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Ethnic crossover

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Deckman 13 Jul 03 - 01:49 PM
Sorcha 12 Jul 03 - 03:12 PM
Art Thieme 24 Oct 99 - 09:05 PM
Allan C. 12 Aug 99 - 06:45 AM
Allan C. 12 Aug 99 - 06:06 AM
katlaughing 12 Aug 99 - 06:03 AM
Allan C. 12 Aug 99 - 05:34 AM
katlaughing 12 Aug 99 - 12:05 AM
j0_77 11 Aug 99 - 11:45 PM
j0_77 11 Aug 99 - 11:30 PM
WyoWoman 11 Aug 99 - 10:39 PM
Allan C. 11 Aug 99 - 03:17 PM
Llanfair 11 Aug 99 - 02:38 PM
Jeri 11 Aug 99 - 02:23 PM
annamill 11 Aug 99 - 01:35 PM
Allan C. 11 Aug 99 - 01:08 PM
M 11 Aug 99 - 11:57 AM
Bert 11 Aug 99 - 11:19 AM
Hutzul 11 Aug 99 - 11:17 AM
Allan C. 11 Aug 99 - 11:03 AM
M 11 Aug 99 - 10:49 AM
alison 11 Aug 99 - 02:29 AM
alison 11 Aug 99 - 02:24 AM
Terry 10 Aug 99 - 06:36 PM
M 10 Aug 99 - 05:29 PM
j0_77 10 Aug 99 - 05:02 PM
MMario 10 Aug 99 - 04:26 PM
Terry 10 Aug 99 - 04:16 PM
j0_77 10 Aug 99 - 02:41 PM
j0_77 10 Aug 99 - 02:26 PM
M 10 Aug 99 - 02:03 PM
katlaughing 10 Aug 99 - 01:35 PM
j0_77 10 Aug 99 - 01:02 PM
katlaughing 10 Aug 99 - 12:15 PM
Bert 10 Aug 99 - 11:35 AM
Bob Landry 10 Aug 99 - 11:32 AM
alison 10 Aug 99 - 05:16 AM
WyoWoman 10 Aug 99 - 01:45 AM
j0_77 09 Aug 99 - 01:02 PM
Bob Landry 09 Aug 99 - 12:16 PM
WyoWoman 08 Aug 99 - 06:47 PM
McKnees 08 Aug 99 - 09:55 AM
McKnees 08 Aug 99 - 09:53 AM
McKnees 08 Aug 99 - 09:51 AM
MAG (inactive) 07 Aug 99 - 08:10 PM
WyoWoman 03 Aug 99 - 11:32 PM
paddy 03 Aug 99 - 11:29 PM
Bert 03 Aug 99 - 03:05 PM
Penny S. 03 Aug 99 - 02:53 PM
Bert 03 Aug 99 - 01:44 PM
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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Deckman
Date: 13 Jul 03 - 01:49 PM

Sorcha ... Thanks for opening this thread again. Re-reading it has made me very hungry, and lonesome, for the comfort food of my childhood: "Ruisileppa", "Villi" and goat stew. My Grandmother, who immigrated to America from Finland in 1886, used to serve this meal to me. Ruisileppa was a large, round loaf of very course sougdough rye bread. The Villi was a cultured milk, something like a mix of yougurt and buttermilk. (I still have her original starter). And as she raised nanny goats for the milk, we also eat goat meat stew. CHEERS, Bob


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Sorcha
Date: 12 Jul 03 - 03:12 PM

Found Hatch frozen green chile in my grocery store today!! Oh, frabjous day!!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Art Thieme
Date: 24 Oct 99 - 09:05 PM

A Scotsman who wears pants is guilty of this... ;-)

Art


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 06:45 AM

This is a great thread! I am learning a bunch about what people really like to eat. And since food is one of my favorite subjects, I have created a NEW THREAD to continue this delicious discussion. Ethnic Foods Crossover (Cont'd)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 06:06 AM

Sounds like a great diet. But, you say it keeps you up all night? *grin*


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: katlaughing
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 06:03 AM

Thanks, Allan! Just made delicious brownies and blueberry muffins tonight, all using his low carb flour and recipes. Really tasty.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 05:34 AM

40 pounds!! Goodonya, Kat!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: katlaughing
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 12:05 AM

WW: I am living proof that being Scots/Irish with a little English and Native American thrown in is NOT a guarantee against all things sweet being comforting!

