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BS: Signs of Autumn

Senoufou 25 Oct 20 - 05:43 PM
Mrrzy 25 Oct 20 - 05:31 PM
keberoxu 25 Oct 20 - 05:04 PM
EBarnacle 21 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM
keberoxu 21 Oct 20 - 12:47 PM
Mrrzy 14 Oct 20 - 12:11 AM
leeneia 13 Oct 20 - 10:02 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Oct 20 - 07:55 PM
Gallus Moll 12 Oct 20 - 06:21 PM
Mrrzy 12 Oct 20 - 04:24 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Oct 20 - 03:26 PM
Jos 12 Oct 20 - 02:31 PM
Steve Shaw 12 Oct 20 - 02:13 PM
Senoufou 12 Oct 20 - 01:01 PM
Gallus Moll 12 Oct 20 - 06:18 AM
Senoufou 11 Oct 20 - 04:23 PM
EBarnacle 11 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM
keberoxu 09 Oct 20 - 07:33 PM
Charmion 07 Oct 20 - 06:54 PM
Senoufou 07 Oct 20 - 06:11 PM
Charmion 07 Oct 20 - 05:01 PM
Senoufou 07 Oct 20 - 04:23 PM
Charmion 07 Oct 20 - 03:54 PM
Senoufou 07 Oct 20 - 03:25 PM
Senoufou 05 Oct 20 - 03:49 AM
keberoxu 04 Oct 20 - 07:21 PM
EBarnacle 04 Oct 20 - 05:07 PM
keberoxu 03 Oct 20 - 06:31 PM
Senoufou 02 Oct 20 - 12:00 PM
robomatic 02 Oct 20 - 11:00 AM
leeneia 01 Oct 20 - 01:56 PM
Charmion's brother Andrew 01 Oct 20 - 11:26 AM
Charmion 01 Oct 20 - 10:47 AM
keberoxu 29 Sep 20 - 06:43 PM
Senoufou 29 Sep 20 - 11:12 AM
Charmion 29 Sep 20 - 10:56 AM
keberoxu 27 Sep 20 - 03:47 PM
Senoufou 27 Sep 20 - 04:20 AM
Jos 27 Sep 20 - 03:31 AM
Senoufou 26 Sep 20 - 03:56 PM
keberoxu 26 Sep 20 - 03:49 PM
Senoufou 26 Sep 20 - 03:28 PM
Charmion 26 Sep 20 - 02:46 PM
Senoufou 26 Sep 20 - 02:34 AM
Tattie Bogle 25 Sep 20 - 08:04 PM
Senoufou 24 Sep 20 - 07:16 AM
keberoxu 23 Sep 20 - 12:17 PM
Senoufou 21 Sep 20 - 03:21 PM
Donuel 21 Sep 20 - 03:10 PM
Bill D 21 Sep 20 - 01:25 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 05:43 PM

Our clocks 'went back' at 2am, and we're now an hour earlier than we were before. Most confusing for our 'body clocks'. It gets dark now by 4pm, but dawn is a bit earlier. It always takes me about three weeks to adjust.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Mrrzy
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 05:31 PM

Finally cold out. Went to hear music outdoors at a winery, came home 3ish, and here it is 5.30ish and my feet are still *radiating* cold under the blanket on my couch.

I love fall clothes. And the sound of leaves being blown from trees and along patios.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 25 Oct 20 - 05:04 PM

... how do things look coming up to All Hallows Eve??

and don't forget the other senses,
as Autumn is also a time, as well as looking,
for listening,
tasting,
smelling,
touching ...

what are tne odo[u]rs of Autumn where you are?


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: EBarnacle
Date: 21 Oct 20 - 02:05 PM

'Tis closing in on the final days of the elections on this side of the pond. We local types keep reminding people that the election is more than for president.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 21 Oct 20 - 12:47 PM

The hills and mountains, from a viewing distance in the car on the highway,
still have a lovely patchwork of colored leaves.

Get close up to any trees on level ground, though,
and those leaves are falling so fast --
and the leaf-blower landscaper groundsworkers
are working up a storm in town.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Mrrzy
Date: 14 Oct 20 - 12:11 AM

Great bird naming.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Oct 20 - 10:02 PM

Migration - another sign of autumn. The DH and I went on a long ride to birdwatch a few days ago. Went to a state wildlife refuge and saw 16 kinds of birds - bald eagle, blue heron, great egret, killdeer were the most exciting.

