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BS: Fish

Beer 18 Sep 08 - 10:20 PM
Rowan 18 Sep 08 - 09:16 PM
Bee 18 Sep 08 - 06:58 PM
Ed T 18 Sep 08 - 06:11 PM
Morticia 18 Sep 08 - 04:57 PM
Richard Bridge 18 Sep 08 - 02:19 AM
Gurney 18 Sep 08 - 01:59 AM
Gurney 18 Sep 08 - 01:59 AM
Gurney 18 Sep 08 - 01:58 AM
The Fooles Troupe 17 Sep 08 - 11:59 PM
Rowan 17 Sep 08 - 06:55 PM
Ed T 17 Sep 08 - 06:49 PM
Rowan 17 Sep 08 - 06:34 PM
The Fooles Troupe 16 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM
Rapparee 16 Sep 08 - 10:26 PM
Rowan 16 Sep 08 - 07:50 PM
Stu 16 Sep 08 - 05:47 AM
The Fooles Troupe 16 Sep 08 - 04:37 AM
Ed T 15 Sep 08 - 07:32 PM
Ed T 15 Sep 08 - 07:27 PM
Ed T 15 Sep 08 - 07:21 PM
Ed T 15 Sep 08 - 07:14 PM
the lemonade lady 15 Sep 08 - 06:56 PM
Bee 15 Sep 08 - 04:09 PM
Jack Blandiver 15 Sep 08 - 03:39 PM
Ed T 15 Sep 08 - 02:20 PM
bobad 15 Sep 08 - 01:59 PM
open mike 15 Sep 08 - 12:35 PM
Rapparee 15 Sep 08 - 12:23 AM
mg 15 Sep 08 - 12:22 AM
The Fooles Troupe 14 Sep 08 - 11:42 PM
The Fooles Troupe 14 Sep 08 - 11:36 PM
bobad 14 Sep 08 - 10:58 PM
Beer 14 Sep 08 - 10:48 PM
bobad 14 Sep 08 - 10:31 PM
Rapparee 14 Sep 08 - 10:01 PM
Beer 14 Sep 08 - 09:36 PM
Ed T 14 Sep 08 - 09:01 PM
Ed T 14 Sep 08 - 10:40 AM
GUEST,HiLo 14 Sep 08 - 10:34 AM
Ed T 14 Sep 08 - 10:31 AM
Ed T 14 Sep 08 - 10:07 AM
Bee 14 Sep 08 - 12:23 AM
Beer 13 Sep 08 - 11:53 PM
bobad 13 Sep 08 - 11:42 PM
Beer 13 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM
bobad 13 Sep 08 - 11:25 PM
Beer 13 Sep 08 - 11:20 PM
bobad 13 Sep 08 - 10:08 PM
Bee 13 Sep 08 - 09:31 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 10:20 PM

That is one hell of an interesting recipe Rowan. Now to find some Cod?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rowan
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 09:16 PM

Well, Bee, I'd encourage him.
To try singing it sober, of course. It's not bad as one's only party piece.

But then, I'm known to be odd, especially in my belief that most people who "cannot sing" are usually that way because that's what they were 'taught'; I wouldn't accuse 'catters of such behaviour. I suspect a few errors of pitch wouldn't do the song any irrrevocable harm and may actually improve its delivery in some circumstances.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Bee
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 06:58 PM

Rowan, a friend of ours who cannot sing, always sings that whenever he is several sheets to the wind. It's the only song I've ever heard him attempt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 06:11 PM

Sole-wrapped Asparagus with Tangerine Beurre Blanc

http://www.albion.bc.ca/recipes/local-finfish/sole-fillets.htm


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Morticia
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 04:57 PM

Fish and asparagus pie by Morti ( copyright ltd to one beer if seen at a festival)

Cook up some potato, mash with butter and milk and white pepper.

Cook some mixed fish ( tonight was salmon, smoked haddock and cod) in milk with fresh parsley, salt and pepper until just flaky. Flake and put aside.Save the milk.

Into a casserole dish slice up mushrooms, spring onion and asparagus.

Sauce

Melt a chunk of butter into a pan, stir in a tablespoon of flour and then stir together to a smooth paste, add in the milk you cooked the fish in, some thai fish sauce (if available) or fish stock, more parsley and a dash of pepper or cayenne sauce.