Interstingly enough, though, a lot of the things in this thread are allowed in my food intake, except the potatoes, too many carbs! I've lost almost 40lbs, so I am going to stick with it and enjoy the butter, eggs, sweet cream, broiled chicken, etc. The doctor who came up with this is a cardiologist, has treated people for a lot of years, and has good reasoning along with scientific backup for what he advocates, which is anathema according to all of the diet gurus. LOW Carbs, HIGH protein! Works fer me:-)

Oh and the sweets thing? He's got scrumptious chocolate brownie food bars, baking flour, recipes, etc. all of which are lo carb, so no prob. I'm in heaven!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:45 PM

The Book 'Broth & Blarney'- Easons Book Store in Dublin Ireland - that's where I got my copy. Or you could try Amazon - I did but it could not locate the book. Kinda weird as they claim if a book is in print they have it on their database.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:30 PM

Colcannon - according to my Leprechaun Dictionary means -

'White headed Kale'

Don'nt know what that is but it must be fun :)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: WyoWoman
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 10:39 PM

I just touched back into this thread after several days' absence and I've gained 5 lbs. from simply READING these recipes. Interesting, isn't it, that none of the food that really comforts us involves a broiled chicken breast and fat-free raspberry vinaigrette?

I think because of my Irish-Scots heritage I gravitate towards potatoey, starchy, buttery things for comfort, rather than sweets. Think this is an ethnic inclination?

ww


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 03:17 PM

Jeri, unfortunately I do not know of anyone who grows them commercially. You would think they would have the potential of the not-exactly-from-Vadelia Vadelia onions which are now so easy to find in the U.S.. M-m-m-m-m I may have to re-think my career plans...

If I could easily lay my hands on some, I would gladly send you some. But the people I used to know in West Virginia who used to supply me moved away. I have yet to stumble upon some in my wanderings through the woods. Places where they grow wild are kept as family secrets like the location of good morel patches.

But you could take a look at these sites to learn a little more about them:

Ramps

Ramps festival and pictures of ramps


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Llanfair
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 02:38 PM

In the UK, your Ramps are called Ramsons, or wild garlic. The woods across the road from us are thick with them in the spring. I haven't tried eating them yet, though. Allan, I shall have to try your recipe, and Bert, Bubble and Squeak is one of my favourites. Why is all the good stuff full of fat? Like me, I suppose!!!!!! Hwyl, Bron.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Jeri
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 02:23 PM

Allan, is there any way for a poor, un-ramped New Hampshirite to get her hands on some ramps? Does anyone export? If I send money, could someone mail me some? I really would like to try them - I like all kinds of stinky food!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: annamill
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 01:35 PM

I've just gained about 5 lbs. Those boxty things sound an awful lot like the potato pancakes my Southern Mom used to make. She'd serve them with apple sauce and pork chops or Southern fried chicken. Ohhhh.. I'm droolin'... I'm going to go saute some tomatos and peppers from my garden. I'm starving. See ya.

Love, annap


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 01:08 PM

Both of you (Bert and M) are right. They are extremely potent. There is a ramps festival in West Virginia each year. There is also a significant drop in local population expansion about nine months after this event. Eating them raw is not for the timid but they do very well in cooking. One of my favorite ways to prepare them (scallions can be substituted) is to grease a large Pyrex casserole dish or oblong pan with drippings from the pound of bacon you'll need to fry. Crumble three quarters of the bacon over the bottom of the dish or pan. Cover the bacon with a generous layer of chopped ramps. Grate about a quarter pound or more of cheese (I like a mixture of sharp cheddar and monterey jack) and sprinkle half of it over the bacon and ramps. Separate a dozen eggs. Beat the whites until soft peaks can be made. Beat the yolks until creamy and add salt and pepper. Fold the beaten yolks into the whites. Gently pour the egg mixture over the bacon and ramps layers. Sprinkle the rest of the bacon and a few more chopped ramps over the eggs. Top with the remaining cheese. If desired, you can decorate by dipping three whole ramps in bacon grease and lay them on top of the top layer of cheese. Then bake in a moderately hot (400 degrees F.) oven for about 45 minutes to an hour or until the topping browns a bit and the middle won't jiggle when you move the pan. Time will vary depending upon size of pan. A layer of green chiles put on before the eggs are added is also wonderful! This last was taught to me by my grandmother who learned the basic recipe from her French mother but adapted it after learning Mexican cooking from a brother-in-law.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: M
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:57 AM