We also saw some shorebirds we can't identify, but they were a wonderful sight nonetheless. There are largish shorebirds called willitts, and we decided to call those we saw won'titts. Shorebirds can be so hard to identify that there is a blanket term "peep" to cover all of them, but the word peep doesn't seem right for big birds.

We were baffled by a woodpecker that had a brownish head and red patches on its cheeks. Turned out to be a juvenile woodpecker. All these years of birdwatching, and we had no idea they existed.

It was a beautiful afternoon, and we were so glad to get out of the house.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 07:55 PM

I get bumper crops of Autumn Bliss raspberries most years, and last year I made some raspberry gin. I loved it, but Mrs Steve didn't care for it. That meant temporary heaven for me, but she wouldn't appreciate it if I made any more...


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 06:21 PM

Hi Sen, usually I get a lot of apples and quinces from friends who have some trees in their garden, but they are totally isolating so not wanting to contact anyone at all this year!!! - Last year I had some left over quinces and experimented with quince vodka -- really lovely! (thought gin would overpower the delicate quince flavour.
I came across a book of recipes for absolutely every single type of wold and hedgerow thing you can imagine - and I know someone working her way through each one. Shall post the name of the author and her book when I find it again online - - -
Now we are all anticipating the January rush to buy Seville oranges for marmalade making-------!!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 04:24 PM

I am reminded of a poem...

Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Spread it thick, say it quick!
Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Spread it thicker, say it quicker!
Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Don’t eat with your mouth full!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 03:26 PM

Bigger Kilner jars are great for making sloe and damson gins. I have a goodly supply of said jars.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Jos
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 02:31 PM

You can still buy new Kilner jars (not just old ones in charity shops) - they aren't that old.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 02:13 PM

The weather here has skipped three-quarters of October and the whole of November. However, I've just bought a new replacement Weber gas barbie for a bargain price. It will stay under cover until next year and I'm leaving the old one outside in case we want a sausage sizzle on, e.g., Christmas Day...


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 01:01 PM

Ooooh yum yum Gallus Moll! My Irish aunties (who lived in Durham for some years) made all those types of things in the autumn too. In those days we all had a 'larder' or 'pantry' (walk-in room with shelves, freezing cold and used for storage of food) There was bottled fruit (remember Kilner jars?), chutney, jam etc.
Our neighbour-across-the-road collects up windfall apples (Bramleys) and makes delicious crumbles. She sells them on her rounds (she flogs vegetables/fruit from her car like a travelling greengrocer to make a few bob)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 12 Oct 20 - 06:18 AM

Damson jelly, Damson Gin, Bramble and Apple jelly, Green Tomato chutney, Rowan jelly......all safely in the store cuoboard, Autumn harvest.
Soup pot is now out for Cullen Skink, Lentil, bottom of the fridge soup and other hearty Scottish delicacies - mince and tatties, casseroles, haggis/ neeps/tatties a' the things yer grannie cooked!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 11 Oct 20 - 04:23 PM

We had blooming hailstones yesterday and tons more rain today.
BamBam the tame deer hates the cold and the rain, so there's a photo of him in The Fox pub scrutinising the menu on the wall. Some wag had written underneath the picture "Hide the venison for God's sake!"
He enters the pub almost every day. I don't personally think it's very hygienic (but Normal for Norfolk?)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: EBarnacle
Date: 11 Oct 20 - 12:13 PM

OK, there was frost on my windshield yesterday and the temp went up to 24 C. Took the last o our ripe tomatoes in. Indian Summer is officially here. The root veggies come in next, especially the potatoes. Lost most of that crop as they developed a fungus. The sweet potatoes may overwinter in their planters.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 09 Oct 20 - 07:33 PM

... increasingly bare trees.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 06:54 PM

Eliza, the late ‘60s was a time when young Canadians liked to spend the summer travelling around the country, often hitch-hiking. So many were doing it that school gyms and church basements were opened to provide hostel space. In big cities and in tourist towns like Stratford, patrolling cops looked for young folks on the street, especially if they had rucksacks and sleeping bags. Hitch-hiking was technically illegal, and wandering kids also had a tendency to beg — also illegal. (The Criminal Code included both behaviours in its definition of the offence of vagrancy.)

