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Old Folkers

Bill@W.Aussie 01 Jan 99 - 11:33 AM
dwditty 01 Jan 99 - 11:43 AM
Liam's Brother 01 Jan 99 - 12:23 PM
Liam's Brother 01 Jan 99 - 12:27 PM
Sandy Paton 01 Jan 99 - 01:13 PM
Sandy Paton 01 Jan 99 - 01:16 PM
Animaterra 01 Jan 99 - 03:32 PM
Alice 01 Jan 99 - 04:10 PM
Alice 01 Jan 99 - 04:13 PM
clansfolk 01 Jan 99 - 04:18 PM
Bill D 01 Jan 99 - 05:37 PM
Helen 01 Jan 99 - 06:02 PM
Helen 01 Jan 99 - 06:09 PM
Alice 01 Jan 99 - 08:45 PM
52 zoo 01 Jan 99 - 09:52 PM
alison 01 Jan 99 - 11:27 PM
Big Mick 02 Jan 99 - 02:11 AM
Banjeray 02 Jan 99 - 07:58 AM
BAZ 02 Jan 99 - 10:31 AM
Jack mostly folk 02 Jan 99 - 10:47 AM
Sierra Willy 02 Jan 99 - 11:30 AM
folk1234 02 Jan 99 - 12:49 PM
Roger in Baltimore 02 Jan 99 - 05:04 PM
sharon 02 Jan 99 - 05:21 PM
Helen 02 Jan 99 - 05:34 PM
Dani 03 Jan 99 - 02:14 PM
Sandy Paton 03 Jan 99 - 02:45 PM
BSeed 04 Jan 99 - 01:38 AM
Roger in Baltimore 04 Jan 99 - 06:16 AM
04 Jan 99 - 03:55 PM
Bill@W.Aussie 05 Jan 99 - 07:16 AM
blt 03 Dec 00 - 08:04 PM
GUEST,bernielh@hotmail.com 03 Dec 00 - 08:34 PM
SINSULL 03 Dec 00 - 10:43 PM
Troll 03 Dec 00 - 11:05 PM
GUEST,Big Red 03 Dec 00 - 11:12 PM
GUEST,(Edgar A.)--a.k.a. Art Thieme 06 Dec 00 - 06:13 PM
RoyH (Burl) 07 Dec 00 - 03:46 PM
Sandy Paton 07 Dec 00 - 05:01 PM
ddw 07 Dec 00 - 10:24 PM
Mrs.Duck 08 Dec 00 - 04:34 AM
Mrs.Duck 08 Dec 00 - 04:35 AM
Geoff the Duck 08 Dec 00 - 04:48 AM
Cap't Bob 08 Dec 00 - 05:18 PM
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Subject: Old Folkers
From: Bill@W.Aussie
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 11:33 AM

Life is racing past me at Mach9 and a half. I still love to get out my Guitar and sing songs. In reality, I live on the edge of a desert, but as far as Folk Music goes I live in the middle of it. (Can't make a go of a Folk Club here.)(Trust me, I'm one of may who have tried.) Just wondered about other Mudcats. Do you ever stop being a Folkie and give your guitar to the grandkids and forget it? (Especially those who are in places where a Folk Club is a rarity.)

I'm intersested in your experieces.

Bill S.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: dwditty
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 11:43 AM

I somebody sang a folk song in the middle of the desert, would it make any sound?


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 12:23 PM

Must be hot there , Bill. What's the temperature at the edge of the desert?

As far as folk song clubs go, the best chance for a folk club is where they are a goodly number of people as I guess you know. I have a lot of folk club stories. When you have a folk club you get inclusionary and exclusionary problems such as "traditional music only," "American folk music only," "singer-songwriters only," What do you mean you don't hire Celtic kletzmer bands?" Could drive someone nuts. Maybe you're better off on your own.

I stopped singing for 14 years. Not even in the shower. I didn't sing in church either because I don't go to church. While I have some regrets about it now, they are not deep regrets. I needed to be at my desk bright-eyed and bushy-tailed every day until I could qualify for my pension. As soon as I did that, I started singing again... and here I am, tunefully retired.