Ramps are a wild onion/scallion-type plant. They look like lily-of-the-valley. Right, Allan? I have yet to eat one, them being somewhat regional and hidden in the woods. Sorta like truffles. Ramps are exceptionally pungent, no? (This coming from someone who teethed on onions.)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bert
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:19 AM

Ramps? are they those skinny little wild onion things?

I don't think we should be discussing fried potatoes without mentioning 'Bubble and Squeak'. So many of us Limeys grew up eating Bubble and Squeak as the 'standard' Monday evening meal. Mmmmm! Yum!

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Hutzul
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:17 AM

OK I have to add a note for the Slavic race. Nothing warms a chill winter night like a bowl of Ukrainian borsch. It is a red beet soup base with beef stock and lots of veggies. Peter Orstroushko, the mandolin player, actually put his mother's recipe to music and sings it on one of his albums, dedicated to the "church ladies". These are the old dolls who whip up a huge "banyek" (soup pot) every weekend at Ukrainian church halls all over the world. "Smoch Mnoho!" Happy eating.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Allan C.
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 11:03 AM

Alison, yes, in some parts of the U.S. this is (more or less) hash browns. In some places hash browns are little more than grated raw potatoes which are mixed with beaten egg and salt and pepper (lots of both!); made into patties then fried. (Do I really need to say "in an iron skillet"? - after all, doesn't EVERYTHING taste better cooked in a cast iron pot or pan?) In some areas chopped onions, scallions, or even ramps are added. (Does anyone else besides me know what ramps are?) However, in various places, the potatoes are cubed rather than grated and left loose - not pattied. Some folks even coat them in a seasoned mixture of bread or cracker crumbs before frying. Still, all who make these will swear that theirs are the "true" hash browns.

I have recently been to a Malaysian restaurant where a large number of their dishes are potato-based. Many dishes are made with a potato batter of varying thickness to create patties or crepes as needed. I am working on getting a better idea of what goes into them. A lot of peanuts are used in wonderful ways as well. Delicious!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: M
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 10:49 AM

Alison, yes, colcannon is basically champ but with cabbage. Thanks for posting the recipe. Hash browns don't have the mashed potatoes in them, do they? I think that's the difference. The starch helps bind the cakes together. Whan I was in Ireland last year, I had the BEST food!! Didn't get up North for an Ulster fry, but definitely want to. Loved black pudding! Ah, yes…Irish cuisine. The thought behind the rhyme is, I guess, that making boxty is (kinda) labor intensive , what with the grating and mashing and all, but also kinda basic. So if one goes to the trouble to make it, then, well…the way to a man's heart is through his stomach. (Especially if he can't cook!) This applies to all different cultures--in traditional Hopi society, young girls had to perfect their (manual) corn-grinding skills to become more suitable spousal material.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: alison
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 02:29 AM

Who needs the recipe when you can have the song

COLCANNON

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: alison
Date: 11 Aug 99 - 02:24 AM

Boxty

2cups raw spud
2cups mashed spud
2cups plain flour
125ml -ish milk or buttermilk
1tsp baking powder
1tsp salt
melted butter

peel and grate raw spuds, squeeze out liquid into a basin using linen teatowel (I assume clean tea towel*grin*)
Mix grated and mashed spud
when the starch has separated form the spud water pour off water and add starch to spuds (sounds healthy doesn't it)
add dry ingredients and mix well
add buttermilk ot make a dropping consistency
beat well and fry in dollops in a greased pan
fry both sides, serve with butter and sugar,...

book next appointment with cardiologist *grin*

(isn't this hash browns?)

