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User Name Thread Name Subject Posted
Jack (who is called Jack) Chord req: betcha can do this (6) RE: Chord req: betcha can do this 26 Oct 99


I'll assume that what you are talking about is the Pentatonic five-tone scale, with a 'blue note' added between the third and fourth tones, that works so well creating melodies for blues.

I - flatIII - IV - flatV - V - flatVII

I have not studied this, so take this with a grain of salt.

One of the roots of the blues were african-american 'moans' and 'field hollers' that made extensive use of the modified pentatonic scale you describe. As the blues evolved musicians incorporated the melodic ideas from these songs and began to integrate them with traditional western harmonies based on the Tonic - subdominant - dominant chords. With some modifications, like the reliance on the flatted instead of the major 7th, they discovered a happy marraige between the modified pentatonic melodies and these chord progressions. They did not create the chords based on the pentatonic scale.

I suppose that some kind of harmony theory based on the pentatonic scale alone is possible. It may even be well know to real musicians, unlike myself. It would be its own system, and I imagine it would be somewhat spare, having far fewer notes and intervals to work with.

Best Regards


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