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WWII songs

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Vixen 16 Apr 99 - 03:16 PM
16 Apr 99 - 03:45 PM
Bert 16 Apr 99 - 04:14 PM
Joe Offer 16 Apr 99 - 04:24 PM
Art Thieme 16 Apr 99 - 04:34 PM
LEJ 16 Apr 99 - 05:25 PM
jofield 16 Apr 99 - 06:54 PM
Tiger 16 Apr 99 - 06:54 PM
Shack 16 Apr 99 - 07:09 PM
Ferrara 16 Apr 99 - 09:59 PM
John Hindsill 16 Apr 99 - 10:24 PM
SeanM 17 Apr 99 - 01:10 AM
alison 18 Apr 99 - 02:49 AM
AndyG 18 Apr 99 - 07:49 AM
Bud 18 Apr 99 - 09:08 AM
Tucker 19 Apr 99 - 05:33 AM
Alan B 19 Apr 99 - 05:42 AM
19 Apr 99 - 06:27 AM
Ferrara 19 Apr 99 - 06:37 AM
Reta 19 Apr 99 - 06:38 AM
Vixen 19 Apr 99 - 08:28 AM
Tiger 19 Apr 99 - 10:17 AM
Jerry Friedman 19 Apr 99 - 11:05 AM
bey 19 Apr 99 - 02:19 PM
Gene 19 Apr 99 - 02:36 PM
LEJ 19 Apr 99 - 03:02 PM
Lion 19 Apr 99 - 03:07 PM
Reta 19 Apr 99 - 04:23 PM
Pete M 19 Apr 99 - 04:42 PM
Dale Rose 19 Apr 99 - 05:22 PM
Henrik W. 20 Apr 99 - 12:48 PM
Ferrara 20 Apr 99 - 02:12 PM
bet 20 Apr 99 - 05:11 PM
Tucker 20 Apr 99 - 08:37 PM
Night Owl 20 Apr 99 - 11:09 PM
Gene 21 Apr 99 - 12:06 AM
Pete M 21 Apr 99 - 12:26 AM
Dale Rose 21 Apr 99 - 02:21 AM
Tucker 21 Apr 99 - 03:57 AM
Joe Offer 21 Apr 99 - 04:41 AM
Pete M 21 Apr 99 - 07:28 AM
Steve Parkes 21 Apr 99 - 08:00 AM
Ferrara 21 Apr 99 - 04:34 PM
Vixen 21 Apr 99 - 05:13 PM
Pete M 21 Apr 99 - 09:40 PM
Max 22 Apr 99 - 10:36 AM
Ferrara 22 Apr 99 - 12:16 PM
Penny 22 Apr 99 - 01:44 PM
Reta 22 Apr 99 - 03:58 PM
bert 24 Apr 99 - 02:07 PM
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Subject: WWII songs
From: Vixen
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 03:16 PM

D'Cats--

I just found out that VicTim will be playing an Elderhostel gig in June. Last year, the theme of the Elderhostel was 19th and 20th c. immigration, and we played background music at a "tea-party" which was a reenactment of a wealthy woman's garden tea with Irish immigrant servant girls. The group that did the reenactment calls themselves "The Irish Biddies" and Tim and I played a bunch of Irish tunes on fiddle, hammered dulcimer, and recorder. It was fun for us and the seniors *loved* it.

This year, the theme is WWII. I have no idea what the lunch will be like, but we'd like to have some popular tunes from the WWII era for the Seniors sing along to if they wish. If you have any suggestions, let me know titles and possible sources for the lyrics and music. If you don't know where I can find the music, just let me know titles and I'll try to find lyrics and music.

Thank You All in Advance--

V


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From:
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 03:45 PM

(There'll Be Bluebirds Over) The White Cliffs of Dover
When The Lights Go On Again All Over The World
Rosie The Riveter
Don't Sit Under The Apple Tree (With Anyone Else But Me)
I'll Be Seeing You
Deep In The Heart Of Texas
Don't Fence Me In
Swinging on a Star
Mairzy Doats
Pistol Packin' Mama
Dance with a Dolly
Sentimental Journey
Empty Chair at the Christmas Table
There's A Gold Star In Her Window
Chattanooga Choo Choo
Rum and Coca Cola
In The Mood
It's Been A Long, Long Time


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Bert
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 04:14 PM

Bless 'em All
D-Day Dodgers and/or it's parent Lili Marlene
Various parodies on Colonel Bogey
When They Sound the Last All Clear
Follow the white line
Lionel Bart had some good songs in his musical "Blitz" The only one that come to mind at the moment though is "Duty Calls"
George Formby did dozens, Again I can't recall any specific ones but a web search might find them.