So the Stratford cops were just deciding whether to bust you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 06:11 PM

When I was visiting my Irish auntie and uncle in London, Ontario (this was the late sixties) it was a very pretty town. Rather similar to our village here - bungalows with pretty open-plan front gardens and pavements. I really liked it, and walked about on my own exploring (August/September so quite warm) A few times a Police car would slow down and the Canadian officer would ask me what I was doing! They always found it a bit strange for a young lady to be walking about like that. I did notice that most people got into a car to go out.
I also remember the massive thunderstorms during the nights. And the lovely cool basements people had (not something we have here).
I swam in every one of the Lakes (Huron, Ontario, Erie, Superior and Michigan) but sadly I left Canada before the autumn leaves turned to gold.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 05:01 PM

In 1997, Stratford Ontario took first place in its category in the Nations In Bloom "Prettiest Town" competition -- we're still patting ourselves on the back over that -- but the contest I want to see is "England's Maddest Village".

Actually, Stratford can be fairly mad sometimes, for Canada. We usually keep it to ourselves during the summer, when the tourists are about, but we let our freak flag fly once the snow comes and we have the place to ourselves.

But I doubt our chances in competition with any representative dorp in the UK.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 04:23 PM

Ha Charmion, that must have been quite spectacular! I've never observed a group setting off, just those who are arriving.
So funny that the ducks didn't even bother looking. "Those blooming geese at it again! Shut up you lot, we're trying to have a little nap here!"


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 03:54 PM

Eliza, this morning as we walked along the river we watched another such flotilla get organized to migrate, squabbling over who was going with whom. Two ganders, each with his own gaggle, really went at it, honking ferociously and rearing up to beat their wings, each in the other's face. Then the other birds in each respective gaggle joined in, honking and ragging the opposition gander. Meanwhile, the snoozing mallard ducks did not even crack an eye, let alone bother to take notice.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 07 Oct 20 - 03:25 PM

The incoming migrations of various geese have started, and this evening a group of about twenty Canada geese flew overhead, then circled our house/street honking loudly. They were selecting a place to settle (there are several small lakes and the winding river Wensum, plus millponds from which to choose) The leader of the V formation finally decided and they all descended down towards the lake behind the village hall.
It always touches my heart to watch them - they've had such a long and arduous journey.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 05 Oct 20 - 03:49 AM

Some of our fields have been combine-harvested now, and our local sheep/pig farmer has put his flock of sheep onto the stubble to munch up any leftovers.
But one ewe managed to escape, and has been seen up Cadders Hill nibbling on roadside weeds.
Guess who discovered her and added her to his menagerie? Yes, BamBam now has three goats, a whippet dog, an escaped pig and a solitary ewe in his retinue.
Wonder if they'll all fit in The Fox pub?
A deer, some swans, three goats, a pig and a sheep entered a pub. The fed-up landlord said, "Oh deer, swanning around in here again? Goat to blazes all of ewe, and take that smelly thing with you, the utter pig!
No animals allowed to Lyng-er in 'ere!" So they all peed copiously on his carpet and left.
Honestly, this is all true (except my joke) This village must be the maddest in England.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 07:21 PM

Wearing my winter coat when
I filled the fuel tank on my auto,
outdoors after dark.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: EBarnacle
Date: 04 Oct 20 - 05:07 PM

The trees are starting to turn here in Central NJ. It is not yet Indian [or is it Native Peoples'] Summer yet, as we haven't had a frost to rebound from. The frost line is about 15 miles due North of here.
I am getting ready to put my Short sleeved warm weather clothes up for the Winter. I will soon have to wear sox on a regular basis, even in the house.
I will miss my Hawaiian prints.
Festival season is winding down, even the reruns of the virtual events.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 03 Oct 20 - 06:31 PM

About time to retire the sandals for the season,
and stick to shoes with thick socks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 02 Oct 20 - 12:00 PM

No autumn colours among the trees yet as the temperature hasn't been low enough. Plus the endless rain is keeping all the trees/plants in good fettle.
That deer BamBam has taken to playing football every morning with his three goat friends in a nearby lady's huge garden. They began by eating all her hanging baskets' blooms. There's a goalpost (for her grandchildren) and we're sure he tries to score a goal. A wag posted on our Facebook that the deer should be signed up for Dereham Football Club! (Dereham is our nearest town). Deer-ham get it? hee hee
No sign of the escaped pig however.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: robomatic
Date: 02 Oct 20 - 11:00 AM

In Southcentral Alaska a proper Autumn lasts about two weeks. We are more than halfway through ours. Most but not all of the deciduous leaves have loosened from the branches and, within a day of them being raked, gale force winds spread the rest all over.

