mudcat.org: BS: Language Pet Peeves
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36]


BS: Language Pet Peeves

Lighter 19 Apr 21 - 03:42 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Apr 21 - 03:33 PM
Mrrzy 19 Apr 21 - 02:04 PM
leeneia 19 Apr 21 - 12:38 PM
leeneia 19 Apr 21 - 11:49 AM
leeneia 19 Apr 21 - 11:48 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Apr 21 - 12:20 PM
meself 18 Apr 21 - 12:15 PM
Lighter 18 Apr 21 - 11:38 AM
Nigel Parsons 18 Apr 21 - 10:56 AM
leeneia 18 Apr 21 - 10:08 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Apr 21 - 09:15 AM
Jon Freeman 18 Apr 21 - 08:27 AM
Mrrzy 18 Apr 21 - 07:56 AM
Lighter 18 Apr 21 - 06:57 AM
Jos 18 Apr 21 - 06:45 AM
Steve Shaw 18 Apr 21 - 05:55 AM
Donuel 18 Apr 21 - 05:10 AM
Jon Freeman 18 Apr 21 - 03:55 AM
Jos 18 Apr 21 - 03:16 AM
robomatic 17 Apr 21 - 06:08 PM
Jos 17 Apr 21 - 03:00 PM
leeneia 17 Apr 21 - 02:53 PM
Steve Shaw 17 Apr 21 - 12:19 PM
Mrrzy 17 Apr 21 - 11:32 AM
Doug Chadwick 17 Apr 21 - 04:00 AM
Joe_F 16 Apr 21 - 08:56 PM
Mrrzy 16 Apr 21 - 05:22 PM
Doug Chadwick 16 Apr 21 - 02:56 PM
meself 16 Apr 21 - 01:41 PM
Mrrzy 16 Apr 21 - 12:39 PM
Steve Shaw 16 Apr 21 - 12:24 PM
meself 16 Apr 21 - 10:56 AM
Stilly River Sage 16 Apr 21 - 10:47 AM
Dave the Gnome 16 Apr 21 - 10:44 AM
Charmion 16 Apr 21 - 10:15 AM
Bill D 16 Apr 21 - 09:06 AM
G-Force 16 Apr 21 - 09:03 AM
robomatic 16 Apr 21 - 08:41 AM
Jon Freeman 16 Apr 21 - 08:36 AM
Backwoodsman 16 Apr 21 - 08:36 AM
Raggytash 16 Apr 21 - 07:45 AM
Mrrzy 16 Apr 21 - 07:21 AM
Mrrzy 16 Apr 21 - 07:19 AM
SPB-Cooperator 16 Apr 21 - 07:03 AM
Jos 16 Apr 21 - 06:47 AM
SPB-Cooperator 16 Apr 21 - 06:30 AM
meself 29 Mar 21 - 12:45 PM
Jon Freeman 29 Mar 21 - 02:59 AM
Jos 29 Mar 21 - 02:12 AM
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:






Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 03:42 PM

Yes, and know-it-alls are still objecting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 03:33 PM

It was repurposed thus at least six hundred years ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 02:04 PM

That is what They is for... He, She or It, depending on context. Repurposing a plural into a singular. You have seen that before, haha!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 12:38 PM

Not a peeve. I've learned a new word. Those banners that we see at the bottom of newscasts, usually unrelated to the story being discussed, are called chyrons.

Learn all about it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKx5TzW0URo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 11:49 AM

Steve: we are not deceived. :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 19 Apr 21 - 11:48 AM

A few years ago there was a long and worthy mudcat thread about all the variants we have created of the missing second-person plural. Y'all, you all, youse, all y'all, etc.

In Scotland I encountered something that sounded like "yiz". Is that plural?

Now what we need is a pronoun which means "he, she or it" depending on circumstance.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 12:20 PM

I always do the same deliberate mistake of typing "Viola!" for that exclamation, Nigel. It's a kickback against the pretentiousness of some people for whom using unnecessary foreign phrases is a sine qua non...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 12:15 PM

I believe "y'all" is becoming more popular due to - wait for it ... the internet. Some years back, it would be a clear indication of a Southern American; now, not so much. Where I grew up (Central/Eastern Canada), "you all" was not uncommon, but "y'all" unheard of. "Yous(e)" is common where there was significant Irish settlement.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 11:38 AM

No vaguer than "resist" or "react."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 10:56 AM

From: Steve Shaw
"...but tried it and it was OK, though I haven't bothered since." . . .

. . . to avoid buttery drips on the trousers, and make sure you've had five pints before you eat it. Viola!


Nice try, but mentioning one musical instrument is not enough to make this a music thread ;)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 10:08 AM

New peeve: push back. A vague phrase used by TV journalists who are too lazy or busy to be specific.

"Today Matt Gaetz pushed back against charges that he had [insert name of criminal or inappropriate thing to do]."
===============
I don't know what a poppadom is, but that would be a cute name for a small, fuzzy dog.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 09:15 AM

When I were a student, Jos, we thought nothing of downing six pints of Bank's bitter and then going for a biryani with extra fried rice and two poppadoms...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 08:27 AM

I'll leave Y'all to you Yanks (British usage of "Yanks" there...).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 07:56 AM

You used to be plural only when Thee was the singular.