Don't give your guitar away. If you want to be in the company of other singers, teach your grandchildren and get in the car every now and then and go someplace where they have a folk club. Change of scenery is good for you.

Happy birthday on 9MAR. I follow you 18 days later. Keep your chin up, Grandad!

All the best,
Dan


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 12:27 PM

Sorry, Bill, you said Mach 9, not March 9th. This is very fast. I thought things happened more slowly further from the city.

Anyway, have a nice birthday, whatever your sign.

All the best.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 01:13 PM

Hello, fellow grandpa:

Last night, my wife and I were booked for a "first Night" celebration in a city near where we live in rural peace. We had a fine audience of older people (who were forced to stand for the entire presentation due to a lack of seating -- an oversight of the local planning committee). It was bitter cold and windy, but folks came out anyway. When we invited them to join in on the choruses, they sang with enthusiasm -- songs they'd never heard before, usually, but with easily accessible choruses. We had a great time! Afterward, we were asked to sing at a local middle school and at a Rotary Club gathering. All this took place in a small city that does not have a folk club or coffeehouse of any kind.

I will be 70 next month, and my wife is just three years younger. We've been singing together for the 41 years of our marriage. We still love it, and thank our lucky stars that folk music is not a youth cult.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 01:16 PM

Ooops! Hit a wrong button, I guess.

The moral of the story is "keep the guitar, sing with the grandkids and anyone else willing to share a song, enjoy it, and pass it along."

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Animaterra
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 03:32 PM

As one who lived in a suburban wasteland for many years, I'm with Sandy- sing anyway! Of course, Sandy, not everyone has your particular spirit that gets us all singing, but I sang to myself, and listened to recordings, and traveled far to hear music, when no one around me wanted to listen. Lo and behold, after awhile people were actually asking me to sing, and to help them learn how to sing- maybe if you don't call it folk music, people who would otherwise stay away in droves might come and might find themselves singing along!


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 04:10 PM

Bill, You're Never Too Young To Sing.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 04:13 PM

oooops.... that should be Never Too OLD to Sing. (I'm getting old and absent minded.)


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: clansfolk
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 04:18 PM

I've been and old Folker for many a year and I've spent all me money on new strings and beer But I just keep singing whatever they say I've 3ven kept playing when they didn't pay

and it's no nay never no nay never no more I will never stop singing no never no more...

What about some decent verses to keep the song going?

Having played since I was eight and now I have the pleasure of playng in a group with my wife and son all I can say is - he better get his own guitars.... I'll keep playing mine!

All the best and sing well

Pete (Clansfolk)


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Bill D
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 05:37 PM

I have played and sung and listened to 'folkish' music for about 38 years now...ever since Pete Seeger sang at my college in the early 60's and I found EVERYONE singing along....including me! Since I never tried to be a serious performer, I made sure I would always have the music I wanted to hear. If I couldn't manage, I could but records of those who did, and I bought a LOT!...I still sing and play, though not as much as I used to, since other things are competing for time and energy...but the music is ALWAYS there; I could not imagine not having it around. I am fortunate to have lived since 1977 in Washington DC area, where I had lots of choices, but if I were condemned to some isolated spot for the rest of my life, I would have the music...and now, the Mudcat, to keep the juices flowing.

Since my 'craft' (woodturning) now demands a lot of my time, I was was interested a few years ago to see a definition of an 'artist' as "One who creates a supply, whether or not there is any demand"...and I think that sort of definition could well be used for 'musician' also...for some of us, there MUST be music, whether we make it or simply put the needle to the vinyl..(yes, I still play lots of those OLD ones!)

So, I urge anyone, even those not surrounded by it to look around..there are people making music everywhere, and you just might find, thru a church, school...etc...that there ARE a few doing the kind YOU like!....the effort is woth it!


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Helen
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 06:02 PM

Hi Bill S

I assume by your e-mail that you are in WA? I empathise with your predicament, and echo everyone else's comments. Don't give the guitar away. A friend of mine has been a folkie for a long time and has been travelling around the outback a fair bit over the last few years. he comes back with lots of country & western tunes which seem to fit okay with the rest of his traditional Oz music repertoire. He takes his guitar with him when he travels and I think he just sits in pubs or cafes and camping grounds and plays when the urge hits him. He has told us that lots of people come out of the woodowork and join in singing or playing.

