Mudcat Café message #1025006 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #5830   Message #1025006
Posted By: Joe Offer
26-Sep-03 - 01:22 AM
Thread Name: Lyr Req: Roger the Miller and the Grey Mare
Subject: ADD Version: Gay Jemmie the Miller (The Grey Mare)
This one is from Vermont Folk-Songs and Ballads (Flanders & Brown, 1931), and it has a tune.

Gay Jemmie, The Miller
RECORDED BY MRS. ALICE BROWN, July 17, 1930, in Bennington, Vermont, from the singing of Mrs. Fannie Hawkins, Windsor Home. The song was taught her, when a child, by an aunt, whose father (Steven Hawkins) kept the toll gate, between Arlington and Stratton, Vermont. Mrs. Hawkins was for many years a school teacher in Vermont, and she entered with zest into the sport of recalling old songs for the state.


GAY JEMMIE, THE MILLER

Gay Jemmie, the Miller, went courting of late
To a rich farmer's daughter called "beautiful Kate."
She had for her portion full five thousand pounds,
She had for her portion gay jewels and gowns,
She had for her portion full fifty fine things, She had for her portion,
She had for her portion,
She had for her portion gay jewels and rings.

The day was appointed, the money laid down,
Which proved the full value of five thousand pounds.
The parson was sent for, the couple were dressed,
Said Jem to her father, "I've one more regret
Although your daughter is lovely and fair,
I can't have your daughter,
I can't have your daughter,
I can't have your daughter without the gray mare."

The money soon vanished out of his sight
And likewise Miss Katie, his joy and delight,
And then like a dog he was kicked out of doors
And ordered never to come there more.
Then Jemmie, he tore his long yellow hair
And wished he had never,
And wished he had never,
And wished he had never stood for the gray mare.

A year or two after or somewheres about
He chanced to meet Katie, his joy and delight.
"How are you, Miss Katie, and don't you know me?"
"If I'm not mistaken, I've seen you," said she.
"Or somebody like you with long yellow hair,
Who once came a-courting,
Who once came a-courting,
Who once came a-courting my father's gray mare."

"Oh, 't was not the gray mare a-courting I came,
But it was to Miss Katie, so call-ed by name.
Little did I think, nor had I a doubt
That your father would give me the gray mare to boot
At the loss of such a dutiful son, But now I am sorry
But now I am sorry,
But now I am sorry for what I have done."

"With respect to your sorrows, I value them not.
There are young men enough in this world to be got
And I think that a man must be near despair
To marry a wife for the price of a mare.
The price of a mare cannot be so great,
So fare you well, Jemmie,
So fare you well, Jemmie,
So fare you well, Jemmie, go mourn for your Kate."

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