You is now ambiguous, could be plural or singular.

Y'all is plural, leaving You as an unambiguous singular. Useful.

Also Southern US- here is where I am, there is where you are, yonder is somewhere else. Also useful.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 06:57 AM

"Y'all" means "the two or more of you" or, sometimes, "the one of you as a representative of a group."

Period. And it's useful.

It's used in speech every day by everybody who grew up in the South, regardless of education, class, or ethnicity. Not even the most pedantic Southern English teacher takes notice - because they use it too.

It's definitely not fading out. It might even be spreading northward.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 06:45 AM

1. I don't like vinegar on my chips.
2. I don't like tomato ketchup (it ruins the taste of tomato for no good purpose).

3. Five pints? Yes, especially after a good long walk finishing in a decent pub. But would I want a chip butty afterwards? It probably wouldn't occur to me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 05:55 AM

"...but tried it and it was OK, though I haven't bothered since."

You must be doing it wrong. For a start, you need chip shop chips. They must be overloaded with salt 'n' vinegar. Take one slice of terrible white bread. Butter it thickly (when you bite into the butty your teeth should be leaving little cliff edges). Stork will do at a pinch. Load one half with chips then fold it over. Tommy K optional. Two basic rules should be followed: sit over your plate (or newspaper wrapping) to avoid buttery drips on the trousers, and make sure you've had five pints before you eat it. Viola!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Donuel
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 05:10 AM

Y'all. - you all; you people, usage southern US
Perhaps its fading out like 'race creed or color'
I am not sure if can be used both affectionately or aggressively but it is a southern thing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 03:55 AM

I thought "sarnie" was probably a scouse thing but its origins are uncertain. Some answers I found point to the OED which apparently indicates that the use of "sarnie" popped up in 1961 and is believed to be from a northern England dialectical pronunciation of "sand" from "sandwich."

I was familiar with both this and "butty" from my years in North Wales, I'm not sure about Norfolk where I've lived my last 20.

I think my choice of word usually depends on the filling, eg. a cheese sandwich but a chip (or bacon) butty.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 18 Apr 21 - 03:16 AM

I reached middle age before I even heard of a chip butty. It struck me as a strange idea, but tried it and it was OK, though I haven't bothered since. I have also heard people say 'bacon butty' and maybe 'jam butty' - but never 'egg butty' or any of the others. I think it is a North / South thing, to do with where you grew up, not where you live now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: robomatic
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 06:08 PM

I had one of those cases where my mind is thinking something that 'I' am merely listening to. On awakening. So on this awakening my mind was telling me type:

"I have some issues with a language which occasionally puts a 'p' in front of a word and then fails to pronounce it."

I say 'ptooie' to that!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 03:00 PM

It could be, if you made a sardine sarnie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 02:53 PM

And here I thought a sarnie was something to do with sardines.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 12:19 PM

Twee words get my goat. My two most detested are hubby (Mrs Steve is banned from using that) and sarnie. I'm clenching my buttocks here, even thinking about those two. It's a sandwich if you must. But in reality it's a butty. Egg butty. Bacon butty. Dripping butty. Fish finger butty. Cheese butty. Chip butty. You may call it a sandwich if it's toasted or if you bought it at Marks and Spencer. At a stretch, it can be a ham sandwich. There is no "chip sandwich" and there never has been. And my mum ran a chippy for ten years. Almost as bad as hubby are the related terms "my better half" or "my significant other." "The missus" is just about OK but "the wife" is not. I can just about take "'er indoors."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 11:32 AM

I guess I am old. Or the books I read are...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 17 Apr 21 - 04:00 AM

For me, the name Guy would only bring the effigy to mind in the phrase "Penny for the Guy", when kids in the street are trying to extract money from me in the early days of November.

Even if someone was alluding to a person's scruffy appearance, I would never expect "Guy" to be attached to "regular". They would more likely say "He looks a right scarecrow".

DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Joe_F
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 08:56 PM

The use of "already" as a tag at the end of a request, indicating impatience, is indeed a Jewish importation into American English, representing the Yiddish "shoin".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 05:22 PM

Guy Fawkes effigy-looking, quoi.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 02:56 PM

... poorly dressed, hair like straw, and otherwise unpresentable-looking.

Boris the regular Guy?


DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 01:41 PM

Hmm ... I always heard 'regular guy' as meaning somebody unremarkable, but dependable, trustworthy, unpretentious, and 'one of the boys'.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 12:39 PM

A regular Guy, capital G, (I *did* specify) means -or meant, in my youth and folly- poorly dressed, hair like straw, and otherwise unpresentable-looking. When did that go away?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 12:24 PM

Now that Amazon Prime has put out a new series about Leonardo, here we go again with the "da Vinci" nonsense. It's in the headline of the news item about it on the BBC website and it's repeated throughout the article. "Da Vinci" is not his surname. It refers only to the place he comes from. Calling him "da Vinci" is as daft as calling Henry VIII "the Eighth" or Eric "the Red." Leonardo will do fine...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 10:56 AM

Anyone know how far back we need to go to find the OPs for the 'regular guy' and 'already' contentions?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 10:47 AM

US: Johnny, will you hurry up and finish your dinner already.