As the lower 48 droughts floods and burns we've had an exceptionally fine Summer and Fall getting the occasional rain that the dry land thirst for, and wonderful sunny days. Since Starbucks doesn't allow seating during the Covid pandemic we've hit the drive-thrus and spent our caffeine amped afternoons walking dogs or hiking (or both).

We've got grand trail systems and most folks actually bag their dogs' 'leavings' appropriately. I haven't heard of anyone contracting Covid from trail use, and it's a cheerful way to say hello to folks. I should emphasize that you meet everyone, all ages and paces, hikers, bikers, camera buffs, skin tones, and species (moose bears and birds). To make it even more unusual, very low mosquito counts for these regions.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: leeneia
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 01:56 PM

I was going down some stairs and encountered a grasshopper on the railing. Instead of leaping six feet in the air when it saw my hand, it simply sat there, staring. I lifted my hand over it and set it down on the railing again. You know autumn is here when the grasshoppers lose the will to live.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion's brother Andrew
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 11:26 AM

The shift to Eastern Standard Time on 1 November will briefly relieve this phenomenon and shift it into the afternoon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Oct 20 - 10:47 AM

I got up this morning in the dark, at half-past six.

News flash: Winter is coming.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 06:43 PM

Well, here is something I cannot imagine happening during
a coronavirus pandemic:

a tour bus packed with people
driving the back roads of New England,
staring at the autumn colors in the trees.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 11:12 AM

Same here in our village Charmion - Halloween has been 'cancelled' and no children will be coming round the doors for sweets dressed up in scary costumes. Sad really, but essential that we all obey the anti-Covid rules.
But the huge numbers of pumpkins growing in Algy's fields must mean that supermarkets somewhere will be selling them for decorations. And the unusual endless rain has made them swell to a gigantic size!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 29 Sep 20 - 10:56 AM

Senoufou, I completely agree with Husband on pumpkin waste. Last Hallowe'en, Himself could find only the little "pie pumpkins", so he bought three and displayed them as shrunken heads, much to the neighbours' amusement. The next day, I cut away the charred bits and steamed them for the flesh.

This year, Perth County will observe Hallowe'en privately. Ontario is well on its way into a second wave of COVID infections, and it's just not worth the risk.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 03:47 PM

The golden maples
are now catching up to the red maples
in providing autumn foliage,
although the red ones got a head start.
(southwestern Massachusetts,
not all that far from
New York's Hudson River Valley)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 04:20 AM

I think I must be some kind of Saharan lizard, because high temperatures make me feel so happy! I might sweat (well, I do) but I don't want to be 'cooled down' or have icy drinks etc.
My word, the weather here is still being horrible. Strong winds all night and this morning, rain sweeping across the countryside, everyone looking miserable. So unusual for the East. NOT 'Normal for Norfolk'!
We saw all the pumpkins in 'Algy's Farm' fields on the way to Fakenham. He grows acres of them, massive orange ones and smaller white ones. I think the big supermarkets take them for sale in October (Halloween)
Husband thinks it's a wicked waste of food. Nobody in Africa would waste a beautiful pumpkin by carving a face and putting a tealight inside. I reassure him every year by repeating that our shepherdess next-door-neighbour takes lots of pumpkins after Halloween for her sheep to munch.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Jos
Date: 27 Sep 20 - 03:31 AM

"the fans on again — today’s high is 25C"

That's about 76F. At that kind of temperature (and higher), I just relax and enjoy it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 03:56 PM

'Bleeding' the radiators means letting out any trapped air, by use of a special key which opens the valve. You have to do it for each radiator, and then the air locks can't prevent the hot water circulating.
A power flush involves pumping the whole system through to remove any sludge inside the rads and pipes. (The plumbers put a product called Fernox into the system, which prevents internal corrosion, but it isn't 100% effective).
Imagine my husband's amazement when he first came to UK from Ivory Coast. He'd never in his life seen a radiator, or a boiler, or a hot tap (or any tap in fact) or a bath. Plumbing was a complete mystery to him.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 03:49 PM

Bleed the radiator? Is that anything like
a radiator flush, or something different?


