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BS: Motocycle advise

Amos 04 Jul 10 - 08:27 PM
Guy Wolff 04 Jul 10 - 08:07 PM
Ebbie 04 Jul 10 - 06:27 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jul 10 - 05:47 PM
gnu 04 Jul 10 - 04:12 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 10 - 03:29 PM
Ebbie 04 Jul 10 - 03:22 PM
GUEST,number 6 04 Jul 10 - 10:41 AM
Richard Bridge 04 Jul 10 - 10:05 AM
Raptor 27 Jun 10 - 07:26 PM
GUEST,Riginslinger 26 Jun 10 - 07:57 PM
catspaw49 26 Jun 10 - 01:11 PM
GUEST,Riginslinger 26 Jun 10 - 08:48 AM
Raptor 26 Jun 10 - 06:10 AM
catspaw49 25 Jun 10 - 09:30 AM
Dave the Gnome 25 Jun 10 - 08:30 AM
GUEST,Riginslinger 25 Jun 10 - 08:04 AM
Dave the Gnome 25 Jun 10 - 03:51 AM
Dave the Gnome 25 Jun 10 - 03:48 AM
Darowyn 25 Jun 10 - 03:42 AM
Riginslinger 24 Jun 10 - 04:39 PM
GUEST,erbert 24 Jun 10 - 08:53 AM
GUEST,erbert 24 Jun 10 - 08:48 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 08:36 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 08:31 AM
GUEST,Riginslinger 24 Jun 10 - 08:00 AM
GUEST,LTS pretending to work 24 Jun 10 - 07:20 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 05:17 AM
Richard Bridge 24 Jun 10 - 04:15 AM
Riginslinger 23 Jun 10 - 06:54 PM
Richard Bridge 23 Jun 10 - 05:57 PM
Riginslinger 23 Jun 10 - 05:16 PM
Rusty Dobro 23 Jun 10 - 08:37 AM
Richard Bridge 22 Jun 10 - 05:06 PM
catspaw49 22 Jun 10 - 09:40 AM
GUEST,Riginslinger 22 Jun 10 - 09:14 AM
GUEST,kendall 22 Jun 10 - 07:41 AM
number 6 21 Jun 10 - 09:19 AM
GUEST,kendall 21 Jun 10 - 07:16 AM
bubblyrat 21 Jun 10 - 05:47 AM
GUEST,Joybringer 21 Jun 10 - 05:12 AM
Dave the Gnome 21 Jun 10 - 04:40 AM
Phot 20 Jun 10 - 03:57 PM
Bernard 20 Jun 10 - 01:20 PM
Raptor 20 Jun 10 - 09:13 AM
Darowyn 20 Jun 10 - 05:10 AM
Liz the Squeak 20 Jun 10 - 01:52 AM
catspaw49 19 Jun 10 - 09:04 PM
gnu 19 Jun 10 - 08:27 PM
GUEST,kendall 19 Jun 10 - 06:59 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Amos
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 08:27 PM

Ah, Gnu, that one was a real heart-warmer!!!


A


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Guy Wolff
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 08:07 PM

The three first causes of bad to deadly problems on bikes are :

1) Not being ready to react to and or having the skill to get out of the way of people on the roads not noticing you are there . Think of yourself as the soccer ball in the World cup and you dont want to get kicked !!   SKILL SKILL SKILL . Stay away from crowed roads for a long time !!!
2) Not keeping up the bike : preparing for mechanical problems. I lost a friend who changed his own front fork oil . Good brakes good suspension great tires !!! .
3) Physical exhaustion from not waring the proper clothing (leading to problem #1). Get a good rain suite and ware it . Gloves and leathers . ( Roads when they have just gotten wet have a mist of oil on them like no other time... Careful )


Learn how to stop on: sand , oil and ice . Stopping straight Stopping on a curve

Im with Spaw .. A 750 800 is a great size to start with but no bigger .. BMW is Aluminum so the dry weight is lower (480 pounds ??) .. Lots of torque in the little 883 Harley . Learn what that means ..

Riding a bike is dangerous even for someone with 40 years and 500,000 miles . The more you know the safer you will be but there are always moments of split second reactions .. I would have a test on how fast your awarenesses are ..Bikes are like riding on the back of an eagle . It makes no sense to those who haven't done it . It is as exhilarating and as life threatening as flying that eagle . Life is perilous and life is choice .. Blue skys !!!

