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Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby

The Sandman 07 Jan 09 - 06:32 PM
Suegorgeous 07 Jan 09 - 07:31 PM
PoppaGator 08 Jan 09 - 04:18 PM
PinkAliPink 08 Jan 09 - 05:18 PM
dick greenhaus 08 Jan 09 - 05:39 PM
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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 06:32 PM

Ron Taylor,is amuch better unaccompanied singer then anyone else that has been mentioned so far.
Jeff Gillett,has a my space page,and sometimes works win a duo with Ron.
the Wilson Family,are avery good unaccompanied Harmony group.
Mike Waterson.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 07:31 PM

Talking of Faustus... their track "Brisk lad" (on Faustus) is a stunning example of unaccompanied harmony singing. Can't stop playing it!


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: PoppaGator
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 04:18 PM

"More or less by chance I discovered that I really enjoyed singing unacompanied traditional English and Irish songs."

Are you familiar with the term "Sean Nos"? If not, run a search and see (I mean, hear) what you think.

I got involved with a sea-shanty-singing group a couple of years ago and, through them, began learning a thing or three about singing without instrumental accompaniment.

My personal favorite piece to sing without playing along on my guitar is Dave Van Ronk's "Last Call." Decidedly NOT truly traditional, but set to a melody that certainly sounds ancient. (I don't know for sure whether DVR "stole" an existing tune, or simply was able to compose a very authrntic-sounding new melody.)

The above link provides the (wonderful) lyrics, but not the tune. I didn't find a free audio link right away, but here's an MP3 download ($0.89).


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: PinkAliPink
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 05:18 PM

I'm in a similar position, I love British & Celtic folk music, but am not really very familiar with names for purchasing or listening to on Youtube etc. So recently with a view to finding some artists to add to my collection. I've looked at popular folk compilation albums on Amazon & then Youtubed the various artists.

I also listen to shoutcast radio with Winamp & have found various artists in this way. The Internet archive can also be a free source of lesser known music of podcasts & MP3's & can be downloaded or streamed, Download.com also offers free MP3 downloads across many genres, while efolkmusic.com (although haven't visited for a couple of years) always had mainly American artists but also some celtic & possibly english sounds & has various options including some free MP3's.

Kate Rusby is my favorite new find at the moment, how I missed her before, who knows.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 05:39 PM

I won't even bother to pick individual selections: my website lists some 3500 titles that I think are good.


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