mudcat.org: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafeawe

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance

GUEST,arpeggio_road 18 Dec 07 - 04:55 PM
Davie_ 18 Dec 07 - 05:30 PM
M.Ted 18 Dec 07 - 06:13 PM
Jack Campin 18 Dec 07 - 06:58 PM
McGrath of Harlow 18 Dec 07 - 07:29 PM
katlaughing 18 Dec 07 - 07:58 PM
M.Ted 18 Dec 07 - 08:55 PM
GUEST,van lingle 18 Dec 07 - 09:52 PM
katlaughing 18 Dec 07 - 10:58 PM
katlaughing 18 Dec 07 - 11:02 PM
Rowan 18 Dec 07 - 11:49 PM
Jack Campin 19 Dec 07 - 06:49 AM
GUEST,HughM 19 Dec 07 - 08:00 AM
katlaughing 19 Dec 07 - 10:39 AM
Jack Campin 19 Dec 07 - 10:59 AM
GUEST,arpeggio_road 19 Dec 07 - 01:09 PM
M.Ted 19 Dec 07 - 01:53 PM
Richard Bridge 19 Dec 07 - 02:20 PM
katlaughing 19 Dec 07 - 03:00 PM
Jack Campin 19 Dec 07 - 03:33 PM
GUEST,Volgadon 19 Dec 07 - 04:05 PM
alison 20 Dec 07 - 02:35 AM
GUEST,Volgadon 20 Dec 07 - 11:31 AM
manitas_at_work 20 Dec 07 - 12:19 PM
lady penelope 20 Dec 07 - 03:20 PM
Brendy 20 Dec 07 - 03:26 PM
Arpeggio Road 27 Dec 07 - 09:57 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:




Subject: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,arpeggio_road
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 04:55 PM

This is going to seem like an odd request, but then again it stems from an odd idea! My friend is a bellydancer who wants me to sing, unaccompanied except for a dumbek, for her dancing in an upcoming show. Unfortunately, my voice is best suited for folk or Celtic tunes and not Arabic or rock, per se. Having seen bellydancers dance to Celtic music before, I know this fusion does work, but they all have danced to instrumentals.

I had thought about doing Celtic "mouth-music" songs (aka "Celtic Rap" to this American :) ), but am not entirely knowledgeable about what is out there in that subgenre. That's really the only thought I've had so far. Most songs I know are moderate to ballad speed. ;)

Are there any suggestions of upbeat, acapella songs which seem to work well or might work well for bellydance (or dance, in general, even)? Any artists that you all would recommend I listen to?

Many thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Davie_
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 05:30 PM

mm try The Rocky road to Dublin


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: M.Ted
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 06:13 PM

Just remember one thing,--the dancer follows the dumbek--if you follow the dumbek with whatever song you choose to sing, you will at least survive this novel experience. Throw the dumbek off, and you'll be on the rocks--


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Jack Campin
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 06:58 PM

Western Anatolia is ethnically Celtic, so just use a sirto or zeybek dance song.

If you want to drop the "Celtic" bullshit and rephrase the question, maybe I could suggest something from the Scottish repertoire. (I have played for bellydancers).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 07:29 PM

Eileen Og, or King of the Fairies


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: katlaughing
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 07:58 PM

No need to get nasty to a nicely asking guest, Jack.

Mudcatter Aine would be a good one to ask this of since she does both the music and the bellydancing. I owe her a phone call anyway, so will see what she recommends.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: M.Ted
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 08:55 PM

It's Christmas, Jack, give it a rest.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,van lingle
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 09:52 PM

Check out recordings by The House Band (now defunct, I believe)and some early Planxty.
A slip jig called The Butterfly sounds good with a Middle Eastern tinge. Good luck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: katlaughing
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 10:58 PM

Seems something that has been done with medieval-type early music:

youtube

Here's one done to a bagpipe: click

and just for fun, Sadie bellydances.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: katlaughing
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 11:02 PM

There's an interesting mix of music and movements in this one even though the video isn't very good quality.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Rowan
Date: 18 Dec 07 - 11:49 PM

There are many tunes like the ones listed above but, if I understand your question correctly, you're looking for songs.

Elsie Marley and The cuckoo's nest are two that come to mind that have been used instrumentally for bellydancing but which could be sung without melody instruments.

Cheers, Rowan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 06:49 AM

Perhaps the OP could get back to us saying what they actually *do* sing, if the music of a Celtic people which is routinely used for bellydancing and related dance forms is unacceptable.

What I had in mind was music involving a change of time signature, since virtuslly all bellydance routines include that. The Gay Gordons in Scottish ceilidh dancing often starts in 2/4 and switches to 6/8. Some of those tunes have words, but I'd have to think a bit to come up with suitable ones. Similarly it would be possible to come up with sung versions of the Scottish slow air/march/strathspey/reel medley form, which also has enough rhythmic variety.

But I'd guess the OP may well find Scottish music just as unacceptable as Anatolian (and if their normal repertoire is Irish ballads they certainly won't be able to sing in strathspey time). Unless they say explicitly, it's impossible to tell what somebody really means by that "Celtic" bollocks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,HughM
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 08:00 AM

Eileen Og is in the database as Pride of Petrovar, with related threads. I thought it should have been the Pride of Petravore.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: katlaughing
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 10:39 AM

Jack, why do you say the OP doesn't accept Scottish or Anatolian? Seems you've got your back up for nothing but the "Celtic" reference which you've already gone on about.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 10:59 AM

The OP hasn't shown any apparent interest in any of the suggestions offered. A response would get a serious answer.