Into the casserole dish add all the ingredients then pour sauce over the top. Put a layer of mashed potato on top. I then add a sprinkle of paprika and some anchovies in a pretty pattern, Bake for about 30 mins in a moderate oven, longer if you like your asparagus soft.

Nom, nom, nom.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 02:19 AM

Thank you. 100


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Gurney
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 01:59 AM

1. Say thank you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Gurney
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 01:59 AM

2


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Gurney
Date: 18 Sep 08 - 01:58 AM

3 (little fishes)


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 17 Sep 08 - 11:59 PM

Kalamari rings only 4% calamari


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rowan
Date: 17 Sep 08 - 06:55 PM

Now that's off my chest, a recipe.

Being almost exactly on the watershed of the Great Dividing Range I'm a good three hour drive from the great fish in the Fisherman's Coop at Coffs Harbour, but I use this one on what is sold, in the local supermarkets, as "smoked cod". The fish is boneless, firm, slightly oily, tinged yellow and has a solid flavour.

Dice an onion and a clove of garlic and soften them in olive oil in a decent pot (~40cm diameter); add a tablespoon or so of curry (home-made or commercial paste) towards the end of the softening.

Take a third of a Queensland Blue pumpkin (OK, I know US residents call our pumpkins "squash" and the Brits regard them as cattlefood but you could use a decent - 40cm long x 10cm diam - Butternut instead) and, after peeling, chop it into pieces (~ inch and a half cubed?) that could be cooked but still firm after 20 minutes' simmering. Chuck the pumpkin pieces into the pot with the onions, add a tin of coconut creme and make up the volume to just cover the pumpkin by adding water. A thumb of ginger finely shredded doesn't go amiss. Simmer for 10 minutes.

Chop the fish (about 5 cutlets, each ~20 x 8cm) into short slices and add them to the mix; simmer another 10 minutes.

Makes enough for half a dozen large bowls and is great after a day out in the cold. You may already have a name for it but my daughters just call it "Pumpkin and fish".

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 17 Sep 08 - 06:49 PM

Halibut cheeks, or halibut butt cheeks, this site confuses me?

http://adrenalinesshadow.com/?p=2777


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rowan
Date: 17 Sep 08 - 06:34 PM

I don't wish to carp but it's all been done before, on JennyO's BS: Four reel-life squid thread.

The Fish Song (I Lobster and Never Flounder) - Pinkard and Bowden

I was the cook, ----she was the waitress
Down at Salty Sams seafood cafe
Somewhere between the clam juice and the seaweed salad
some little shrimp... lured her away

Oh, I Lobster, n' never Flounder
He wrapped his line around her
and they drove off in his Carp
Oh, I Lobster n' never Flounder
I Octopus his face in, Eel only break her heart.

I said "just Squid and leave me for that piano Tuna
If you want to Trout something new"
She was the Bass I ever had and my life has no Porpoise
Oh my Cod, I love her, yes I do

Oh, I Lobster, n' never Flounder
He wrapped his line around her
and they drove off in his Carp
Oh, I Lobster n' never Flounder
I Octopus his face in, Eel only break her heart.

Boy, I sword fish she'd come back to me!
I'd show her a whale of a time
You know, I've kelped her picture in my walleye just for the halibut
I wonder if she kelpt mine in her perch?

Yes I said perch. Some of you are looking at me like you are losing your herring
I think I'm getting a haddock!
Well, I bass quit sea horsing around or you folks will go into a state of shark!'
If I get out of here alive — it'll be a mackerel.
"Frankly scallop, I don't give a clam"

Oh, I Lobster, n' never Flounder
He wrapped his line around her
and they drove off in his Carp
Oh, I Lobster n' never Flounder
I Octopus his face in, Eel only break her heart.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 16 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM

Rapaire   - did you say that just for the halibut?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rapparee
Date: 16 Sep 08 - 10:26 PM

Carp ponds were found in many places in Europe; the fish therein were raised for food. Likewise, Japanese raised koi (a type of carp) for food in koi ponds.

Try catching carp on a fly rod -- I'm told that it's one of the best sort of fish for fly fishing.

By the way, a well-kept secret of Alaskans is halibut cheeks.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rowan
Date: 16 Sep 08 - 07:50 PM

"carp are not top drawer, they are bottom feeders..."

