Mudcat Café message #2069282 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #3004   Message #2069282
Posted By: GUEST,reggie miles
05-Jun-07 - 02:02 PM
Thread Name: Songs about getting really old?
Subject: RE: Songs about getting really old?
Thanks for the comment Bugsy. I've actually received mixed reviews for this one. Some folks don't understand why I would malign the elderly as having anything to do with the present state of life on the planet. To those folks I can only scratch my head.

I just noticed that there's a word missing in the last line. It should read - I'll try to do better with my time spent here then.

I'm not certain if I can easily translate the chordal structure via a text format and I don't know how to read or write those musical hen scratchins that those in the know folks know how to use. I'm uncertain as to how to offer it up to you here but here goes. It's a slow to medium paced ballad type song with only four chords. It's a simple folk song type progression. There is only one pattern throughout and that does not change from verse to verse. There is only an "A" part to the melody, no "B", or turn around, or bridge, or any of the other conventions that so many contemporary composers seem so adamant about adding to each and every song they write. Let me try to explain further and see if I can illustrate what I've done with it.

(1)I'm old, yes I'm old and I (5)found out to(1)day
My (4)tired old frame just (1)gets in the (5)way
So I (4)guess I'll move on and try to (1)find me some (the relative minor of the 1 chord)place
Where a (1)man can grow older and (5)die with some (1)grace

If in the key of G major it would look like this.

(G)I'm old, yes I'm old and I (D)found out to(G)day
My (C)tired old frame just (G)gets in the (D)way
So I (C)guess I'll move on and try to (G)find me some (Em)place
Where a (G)man can grow older and (D)die with some (G)grace

Of course, this doesn't tell you how I actually play or sing this melody. It merely offers you the basic idea behind where I went with it. Maybe some songs are better left to interpretation.

Reg