It means the same thing, it's an ironic use of the word, wishing the meal was finished. Already.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 10:44 AM

Nipping out to roll a fag always causes problems...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Charmion
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 10:15 AM

Taking off editor hat and calmly leaving to do something else ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Bill D
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 09:06 AM

I very seldom have heard 'already' used as a future tense in the U.S. It seems more like a term used by some ethnic group(s) Jewish use? If someone did use to to me, I'd have no problem understanding....but....


It would be far more common to hear "He has already finished...X"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: G-Force
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 09:03 AM

In the UK, 'he's a regular guy' means he shits every day.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: robomatic
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 08:41 AM

SPB I respect you and your posts, but to me this OP comes off as more pique than pick.

There is no difficulty in understanding the use of the word 'already' in your OP. It may have some immigrant history in the way other languages express when their users switch to English. It may be related to the German 'waiting for the verb' phenomenon.

Whereas, in my experience we have this.

I don't know if UK or Canada or the many English speaking parts of the world have figured out a way to fix this, but it is my constant reminder to not be too proud of my wonderful English language.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 08:36 AM

I've not heard "regular guy" in the UK either.

I think "quite good" can vary depending on context and tone of voice. "I think I did badly here"/ "no, what you did was quite good" would be complimentary and encouraging".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 08:36 AM

”I cannot recall hearing "he's a regular guy" ever being used in the UK. I don't think anyone here would imagine it as an insult.”

Me neither, Raggy. It’s simply not a part of the UK lexicon.

The one that grates with me is, “I couldn’t care less” (UK) v. “I could care less” (US). The US version clearly doesn’t mean what they think it means!

And the strangest expression I’ve heard from an American in recent times was ‘deplane’, meaning to disembark from an aircraft.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Raggytash
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 07:45 AM

I cannot recall hearing "he's a regular guy" ever being used in the UK. I don't think anyone here would imagine it as an insult.

I am curious as to why Mrrzy thinks it's an insult here.

The use of "quite good" in my experience means exactly that, it is quite good, not too bad, acceptable.

Again I wonder why Mrrzy thinks otherwise.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 07:21 AM

I am expecting the mudelves to add this conversation to the language peeves thread...




Good call, Mrrzy! ---mudelf


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 07:19 AM

He's a regular guy = US compliment, UK insult [capital G guy]

Quite good = very good US, not very good UK [we had a British biss who wondered why managers kept insulting their own staff]

Interestingly if you are Deaf then referring to someone as "very hard of hearing" means describing them as having better hearing than someone who is only a little hard of hearing...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 07:03 AM

It is defined as a typo


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: Jos
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 06:47 AM

Well, 'defininiation' is a rather lovely word I have never come across before ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: BS: Annoying Language Differences
From: SPB-Cooperator
Date: 16 Apr 21 - 06:30 AM

UK and USA have often been described as two great nationals divided by one language.

There are a number examples where the same word is used in UK and US, but in a different way. One that grates on me is the word ALREADY, where in UK it refers to something that has happened and in US to something that someone wants to happen.

For example:

UK: Johnny has already finished his dinner.
US: Johnny, will you hurry up and finish your dinner already.

This is clearly contradictory as the word refers to both something that has happened, and something that hasn't happened.

I am sure a linguist can find the point where the meaning of the word diverged, and which defininiation came first.

Do any other annoying (or even wonderful) differences spring to Mind?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 29 Mar 21 - 12:45 PM

I'm reminded of the young woman who was so roundly mocked on the internet a year ago or so, for answering the game-show question, "What is Popeye's favourite food?", as "Fried chicken" - being of the generation she was, she was thinking of a popular fast-food chain rather than the cartoon character it's named after. The question was ambiguous, and her answer reasonable, so she should have been awarded the point(s) and spared the ridicule - but they didn't ask for my judgement ... !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jon Freeman
Date: 29 Mar 21 - 02:59 AM

My dictionary (Chambers) gives gives "backdoor" as an adjective meanin "Unworthily secret" or "Clandestine".

I usually watch Pointless at tea time and they often have a round where contestants have to think of a single word meeting a certain condition (eg, ending in ious). I am often uncertain (with my own ideas as well as answers by contestants) as to what is one word, what is two words and what is hyphenated. I've also been proved wrong a few times when I've felt sure an answer is/isn't a single word.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Jos
Date: 29 Mar 21 - 02:12 AM

Regarding meaning and stress, the way I would say these words is:

backFIRE (a verb)
BACKlash (a noun)

BACK door (not the front door)
back DOOR (not the back window)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

 


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.


You must be a member to post in non-music threads. Join here.



Mudcat time: 23 April 12:23 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.