Ah! Enlightenment!!! Politicians === Carp...


In the 1890s there was a standoff between the Victorian National Museum (all the colonies - as they then were - described their institutions as "National") and the Govt over the Parliament's unwillingness to fund the museum's research to a standard acceptable to the various curators. At the time, the researchers were in the process of describing and publishing all the "new" (to western science) species of freshwater fish. A common practice was (and still is) to use a patron's name as the specific epithet (the "species" part of Genus - species binomial) for a newly-described species. Many new species had already been so named after these politicians.

Because the scientists mostly came from Britain and parts of Europe where biota also had "common" names it was also (at that time) common for such scientists to assign a "common" name to a new species. [The fact that Aborigines might already have assigned and were using such names was routinely, if not universally, ignored.] So these scientists gave unpleasant common names (like "spotted bottom feeder") to those species they had just named after the pollies and sent their manuscripts off for publication in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria.

When the pollies found out, after publication in colony's major scientific journal, the govt. censored the relevant issue, which is now relatively rare.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Stu
Date: 16 Sep 08 - 05:47 AM

Humph.

I thought this thread was about the talented and brilliant rock singer, ex of Marillion, but you lot are talking about grub.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 16 Sep 08 - 04:37 AM

"carp are not top drawer, they are bottom feeders..."

Ah! Enlightenment!!! Politicians === Carp...


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 07:32 PM

Fish and health
http://www.ocean.udel.edu/mas/seafood/nutritioninfo.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 07:27 PM

Soya andf oyster sauce additive 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD)?

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/concen/specif/oystere.shtml


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 07:21 PM

Sorry, the fish lip ricipe:

http://www.newsgd.com/enjoylife/living/dining/200604260026.htm



The scoop on fish and lipstick
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2544/does-lipstick-contain-fish-scales


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 07:14 PM

Fish lips anyone?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: the lemonade lady
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 06:56 PM

fish


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Bee
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 04:09 PM

May I suggest, Insane Beard, combining the love of pork and seafood as follows?

One pork roast, either boneless loin, or better, rib roast. If boneless, carve a good deep pocket lengthwise, if rib, slice deeply between bones, leaving the bone side closed at the 'back' of the roast.

Prepare stuffing of bread, sage, savoury, marjoram, thyme,(or replace these herbs with poultry seasoning) black pepper, a little oil. Gently mix in, without breaking, one or two cans (size of roast should dictate) of large boiled oysters. (I have also added a half cup of chestnuts as well). Taste oyster liquid for saltiness and add a little for moisture if it isn't too salty - use water if you wish. Stuff the pockets you've made with this good stuffing.

Place roast in open pan in 350F oven. Place thick slices of sweet onion all around, as many as you can cram in. Pour a full bottle of beer over all. Baste frequently, add more beer if necessary. Roast until very tender.

This is really, really good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 03:39 PM

i am a pescatarian....not my religion but my diet..

After drooling my way through this thread I'm sorely tempted to join you, were I not so roundly committed to the consumption of fowl, game & free range porkers.

On Fridays however, I am a Pescatarian.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 02:20 PM

I certainly would not discourage anyone from eating any fish. "Each to his own, when it comes to taste." If you enjoy them, good for you.

Unlike many fish, carp can survive in very polluted water. This may be the reason for the bbad experiences I have had. Maybe they were raised in bad water, as they had a definite muddy flavour (and that does not reflect quality to me).

http://www.big-river.com/br.story.a.html

"The oil is what may give carp a bad taste, too, if it has grown up in polluted water. Carp can and do survive in extremely polluted water, but they won't taste good". http://www.big-river.com/br.story.a.html



Sorry, but, everytime I look at my goldfish, I think of their relation to carp:)

Maybe this is why I personally do not personally stomach the fish?
http://www.pond-doctor.co.uk/longdigestion.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 01:59 PM

"carp are not top drawer, they are bottom feeders..."