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 03:28 PM

You're probably right Charmion. But the young lad sorted it (He's called George, and such a nice chap) He put mastic into the gap, and is going to board over the spaces in the small breeze-block stack too, which will hermetically seal the overhead roof and completely protect the boiler.
We laughed and said we'll keep changing its nappies (ie the wet towels on the top) until he comes back with the materials for boarding up the gaps.
He told us to put the heating on, it would dry out any damp in the boiler casing. So we're toasty warm now. Good thing, as it's horrible outside. Flooding almost blocked the road over to Fakenham (supermarket) and loads of tree branches down, and shifted to the side awaiting collection.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 02:46 PM

Senoufou, your boiler installers need a lawsuit. Failing to waterproof a roof opening is sheer incompetence, if not malfeasance.

We have the furnace off again and the fans on again — today’s high is 25C, and we haven to had any frost since the first touch. But the forecast for next week is all rain and chill, so I think we’ve had our lot of the balmy weather.

Our woodshed is stacked full. We’re good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 26 Sep 20 - 02:34 AM

Oh Tattie, I do sympathise! At this very minute (7.30am) I'm awaiting our friendly plumber. Our NEW boiler, installed a few weeks ago, has a little chimney which goes up through the garage roof. The installers had left a gap around it, and of course the torrential rain we've been having has entered and drenched the boiler, doing it no good. We've had to put a mountain of newspaper and thick towels on the top of it, and this morning they're soaked.
So no heating, and thick jumpers on, just like you.
Our area (Norfolk) has had ferocious winds and torrential rain for three days. Many trees are down, blocking roads, and also there have been power cuts all across the county (not our village fortunately)
Most unusual, as the rest of the UK hasn't had this much. We're usually the driest place, but not this month!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 25 Sep 20 - 08:04 PM

When you decide it's cold enough to switch on the central heating and it doesn't work! 2 further days in the very big sweaters before heating engineer arrives and replaces a faulty valve.
I made the mistake of posting our plight on Facebook and had about 20 people tell me to "bleed your radiators". Nothing wrong with our bleeding radiators: if they only needed bleeding, at least some of them would have been warm at the bottom and cold at the top: ours were all stone-cold throughout!
The Facebook College of uber-qualified heating engineers strikes again! Almost as good as the Facebook Faculty of Unqualified Medicine which I encountered the week before.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 24 Sep 20 - 07:16 AM

We're coming up to the Autumn 'rutting season' of deer, when the males get aggressive and ...er...horny (excuse the pun)
The 'tame' deer in our village (BamBam) has committed his worst-ever faux pas. A lady was outside the school this morning, bending down to kiss her young daughter goodbye, when BamBam came up behind her and tried to mount her!!! He was visibly...um...excited. We're all mystified because his owner had him castrated ages ago.
Everyone is talking about it, and giggling. But we're more or less agreed that this has gone too far. He brought his three goat mates and an escaped pig into the pub (beer for the deer and pork scratchings please?) and they all weed again on the carpet. He tried to get onto the school bus. He's out at night in the dark, and some village women went out with torches to try and get him home (no street lights here and it's pitch black at night)
I can't help chuckling though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Sep 20 - 12:17 PM

A touch of Indian Summer here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Senoufou
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 03:21 PM

It was very hot here today, with lovely sunshine, like the middle of summer. I got all the bulbs planted in my tubs, and they should look very nice in the Spring.
That crazy tame red deer BamBam has been everywhere today snacking on people's late roses and autumn flowers (dahlias, chrysanthemums etc) and then, because all the village children are back at school, he tried to get into the school through the main door. When the Headmistress chased him away, he went next door to the little nursery and got in there. Trouble is he wees copiously on the carpets inside buildings.
I suppose he can't understand why all the children are no longer down by the river paddling & swimming.
At least he won't have an Autumn 'rut', because he's been castrated!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 03:10 PM

When the cat food won't come out of the can without a spoon, it is Autumn.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Bill D
Date: 21 Sep 20 - 01:25 PM

The real sign of Autumn for me is when my plastic (lidded) glass of water on my bedside table remains cool all night.. that is when subsidiary signs appear in the form of a down comforter, long sleeved undershirt, and old socks filled with rice and microwaved come down from storage.
   No serious color change in foliage yet, but nights in the 40s are a warning. We are supposed to have a *heat wave* of a week in the low 80s now... but the comforter and 'warmy bags' of rice stay where they are.


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Mudcat time: 21 April 4:18 AM EDT

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