So, maybe you can investigate the country music around your area and you might find enough similarity in the tunes and the lyrics to at least have some other people to play with, and maybe it is also worth thinking about just sitting somewhere public with your guitar and seeing if anyone else shows up who wants to join in. This is assuming that you are not way out on your own with no passers by at all :-)

Regards, Helen (Newcastle, NSW)


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Helen
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 06:09 PM

On another note: A few years ago I had an idea (but no resources to carry it out) about setting up an Old Folkies Home/Retirement Village. I think that my own personal nightmare of growing old is the possibility that I'll be trapped in a regular old folk's home with bingo players and carpet bowlers, being wheeled in to a concert of singers singing way off key, and playing out of tune fiddles, playing "We'll Meet Again" or something from the turn of this century (rather than Stairway to Heaven or a bit of Metallica?), and being patted on the head by a well-meaning young-un who says "you'll love this music, dear" and being left there, incapable of wheeling myself away from the aural torture.

It's be far better to set up an Old Folkies Home where the residents would sit around having sessions and Mudcat-type chats and *we* would be the ones going to other old folks homes to provide the music. Like one long folk festival for the rest of your life.

What do you reckon?

Helen


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 08:45 PM

That's interesting, Helen. My voice teacher works two mornings a week at the county old folks home. On her first day, there was an angry looking woman in a wheelchair in the hallway, and she was told, don't bother with her, she only speaks Italian. My teacher (who speaks 7 languages and was once married to a Sicilian opera singer) asked the woman what kind of music she liked. The woman snapped back something mean, and then was astounded when my teacher responded with some chiding Sicilian slang. Ever since then, she has been eager to listen to the music each week, and comes out of her room to listen, even though she never participated in group things before. There were patients in rooms where the staff had said, you don't need to go in there and sing, they are 'out of it'. Well, my teacher would go into every room, and now there are people responding to her singing that never responded to the staff.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: 52 zoo
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 09:52 PM

I shelved music for 25 years to work in the family resturant. Have been playing and writing again. No one should ever quit. At my present age of 52, I now feel 27 again. Never quit pluckin the strings.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: alison
Date: 01 Jan 99 - 11:27 PM

Hi,

I remember when I was a student nurse looking after an old lady who had a very bad stroke. Wiped out her ability to move and speak. The staff and relatives had written her off..... saying she was basically a vegetable.

We'll a friend and I were working with her one day and happened to be singing....... and she started to try to join in, so we started singing the "Show me the way to go home." She didn't get all the words but she sang enough of them. When her relatives came and saw, it changed their entire attitude, they started treating her like she was a human being again.

Don't give up your music... it can break through in a lot of situations. And if you can't sing with others.... go sing TO others.

slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Big Mick
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 02:11 AM

And now you know why I chase after the fair Alison, eh lads?

Helen, I love your idea, let me know where it is at and I will have myself committed straight away. We will call it "The Mudcat Manor".

I will never give up my music, when I am too old to make a decent chord on a guitar, I will sing sean nos. Art Thieme sent me a tape of an old Wobbly organizer that Art recorded in the early sixties. The old man was singing away on that tape and telling the stories. There is never a need to stifle ones soul.

All the best,

Mick Lane


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Banjeray
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 07:58 AM


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: BAZ
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 10:31 AM

Bill
Don't ever give up or give the guitar away.
I first started playing back in the 60's and frequented most of the London and suburb folkclubs at that time. During the 70's and 80's I hardly touched the instruments but since taking early retirement about 5 years ago my wife and I have started singing and playing again and find we are more in demand than we ever were. The enthusiasm is back along with the yearning to learn new instruments along with new tunes and songs,
My advice don't ever give up, ever.
Best of luck
Baz


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Jack mostly folk
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 10:47 AM

