a hot pink teddy bear. Three times she asked, "Is this a stuffed toy?" Nobody answered the first two times. Finally her mother said yes.

    If a parent had simply said "Don't interrupt" that would have been better than pretending she doesn't exist. And really, what is so important that you can't stop yacking long enough to see your child safely down a jetway and into the plane?

    Then she asked three times, "What animal is it?" Her mother said "You figure it out." That's not going to teach her anything.

    As we approached the door into the plane, they allowed her to pull on a metal bar covered with a bright yellow coating. Didn't observe what she was doing, didn't tell her to stop. Didn't explain that parts of an aircraft are not toys and are not to be touched. In short, no parenting was going on.
    ===============
    Ya know, a lot of people are irritated by teen-agers' "up-talk." I think up-talk reflects the insecurity of young people who do not feel confident that an adult is listening to them. They put a question in every utterance because they are unconsciously asking "Are you paying any attention? Do you hear me? Are you there?"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mr Red
    Date: 11 Jun 19 - 03:52 AM

    I see it all the time on buses. Pushchair facing the front and the mother behind, fixed on the phone.
    Less than half of them put the chair facing back, which is the correct way in case of a sudden stop. And it affords eye contact parent & child.

    As a non parent, I once read that engaging in what the child is interested in allows them to learn faster. Ignoring or deflecting them with other things, doesn't. When in the company of a toddler I tend to follow their interest, now.

    Some understand, some don't. As Winston Churchill said "The two most important jobs in life are given to amateurs, parenthood & citizenship"


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 11 Jun 19 - 10:58 AM

    Excellent points, Mr. Red.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Jos
    Date: 11 Jun 19 - 12:25 PM

    Many years ago when I used to push a child along in a pram, the pram was designed so that the child would sit facing me, but did he want to sit and look at me? No, whenever possible (that is, when it wasn't raining) he liked to have the hood down so that he could turn round and see where we were going.

    (There were no portable phones or electronic devices in those days, but even now I do not use one while walking along.)


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 13 Jun 19 - 03:53 AM

    "Get-go": I don't watch much TV which is maybe why I haven't heard it.
    I prefer " My get-up-and-go has got up and went"!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 13 Jun 19 - 12:51 PM

    Tattie, this is now a music thread!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Tattie Bogle
    Date: 13 Jun 19 - 05:30 PM

    I have no pet peeve with that!


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 14 Jun 19 - 11:01 AM

    Fox News, reporting on an awful incident where a pregnant woman was murdered and the fetus[before]/baby[after] was kidnapped, used the term "womb-raider" in headlines when the baby died.

    I was horrified and kinda impressed at the same time.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: leeneia
    Date: 15 Jun 19 - 10:17 PM

    I dislike that, Mrrzy. "Womb-raider" sounds too much like a term from science fiction. What a horrible crime, made slightly worse for the family when Fox News tries to be trendy about it.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Gurney
    Date: 16 Jun 19 - 12:49 AM

    BBCWrestler (if I may call him that)up there picked one of mine. I watch American Pickers on the TV, and Mike Wolfe often says "Very Unique."
    It is or it isn't unique. There aren't degrees of uniqueness.

    Another term that I thought was peculiar to Americans was the use of the term 'Careen' when they mean 'Career." One means to clean a ship, the other (among other meanings) to move erratically. I just checked on Wordweb, the (possibly American) computer dictionary, and even that useful application doesn't know the difference, although it claims both words to the 'move erratically' meaning. Also, it has jammed up on me for asking!

    Many English speakers often use 'an' before a word that begins with 'H,' such as 'An horrific accident, An herb garden.'

    Books generally have dispensed with speech marks " in favour of quotation marks '.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: JennieG
    Date: 16 Jun 19 - 02:04 AM

    Not only Americans, Gurney......Ozzies use 'career' meaning to move erratically, as in 'the car went careering down the hill'. 'Careen', not so much.

    Considering that much of our speech patterns came from various parts of Great Britain rather than the U.S., it could point to an origin on the British side of the pond.


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    Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
    From: Mrrzy
    Date: 16 Jun 19 - 09:02 AM

    We call those single quotes and double quotes. They are used for different things. I have not seen singles used instead of doubles. I would object.

    Leeneia, yes indeed.


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