How about an Ulster Fry?.... grab everything you can see and fry it.... easy!!!!

couldn't find a recipe for Colcannon, but isn't it just champ made with cabbage? Got one for donegal pie and Guinness cake..... ah the joys of Irish cuisine.......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Terry
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 06:36 PM

THAT explains why I don't have a man! I can't make boxty and I've been eating too many potatoes. Thanks, M!


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: M
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 05:29 PM

"Boxty in the griddle, boxty in the pan, if you can't make boxty you'll never get a man."

All the boxty receits that I have call for grated potatoes, alomg with the potato starch (and water) that leaches out of them.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 05:02 PM

Err ummm - Tatie Scones/ Potatoe Bread are about the same thing but entirely different from Boxty.

The difference is this Potatoe Bread can be baked - but is usualy fried. It is a dough made from boiled mashed taters and flour (do add salt to the flour!!). This is the most basic recipe. Also ,like regular dough, it must be proved!

To Proof Dough - Put in a warm place for a couple of hours and when it starts rising *carefully* place in oven or in this case, the skillet. BTW Potatoe Bread needs only bout half hour to prove.

Boxty is a Batter not a dough! It must be made with grated uncooked taters! Do peel em first:)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: MMario
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 04:26 PM

we just called 'em "potato cakes" - pretty much the same - but depending on what leftovers were available to go into them could be anywhere from almost fluid to really cake-like. Potatoes and an onion or cabbage type green were always the primary ingredients though.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Terry
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 04:16 PM

My American mother was a sophisticated and fantastic cook. You know the kind of resourceful, confident woman who can whip up, at a moment's notice, a delectable souffle for 10 unexpected guests from nothing but the remaining half of a wrinkled tomato, a hard rind of cheese and two eggs in the fridge, and some spices. Over the course of their 49-year marriage, she "improved" my father's favorite Irish foods so that she found them almost palatable, too, using onion, garlic and various spices in Irish stews, boxty, colcannon, etc. Mom's and Nana's versions were so different as to not be the same food at all.

My 81-year-old father's brother died last week and, since then, Dad has been having nostalgic cravings for the comfort food of his childhood the way his mother, not mine, made it. It seems to be what his tastebuds need to ritualize mourning.

One of the things he's craved is a dish he calls "rissoles," which is Spam dipped in batter and deep fat fried. The result is similar to toad in the hole, I suppose.

(Getting to the point of my post...) Another is boxty. j077's recipe is pretty much the way my grandmother made griddle boxty except that she used mashed potato, not grated. You can make a pan version by baking the same ingredients in a 9x12" pyrex dish and cut it into squares, split each square and put a pat of butter between the halves.

My Nana used to say, "Boxty in the griddle, boxty in the pan; if you don't eat boxty, you'll never get a man."


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 02:41 PM

Hmm I await help here 'haps Missy Alison can educate me - but I always thought that Col-cannon had to have some extra vegitable like 'Kale' - now i ain't an expert as I have to use a Cookery Book. Champs - hmmm never heard the term but according to ma trusty Leperachaun Book it is similar but NOT the same thing. Researching that very thing right now ....BRB


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 02:26 PM

Boxty - from a secret cookbook 'Broth & Blarney' by Anne Morris.

1 lb potatoes - peeled and grated

You must grate em using a tin lid with holes made by hammering a nail through at 1/4 inch spacing - or use a regular grater. Experiment, try medium grade first :)

6 oz - plain flour

1/2 5mil tsp - baking powder

3/4 5mil tsp - salt

4 fluid oz - milk

Cooking oil OR

Any dripping, fat/lard etc...

Sieve flower, salt and baking powder together. Mix with grated pototoes, add milk to thicken the batter. Heat frying pan/skillet, add lots of oil. Pour batter onto pan/skillet. Cook on either side for 3/4 minutes or untill golden brown. Serve hot with a little butter on each slice.

Kinda like Pitza but not fattening and I've added partly cooked burger pattie meat to the batter. That is both nourishing and very very yummmmieeeeeee.