Bill and mudcayyer friends, Boy Howdy do I know what its like. At age fifty I moved from a very active folkish community to Southern Washington State to take a job allowing me a lifestyle of living "away from it all". Sadly for my lack of good judgement I got away from it all, the music scene here is 100 miles in any direction. Portland to the west, Richland, Pentleton to the east, Bend to the south and Yakima to the north, but all are 90 minutes or more of driving. I've been here now for five years and still struggling to connect with and stay active with the folk societies and folklife groups. My wife is my most tollerble listener and my dog loves to listen but wonders what it is I'm doing. Yes, I have thought about giving in to old age as time passes, but when I find a song circle, coffee house or festval a 100 miles away once a month in one direction or the other. I am compelled and dedicate my spare time to just go do it. Some times the drive affords me the time to listen to CDs and find a new song to memorize. Or we'll spend the week end and do the town, then back home where we have this wonderful lifestyle, "away from it all". Jack mostly folk


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Sierra Willy
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 11:30 AM

Language is the soul and music the heart of human expression. It comes from within, welling up as from an eternal spring. It can be primed and focussed and trained and directed, its onrush is nourishing and nurturing and replenishing. Folk is the language and expression of everyday people and everyday events. It is the communication of street corners and dives of tent cities and congregations of living rooms and coincidences. Wherever there are folk there is folk music in one form or another. I will never stop playing, they will have to pry my cold dead fingers from my instrument! Please don't stop, the well is never dried up though it may occasionally seem a little low. I work in parks and recreation and we have done campfire programs with guitars and dulcimers and harmonicas and spoons etc. These are our best programs. We usually have a few songbooks for folks to share and encourage them to sing along. We ask them for suggestions. Occasioanlly someone from the audience will lead a song. We have had upwards of 100 people attend and sing along. Folk music never dies the great thing about it is that it is always just beginning. So play, sing, and smile. Try volunteering at a nearby park or campground or classroom. Use folk music to teach natural and cultural history, love, humor, compassion, personal struggle, or whatever you like. Folks like you will come out of the woodwork and join in. The more you give the more you get. Happy old time fun in the new year!


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: folk1234
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 12:49 PM

Oh, I guess I'll throw my $0.02 in to this very interesting thread. At the ripe age of 50, I came out of the closet, shower, and car, bought a guitar, took lessons, and joined a local (Branford, CT) Folk Music Society. The following year, 1989, I went to Pinewoods for the first time and I've been hooked on traditional music ever since. Six years ago, I moved, for a job, to a vertual folk music desert in rural Southeastern Oklahoma. The only traditional music here is country swing and the only popular music is Garth Brooks, et al. I'm fortunate however in that the Oklahoma City Traditional Music Association (www.octma.org) (I'd make this clickable if I knew how)is only 90 miles away. Because of our very active and exciting agenda, I have been saved from 'old folkie-dom'.

Helen, I truly like your idea about an old folkie retirement village! Imagine, if you will, a Pinewoods-like setting (with a few more comforts) in an environment of music, dancing, learning, sharing, and caring. I might even retire again for something like that! This may be meat for a new thread. Who's interested, how can we do it?


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 05:04 PM

Bill,

I have spent many a year where the only person who heard me play and sing was me. I go through a significant physical change whenever I pick up an strum a guitar. I cannot explain it, but clearly the playing does something to me.

Certainly music is a form of communication, so there is joy in sharing it with others, but one can "commune' with oneself as well.

So even if you were a hermit in a cave in the high Himalayas I would encourage you to keep on playing (change the strings once a year whether it's needed or not).

And as others have said, if there are grand children, sing to them. It is one way of sharing yourself when you share your love of music and song.

Keep on singing.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: sharon
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 05:21 PM

I once read (on someone's t-shirt! You would ask!!) that "We do not quit playing music because we grow old. We grow old because we quit playing music." I never intend to grow old!!


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Helen
Date: 02 Jan 99 - 05:34 PM

Mick, At this stage the Old Folkies' Home has to be in virtual reality. And I have a strong premonition fo what's going to happen. You American Mudcateers will set it up and I'll have to move over there from Oz just to be a part of the old-folkie action.

Sierra Willy, That's a beautiful piece of writing you have there. It's worth printing out and framing. Thanks.