Bert.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 04:24 PM

As Time Goes By
We'll always have Paris, Rick," she said, and walked off toward the plane.....
(well, maybe it's not an exact quote)
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Art Thieme
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 04:34 PM

"White Cliffs Of Dover"---I used to do it with banjo...

"Franklin Roosevelt told the people how he felt,
We damn near believed what he said,
Said, I hate war and so does Eleanor,"
But we won't be safe 'til everybody's dead."-------From The Almanac Singers Pete singin' lead...

See the song I posted here quite recently "Beneath A Bridge In Sicily".

Art


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: LEJ
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 05:25 PM

Tuxedo Junction,
Deep Purple,
Unchained Melody,
She wore a Yellow Ribbon


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: jofield
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 06:54 PM

God, those were great songs! '38 - '45 was really the high-point in American and British popular music, when the best musicians were also the ones selling the most records. I saw a documentary -- probably the World At War -- with a clip of George Formby surrounded by troops playing the uke and singing a song about the Maginot Line -- very cute.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Tiger
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 06:54 PM

Vixen....

I do a 2-song WWI-WWII medley, with 2 songs which may have been the most popular and tear-producing war-related songs of these two periods:

Till We Meet Again
Lili Marlene

I'd recommend the Clancy Brothers version of Lili if you can find it.

.....Tiger


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Shack
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 07:09 PM

I don't know if this is rightfully a WWII song or a song ABOUT WWII, but how about ...

FRAULEIN (1957)

"As my memory wanders away over yonder,
down by the old river Rhine,
where I loved her and left her
and now can't forget her,
She was my pretty fraulein."
(chorus)
"Fraulein, fraulein, go down by the water,
just as the stars start to shine.
By the same stars above you, I swear that I love you.
You are my pretty fraulein."


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Subject: Lyr Add: STARS AND STRIPES ON IWO JIMA^^
From: Ferrara
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 09:59 PM

We had a 78 RPM record of this one. I don't know how many people would know it, though. It wasn't a big hit but it was a hit in our family right after the war.


STARS AND STRIPES ON IWO JIMA
Written by Bob Wills, ©1945
As recorded by Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys

When the Yanks raised the Stars and Stripes on Iwo Jima isle,
Through the blood and tears they won through.
Bless the heart of each Yankee there on Iwo Jima Isle,
Resting 'neath the blanket of blue.
High on the hill of Suribachi,
Waves Old Glory and she always will.
When the Yanks raised the Stars and Stripes on Iwo Jima isle,
There were tears in their hearts though they smiled.

[The following verse is sung by The Sons of the Pioneers; it is not on Wills' recording:]

When the Yanks raised the stars and stripes on Iwo Jima isle
Ev'ry heart could sing once again
And the sight of Old Glory over Iwo Jima Isle
Swelled the hearts of our fighting men.
Long will it wave o'er the hilltop
As a symbol of heroes who died.
When the Yanks raised the stars and stripes on Iwo Jima isle,
There were tears in their hearts though they smiled.


If anyone wants the tune, say so. I'm about halfway through typing it into Noteworthy Composer, but I'll have to get Bill's help in posting it. - Rita F


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: John Hindsill
Date: 16 Apr 99 - 10:24 PM

Others to add:

Comin' in on a Wing and a Prayer
The Ballad of Rodger Young
A Walk in the Sun - Earl Robinson

Delete from previous lists "Unchained Melody". This song was written as the title song for the movie "Unchained" in the mid-1950s. What! You've never heard of it? It was a prison story starring Elroy 'Crazylegs' Hirsch of LA Ram football fame. The co-star was 40's band singer Johnny Johnston; he was asked to sing the song over the titles, but declined because he wanted to take his career in another direction. Bad choice...the movie tanked, the song was a monster hit. JJ's career moved to hosting a Friday night bowling on the tele.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: SeanM
Date: 17 Apr 99 - 01:10 AM

Not to throw in a dissonant note here, but earlier it was mentioned that the WWII period was the high point in American and British music...