All the best , Guy


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Ebbie
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 06:27 PM

Ah. Crow Sister, I think that is one of the places where we part ways. "Because it's fun" smacks too much of the toddler who takes great pleasure in banging pots and pans together.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 05:47 PM

Number 6, I think it is a statement that burdensome conventionality does not have universal sway. I rather sympathise with that. Do you remember the relief when the Stetford banality of the 50s gave way to the 60s?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: gnu
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 04:12 PM

I GOTTA tell this one here...

Many moons ago... I got off the ferry to Newfoundland and proceeded up the highway. There were 400 Hell's Angels on the ferry.

I stopped to gas up at a remote gas station up the road a ways as I always did... supprt the local economy, eh b'y? Two bikes pulled in at the same time.

The Newfie, about 5'4" in a doeskin shirt and gum rubbers was splitting wood and came out to pump our gas. His two lads of about 8 years old ran to the bikes and one jumped up on a bike.

These bikers were each over 6' and HUGE. One biker is pissed, points at the kid, points at his colours, and asks, "Don't you know who we are?"

The Newf says, "No b'y. 'ho are yees?"

"Hell's Angels and about 400 of us just got off the boat."

"You know 'ho I is?"

"Who are YOU?"

"Johnny, get off the man's bike... well, I be a Newfoundlander and there's about 600,000 of us on this fookin island. 'ow ere ye gettin off it? Now, d'ya want yer gas er wha?"

The bikers roared with laughter... and gave n an undred dollar tip.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 03:29 PM

"can you explain it?"

I'm not one, but my guess is that they do it because it's FUN! ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Ebbie
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 03:22 PM

I don't think I will ever understand the mindset of the biker who joins a 30-strong group of likeminded people to snort and roar and fart and blat their way looping through the 6 block heart of downtown, sometimes doing it twice before roaring off to parts unknown. They are not sightseeing, they are not visiting anybody, they are not buying anything, they appear to be simply bellowing "Look at me!"

Will anyone here admit to being one of them? If so, can you explain it?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,number 6
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 10:41 AM

This weekend 5000 bikers converged on the seaside resort town of St. Andrew's N.B. .... A large majority of these bikes of course being Harley davidsons.. Yup, 5000 Harley Davidsons all tuned up to be noisy as Hell ... all screaming "look at me" ... I remember when a harley meant something that was rebelleous, anti society ... now days a Harley T-Shirt will cost you $65, and I bet you those 5000 bikers will be wearing those $65 t-shirts ... along with those t-shirts they will undoubtably be wearing their authentic expensive harley davidson leathers, expensive harley davidson boots, and expensive harley davidson bandanas .... whew, that in itself is enough to make you rebel against all of that .... Geeezuz H .... it would be just as frighteneing if 5000 investment brokers invaded St. Andrews in their beemers and Lacoste golf shirts.

Get a Vespra if you really want to make a statement.

BTW ... that harley biker who ran into that girl above in my post up above ... he got off with failing to negotiate a turn ... it was hardly a turn in the road at all, he just couldn't handle his big toy.

biLL


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 10:05 AM

Personally, Raptor, If you are a learner now I think you are pushing your luck to get an H/G 883 Sportster, which by normal standards is a very big powerful bike, without extra training, something like the UK Direct Access courses.

Interestingly, AJS do a 125cc "cruiser" called the Raptor that is legal for learners in the UK to ride.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Raptor
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 07:26 PM

Yeah What?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Riginslinger
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 07:57 PM

And what would you recommend, Spaw?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: catspaw49
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 01:11 PM

the latest plan is that I'm gonna buy the Harley Sportster 883 for my girlfriend and ride it for a year then buy one of the bigger ones for me. What do you think?

I think you can buy a real image or you can buy a real motorcycle......That said, the Sportster is the ONLY H-D sort of worth the money.

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Riginslinger
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 08:48 AM

Sounds like a great idea to me. Those Sportsters are nice little bikes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Raptor
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 06:10 AM

the latest plan is that I'm gonna buy the Harley Sportster 883 for my girlfriend and ride it for a year then buy one of the bigger ones for me. What do you think?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: catspaw49
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 09:30 AM

Does the Russian BMW still have a shovel mount?

As the story goes, originally the Russians in post WWII style took whatever they could and the Germans had a great bike. The Russains never questioned anything about the building plans, they just copied it exactly. So when they brought their version to the mootorcycling world, one magazine reviewed it and wondered what the hell the brackets were for. The Russians had no idea. All they knew was that the German version had them so..............

Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 08:30 AM

No, that's YOU, Rig:-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Riginslinger
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 08:04 AM

Because they drive on the wrong side of the street over there, I suppose.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 03:51 AM

Oh - BTW - If anyone is thinking of getting a Russian combo, check out if it has a powered sidecar wheel - If so they cannot be switched over to the left of the bike - Which is a current legal requirement in the UK.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 03:48 AM

Motorcycle combo was classed as a trike. But that was in the days when you could drive a trike - including a Reliant 3 wheeled car - on a bike licence. No regulations of reverse gears either when I had one in the late 70's / early 80's. Rules and regs have all changed now but I think you can still ride a trike on your provisional - Check it out is the best idea.

Cheers

DeG

BTW - Mine was a 'Supervan III' - just the same as Del Boy's but in Turquoise rather than Yellow. Never did sort out the overheating problem but it was the most efficient engine I ever owned. 700cc 50+ MPG and 70+ MPH. Wonder why they don't start making them again?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Darowyn
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 03:42 AM

That's because it is a Russian copy of an R50.
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Riginslinger
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 04:39 PM

Looks like an old Beemer.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,erbert
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:53 AM

probably these..

http://www.ural.cc/index.php?bikes_sidecar


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,erbert
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:48 AM

what about motorbike and sidecar ?

.. legally defined as 2 or 3 wheeler ?


I found internet ads for a really nice retro looking Russian manufactured bike & sidecar a few years ago
when me and the mrs were considering options for older age travel arrangents..


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:36 AM

Oops I suppose no bunch of photos of bikes would be complete without some titty totty draped over it..

Trike with Naked Bird


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:31 AM

Aye, so I thought.

Some entertaining custom trikes out there:

Mustang Hmm
http://www.ratraceproductions.com/cryptkeeper-trike-main.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2548/3689574145_e43deac21e.jpg
http://marketing.genesee.edu/images/custom_built_trike.jpg


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Riginslinger
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:00 AM

Wow! It sounds like they really don't like motorcycles in the UK. What to they do about folks like the Hell's Angels and the Outlaws?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,LTS pretending to work
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 07:20 AM

Re UK licences and bikes

Full car licence = provisional bike licence - you MUST take both CBT and Theory tests before being allowed on the road with L plates.

Trikes count as a 3 wheeled vehicle and can be ridden with full car licence. A helmet is not required but most trikers I know wear one if travelling any distance on larger roads. I'll have to double check but I think if it is over a certain CC you are allowed on motorways on a trike. I have certainly seen (and been overtaken by) trikers on motorways.

Previously you could drive Trikes and other 3 wheeled vehicles (remember the Plastic Pig - forerunner to the Robin Reliant?) on a bike licence, but I have a sneaking suspicion this might have changed recently.

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 05:17 AM

"I am thinking about getting a bike again - but there is no accelerated access for people who never got a licence (!) and that would mean I had to ride a 125 while I did the "CBT" (honestly, it's really called that) and then once I passed my test I could go directly to a 400. Oh mother is it worth it?"

RB, what's the legislation regards trikes? I was talking to a fella at Knockholt who's just got himself one. I'm guessing you'd be OK to ride straightaway on a car license without the faffing.

There's a couple of bikers that ride trikes round my way, right throaty beasts they are, and they look great fun - though admittedly possibly not *quite* the adrenaline rush of two wheels. And on the plus side, you can go lidless if you like.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 04:15 AM

Actually, no, I mis-read that. It's power not size that counts, but they are just as sticky on power and it is quite pedantic.

The UK basic scheme is that you have to get a provisional licence (and insurance) and do a thing called the CBT before you are allowed to ride anything. Then mostly you are allowed to ride a bike of up to 125 cc with power output up to 11 kw (14.75 bhp) with "L" plates and subject to learner restrictions (no pillions, no motorways, etc). Then you take the theory test and the practical test. If you pass then for the next two years you are restricted to 25kw (33 bhp). THe REs are 28 bhp so would be permissible.

There are two other schemes - the accelerated access scheme and the direct access scheme. They are only available if you are over 21.

Direct access - do CBT and theory test then you may ride (with L-plates and other learner restrictions - and ALSO accompanied at all times by an approved instructor on another bike and in radio contact AND if you wear fluorescent or reflective clothing - any size bike while you practise. Then do your practical test on a bike with MORE than 35kw (47 bhp). If you pass you can ride any size bike.