Folk1234 I'll start the new thread if you haven't done it already. I've been trying to float this idea for a number of years but I don't know how to get it going unless we collectively invade an existing retirement home and set up home there.

Helen


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Dani
Date: 03 Jan 99 - 02:14 PM

From the other side, I'm helping to plan a program for a local elementary school which will feature an old-time fiddle player from nearby. He's just turned 80, and is full of music and stories and opinions. Each of his years adds to his patina and the high regard in which he is held by his fellow musicians.

Keep playing.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 03 Jan 99 - 02:45 PM

I recorded "Uncle Monroe" Presnell, down on Beech Mountain in North Carolina, when he was 86, then used several of his beautifully sung ballads on the 2 LP set released by Folk-Legacy. I'm using two more on the new CD of traditional songs and ballads I'm currently editing, but these were recorded five years earlier, when Uncle Monroe was a brisk young fellow of 81.

Horton Barker was a youth of about 75 when I recorded the album released by Folkways (before we started Folk-Legacy), and Hobart Smith was in his seventies when we recorded his Folk-Legacy album. Jeannie Robertson was probably about 50 when Hamish Henderson discovered her, Sara Cleveland was in her mid-fifties when we found her and recorded her wonderful repertoire of traditional ballads.

So you can see that age has very little to do with one's ability to continue singing and loving this music. Keep on keepin' on!

Sandy


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: BSeed
Date: 04 Jan 99 - 01:38 AM

Four or five years ago I ran across a couple of other old folkers in a dog park on San Francisco Bay. I hadn't played for anyone but my students and at occasional union activities for years, had reached a wide but not high plateau with a long downward sloping surface as far as my instrumental skills were concerned. But I came across these two playing guitar and autoharp (I've told this story before in another thread, but not from this point of view), commented on their instruments, and was invited to sit and to play, and invited to join them with my own instruments the following Sunday.

That turned into regular Sunday afternoon sessions, then weekly sessions at the autoharpist's, and a whole new social life--and a definite renaissance of my musical life: I've learned to frail the banjo (in addition to up-picking and rather slow three-finger picking), am working on melodic clawhammer style--I do a creditable job on slow to medium speed ballads and a few fiddle tunes; I'm also learning to flatpick fiddle tunes on the guitar; I've finally learned how to play cross-harp style harmonica; my singing has improved greatly, but I still have a difficult time harmonizing without written notes (anyone have a good idea how to learn to sing harmony?) (actually, I do pretty well faking tenor harmony, but my range is really bass/baritone); I'm writing occasional songs again (sometimes inspired by Mudcat crashes)--in short, I have been born again, in a folk sense.

I was over sixty when this rebirth began. I have never felt more alive, nor have I ever learned so much so fast. And while the idea of living in a community of old folkie Mudcateers sounds enticing, I think I'll stay in the real world a while longer. I'm just starting a new career in an independent studies program, teaching photography--and next semester, *folk music*.

Any Mudcateers in the area--or travelling through the area--who would like to come and sit in my class, I'd be delighted to see you. I'll keep you posted on how it's going, when class times are, when we get brave enough to give a recital, etc. --seed


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Roger in Baltimore
Date: 04 Jan 99 - 06:16 AM

Seed,

If you can sing a melody, you have the potential to sing harmony. To bring that potential out, I recommend Cathy Fink and Marcy Marxer's tape package called "Learn to Sing Harmony."

It is a booklet plus a series of cassette tapes. They do some explanation of what harmony is and then do many examples. They offer opportunities for you to sing along with a part and then to sing it yourself with the melody. They have help from Robin and Linda Williams. They also provide at least two ranges per song. The songs were all familiar to me, all traditional folk songs.

The package is available from Homespun Tapes. The telephone number there is 1-800-33-TAPES. I have found the package well worth the $37.50. It increased my confidence in harmony singing immensely.