I'd like to voice the opinion that there was just as much chaff among the gems as there always has been... time has just preserved the ones we enjoy. In another 30-40 years, people will look back on the 80s and 90s and bemoan 'why can't we have music like we had then!'

M


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: alison
Date: 18 Apr 99 - 02:49 AM

Don't know if they were WWI or WWII... but have used them in this sort of thing for old folks..

Keep the campfires burning
roll out the barrel
(pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and) smile, smile, smile
It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary (makes a good medley with the previous two)

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: AndyG
Date: 18 Apr 99 - 07:49 AM

alison,

(Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag ang) Smile, Smile, Smile & It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary are both WWI, Roll out the Barrel is, I think, WWII. Don't know the other song, but Keep the Home Fires Burning is WWI.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Bud
Date: 18 Apr 99 - 09:08 AM

These were popular during the War, I am not sure when they were first composed

Amapola
Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar
Chattanooga Choo Choo
Woodpecker's song
Maria Elena
Elmer's tune
Deep in the Heart of Texas
I've got a gal in Kalamazoo
Tangerine
As time goes by
Don't Fence Me In
I'll Walk Alone
Chickery Chick
Till the end of time
G.I. Jive
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (of Company B)
Jersey Bounce
Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition
Don't sit under the apple tree

White Christmas and Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer are also frrom this era, but unless your performance is in December, may not be seasonally appropriate.

Thanks for the nostalgia!!

Bud


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Tucker
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 05:33 AM

We'll meet again, don't know where, don't know when but I know it will be some sunny day...... I don't know if that's the same one mentioned earlier by Tiger but it's a tear jerker and a moving song


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Alan B
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 05:42 AM

It may be WW1, not 2, but try this.
A few years ago at a school concert we (the audience) were split into two groups.

One group were asked to sing "(Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag) and smile, smile smile" chorus.

Then the second group sang "It's a long, long way to Tipperary" chorus.

Finally, the two were brought together, with Tipperary as a counterpoint to Pack up your troubles. It worked really well.

f you want to try it, start singing

Its a Long way, and "Pack" starts on the same beat as the word "Long"

No idea if the same would work with the verses, but might be fun trying

Alan B


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From:
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 06:27 AM

I agree with Tiger in his choice but add "I'll Walk Alone". You can find the words and melody for We'll Meet Again and Lili Marlene and the melody only for I'll Walk Alone at Song Lyrics Archive

http://ingeb.org/folksong.html

I know the lyrics to I'll Walk Alone if you need them.

Blessings Reta


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Ferrara
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 06:37 AM

You can also sing all four service theme songs together: Anchors Aweigh, Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder, The Caissons Go Rolling Along and the Marines Hymn (from the halls of Montezuma...). I'll admit this is probably not something you'll want to do.

I saw it done with about 80 people in the audience. The leader made up big newsprint song sheets for each song, divided the audience into four groups, practiced each song once and let 'er rip. A good time was had by all.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Reta
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 06:38 AM

Hi again!

This site will give all the top recordings and lyrics of the great wars.

http://www.summer.com.br/~pfilho/html/top1/index.html

Blessings Reta


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Vixen
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 08:28 AM

WOW!!!

Once again, the Mudcats are the BEST! I wish the rest of the world ran this way!

I just got in on Monday morning, and read the postings from the weekend!

Thank you all! Tim and I are going to have a blast with this one!

(if anybody needs an exclamation point, help yourself to some of mine!!!!)

V


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Tiger
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 10:17 AM

My suggested WWI song was not We'll Meet Again, but rather Till We Meet Again. The one where the chorus begins:

"Smile the while you kiss me sad adieu."

....Tiger


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Jerry Friedman
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 11:05 AM

Is "I'll Walk Alone" different from "You'll Never Walk Alone"? (YNWA is from the right time.)

Is the George Formby song about the Maginot Line "We're Gonna Hang Out the Washing on the Siegfried Line"?

"Roll out the Barrel", aka "The Beer Barrel Polka", was popular in Britain in 1939-40 and also in the U.S. in 1940, before the U.S. entered the war. According to The Timetables of History,, where I'm getting all this information, it's of Czech origin.

Another (and very moving) one from 1940 is "The Last Time I Saw Paris".

"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" is a few years later.