Book is not on Amazon, I already looked. I can get copies if any one wants them :)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: M
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 02:03 PM

As I know them, champ and colcannon are pretty much the same thing. The key ingredient to both of them, though, is GREENS - whether they be scallions, kale, finely shredded cabbage or (your choice here). Onions are a good addition. Cheese? Could work, but that's not what makes it champ. Oh, and lots of butter. Champ is definately more on the oozy, liquidy side than regular mashed potatoes.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: katlaughing
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 01:35 PM

Keerist! Jo77! We've a band in Wyoming called Col cannon! D'ya 'spose? I thought Alison's recipe was called "champ", but if it is the pratie volcano thingy then it's what we called mashed potatoes with a little onyun and cheese added. Still yummy no matter! Now, finding that land and then looking for an exit, that's not something I'd mind too much.....kinda like being here at the Mudcat, enchanting!

Thanks for the info!

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 01:02 PM

Boxty is a Secret weapon devised by leperachauns in ancient times in case they were ever caught flying them UFOs. It is a food and after a victim is captured by the aroma, are then led by the nose to the location. Next while they dally at the trap their taste buds are bewitched by leperachaun spells. Now captive the unfortunate prisoner is byond hope and will next take a little bite. They are gonners. Caput. See Alison's recipee, but mark me, that is not the most potent mixture by a long measure, a variation called Col-cannon- I think :) Mind you I'm no expert being a travelling person and never spending more than the width of a week in any one place. But the land of the leprechaun is hard to find and when found hard to loose again. Some Greeks once went there and were lost for a day, the mist fell on them and not knowing up from down, they never did find their way back home. (See Dublin history) This explains why the travelling people of Ireland are travellers. Once you decide to leave - it's a whole new deal finding the exit.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: katlaughing
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 12:15 PM

And what IS Boxty?


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bert
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 11:35 AM

Alison, we used to make something like that only we used regular onions and fried them up a bit and added a good amount of grated cheese. We didn't have a name for it though, it was just 'that cheese and potato oniony thing'

Now you've got me thinking about food from when I was a kid.

Anyone remember 'egg and bacon pie'?

and how about some 'bread and drip'?

and 'Welsh Rabbit'

and 'Buckling' and 'Bloaters'

Bert


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bob Landry
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 11:32 AM

WyoWoman, we're not that far from you. If Steve Parkes can find this place all the way from Merry Olde England (we had a good time last night at my place) then you can, too. Make your way to Sweetgrass, Montana, and head north on Highway 2 for about 7-8 hours. Ya can't miss it! Next festival, the first weekend in August, 2000.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: alison
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 05:16 AM

Boxty is good... does anywhere else make champ?

you cook your spuds, make it really creamy with milk, cream whatever and add scallions (or shallots, eschallots, spring onions whatever they're called.) mix it all up and serve in a huge steaming dollop, on the plate... I still have visions of my dad making his into a volcano type shape... putting even bigger dollops of butter into the middle, closing up the "volcano" and spiking the sides to see the butter oozing out....... YUMMMMMM......

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: WyoWoman
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 01:45 AM

Bob, It may be a commercial, but it sure sounded good to me. Wish it were closer to my neck of the woods.

WW


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: j0_77
Date: 09 Aug 99 - 01:02 PM

Ok - my list of crimes against the digestive system are - Biscuits and Gravey/Pecons - not know in Britain, English Cheeses not know in Ireland (weird as they are very yummie and it is only a couple of hundered miles from UK mainland to Ireland) Boxty an Irish food - mega yummie - not known anywhere except there. Alison and Den take note.

I made a pile of Tater Scones (Potato bread) for a party and they were devoured by a bunch of Basket Ball phreaks in a couple of minutes!!.