Roger in Baltimore


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From:
Date: 04 Jan 99 - 03:55 PM

Roger, thanks. It sounds good and I'll check it out. --seed


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Bill@W.Aussie
Date: 05 Jan 99 - 07:16 AM

Helen,

Thanks for your suggetions. I enjoy reading what you have to say. However, I started another THREAD, 'Self Righteous Prats' and I'd soon be one of them if I went to a Country Music hangout. I do like John Williamson but John, very diplomatically, distances himself from Country music. He's an Australian Balladeer, according ot him, and I agree. I personally loathe to hear, obviously Australian, singers using an American accent. But again I value what you have to say.

Bill


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: blt
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 08:04 PM

I came acrosss this thread by accident (if there are such things as accidents); I am 49, have spent my entire life loving, leaving, searching for, returning to my guitar, and to singing. There are times when I've thought that all the other folkies were always somewhere else, like elves playing in the distance who disappeared whenever I came near. I have moved so many times, back and forth across the USA, each time looking for a connection through folk music, and sometimes I knew it when I found it and sometimes I didn't. It's that old story of the truth coming to knock on my door and I tell it, in some annoyance, to go away because I'm busy looking for the truth. As I age, I plan to surround myself with music, dance, and song--to avoid these gifts out of some fear that I'm too old, the music too un-hip, or (even worse) too silly will only disable me. I am a dance/movement therapist working with young children and adolescents, as well as adults, in crisis and I can assure anyone that the healing power of music and dance is ageless.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: GUEST,bernielh@hotmail.com
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 08:34 PM

I will understand if youcant find this i have asked lots of people the song title or the vocalist are unknow but here are some of the lyrics and this is rough of what it may actually be.

Here goes: now according to indian law i could have my choice of a sqwa i needed no help but along came hop along cassidy maverick and billy the kid, Id a been fine if they hadnt showed up when they did and there was even doc holiday buffelo bill jesse james and 300 cavelry but i cant remember their names..

If you know the title and artist please email me with the info i would really appretiate your help in locating this song. Thankyou Bernie

Bernie, you will get more of a response to you request if it is in a thread of its own, so I have copied your message and started one for you called "Lyr Req: According to Indian Law."
- el joeclone -


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: SINSULL
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 10:43 PM

The Old Folkies Home is named House of the Setting Sun and plans have been under way for a while. Matt+R has been guaranteed a job emptying bedpans. Check the threads - there's lots about it there.
BR>Bill - don't throw or give away your guitar. Paltalk and Hearme are available for you to perform. Or youcan just listen to others. Time zones can be a problem but you can arrange a scheduled time and date if you like.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Troll
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 11:05 PM

Throw away my guitar? Stop singing? My kid should be so lucky as to get my pre-war pride and joy.
I bought him a pretty good guitar for X-mas a couple of years ago. After that, it's up to HIM!
Now for this House of the Setting Sun, Let me know when you get it going. I'll come over and entertain. I like singing at old folks homes.
I'll be 60 next week and have no plans to quit.
Oh yeah. He gets the guitar after I kick off but only if he can show he didn't do me in so he could inherit. *BG*

troll


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: GUEST,Big Red
Date: 03 Dec 00 - 11:12 PM

I fell in love with folk during the folk "scare" of the 50's & 60's. While I ahve no instrumental talent, I have been strumming my guitar ever since. In the old days we ahd a trio (like everyone else) but went our seperate ways. While the other two guys gave up the music, I stayed with it. Last Jan. we got together again for the first time in over thirty years and it was a blast. We did it again in Sept and plan to do it several times next year and maybe even go on stage. Over the years I found (and still find) that to sit and play and sing is the greatest release in the world for me. While I stay with the stuff from my day, it never ceases to comfort me. I am now collecting records that I couldn't afford back then. (See my thread on lesser known folk groups) I love the Mudcat and have learned much from it. I recently started a thread on buying a guitar and was advised that not many old Gibsons are beyond salvation. I took mine in to a good luthier and it is again a wonderful instrument for a lot less money. Thank you Mudcatters. Stay with it. It's good for the soul! Mudcat has livened me up enough so that I am even considering taking guitar lessons so that I will be able to more than one simple strum with my right hand. Who know's, I could even becopme passable, even in my old age.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: GUEST,(Edgar A.)--a.k.a. Art Thieme
Date: 06 Dec 00 - 06:13 PM

I can't pick my guitar or banjo now but I still try singing in the shower and (to S'paw's consternation) keep re-posting my puns and songs here in different threads all the time. I do pick up the banjo now and again just to see if I'm better. Whatever! It's all a gas !!!!!!

