Mudcat Café message #1935320 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #75122   Message #1935320
Posted By: GUEST,Frank Hamilton
13-Jan-07 - 12:47 PM
Thread Name: Little known '60s Folk Singers
Subject: RE: Little known 1960's Folk Singers
There was Addiss and Crowfut, two folkies who toured the world on a State Department grant. They introduced American folk music around the world.

Sorry i got Howie Burson's name wrong. Yes, Gil Turner. Thanks, Steve.

There are countless great folk instrumentalists who haven't been mentioned such as "Ti Jean" Johnnie Carignan, one of the world's best fiddlers from French Canada.

Earl Collins, a great traditional country fiddler who lived in LA......

Ralph Blizzard ...another great fiddler.

Zylphia Horton, wife of Miles Horton from Highlander Folk School responsible for the popularity of "We Shall Overcome". Played accordian.

Jenny Vincent Wells from New Mexico...spanish songs. Accordian also.

There was a guitarist from McCabe's Guitar Shop...I can't remember his name...I think it was Rick but he was a phenomenal finger picker.

Joe and Antoinette McKenna.....Joe...master of the Uillean pipes and Antoinette, singer and player of Irish harp...exceptional performers.

The Pindar singers from the Bahamas....Joseph Spence...Bahamian guitar player and singer.

Clark Allen...flamenco and Spanish songs from the San Diego area.

Did somebody mention Joe and Eddie from the Troubador in LA? (maybe getting redundant here)

I wouldn't call Ed McCurdy little-known but maybe comparatively to others.

John Herald....with Ralph Rinzler in "Greenbriar Boys". Wrote a version of "Stewball".

How about Molly Scott? Pretty lady. Nice voice.

Howie Mitchell, dulcimer player with the group, "Golden Ring".

George and Gerry Armstrong from Illinois. George...folklorist and bagpipes...Gerry, dulcimer and traditional ballads. Jenny, their daughter is also a fine singer/player.

Banjo Dancing with Stephen Wade...although he is pretty well-known in the Mid-West.

I vote for my friend Mark Dvorak from Illinois who is just coming into his own as a songwriter as well as folksinger.

Sonny Houston lives in GA and has played on records with Guy and Candie Carawan.
Plays all kinds of instruments.

Red Grammer (sp?) who replaced Glenn Yarborough in the "Limelighters".

Ernie Lieberman (Sheldon) who also replaced Glenn in the "Limelighters". Ernie became a substantial songwriter.

Betty Sanders...part of People's Artists but sang through the Sixties.

Jerry Walter (banjo picker) of the "Gateway Singers" which had "Elmer Lee Thomas" a fine African-American singer as well as a starting group for Travis Edmondsen.

"Sonny" Vale was the Robert DeCormier of the West Coat with his Folk Chorus.

Earl Robinson kept performing through the Sixties and was writing and composing music.

Peter Alsop, a writer of children's songs and folksinger from LA, married to Ellen Geer, daughter of Will Geer.

Freddie Hellerman was with the well-known Weavers but his private accomplishments were as a producer for Joan Baez (I think first recording) and songwriter. "Come Away Melinda"..

Then there's the "Fast Folk" crowd from New York. Steve Suffet will know Jack Hardy and those people.

A great folk instrumentalist and singer is Joe Craven who did a remarkable CD called "Camptown".

I'll mention John McCutcheon just because he has recently moved to GA and is a neighbor, now.

Did anyone mention Si Kahn? Not a big big name but just as important as any.

Micheal Smith (songwriter "The Dutchman"..Chicago) and Barbara Barrow.

Ken Pearlman...fairly well known in banjo circles.

I'll vote for my friend Adam Miller who is now touring the country and making a good living as (gasp) a folksinger. Autoharp and guitar.

Then there's Peter Marston, from New England, a great singer was with David Jones in "Starboard List"....David...also great. Pete's brother (my friend) Chick is a great blues fingerpicker and works with his wife Ellen Ford, singer in N.E. and Florida.

John Langstaff is known as a baritone who started the "Christmas Revels" in Cambridge but was formerly on staff at Pine Woods.


The more these names come up, the more I realize just how extensive and powerful the "folk scare" was. The beat goes on.....................................

Frank