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User Name Thread Name Subject Posted
chico Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore (25) RE: Lyr Add: Songs from HMS Pinafore 18 Sep 05


If you really want the highlights. . . Some of these are not quite complete.


   Em   B7    Em
A many years ago,
      B7    Em       B
When I was young and charming,
    Em      B7       Em
As some of you may know,
   F         B7    Em
I practised baby-farming.
    Bm
Now this is most alarming!
When she was young and charming,
She practised baby-farming,
A many years ago.

      D7             G
Two tender babes I nursed:
D7                G
One was of low condition,
      B7    Em    F#7
The other, upper crust,
    Em   B7   Em
A regular patrician.
      
Now, this is the position:
One was of low condition,
The other a patrician,
A many years ago.
            B7    Em

Oh, bitter is my cup!
   B7    Em    B
However could I do it?
    Em    B7          E
I mixed those children up,
    F      B7      Em
And not a creature knew it!

However could you do it?
Some day, no doubt, you'll rue it,
Although no creature knew it,
So many years ago.

    D7               G
In time each little waif
    D7             G
Forsook his foster-mother,
      B7       Em       F#7
The well born babe was Ralph--
      Em B7          Em
Your captain was the other!!!

They left their foster-mother,
The one was Ralph, our brother,
Our captain was the other,
A many years ago.

SIR JOSEPH. Then I am to understand that Captain Corcoran
and Ralph were exchanged in childhood's happy hour -- that Ralph
is really the Captain, and the Captain is Ralph?
    BUT. That is the idea I intended to convey, officially!
    SIR JOSEPH. And very well you have conveyed it.
    BUT. Aye! aye! yer 'onour.
    SIR JOSEPH. Dear me! Let them appear before me, at once!

* * *

    E7            A
He is an Englishman!
    D       A7       D    (A7)
For he himself has said it,
         D       A7      D    (A7)
And it's greatly to his credit,
       G      A7 G D
That he is an Englishman!
       A D A E7   A
That he is an Englishman!
A       Ab       A   E7 A   E (A)
For he might have been a Roosian,
   Ab       A    E7   A E (A)
A French, or Turk, or Proosian,
       D A   E7 A
Or perhaps Itali-an!

Or perhaps Itali-an!

         D             A7 D A (D A)
But in spite of all temptations
       D       A7   D
To belong to other nations,
       G      A    D
He remains an Englishman!
A      Dx1
He remains an Englishman!

* *

E    A   E      A       A (B7)
I am the monarch of the sea,
The ruler of the Queen's Navee,
Whose praise Great Britain loudly chants.
And we are his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
    B7             F#7               B7
His sisters and his cousins, and his aunts!
                E   
When at anchor here I ride,
My bosom swells with pride,
And I snap my fingers at a foeman's taunts;

And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!

But when the breezes blow,
I generally go below,
And seek the seclusion that a cabin grants;
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
And so do his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts!
F#m7 E       B       E   
His sisters and his cousins, Whom he reckons up by dozens, And his aunts!

    A                               A                E7
When I was a lad I served a term, As office boy to an Attorney's firm.
    A                      Am?                B7                           E
I cleaned the windows and I swept the floor, and I polished up the handle of the big front door.
    E                B7          E
(He polished up the handle of the big front door)

    A                         7             D                         A
I polished up that handle so carefullee that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!
    A                                           D             E7            A
(He polished up that handle so carefullee that now he is the ruler of the Queen's Navee)

As office boy I made such a mark that they gave me the post of a junior clerk.
I served the writs with a smile so bland, and I copied all the letters in a big round hand--
I copied all the letters in a hand so free, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

In serving writs I made such a name that an articled clerk I soon became;
I wore clean collars and a brand-new suit for the pass examination at the Institute,
And that pass examination did so well for me, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

Of legal knowledge I acquired such a grip that they took me into the partnership.
And that junior partnership, I ween, was the only ship that I ever had seen.
But that kind of ship so suited me, that now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

I grew so rich that I was sent by a pocket borough into Parliament.
I always voted at my party's call, and I never thought of thinking for myself at all.
I thought so little, they rewarded me by making me the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!

Now landsmen all, whoever you may be, if you want to rise to the top of the tree,
If your soul isn't fettered to an office stool, be careful to be guided by this golden rule--
Stick close to your desks and never go to sea, and you all may be rulers of the Queen's Navee!

* * *
          C             G            C          G
For I'm called Little Buttercup -- dear Little Buttercup,
C             F         C
Though I could never tell why,
      A7             Dm          G7          C
But still I'm called Buttercup -- poor little Buttercup,
               G7      C
Sweet Little Buttercup I!
       Am          E7          Am      E7
I've snuff and tobaccy, and excellent jacky,
       Am                      E7
I've scissors, and watches, and knives;
       Am          E7          Am      E7
I've ribbons and laces to set off the faces
    Am            D7             G
Of pretty young sweethearts and wives.
       G7          C          G7          C (7)
I've treacle and toffee, I've tea and I've coffee,
       F          C7       F
Soft tommy and succulent chops;
       D7          G         B7       Em    (C#)
I've chickens and conies, and pretty polonies,
      G         D7       G
And excellent peppermint drops.

    C            G7            C          G7
Then buy of your Buttercup -- dear Little Buttercup;
C             F       C
Sailors should never be shy;
    A7          Dm          G7            C
So, buy of your Buttercup -- poor Little Buttercup;
               G7       C
Come, of your Buttercup buy!

* * *

My gallant crew, good morning.
Sir, good morning!
I hope you're all quite well.
Quite well; and you, sir
I am in reasonable health, and happy
To meet you all once more.

You do us proud, sir!