Accelerated access - first get your basic licence. You can ride big bikes (over 25kw) with L-plates and other learner restrictions - and ALSO accompanied at all times by an approved instructor on another bike and in radio contact AND if you wear fluorescent or reflective clothing - any size bike while you practise for a further test that must be taken on a bike with over 35 kw. If you pass you can ride any size bike (and if you fail you don't use your licence to ride bikes of up to 25 kw.

The 25 kw rule also restricts you to bikes with a power/weight ratio not exceeding 0.16 kW/kg.

If you have (a full UK car licence fit counts as a bike provisional licence but you still have to do a CBT and (I think) theory test before riding anything.

All bikes over 3 years old (from date of manufacture) have to have an MoT certificate of roadworthiness, and of course all bikes have to carry road tax.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Riginslinger
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 06:54 PM

Wow, are they that sticky on 100cc's?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 05:57 PM

Cheers dude - they're all 500cc so over teh 400 cc limit and left foot gearchange, but they do look good and the cafe racer looks wonderful!


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Riginslinger
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 05:16 PM

Richard, if you Google Royal Enfield you will see that the old thumpers are being made in India and imported to the US. I don't know about the UK, but that would be a classy 400.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Rusty Dobro
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 08:37 AM

What about a nice '52 Vincent Black Lightning? I have it on good authority that a girl could feel special on any such-like.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 05:06 PM

I am thinking about getting a bike again - but there is no accelerated access for people who never got a licence (!) and that would mean I had to ride a 125 while I did the "CBT" (honestly, it's really called that) and then once I passed my test I could go directly to a 400. Oh mother is it worth it?

Maybe a restricted chair? What falls within L-limits for that?

I also worry if I could ever get used to a left-foot gearchange


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: catspaw49
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:40 AM

That's because the Harley will have been such a pain in the ass that you'll quit motorcycling before you give it a real chance on a good bike..............

Sorry Bill......Was the guy a jerk or perhaps in shock himself? I once saw a guy whose wife was killed in the seat beside him walking/pacing around the car talking about the damage. The mind can takes you elsewhere when the truth is too painful.   


Spaw


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Riginslinger
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:14 AM

Harleys have a low center of gravity and are really easy to ride. Buy the Harley, let out the clutch and twist the throttle open. You'll never want to ride anything else.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 07:41 AM

I hope you have the balls to appear as a witness for the prosecution! That's depraved indifference if I ever saw it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: number 6
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 09:19 AM

Last evening I witnessed a big Harley Davidson lose control, spin off the road and hit a young girl walking along the sidewalk, killing her. The Harley guy was ok.

It was extremely disturbing. The Harley guy was more concerned about his bike, in fact picked it up, checking it over for the damage. He never did acknowledge the young girl lying on the sidewalk.

I'm very shaken up and angry over this.

biLL


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 07:16 AM

I see Harley riders all the time, half bare assed and no brain bucket. Their IQ must hover right around room temperature.
At the same time, I see Honda and Suzuki riders dressed in leathers with a helmet. Any conclusions?


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: bubblyrat
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 05:47 AM

Early 1960s, those were the days in Britain ! Every young man wanted a bike,and there were LOADS to choose from ; BSA...AJS...Royal Enfield...Francis Barnett....Triumph...James...Ambassador....Velocette...and one got a glimpse of the odd Vincent !
             I had an Ambassador 200 ( no rear suspension,just enormous springs under the saddle !) , then a sedate but trusty BSA C11G 250.A lot of people favoured the Triumph Tiger Cub. In later life,I used small stuff to get to work on...Suzuki, then a shaft-drive Yamaha.
                   Have fun, drive carefully, and READ THE ROAD AHEAD !! ( best advice any Policeman ever gave me !).


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,Joybringer
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 05:12 AM

Anyone how rode a real motorcycle would find it hard to sit on a scooter no matter what cc. I´m now back on a R100RT BMW, It shakes a little more than the R80RT which is why the police favoured the 80 for many years.

Had a GL1500 Goldwing for eleven years,


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 04:40 AM

Anyone any views on the new breed of big scooters? More like bikes really with the power and larger and fatter wheels but with the protection of a scooter. I must admit a certain anti feeling for them just based on looks but all the reviews seem to rave about them -

650 Suzuiki Burgman

For instance.

The head says it is a good one but the heart says - nah.