Seems a bit troll-ish.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,arpeggio_road
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 01:09 PM

Thanks so much for the responses so far - they have been spectacularly helpful! I'll be looking these all up and trying them. I apologize for not being able to respond to everyone's post in a more timely manner, but I have limited access to the internet at home and can only use the internet at work during the lunch hour.

katlaughing: I am eager to hear what Aine says. If you feel that it is more proper that I also e-mail, i can certainly do that as well.

To Jack and others who might be wondering: This "OP" is obviously very new to all of this (posting to a forum, music, etc.). I'm afraid I don't know much about what is the proper way to term certain types of music, and I certainly didn't mean to offend! :( Most of my musical knowledge (limited thought it is) concerns European medieval and Baroque music and American Broadway/Songbook standards (and that might not even be the right descriptions for them! :)).

When I hear what is broadly termed "Celtic" music on American radio, it usually refers music from the Scottish, Irish, Welsh, Canadian/Nova Scotian, and Briton countries/regions (and American copycats of the style :)). Since I have no preference to music from any particular region, I used what I considered a generic term, hoping that people would forgive my naivete.

Any suggestions people have is fine and I'll try singing anything once! :) My only concern with Arabic region music is singing it wrong, especially with the quarter-tones and the pronunciation. Of course, I might run into the same thing with Irish/Scottish/Welsh/Briton music, as well, I suppose. :( Otherwise, I like Arabic region music quite a bit. I apologize if I gave anyone the wrong impression. Also, the lady who asked me to sing for her specifically wanted something "different, like Irish music or something." So, here I am posting this odd question! ;)

I will try checking again when I get home from work. Thanks again for all of the suggestions so far!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: M.Ted
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 01:53 PM

Jack is referring to the fact that ancient Gallacia, in the center of Anatolia, was so called because of it's conquest and occupation by Gaulic warriors. Gauls having been Celts. These were, of course, the Galatians of St. Paul, and later, St. Jerome.

It is presumed that the Galatians, along with their language and culture, were assimilated into the indigenous population over the millenia, and, that being the case, Anatolian dances of any sort could be considered Celtic.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 02:20 PM

There are plenty of English who object to being called celtic, and regrettably the expression "Celtic" in description of a type of music often seems to involve a fiddle and a bodhran in a race to see who can finish first.

I would really have thought that to provide rhythm for a middle eastern dance, one ought to use middle eastern music. Irish and American tunes and songs for Morris dance offend me too!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: katlaughing
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 03:00 PM

Thanks for the clarification, arpeggio road. I have left a message for Aine. If she gets back to me, I will post whatever she might suggest.

If you join the Mudcat, (it's free!)you will be able to communicate with members by Personal Message known as "PMs" and access other areas such as Memebers Photos and Info. With limited access, it would take less of your time as you wouldn't have to type in your user name every time you post. That IS greatly appreciated by the way. We really encourage "guests" to use a consistent name.

As to "Celtic" there are endless discussions on here about that, if you care to read more.;-)

kat


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Jack Campin
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 03:33 PM

One idea I had was using children's songs - things like "Wha Saw the Forty-Second", "Katie Bairdie",
"One, Two, Three-a-Leerie", "I Had a Sausage", "In and Out the Dusty Bluebells", "Mactavish Is Dead and His Brother Don't Know It" - try Ewan McVicar's new book for lots of these. The advantage is they're quite short, rhythmically varied, and nobody will think you're taking yourself too seriously.

Or a very fast comic song like "McGinty's Meal and Ale" or "Mary Mack" (or "The Rocky Road to Dublin", already mentioned, but that rhythm is never used in Middle Eastern music).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,Volgadon
Date: 19 Dec 07 - 04:05 PM

Well, as what I think most Westerners consider bellydancing is rather different from the stuff I've seen performed at traditional weddings and the like, you might as well try a 'Celtic' song.
"Dacw Nghariad" is a good Welsh song, it might work.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: alison
Date: 20 Dec 07 - 02:35 AM

have a listen to Loreena McKennitt - there are some good "Celtic - bellydance" tpe tunes on "The Mask & the Mirror" - we used to dance to them

slainte

alison


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: GUEST,Volgadon
Date: 20 Dec 07 - 11:31 AM

That is true, I really liked her arrangement of God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: manitas_at_work
Date: 20 Dec 07 - 12:19 PM

"expression "Celtic" in description of a type of music often seems to involve a fiddle and a bodhran in a race to see who can finish first"

You let the bodhran finish first and then while he's at the bar getting the pints in you can play the last few bars at the proper speed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: lady penelope
Date: 20 Dec 07 - 03:20 PM

Maith Music would work for up tempo dances, but you can belly dance to anything including waltzes. Often you want a 'kick' in the beat (a syncopation or odd time) for belly dancing, but there are plenty of reels in maith music (it is, after all, pipe music sung)and other bits and pieces that might serve.

There's a song by Annie Lennox called Primitive off her Diva album. Not folk music, but it could easily be sung with just a dumbek along for rhythm. It would be suitable for a veil dance or anything with fine control dancing.

I'd suggest getting a few pieces together and going through it with you dancer friend and if possible the dumbek player. A simple syncopation to a 4/4 tune could easily provide you what you're looking for.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Brendy
Date: 20 Dec 07 - 03:26 PM

The Well Below The Valley ala Planxty has that 'Eastern' feel to it, and given the subject of the song, I think it would probably work well interpreted by Bellydance.

Van Lingle mentioned The Bothy Band's 'The Butterfly'. Good tune for it as well. 'The Maids Of Michelstown' (Out of the wind into the sun album) also comes to mind.

B.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tune Req: Celtic tunes suitable for bellydance
From: Arpeggio Road
Date: 27 Dec 07 - 09:57 AM

Thank you all so much for your help in finding tunes! I will definitely research them all in more detail.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 14 December 8:29 AM EST

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.