Oklahoma is from 1942. You probably don't need me to suggest "People will Say we're in Love" as a duet, Vixen.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: bey
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 02:19 PM

Vixen, just found a few minutes to check the mudcat. I've been going through Mom's music and have many, many differnt WWII song sheets and books. I'll get them out when I get home and send the ones that are not already listed. (I'm at school now, lunch time and lunch is dumb today). It always amazes me the number of songs that come up when someone asks for something. Later, bet


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Subject: Lyr Add: EMPTY CHAIR AT THE CHRISTMAS TABLE^^
From: Gene
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 02:36 PM

Here's a couple of other WWII songs...

EMPTY CHAIR AT THE CHRISTMAS TABLE
words and music by Bob Wills, Cliff Sundin and "Cactus Jack" Cliff Johnsen, ©1945.
As recorded by Bob Wills

There's an empty chair at the table
And a light on the Christmas tree.
And a story's told by a star of gold
And a light on the Christmas tree.
Bless all the angels up in heaven.
May they watch o'er him oh, so tenderly.
There's an empty chair at the table
And a light on a Christmas tree.

Heads bowed in prayer to ask His blessing
For that one still so dear to you and me,
There's an empty chair at the table
And a light on a Christmas tree.


WHITE CROSS ON OKINAWA
words and music by Bob Wills, Cliff Sundin and "Cactus Jack" Cliff Johnsen, ©1945.
As recorded by Bob Wills

There's a white cross tonight on Okinawa
Under skies of blue, worldly cares are through
High above waves the old star-spangled banner
In his memory, she'll be true.
Some mother's heart knows the sorrow
Silently her prayers cross the foam
There's a white cross tonight on Okinawa
And gold star in some mother's home.

Some mother's heart knows the sorrow
Silently her prayers cross the foam
There's a white cross tonight on Okinawa
And gold star in some mother's home.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: LEJ
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 03:02 PM

Vixen...be careful when you mention Oklahoma . You'll get Catspaw started up on his x-rated parodies again.

My Dad always loved "Lili Marlene", even though it came from the German side in the war.

Was wondering how many World War II vets visit the Mudcat?


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Lion
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 03:07 PM

Hey! LEJ your phone is busy. I know you're enjoying the thread but I gotta talk to you!!!!xxxx


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Reta
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 04:23 PM

Hi all!

Yes, I'll Walk Alone is a different song than You'll Never Walk Alone. It's very lovely and sentimental. I believe a singer by the name of Jane Froman made the popular recording.

I heard a story about Lili Marlene many years ago but don't know how true it is. It was said that Hitler commissioned the writing of that song to honor his love for his niece. Later, when he confessed his love to her she rebuffed him & he had her killed. As I said, I don't know if it's true or not. If anyone knows I would like to hear about it. I always considered it to be one of the greatest songs of ww2, as did most of the world at that time. Blessings Reta


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Pete M
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 04:42 PM

Reta, it hardly seems likely since the song is about a prostitute; but "Lili" is undoubtedly the defining song of WWII. There are many recorded instances of both sides singing it together, in hospitals, cages, and across no mans land.

One other popular song not yet mentioned is "Coming in on a wing and a prayer". Then of course you could start on the folk songs.

Ferrara "..theme songs of the services???" Sheesh! As they say 'Only in America'!

Pete M


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Dale Rose
Date: 19 Apr 99 - 05:22 PM

I recently purchased The Best of Dolores Keane, in which she sings a nice version of Lili Marlene (in English). No indication in the notes as to why the Irish lady chose that particular song.

The defining version, of course, is that of Lale Andersen. You can find a clip of her version (cut #7) at tunes.com, along with many other songs on the CD VE Day, 50th Anniversary Musical Memories. At 31 songs for $10.99, it is a real bargain. It contains segments of speeches, as well as songs from several countries, not just the United States.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Henrik W.
Date: 20 Apr 99 - 12:48 PM

Two really good songs _about_ WWII are

a) "51st Highland Division's Farewell to Sicily"
by Hamish Henderson (who was with the 51st HD, when
they were stationed on Sicily).

b) "The Beaches of St. Valery" by Davy Steele of
Battlefield Band - incidentally this song is also
about the 51st Highlanders.

Cheers

Henrik


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Ferrara
Date: 20 Apr 99 - 02:12 PM

This may be WWII - at least my mom sang it a lot when I was a kid and it has that sort of feeling... don't know the title but chorus went, "I'll hold you in my heart Til I can hold you in my arms, Darling, please wait for me."