Cheers

DeG


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Phot
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 03:57 PM

Hey Rap, just get out there and enjoy it! I can only re-iterate about the training and leathers, going down the road on your ass isn't fun, gravel rash hurts like hell, and remember that ashpalt will grind through bone and skin at the rate of 4 inches a second!

I suppose I didn't take the most sensible approach to bikes, I got a Honda CG 125 (12hp, single cylinder, drum brakes flat out at 60) 42 days later I passed my test, the following day I made a really daft move, I called in at Bridge motercycles in Exeter while out for a ride and totally on a whim bought a bigger bike (Well it was a looker!), a Kawasaki ZXR 750 J1, pretty much a full race machine, 125hp, twin 320mm front discs, and a top end in excess of 150! My argument was the throttle went both ways, but in hindsight a bit of a daft idea.

Just ride to your ability, if you feel out of your comfort zone, back off and live to ride another day, don't try to keep up with the quick guys until you know what your bike and you are capable of.

The last bike I had was a Triumph T595 Daytona (955cc) with a full factory race exhaust and re-mapped ignition to suit, result, 0-60 in less than 3 seconds, and a top end of around 180.

I don't ride anymore due to shot knees, wrists, and hands, but if I could I would probably have another Daytona!

Wassail, and keep it shiney side up! Chris


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Bernard
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:20 PM

I only ever had three minor spills, all caused by someone else 'not seeing me'...

I lived to tell the tale, but others do not.

You can learn bike control on a 125cc, but the problem is it doesn't have the power to pull you out of trouble.

On the up side, it probably doesn't push you into trouble quite so readily, and you're more likely to think about what you're doing and drive defensibly, which is how everyone should drive, whether on two or more wheels.

You have to accept the biggest danger is coming from other road users who think they have every right to expect to get from one place to another as quickly as their chosen vehicle will take them - and I find that twenty-something young women are the most self-centred in that respect these days.

Just an observation based upon experience.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Raptor
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 09:13 AM

I promise I'll get the gear and I'm already in the motocycle course.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Darowyn
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 05:10 AM

This world is full of people who, when they see that I ride a Motorbike, will tell me,
"I had one of those and they are bloody dangerous. I fell off it."
What they are really saying is that they never actually learned to ride safely.
I have had a bike as my main transport for over 45 years.
I've ridden hundreds of thousands of miles on the road, trained hundreds of learner riders, (and apprentice bike mechanics) and raced on the circuits at up to international level.
It doesn't mean that I'm immortal, or immune to some blind, or drunk, or drug crazed idiot in a four-wheeler. But it does mean that I have learned a few skills in spotting and avoiding hazards, and acquired a respectable level of machine control.
So here's my advice.
Harleys are for looking at, not riding. Buy a picture of one. You'll save money and unhappiness. You could not pick a less enjoyable form of transport.
A middle weight bike will still feel very heavy until you are used to it, but they do have more stability and inspire more confidence than, for example a small wheeled scooter or a 125cc bike.
I would recommend a basic naked bike, one of the twin cylinder Japanese bikes around 500 to 600cc.
Chopper style cruisers are hard to handle at low speed, on corners, over bumps, and pretty much everywhere else.
Race replicas, and sportsbikes can be very uncomfortable for larger or more mature riders- probably why they do so few miles on them that they never actually learn how to ride! (Hence the high accident rate)
Trail Bike / Adventure off roaders, as long as they have good road tyres, are excellent for both city riding and back roads, but not so good on Motorways and Highways (Why would you ride a bike on those roads anyway?)
Lastly and most important.
GET SOME PROPER TRAINING. GET SOME PROPER PROTECTIVE GEAR, AND USE IT.
Cheers
Dave
(just working out my route for this years National Motorcycle Rally.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:52 AM

Oh Spaw... you put into words everything I couldn't about what it feels to be a biker... I've not been on one for 3 years now, and by all the deities, I miss it!

Rap - Start small to medium, work up. Much as I love watching them, don't start with a Harley... Riding needs to be second nature to work one of those buggers. I barely got across the car park on the one I tried.

Oh, and never ever, EVER ride in anything less than long sleeved leather or kevlar and proper solid boots. Even a gentle drop at 4mph can take the skin off your arm and crush poorly supported feet.

Meanwhile, if anyone in or near London wants to give a deprived bikerchick a treat, I have my own lid!