   A      E7             A
I am the Captain of the Pinafore;
         A         E7      A
And a right good captain, too!
         D          A
You're very, very good,
    C          A
And be it understood,
       E    B7          E
I command a right good crew,
       B7          E
We're very, very good,
    B7          E
And be it understood,
             B7          E
He commands a right good crew.
         D          Bm          C#             C#7
Though related to a peer, I can hand, reef, and steer,
    F#m   D#   E (7)
And ship a selvagee;
      A             B7          C?       F#7?
I am never known to quail at the fury of a gale,
          E          B7       E
And I'm never, never sick at sea!
       B7         E          B7                   E7
What, never? No, never! What, never. . . ? Hardly ever!
                      F# Bm
He's hardly ever sick at sea!
       A            
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
         E                     A
For the hardy Captain of the Pinafore!


I do my best to satisfy you all--
And with you we're quite content.
You're exceedingly polite,
And I think it only right
To return the compliment.
We're exceedingly polite,
And he thinks it's only right
To return the compliment.
Bad language or abuse,
I never, never use,
Whatever the emergency;
Though Bother it I may
Occasionally say,
I never use a big, big D--
What, never
No, never!
What, never
Hardly ever!
Hardly ever swears a big, big D--
Then give three cheers, and one cheer more,
For the well-bred Captain of the Pinafore!

* * *

E
Never mind the why and wherefore,
          B7               
Love can level ranks, and therefore,
            E    B7   F#          E
Though his lordship's station's mighty,
         A         E       B
Though stupendous be his brain,
             F#7             B
Though your tastes are mean and flighty
                      F#    B
And your fortune poor and plain,

    B
and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,

Rend the air with warbling wild,

For the union of his/my lordship
E               B F#7    B
With a humble captain's child!
      
For a humble captain's daughter--

For a gallant captain's daughter--

And a lord who rules the water--

And a tar who ploughs the water!

ALL. Let the air with joy be laden,
Rend with songs the air above,
For the union of a maiden
With the man who owns her love!
SIR JOSEPH.    Never mind the why and wherefore,
Love can level ranks, and therefore,
Though your nautical relation (alluding to Capt.)
In my set could scarcely pass--
Though you occupy a station
In the lower middle class--
CAPT. and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,
SIR JOSEPH.    Rend the air with warbling wild,
For the union of my/your lordship
With a humble captain's child!
For a humble captain's daughter--
JOS. For a gallant captain's daughter--
SIR JOSEPH.    And a lord who rules the water--
JOS. (aside). And a tar who ploughs the water!
ALL. Let the air with joy be laden,
Rend with songs the air above,
For the union of a maiden
With the man who owns her love!
JOS. Never mind the why and wherefore,
Love can level ranks, and therefore
I admit the jurisdiction;
Ably have you played your part;
You have carried firm conviction
To my hesitating heart.
CAPT. and Ring the merry bells on board-ship,
SIR JOSEPH.    Rend the air with warbling wild,
For the union of my/his lordship
With a humble captain's child!
For a humble captain's daughter--
JOS. For a gallant captain's daughter--
SIR JOSEPH.    And a lord who rules the water--
JOS. (aside). And a tar who ploughs the water!
(Aloud.) Let the air with joy be laden.
CAPT. and SIR JOSEPH. Ring the merry bells on board-ship--
JOS. For the union of a maiden--
CAPT. and SIR JOSEPH. For her union with his lordship.
ALL. Rend with songs the air above
For the man who owns her love!

* * *

Dm
Things are seldom what they seem,

Skim milk masquerades as cream;
F         C      Dm7
Highlows pass as patent leathers;
Dm       Am       Dm         A
Jackdaws strut in peacock's feathers.

Very true, So they do.

Dm         
Black sheep dwell in every fold;
All that glitters is not gold;
F         C    Dm7 C    Dm
Storks turn out to be but logs;
Am      Bb7   A
Bulls are but inflated frogs.

So they be, Frequentlee.

Drops the wind and stops the mill;
Turbot is ambitious brill;
Gild the farthing if you will,
Yet it is a farthing still.

Yes, I know. That is so.

Though to catch your drift I'm striving,
It is shady -- it is shady;
I don't see at what you're driving,
Mystic lady -- mystic lady.

Stern conviction's o'er me stealing,
That the mystic lady's dealing
In oracular revealing.

Stern conviction's o'er him stealing,
That the mystic lady's dealing
In oracular revealing.

Yes, I know--That is so!

Though I'm anything but clever,
I could talk like that for ever
Once a cat was killed by care;
Only brave deserve the fair.

Very true, So they do.

Wink is often good as nod;
Spoils the child who spares the rod;
Thirsty lambs run foxy dangers;
Dogs are found in many mangers.

Frequentlee, I agree.

Paw of cat the chestnut snatches;
Worn-out garments show new patches;
Only count the chick that hatches;
Men are grown-up catchy-catchies.

Yes, I know, That is so.

Though to catch my drift he's striving,
I'll dissemble -- I'll dissemble;
When he sees at what I'm driving,
Let him tremble -- let him tremble!

Though a mystic tone I you borrow,
    A    A+         D   
I shall learn the truth with sorrow,
Dm   F#m         G      D
Here to-day and gone to-morrow;
Yes, I know--That is so!

* * *
    C
We sail the ocean blue,
          G7             C
And our saucy ship's a beauty;

We're sober men and true,
      G7             C
And attentive to our duty.
          F
When the balls whistle free
             C
O'er the bright blue sea,
    G7                   C
We stand to our guns all day;
          F
When at anchor we ride
         C
On the Portsmouth tide,
          Em
We have plenty of time to play.


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