Andres - you can cook me a steak any time :)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bob Landry
Date: 09 Aug 99 - 12:16 PM

If your vacation plans permit and you're looking for a way to overdose on foods of the world, check out Edmonton's Heritage Festival, held each year during the first weekend in August. This year, local residents from over 50 countries (all continents) offered an average of three ethnic dishes as well as demonstrations of music and dance from their homelands. If you like it hot, you can get hot. If you like it bland, you can get bland. Whatever your tastes, you'll find somtehing that satisfies you. While standing in line for French crepes in Grand Marnier sauce, we listened to mouth music from Pakistan. Admission is free, but donations to the local food bank are welcome. Food costs are a lot lower than in Niagara Falls, ranging from $1 to $4 per sample.

Geez, I just reread this post and it sounds likes a commercial. Ah well, so be it!

Bob


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: WyoWoman
Date: 08 Aug 99 - 06:47 PM

MAG-- I'm so happy you tried the carne adovada. Isn't that just yummy? I like it with a skosh of sour cream and loverly warm flour tortillas. GAWDAMITEY, I'M HUNGRY!

Just got back from a four-day road trip and only have mushy spinach-in-a-bag in my fridge. I want someone to cook me something! Guess I'll have to shuffle off to the market...

At any rate, I'm happy to have hooked someone else on carne adovada.

Wait 'til I post my Tortilla Soup recipe. mmmm

WW


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: McKnees
Date: 08 Aug 99 - 09:55 AM

~Whoops got hickups sorry folks


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: McKnees
Date: 08 Aug 99 - 09:53 AM

I wonder if anyone has tried the old cheese and jam sandwiches and the fried bread and home made raspberry jam, both are wonderful. As to the Yorkshire puds have you tried putting sliced apple in them when having roast pork. Or making stovies with left over roast beef, by frying up chopped onion with the chopped up beef and mixing with creamed mashed potato and serve with the remaining gravy. must go and make a sandwich.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: McKnees
Date: 08 Aug 99 - 09:51 AM

I wonder if anyone has tried the old cheese and jam sandwiches and the fried bread and home made raspberry jam, both are wonderful. As to the Yorkshire puds have you tried putting sliced apple in them when having roast pork. Or making stovies with left over roast beef, by frying up chopped onion with the chopped up beef and mixing with creamed mashed potato and serve with the remaining gravy. must go and make a sandwich.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: MAG (inactive)
Date: 07 Aug 99 - 08:10 PM

OK, I tried the carne adovade recipe and it is truly delectable; used a crockpot and now I've got food for a week!

MA


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: WyoWoman
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 11:32 PM

Growing up in Oklahoma, our idea of spices was salt and pepper and to be really, really "out there," maybe a bit of oregano. Now I favor recipes that start out, "Take all the garlic you can find in the house; chop fine...."

ww


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: paddy
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 11:29 PM

katlaughing- pork chops & apples, hmmmmm good. had a similar thing in the mountains of virgina years ago, but with lots of cabbage mixed in. it was then a novel thing for me, but turned out to be delicious. have made it on ocassion (never can remember how to spell that word), but add a few bunny bullets (aka raisins)


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bert
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 03:05 PM

Ah! a Cornish Pasty and a pint of scrumpy.

But don't forget the 'Figgy obbin' if you're going to Cornwall, Penny.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Penny S.
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 02:53 PM

And a really good onion gravy with the Toad. See above.

Tomorrow I head for the land of scones and clotted cream, of saffron bun and bread, and the slighted pasty: the Cornish are in revolt again, this time against The New York Times, and its comparison of the pasty to a ceramic door-stop. A good dough and a trusty hand, a well-cooked filling, too; and burger men will understand what Cornish cooks can do!

But I won't be eating starry-gazy pie.

Penny


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Subject: RE: Ethnic crossover
From: Bert
Date: 03 Aug 99 - 01:44 PM

Bron and Penny have the recipe for Yorkshire Pudding just right. If you've not made it before, you may need to try a couple of times before you get it just right. It takes a little practice but it's well worth it.
When making Yorkshire Pudding in Colorado Springs, we used to add an extra egg to compensate for the altitude of over 6000 feet, otherwise it was too heavy.

Use the same batter for 'Toad in the Hole'. Put either link sausages or tender lamb chops in a baking dish and pour the batter over them before popping them in the oven. You still need to get that pan 'smoking hot' first though. Mmmmm delicious.

Bert.


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