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: catspaw49
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 09:04 PM

While I worry over new riders, I wouldn't argue against bikes for love nor money. Like other personal activities it is hard to explain why some love it and others do not. There is certainly no changing anyone's mind about it though. When it comes to road bikes, Kendall makes an old and popular view........and I've been down a few times myself. But when you really love something......................

It's early evening on pleasant summer day. The temperature has brought the humidity to a less noticeable level and there is this great place about 50 miles away where they have something great to eat. There are several ways to get there but two are a lot more fun to ride so you throw a leg over and turn the key. If you're an old fart you remember what a pain in the ass it was to kick start big bore bikes.

When I was 15 I bought my first, a BSA 250, sort of a mini thumper but it lasted only a month or so. I had to have something a lot bigger!   The only folks who rode Harleys were outlaws and cops. Big Japanese bikes were still a few years in the future so if you wanted a fun and pwerful ride it was a Brit. I think I'd been riding only 6 weeks or so when I took every cent I had and bought a Triumph Bonneville. I brought it home and although I had successfully kept this activity from my parents, my Dad found out and so I brought the Bonnie home to live in the garage instead of at a friend's house. The Old Man knew it was hopeless and as I was otherwise a pretty good kid, he looked at it sitting there and said, "Boy, I'd just as soon you bought yourself a coffin." That was about it.....well spoken and clear......and he never said another word on the matter.

I had a series of Brits til 1970 when I was so frustrated with the damn things I was ready to fly to England and kill Joe Lucas, whoever ta' hell he was. There was also no resisting the Honda 750. It changed the face of motorcycling completely and it also started my love affair with the big bore riceburners. It culminated in 1985 when I bought the bike I still have. Its a Honda Sabre 65, 1100 V-4 and probably the best example of what the Triumphs and BSAs wanted and strived to be, but never were. Smooth, fast, powerful, and reliable with good handling and good looks to boot. But we were about to take a ride weren't we?

You turn the key and hit the starter and as the engine warms you strap on your helmet, pull on some gloves, and decide which way you're going. Leaving your house you take it easy but as you reach the highway you wick it up and appreciate the acceleration. There is no way to explain the feeling of riding a bike that will exceed every speed limit in first gear. For the next 50 miles you ride and enjoy the feeling as the sweeping turns lead to tight esses and a short straight stretch follow an off camber turn to the left. Its a nice road with fun riding and enough of it qualifies as a "proficiency run" to give you the rush that a bike can bring.

Maybe you arrive and find your spot closed, but it doesn't matter. You didn't come for the food.....it was all about the ride. So pull into that little drive-in you've seen so many times and try out their onion rings while you relax, leaning on the bike and remembering all the other joints you discovered just by accidents on other nights like this. Maybe you remember the nice folks who had a bonfire going a cold fall night and stopping to get warm.....and they gave you coffee and conversation and flaming marshmallows. You don't make those stops with a car.

Riding home on a less challenging route you enjoy the added smoothness and power the moist night air adds. Its amazing how much difference you can tell on a bike....things you rarely notice in a car.When you get home you take a few minutes just to sit on the bike in the garage. I don't know why. I gues there is a certain communion between a bike and rider that makes you know that machinery has a soul. They do you know..................really.

Raptor, I hope you decide buy a bike and hope you take all the proper lessons and courses which are available now. I admit that I worry about the middle-aged newbie but if you can have a few nights like the one above or thousands of others from broiling sun to 20 below, life is just a bit more worthwhile.



Spaw

btw, get a 750....big enough to be both fun and stable and not making you want to trade soon. Much smaller and you lack some of the kick to be truthful.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: gnu
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 08:27 PM

Indeed Kendall. When I came home with my first bike, my old man said, "Boy, I hope you don't learn the hard way just how stupid a thing you just did."

He was right.

If you do get a bike, keep the lights on all the time and blow the horn a lot when you are approaching intersections. As robo said... "automobiles didn't give you a lot of 'respect' even when they could see you"... and they often DON'T see you. Seriously, they don't "see" you.

Zen... sorry, but two wheels is only better than one wheel. Now, your mileage may vary, but your mileage has been lucky. Round here, the drivers are poorly trained, poorly licensed, smoking, drinking coffee, talking on the cell... you get the pic. I'd rather be on foot here.

But, when a nice bike rolls by, I wish I was on it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Motocycle advise
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 06:59 PM

There are two kinds of motorcycle riders. Those who have put one down and those who are going to put one down.

One trip into a rock pile caused by an idiot taking his side of the road out of the middle cured me of bikes.


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