Keep doin' it. Be glad that you can. If you were on that island like Tom Hanks in his new flick, I'm pretty certain your guitar might become your best friend. (For me personally, I would be glad that it's shaped sort of like one of Piccasso's females. ;-)

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: RoyH (Burl)
Date: 07 Dec 00 - 03:46 PM

Good health to you Sandy Paton. I'm not 70 until next June-how dare you be older than me? I'm with you on don't quit singing. In fact I don't think it can be done once the folk bug has bitten. For a variety of reasons I 'quit' singing and contact with the folk world a while ago but I couldn't keep it up. The songs took me over. I do less than I used to but I ain't gonna quit no more. I like listening too, live or on record. I'll be ordering some of your custom cassettes after Christmas. Kiss Caroline for me, and I will bestow your greetings on the lovely Elaine.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 07 Dec 00 - 05:01 PM

Good to hear from you, Roy (Burl)! Caroline and I are hoping we can see you when you come back to the states next year. Didn't I see some notice somewhere about you getting out to the left coast of the States soon? If you do, be sure to post your schedule to the kids here on the Mudcat. Us old folk farts are obligated to keep 'em up to snuff on the old traditions. I'm now 71, pushing 72 real hard, and Caroline and I just did three gigs in three different states over the last weekend, working with that young whipper-snapper, Rick Fielding from Toronto (well, Scarborough). I actually showed young "Fingers Fielding" a few guitar tricks that surprised him (1: how to get through an entire song without going above the third fret, and (2: the proper way to lean on the top of the guitar while singing an unaccompanied ballad. Yep, there's a lot we can teach these youngsters, Roy. Don't despair!

Sandy (hobbling down to dinner now)


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: ddw
Date: 07 Dec 00 - 10:24 PM

If anybody needs inspiration to keep playing into advanced years, pick up a Pinetop Perkins CD and listen that AMAZING oldster. I'm winging it because I'm at work, but, if memory serves, he was 81 when he recorded his first solo CD and 87 or 89 when he did the one I have. Strong, young-sounding voice and great piano work. Well worth a listen even without any consideration of age.

david


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 08 Dec 00 - 04:34 AM

The idea of an Old Folkies home is one that has been discussed fur a while by our circle of friends. Certainly Whitby would be the preferred location, preferably within zither frame distance of the Tap and Spile. I would not rule it out as a real possibility.


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Mrs.Duck
Date: 08 Dec 00 - 04:35 AM

Sorry that was a genuine error I meant zimmer


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 08 Dec 00 - 04:48 AM

It may have been a typing error, but let's face it - a musical instument built into your walking frame makes a lot of sense. If someone made a zither frame it could be a good seller!
Then how about the Banjo stairlift (or bedwarming pan), plastic skinned bodhrans which could double up as a bedpan, kazoos adapted as asthma inhalers, the possibilities are frightening!
Quack
Geoff the Duck


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Subject: RE: Old Folkers
From: Cap't Bob
Date: 08 Dec 00 - 05:18 PM

Some of you may think of me as somewhat of a youngster (only 67 the last time I did the math). Anyway, during the last year I purchased two guitars and can't seem to get rid of any of the older (er vintage) ones. It could be the second or third childhood I really not sure since I never kept track of such things.

Our band has sort of folded up during the last year and a half due mainly to family considerations of the younger members (kids/sports/babies,etc.). Then about a month ago I met up with an old friend at a folk music concert. We had played together years ago in a band called "Shipwreck". Got to talking with him, and now we're thinking about starting up another band or at least a duo. Can't seem to get it out of my system.

Never give up Bill ~ keep going ~ onward and upward ~ you might want to pick up one of them little Larrivee Parlor guitars ~ they are a bit easier on the fingers.

Cap't Bob


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Mudcat time: 11 August 6:41 PM EDT

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