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: bet
Date: 20 Apr 99 - 05:11 PM

I went through some of Mom's music last night and came up with a few that are probably WWII. If you need melodies I have the music, let me know. A few have already been mentioned.

Coming In On A Wing and a Prayer
I'm Gettin' Sentimental Over You
I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts
Stars and Stripes on Iwo Jima
The White Cliffs of Dover
Candy
Bell Bottom Trousers
Soldier's Last Letter
There'll Be A Hot Time in the Town of Berlin (When the Yanks Go Marching In)
Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition
Six Lessons from Madam La Zonga
When the Lights Go On Again (All Over the World)
A Little on the Lonely Side
Paper Doll

Also have a military book with patriotic songs in it if you want a list of those songs. It's called "Army, Navy, Marines" and has songs like:

Twenty-One Dollars a Day, Once a Month
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy
When Private Brown Becomes a Captain

and if I remember right about 30 to 40 more such songs. I'd be glad to share any you might be able to use.

bet


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Tucker
Date: 20 Apr 99 - 08:37 PM

It appears there are good things that come from bad things...even war. Tiger, I think we are talking about two different songs and Henrik answered a question I was wondering about. "Banks of Sicily". I remember it being on the radio or sung to me vaguely, but the Chad Mitchell Trio brought it home to me somewhere around 1962.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Night Owl
Date: 20 Apr 99 - 11:09 PM

Mom, (89yrs. old & former USO Hostess during WWII) says she remembers a song called "The Hut Hut Song" playing a lot on the jukebox at the USO....said it was a fun song to sing & dance to, but doesn't remember the words.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Gene
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 12:06 AM

It was the Hut Sut Song...Andrew Sisters for one...


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Pete M
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 12:26 AM

Dale, "..the defining version ..(of Lili Marlene)..is that of Lale Andersen"??? Surely you jest.

Never Heard of Marlene Dietrich?

Pete M


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Subject: Origins: Lili Marlene (Lili Marleen)
From: Dale Rose
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 02:21 AM

OK, here I am after an hour or so of research. Lili Marlene (also Lili Marleen)was written by Hans Leip as a poem in 1915. Apparently he had two friends named Lili and Marleen, and it was their names which inspired the title. It was published in a book of poetry in 1937 and was set to music by the composer Norbert Schultze in 1938. Cabaret singer Lale Andersen started singing the song soon after, and recorded it on 2 Aug 39. It made little impression until 1941, when a copy of her recording began to get airplay on a radio station for German soldiers. It was an immediate hit among the soldiers of many nations, and reportedly has since been translated into 48 languages. The Fassbinder film, Lili Marlene in 1980 is a highly fictionalized account of Lale Anderson's life, quite loosely based on her biography from the accounts I read.

Despite looking reasonably diligently, I was unable to come up with a date for Marlene Dietrich's recording, but I think you would have to assume that it was no earlier than 1941. I don't think there is any question as to the fact that her version was better known and much more frequently played in the United States, and perhaps most of the Allied countries as well, though that is just my assumption.

One thing is certain, without Lale Andersen, there almost certainly would be no Marlene Dietrich version. As to which is better or "more" definitive, I guess that is just a matter of opinion.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Tucker
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 03:57 AM

Jeez, the things you learn on these threads! Thx Dale, nice info.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Joe Offer
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 04:41 AM

Well, Pete, I'm not ready to believe "Lili Marlene" is about a prostitute, any more than I believe the Hitler story. I've heard the prostitute story before, but I've never heard anything to make me think it's factual. It's such a nice, sweet song. I think it's true love. Can you prove otherwise?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Pete M
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 07:28 AM

Dale, I couldn't find a date for the Dietrich recording either, so pax eh? Joe, no I can't prove it one way or the other, just passing on what I was told. Like Dale I tracked the song back to the Leip poem, but have no further info on who the subject(s) were or Leips' relationship with her/them.

Pete M


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Steve Parkes
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 08:00 AM

Jerry, George Formby's song goes "Imagine me in the Maginot Line/Sitting on a mine on the Maginot Line/Sergeant says I'm doing fine..." and I can't remember any more (mercifully!). The other song goes:

CHORUS: We're Gonna Hang Out the Washing on the Siegfried Line,
Have you any dirty washing, mother dear?
We're going to hang out the washing on the Siegfried Line,

'Cause the washing day is here.
Whether the weather may be wet or fine, we'll just rub along without a care.
We're going to hang out the washing on the Siegfried Line,
If the Siegfried Line's still there!"

