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GUEST,Observer Chanteys in Royal Navy? (96* d) RE: Chanteys in Royal Navy? 02 May 19


Phil do you usually quote so much out of context? Or are you deliberately trying to mislead?

The Atlantic Monthly, vol. II, Article "Songs of the Sea"

Here is the FULL paragraph:

The sailor does not lack for singing. He sings at certain parts of his work;--indeed, he must sing, if he would work. On vessels of war, the drum and fife or boatswain's whistle furnish the necessary movement-regulator. There, where the strength of one or two hundred men can be applied to one and the same effort, the labor is not intermittent, but continuous. The men form on either side of the rope to be hauled, and walk away with it like firemen marching with their engine. When the headmost pair bring up at the stern or bow, they part, and the two streams flow back to the starting-point, outside the following files. Thus in this perpetual "follow-my-leader" way the work is done, with more precision and steadiness than in the merchant-service. Merchant-men are invariably manned with the least possible number, and often go to sea shorthanded, even according to the parsimonious calculations of their owners. The only way the heavier work can be done at all is by each man doing his utmost at the same moment. This is regulated by the song. And here is the true singing of the deep sea. It is not recreation; it is an essential part of the work. It mastheads the topsail-yards, on making sail; it starts the anchor from the domestic or foreign mud; it "rides down the main tack with a will"; it breaks out and takes on board cargo; it keeps the pumps (the ship's,--not the sailor's) going. A good voice and a new and stirring chorus are worth an extra man. And there is plenty of need of both.

So here YOUR source is differentiating between how seamanship evolutions are performed on Men-of-war and Merchant vessels. In the former [Warship] they rely on "the drum and fife or boatswain's whistle furnish the necessary movement-regulator", whereas on a latter [Merchantman] he states "The only way the heavier work can be done at all is by each man doing his utmost at the same moment. This is regulated by the song". So plainly, Chicago like simple if you prefer,when stating that The sailor does not lack for singing. he is referring to the Merchant sailor.

No mathematics required.

Bugle does not equate to Trumpet it equates to a Baroque Trumpet (Qualified) or a Trumpet Natural (Qualified).

Blue Light Officer and Light Blue Officer are NOT the same thing.

Shanty's were not used in the Royal Navy to work the ship, your own quoted sources tell you that as plainly as it is possible to tell. Were there more men on a man o'war to perform the work than there were on merchantmen - YES there were. Were men o'war sailed more efficiently because of that difference in crew sizes than merchantmen - YES they were. These points have been made repeatedly throughout this thread.

I can list hundreds of shanty's the origins of which clearly indicate their merchant navy origins. I cannot name one single shanty (working song) that indicates Royal Navy origins.


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