So are halibut, flounder, plaice, sole, eels, ling cod, haddock, bass, grouper, bream (snapper), crab and lobster.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: open mike
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 12:35 PM

carp are not top drawer, they are bottom feeders...

i am a pescatarian....not my religion but my diet..

had scallops last night and pickeled herring

the day before....you can get it in bulk here:

http://www.ingebretsens.com/details.php?prodID=199

i saw a pickled herring and pumpkin pie cook book online..

and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollmops are said to be

helpful for hangovers as they replenish electrolytes


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rapparee
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 12:23 AM

Carp were introduced into the Mississippi in the 19th Century. They are top-drawer eating -- filleted, dredged in corn meal, and fried.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: mg
Date: 15 Sep 08 - 12:22 AM

salmon cooks very nicely in the microwave..very tender and flaky. Don't overcook. gm


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 11:42 PM

"Carp is appreciated in many parts of the world"

We appreciate Carp in Australia too - if you read the site, you will understand that introduced Carp are a pest, destroying Australian native fishes by destroying the ecology. We have found a solution
"Charlie Carp" ... sometimes referred to in the Aussie Humourous way as "Charlie Crap"...


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 11:36 PM

"fishes carp and smokes them"

Yes, tobacco is more expensive than it used to be...


BTW, with regard to Sashimi - it is supposed to be done only with sea fish, not fresh fish - as sea water fish supposedly have a lower occurrence of parasites - dunno how truthful that is.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:58 PM

Just down the road from me in Long Sault, on the St. Lawrence river, is a popular carp fishing locale. Annual tournaments draw anglers from all over the world. There's a bunch of stuff on You Tube about it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:48 PM

Bobad,
My neighbor, the one on the facing Montreal, fishes carp and smokes them. He just loves carps.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:31 PM

Ed T, you are displaying your cultural bias by your disparagement of carp as a food fish. Carp is appreciated in many parts of the world and there are many recipes that reflect it's popularity. Most Asian countries prize it and they have myriad ways of preparing it. It is also much prized in the cuisine of eastern Europe and is often used as the main ingredient in the Jewish dish gefilte fish. Indeed as a youngster I would often accompany my parents on shopping expeditions to the ethnic/Jewish quarter of Montreal AKA the Main or St. Lawrence street which had many shops that had tanks of live carp swimming about oblivious to their impending fate. Our family ate it once a year on Christmas eve, which for Catholics was a meatless day, prepared in Polish style ie. in aspic, much like this recipe:

Carp in Aspic
Karp w Galarecie

3 lbs. carp                         1 T gelatin
4 cups vegetable stock       2 T water
4 peppercorns                   1 egg white
3 bay leaves
Clean fish. Remove head and clean it. Cook head and spices in vegetable stock for half hour. Strain. Place whole fish in a pan. Cover with strained stock and simmer for half hour until tender. Remove fish and place on a serving platter. To clarify stock, add slightly beaten egg white and bring to boiling point, stirring lightly. Strain through napkin twice. Dissolve gelatin in water, add stock. Pour over the cooled fish. Garnish with carrot rings, hard boiled eggs, and lemon slices.
         
I didn't much like it as a kid but would probably appreciate it more now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Rapparee
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:01 PM

Reminds me of a story from Plimoth Plantation:

The re-enactment staff were stewing a chicken in a pot over an open fire. A man and woman, obviously the worst type of tourist and know-it-alls to boot, came by and asked, "What are you cooking?"

"A seagull," replied one of the cooks.

"Why, I didn't know they were edible! How can you tell when they're done?"

"When the feathers float to the top."


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 09:36 PM

Good one Ed.

I guess you know the one with the Loon in a pot along with a rock? When you can stick the fork through the rock, throw away the rock as the loon is now cooked.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 09:01 PM

I remember a carp recipe.
You put one in a baggie of dirt,
bury it for two days. Dig it up,
throw the carp awy, and eat the dirt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:40 AM

Twenty-Two Ways To Cook Haddock,fyi:

http://chestofbooks.com/food/recipes/How-To-Cook-Fish/Twenty-Two-Ways-To-Cook-Haddock.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:34 AM

Wow, some great recipes here..I am a major fish lover..my favourite is fresh mackerel, which I fillet myself, wee tad of butter, we shot of lemon and serve with new potatoes boiled and a side of steamed spinach or swiss chard..or better still, steamed baby beets and greens.
Next on My listis Digby scallops..just butter, lightly pan fried and a salad. Then there are mussels, steamed in beer and eaten. That's it.
Nova Scotia lobster is the best I have eaten but I can rarely afford it but when I do treat myself..it is steamed, dipped in lemon butter and savoured..Ohh I am getting hungry.
Great thread, I am about to copy some of the recipes. Thanks all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:31 AM

According to old legend, carrying a peeled potato in the pocket can cure toothache, whilst wearing a dried potato around the neck helps rheumatism.
From Null Hypothesis, the Journal of unlikely science.

http://www.null-hypothesis.co.uk/article/443


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Ed T
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 10:07 AM

Maybe a dodgy mussel is one that is dead (shell open). I agree never eat a dead marine mollusk, as they spoil very quickly (and you do not know how long they were deceased). If you tap them they will close the shell if still alive.