VERSE: Mother dear, I'm writing you from somewhere in France,
Hoping to find you well.
Sergeant says I'm doing fine, a soldier and a half,
Aagh! I've forgotten the last line! Sorry! Somebody put us out of our misery?

There was a series of wartime cartoons called "Life in the B.E.F. - popular misconceptions", which had a great picture of Tommies stringing up lines between the guns and festooning them with washing, to the puzzlement of the German soldiers.

Steve

Complete lyrics can be found here.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Ferrara
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 04:34 PM

Pete M, So sorry to have offended, I know there is a generic name for the songs that I named above for the Army, Navy, etc, but was having a Senior Moment and couldn't think what it might be so I called them "Theme Songs." Actually it has turned into a Senior Week, because I still can't think for the generic name that would usually be used to refer to them although I'm fairly sure it exists.

Joe, I agree, based on the first verse of Lili Marlene, all I can remember right now, there's no reason to suppose that the song is about a prostitute. Maybe someone assumed that because they met under a lamppost outside the barracks and that was a common place for prostitutes to stand. On the other hand, the short parody of Lili Marlene given in the DT database *is* explicitly and hilariously about a prostitute.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Vixen
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 05:13 PM

Dear Ferarra,

If the Senior Moment lasts into June, you're welcome to come to the Elderhostel and sing along!!! In fact, regardless of how long the "moment" lasts, you're welcome to come sing along!!!

A friend of mine calls Senior Moments a symptom of "Sometimer's Disease", which you get before you get "AllTheTimer's Disease." I'm sure she's just a pessimist!

V


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Pete M
Date: 21 Apr 99 - 09:40 PM

Ferrara, no need to apologise, I wasn't offended, bemused would be nearer the mark. The thought of the armed services having thier own "theme" songs just seemed to me to be typically and idiosyncratically American. Although most forces have one or march tune associated with them, some of which may have had words set to them eg "Hearts of Oak", and "A life on the ocean Wave", for the RN and RM; I've never heard of anyone other than civilians singing them, and that only at the begining of the century.

Just don't keep going on about "senior moments" people will start thinking we are getting old, and I refuse to admit to more than 45.

Pete M


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Max
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 10:36 AM

Senior moments!! We call them CRS which stands for 'Can't Remember Sh**'. And they start ocurring at a much younger age than 45.
Bert. (Using Max's machine)


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Ferrara
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 12:16 PM

Yeah, Bert, I first heard about "CRS syndrome" when I was still in the hospital after my heart transplant. One of the support group members told me to expect it, most of the transplant recipients experience it. I've been thinking of making myself a t-shirt that says, "I've got CRS -- *C*an't *R*emember a Darned Thing!"

Pete M, "The Caissons Go Rolling Along" is from WWI and was widely sung by the infantry. A splendid song, it was probably published, but the guys took it up and it became popular in the same way that "Mademoiselle from Armentières" did. I don't know the history of the Marine Corps and Air Force anthems but I do know they're great, well written songs and very well known.

Vixen, (1) where is your ElderHostel going to be? and (2) I loved, loved the "SomeTimer's Disease" and "AllTheTimer's Disease" line! -- I do get an excessive number of senior moments, possibly due to the transplant, and there are times when a joke keeps it from becoming awkward. - Rita F


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Penny
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 01:44 PM

My Dad was in the Royal Engineers (Pioneer Corps) and he sang (sings) a song involving Upnor Hard (near Chatham, Kent), making fast a dinghy pontoon, marching on to Laffensplain (?spelling) and a Zulu warrior. I believe part of it has mutated into a rugby song. It is not to the Engineers march tune, I believe.


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: Reta
Date: 22 Apr 99 - 03:58 PM

Thank you for all the information Dale. Very interesting. I don't think she was a lady of the night either Joe. I think Marlene Dietrich may have sung it in "The Blue Angel". Will try to find out. Don't know the date of that movie but it was long, long ago.

Blessings Reta


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Subject: RE: WWII songs
From: bert
Date: 24 Apr 99 - 02:07 PM

Penny,

I might have known you'd have a song about an English place name.

Bert.


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