Mussels (cultured) in the market are pretty safe. Safe also are oysters, which are harvested and held in certified water areas to cleanse any potentially bad stuff.

As for wild mussels (rare as they may be),and soft shelled clams, one should beware. Though areas are closed, some bad folks still harvest and sell them. There is mostly no certification process for sellers. If you harvest them yourself, or know where they come from...this limits the risk. If they are depurated no problem also.

A main health hazards are fecal cholorform, from animal waste. Residential, recreational and agricultural run off is normally the source, which is injested by the clam. You normally get flu like symptoms, that will pass (no pun intended). Some folks are less bothered by exposure (I suspect like the folks in Mexico who can drink local water without impact). No long term concerns, except if your immune system is already weak.

Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP, or red tide) is a potent neurotoxin. It accumulates in prone areas during warm periods. You will be hospitalized and if you survive, there are no long-term impacts.

However, there are also a couple of other naturally occurring toxins (for example Domoic acid, also a neurotoxin ) that can cause long term brain damage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Bee
Date: 14 Sep 08 - 12:23 AM

But, Beer, will you sleep?

>;-D


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 11:53 PM

Thanks Bobad.
Now I can go to bed.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 11:42 PM

Ya gets a bowl of mussels what have been steamed in a Mariniere sauce like what has been previously described and a side dish of French fries along with a bowl of mayonnaise into which ya dips yer fries. Some freshly baked baguette with which to sop the juices and a nice white wine or a cold beer with which to wash it all down with. Bon appetit!


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 11:34 PM

So your saying that you go up or ask for a dish of steamed mussels and throw in some fries as well? I want to know about how the mussels are served. Are they steamed or otherwise?
If you ask for Poutine, you don't get fries and cheese on the side.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 11:25 PM

Fries on the side like with a hamburger or a couple of steamies.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Beer
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 11:20 PM

Bobad that recipe is a saver. Thank you kindly.

Now. I would still like to know how the mussel's are served in Quebec with fries. I have had deep fried clams to murmurous to mention. Steamed, in chowders and in omelet's. But mussels only steamed I have only had steamed. How do they serve them with Fries?


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: bobad
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 10:08 PM

Beer, they are usually prepared in a manner somewhat similar to this recipe:

Moules Marinières
serves 4

extra virgin olive oil
1 shallot, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 cup dry white wine
3 pounds live mussels, rinsed and debearded just before cooking
handful of chopped fresh parsley
black pepper

Warm the olive oil in a large stockpot over medium low heat.
Sauté the shallot and garlic until translucent.
Add the wine and boil until reduced slightly.
Add the mussels, cover, and cook, shaking the pan occasionally, until the mussels open, then cook for an additional minute.
Remove from the heat, evenly divide the mussels among 4 shallow soup bowls, sprinkle with parsley and black pepper, and pour the cooking juices over all.
Serve immediately.


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Subject: RE: BS: Fish
From: Bee
Date: 13 Sep 08 - 09:31 PM

Most of the mussels we eat are farmed not far away. The wild ones tend to be very gritty and have too much 'beard'. Most people who eat wild mussels hang them in clear seawater off the wharf in hopes they will clear a lot of the grit before being cooked.

Yes 'dodgy' is a scary word, but in fact works fairly well if you are familiar with what a good normal mussel (or clam) looks like, as long as you didn't get them from a zone restricted for disease.

The most dangerous aspect of cooking clams and mussels is ignorance. Every mollusc related intestinal disaster I've witnessed began with a cook who couldn't tell a dead clam from a live one. If they are open a bit and don't close when touched, they are dead. Don't cook them. As they cook, the shells open a little. If one doesn't open - don't eat it.


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